Venice
January 1608

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Institute of Historical Research

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Horatio F. Brown (editor)

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1904

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77-90

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'Venice: January 1608', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 11: 1607-1610 (1904), pp. 77-90. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=96941 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


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January 1608

1608. Jan. 2. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.137. Piero Priuli, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The post of reader in Canon Law has been vacant. A certain George Crichton (Giorgio Crittonio), a man of letters, of profound learning, Regius Professor of Greek, competed. He published arguments in favour of the thesis “Pontifex sit superior Conciliis,” attached the broad-sheet in various parts of the City and sent it to many members of Parliament and in particular to Servin. Servin seeing that such a proposition was contrary to the ancient doctrine of France and to the decisions of the Sorbonne, obtained a decree ordering Crichton to cease defending his thesis.
Paris, 2nd January, 1608.
[Italian.]
Dec. 17. Enclosed in preceding Despatch.138. The decree of Parliament prohibiting Crichton from proposing, supporting or discussing his conclusions.
[Italian.]
Enclosed in preceding Despatch.139. The broad-sheet issued by George Crichton, Regius Professor of Greek.
[Latin.]
Jan. 2. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.140. Piero Priuli, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The late Queen of England frequently lent money to the King of France. The debt assumed large proportions. The King of England now wishes to recover it all and has opened the subject through his Ambassador, asking for the immediate payment of two hundred thousand crowns.
Paris, 2nd January, 1608.
[Italian.]
Jan. 2. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.141. Zorzi Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
On the 30th of last month the King came to the City, where he stayed one day only and left at once for Hampton Court. This brief stay prevented me from discharging my commission upon the subject of the Bailo at Constantinople, and the question of the ship “Corsaletta.” I must inform you that I am well aware of the great stratagems which they are developing at the Admiralty to prevent me from succeeding in the affair of the “Husband,” and to thwart them it was absolutely necessary for me to petition the King himself to issue orders to the Admiralty Judge forbidding him to proceed in this matter until his Majesty returned to the City. I managed to insert such phrases in the petition that the King, who had his foot in the stirrup, should have the opportunity to commit the satisfaction of my demand to the Earl of Salisbury, as I knew that it could not be in better hands. This was done and with courteous words his Majesty added that I might rest assured that he would always respond to the great desire he felt to oblige your Excellencies, and that on his return he would gladly hear me. Lord Salisbury invited me to meet him and some other members of the Council at Court to-morrow and I hope to get a judgement from the Admiralty Judge, which is my great object, as this will secure us against corruption.
As the cargo has not yet been discharged I cannot report its value. All I know is that before she arrived here the ship was so plundered by the person who arrested her, that it is common opinion here that goods to the value of upwards of twenty-five thousand crowns belonging to the pirate Ward and his friends, were taken out of her. These goods were being sent home by him to facilitate his pardon. We shall try to clear the matter up, but as the goods have fallen into very strong hands it will be very difficult to recover them. By accident, I believe, they had not proclaimed Ward as a pirate; they do so now in the form adopted in this country.
There is little news here. The Duke of Lennox has come back from Scotland where he attended Parliament. He waited on me almost at once to assure me of his continued devotion to the Republic. In Scotland the unsuccessful rising of a great chief among those people who live like savages and hardly recognise the King's authority, has freed them from the anxiety in which they had been placed by his escape from prison; (fn. 1) for it has been discovered that he intended to raise Scotland and then Ireland. In escaping he fell and was recaptured and orders have been sent for his immediate execution.
No news from Flanders owing to bad weather.
London, 2nd January, 1607. [m.v.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 3. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.142. Zorzi Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I am just come from a very long conference with the Council about the ship “Husband,” and although I think that the courier has already left, yet I take up the pen if by chance I may be in time, so that your Serenity may be informed of what happened in case the Ambassador Wotton should have received information by this same post.
I demanded the appointment of Judges from among the Council on the ground that this was not only a private, but a public affair as well, and secondly, because the case deeply affected the Republic. On the basis of these two grounds I made a vigorous stand; drawing from them all the advantage I could and rebutting the arguments which, for the space of three hours, these gentlemen advanced against me. Finally they concluded that indirectly I had established my case, that as this was a question in which were many points relating to the law of nations it was not a fit subject to send before an ordinary tribunal. They decided that as far as the civil side went the case should be tried by the ordinary court; the other side by members of the Council; when the Judge had made his examination he was to report to the Council, which would take into consideration the points touching the State and would decide whether the whole affair should be assumed by them and judged by them; in the meantime the ordinary court is not to issue any judgement. I thought that I could not push any further and I also considered this the safe road for upsetting the local sentence, because there are not wanting grave interests of State in this affair, which will compel the Council to assume the matter to itself. I left them with this remark that I was absolutely certain that if they were fully informed of the consequences entailed in this affair they would immediately assume the jurisdiction. I also secured a renewal of the order that the sequestration should continue till the issue of judgement, and vehemently insisted that the Judge should be ordered to restore all that had been taken out of the ship, and the man who arrested her was summoned before the Council and enjoined to find all that he had appropriated. He promised instant compliance, and admitted that he had in his keeping goods to the value of four thousand crowns; these will be consigned at once, and so with the rest, for the Council, seeing my heat, gave rigorous orders to find and deposit everything; and it grows ever clearer that the value is great. I must humbly add that the warmer your Serenity shows yourself towards the Ambassador there, and towards the King, the better the hopes of a successful issue, especially if stress be laid on the two points advanced as the base of my contention. I consider the matter serious, not only on account of the property but much more as a precedent,—for the whole London market is on tip-toe of expectation about the judgement. If it were hostile to us, this pirate and all the others would receive the greatest encouragement, for in view of such an issue, they have all already resolved to transfer their business to Tunis, in the certainty of safety and profit in the purchase of plunder. I laid stress on these considerations of State, and, fighting the ground foot by foot, I have arrived at this point that the delegation of the matter to the Council is certain and the final issue hopeful. I must add that the merchants who are parties to the suit along with almost all the rest, offer such a vigorous opposition to my operations, that were it not for the perfect goodwill of the King towards the Republic, it would be impossible to arrive at my object in face of them. The ability and justice of the Earl of Salisbury are also of great service, and thanks to these, we have, so far, attained what no one who is conversant with the habits of this government believed possible.
London, 3rd January, 1607. [m.v.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 5. Minutes of the Senate. Venetian Archives.143. Having learned from the English Ambassador that the Earl of Tyrone has reached Brussels on his way to Spain and thence to Rome via Italy, and as the Ambassador of his own accord has suggested that it would be pleasing to his Master if, in case the Earl enters our territory, we would take those steps required by our friendly relations to the King, and having subsequently received other information as regards the Earl, it is desirable to take no steps that might involve serious consequences.
Be it therefore resolved that, should the Earl enter our territory, the Cabinet shall take such steps as are necessary to cause him to retire, and shall endeavour to warn him against coming while he is still outside our borders.
The reply to the English Ambassador and the instructions to the Venetian Ambassador in England were added as riders to the motion and the voting was
Ayes60.On a second vote,Ayes42.
Noes7.Noes5.
Neutrals90.Neutrals114.
The motion was lost.
It was then put alone without riders and the voting was
Ayes142.
Noes1.
Neutrals11.
[Italian.]
Jan. 5. Minutes of the Senate. Venetian Archives.144. That the English Ambassador be invited to attend the Cabinet to hear as follows:—
The Christmas Festivities and then the election of the new Cabinet has caused a delay in replying to you, but if the Earl of Tyrone should come into our territory, we will not fail to take such steps as our friendship for your Master may dictate.
Ayes60.Second vote,Ayes42.
Noes7.Noes5.
Neutrals90.Neutrals114.
[Italian.]
Jan. 5. Minutes of the Senate, Venetian Archives.145. To the Ambassador in England.
The English Ambassador here resident has suggested that we would please his Master very much if we ordered the arrest of the Earl of Tyrone should he enter our territory. We now enclose our answer so that you may know what to say, should the King or the Earl of Salisbury touch on the subject.
Ayes60.Second vote,Ayes42.
Noes7.Noes5.
Neutrals90.Neutrals114.
Jan. 10. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.146. Zorzi Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The Spanish (fn. 2) are so anxious to keep the King of England far away from all that may hinder their negotiations for peace in Flanders that they leave no method untried. They avail themselves now of suspicion and now of hope.
I am informed from a very good quarter that they show greater desire than ever that the King should assume the position of mediator. They profess to have such confidence in his friendship that they publicly declare that they are certain of a favourable issue by his intervention. Nor is this sufficient for them, but they are endeavouring to win over the King and the Queen too by suggestions of a matrimonial alliance between a son of the King and a daughter of Spain.
They even go so far as to point out that in this way they could so arrange the affairs of the Low Countries that England should have a good share. They suggest that this would be the moment for such an arrangement now that there is a question of giving a new form to those States. What effect this proposal has on the mind of so wise a Sovereign I can not, as yet, say; but I think I may affirm that it will rouse grave suspicion in the mind of his Most Christian Majesty; for I see that his Ambassador not only is aware of it but considers it sufficient to awaken in the mind of his Master an impression little suited to the present needs of affairs in Flanders and to the general safety. The Ambassador thinks that the firmness the English are displaying in this business is due more to Spanish intrigue than to aught else. It is more likely, however, that it is due to design and not to seduction, for the King of England is an admirably prudent Prince and knows where his interest lies.
I have remarked above that besides flattery the (N59) Spanish use suspicion, for it is universally believed that the Earl of Tyrone was recalled to Brussels and kept in Flanders for no other reason. He will pass the winter there they say as a kind of hostage for the King's attitude.
The King came back to the City four days ago to keep Christmas. He and the Court are entirely absorbed in the festivities and in the Queen's Masque. She is giving it great attention in order that it may come up to expectation.
The business of the ship “Husband” is just where it was when I last wrote. The thick ice on the river has prevented the complete discharge of her cargo; but the note of it which I send represents its value at about thirty thousand crowns.
London, 10th January, 1607. [m.v.]
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Jan. 10. Original Despatch. Venetian Archives.147. Zorzi Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I have received your instructions, of November 29th, to find out whether there are to be had here engineers of experience to serve in your forts. I must humbly reply that as the strength of this kingdom lies in its position and in its fleet the profession of engineer is almost unknown. It occurs to me that Flanders might supply the need, especially as in this truce of arms many will be looking for a new employment. The school and training of Count Maurice, who is reputed the greatest engineer officer of our day, will furnish men. I have opened negotiations.
London, 10th January, 1607. [m.v.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 17. Original Despatch. Venetian Archives.148. Zorzi Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
It is so long now since there has been any certain news from Ireland that from time to time rumours come to the birth and popular suspicion accepts for fact all that is published. I need not trouble your Serenity with these rumours till I find them better confirmed. I need only say that they are put about by those who would like to see disturbances. These persons magnify the numbers of the rebels and talk of the defeat of the royal arms. As nothing can be extracted on the subject from the Court this is taken as confirmation. I, however, seeing that the heat of preparation is cooling, am inclined to think that every day the Council is more and more satisfied that they have nothing to fear. Preparations by land and by sea are relaxed and the imprisonment of numbers of persons is a remedy that implies neither danger nor expense. All else is quiet. The prorogation of Parliament has relieved the King of much trouble and the two nations of much disagreement. Though they talk of union they are more disunited than ever. The Catholics too like the prorogation, for while Parliament is not sitting the severity of the laws against them cannot be increased.
The cold is intenser that any within the memory of man. The Thames is frozen and the City is, as it were, in a state of seige. All the posts are delayed and that is why we have heard only this week that the states of Holland have consented to treat for peace, and that the Congress is being pushed forward.
The Lord High Admiral seeing the vigour with which I urged the case of the “Husband” has determined to proceed upon another tack. Another ship has just put into Portsmouth with a cargo similar to that of the “Husband;” the Admiral informed me at once and agreed that one of my people should go down with one of his to bring the ship here. When that is done I will see that the same steps of sequestration are followed as in the case of the “Husband,” should the cargo prove really to be of a similar nature. Your Excellencies will easily understand the great advantage to be gained if we can erect the judgement in the case of the “Husband” into a precedent against Ward and all other pirates. I will not fail to jog the memory of these goverment offices.
London, 17th January, 1607. [m.v.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 17. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.149. Zorzi Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The Court is still occupied by festivities. The Queen has put off her Masque for a few days. This function has caused the greatest chagrin to the French Ambassador, who, on learning that the King intended to invite the Spanish Ambassador, did all he could to prevent him as he considered that in this undecided question of precedence, such an invitation would give a signal advantage to the Catholic Ambassador. The King has done everything to come to some compromise but, as yet, the French Ambassador declines to consent. This accident has been the reason why the Queen abandoned her intention of inviting your Serenity's Ambassador, an intention she had already communicated to me under seal of secrecy, in order to save her from all the annoyances which might fall upon her from other quarters. I gathered from the proposals made by the King to the Ambassador of France that he intended to invite him and the Archiducal Ambassador to some other entertainment. He protested vigorously, declaring that this was a double injury, for he was not only excluded from the greater function, the Queen's Masque, but also from the nobler company, that of your Serenity's Ambassador, whom they intended to invite with the Spanish Ambassador, the more to honour him. I believe that in order to get over this difficulty they will invite no one but the Spanish Ambassador, in order to remove from the French Ambassador's mind the suspicion that your Serenity's Ambassador was invited along with Spain the more to honour Spain. As for the Archiducal Ambassador there is no word of him as yet. I can assure you that I should have been invited had it not been for this accident.
London, 17th January, 1607. [m.v.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 18. Collegio, Secreta. Esposizioni Principi. Venetian Archives.150. I, Marc' Antonio Corraro, visited the English Ambassador on Wednesday. He was full of expressions of regard for the Republic and declared that he never received a despatch but what his Majesty expressed his desire to draw closer the alliance. The Ambassador then went on to say that he wished to propose that the King should send three or four of his ships to serve the Republic against the pirates. This would prove to the world how united these two powers were, and that if they were not conterminous on land they were at sea. He begged me to convey this much to your Serenity.
I abstained from making any answer about the ships, but I said that the whole world understood, during the late troubles, how great was the affection of the King towards the Republic; and added that your Serenity would soon suppress the pride of the pirates.
The Ambassador replied, “the pirates won't let themselves be caught by the great galleon; they will fly. It does not pay them to fight, they like to plunder in safety. The pirate at Tunis has only one other ship with him, the one he sailed in first before he fitted up the “Soderina” as a man of war. He is very clever at keeping together a crew of all nations, and is a very cool hand. I have seen the great galleon; she is certainly a splendid ship.”
About the peace in Flanders the Ambassador said he thought it would be concluded, though the English agent at the Hague wrote very coldly about it; he thinks, however, that the Spanish will surrender, with sincerity, all their claims. “But I,” said the Ambassador, “don't see this sincerity in the Spanish; such a surrender is too far removed from the spirit of that picture which Fuentes has in his room, a portrait of the King lying down with the globe between his legs.”
[Italian.]
Jan. 20. Collegio, Secreta. Esposizioni, Principi. Venetian Archives.151. The Secretary of the English Ambassador came to the Cabinet and said:—
My master, the Ambassador of England, has commanded me to come here and to report the unlucky accident that, in Padua, has befallen a young Englishman, eighteen years of age, of very noble blood, son of a Councillor of State to his Majesty. This young man was a student in the University and happening to be at a fencing school for his amusement, he engaged in a bout with a pupil of that school and beat him. As he was about to leave along with several other Englishmen, the master of the school presented himself and said that as the defeated party was a pupil of his he now invited the Englishman to engage him. The Englishman consented and took up the usual position; but the master closed furiously and foully upon him, using insulting language, pressing him home and wounding him badly in the hand, God knows with what intent, for had this not been the result of ill-will it would only have been right that, as their rank was so different, the master should have offered some apology next morning. Far from that the master armed himself and took some friends and went to attack the youth. He put his hand to a small weapon he wore at his side but slipped on the ice, the other was on him at once and killed him with a dagger. The Ambassador is very deeply grieved at this, for the fencing master has taken refuge in a church and defies justice. And although his Excellency is sure that the Podestà will not fail to do his duty, as he has always done by the English nation, still this right of sanctuary in churches and certain places has induced his Excellency to send me here to express his desire, which is that your Serenity should interfere with your authority. He would have come in person to prove how much he has the matter at heart but in this bitter weather he is heavily colded. Nevertheless he hopes that your Serenity will interpose to prevent this fellow going unpunished.
The Doge replied regretting the accident, saying that he understood the point and that the Cabinet would take the necessary steps.
The Secretary retired.
Information was requested from Padua. On the 23rd the Secretary again presented himself at the door of the Cabinet to ask if there was any news from Padua. The Secretary to the Cabinet replied “No.” The Secretary to the Embassy came again on the 25th. The Secretary to the Cabinet then told him that the case was very different from what he had represented; for in the process of the inquiry it came out that the Englishman fencing with a certain Thomaso Brochetta of Padua had been slightly wounded in his hand, whereupon he left the fencing school in a rage, threatening to kill Brochetta if he did not apologise. Brochetta went out too and the Englishman fired a pistol at him but missed him, whereupon Brochetta drew a sword and killed him. “The Secretary came close to my ear and said 'It is true that the dead man had a pistol but the Ambassador understands that he did not fire it, it fell and went off by itself and the proof is that the dead man's cloak was pierced by the ball in three places.' He then shrugged his shoulders and of his own accord he added that the fact of carrying a pistol through the streets of Padua made it difficult to establish the innocence of the dead man. I pointed out to him that, when the Churches refused burial to the dead man because he was a Calvinist, the Podestà himself had ordered a public funeral, and the Secretary said that the Ambassador would be highly pleased, for he had much at heart all that touched the case of this young man.”
[Italian.]
Jan. 21. Collegio, Lettere. Venetian Archives.152. To the Podesta of Padua.
You will see from the enclosed representations of the English Ambassador, made through his Secretary, how anxious he is about the death of a young Englishman, said to be noble, and son of a Councillor of State. Considering the bad nature of the case the culprit ought not be safe from your jurisdiction in any place. We require information as to the nature of the crime, and you are desired to furnish it at once, in order that we may arm you with necessary powers and orders. If the case is one of those in which right of sanctuary is of no avail you will take the necessary steps, and in any case report at once to us.
Ayes21.
Noes1.
Neutrals1.
January 21, 1607. [v.m.]
[Italian].
Jan. 23. Senato, Secreta. Despatches from Padua. Venetian Archives.153. Most Serene Prince,
The English Student, aged twenty, called Julius Cæsar, son of a Secretary to the King of England, as reported, a gentleman of high quality, was playing on the 16th of this month at a fencing school with a certain Thomio Brochetta of Padua, and was slightly injured in one hand. The Englishman took offence and left the school declaring he would kill Brochetta unless he apologized. At that moment Brochetta came out of the school and the Englishman fired at him with a revolver, but missed him; thereupon Brochetta drew his sword and gave the Englishman a mortal wound. An unfortunate case, brought about by the deceased, as is clear from the enquiry. The Ambassador in a letter handed to me by a number of English students, makes out that it was done on purpose, and demands proceedings against the homicide. Brochetta has been summoned to surrender to prison and the Ambassador has been informed.
Meantime the body lay in the Church of Saint Catherine, the clergy refusing it admittance to holy ground because they were informed that the man was a Calvinist, and had in his house a person to teach him those dogmas. Finally, they resolved to give him a public funeral and then secretly to exclude him from the church and to put him in a separate place.
Padua, 23rd January, 1608.
[Italian.] Almorò Zane, Podestà.
Jan. 24. Original Despatch. Venetian Archives.154. Zorzi Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I must report that, in the matter of precedence, notwithstanding the vigorous representations of the French Ambassador, I overcame all obstacles and attained my intent. The King and Queen decided to place their regard for you above every other consideration, and there is no longer any doubt as to your precedence. At dinner on the day of the Masque the King spoke publicly with great regard of the Serene Republic.
I must just touch on the splendour of the spectacle, which was worthy of her Majesty's greatness. The apparatus and the cunning of the stage machinery was a miracle, the abundance and beauty of the lights immense, the music and the dance most sumptuous. But what beggared all else and possibly exceeded the public expectation was the wealth of pearls and jewels that adorned the Queen and her ladies, so abundant and splendid that in every one's opinion no other court could have displayed such pomp and riches.* So well composed and ordered was it all that it is evident the mind of her Majesty, the authoress of the whole, is gifted no less highly than her person. She reaped universal applause and the King constantly showed his approval. At the close of the ceremony he said to me that he intended this function to consecrate the birth of the Great Hall which his predecessors had left him built merely in wood, but which he had converted into stone.
London, 24th January, 1607. [m.v.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 24. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.155. Zorzi Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Throughout these festivities I have not had an opportunity to see the King and so I could not execute my commission. He is always away at the chase, for which the season is propitious. He left the day after the Masque. Before he left, however, he sent to his Ambassador in France instructions as to his answers should anything be said to him on this question of precedence. The King also closed the passage between Dover and Calais in order to intercept the message which the French Ambassador here was sending to his master. At a breakfast which the Queen gave to us she began to touch on the subject, but I took care to avoid all discussion.
They are acting with greater reserve than formerly in the matter of selling and exporting ships and other maritime stores; and not even persons of importance have been able to obtain licence for one which was to go to Leghorn. This comes not merely from the scarcity of ships here but also from their annoyance that the Grand Duke of Tuscany should use the resources of this Kingdom in a way that endangers its commerce, and also because they have been warned that Anthony Sherley, who has been given a command in the Mediterranean by the King of Spain, intended to furnish himself with ships from England. His brother is still in prison, nor is it unlikely that this design forms one of the charges against him.
During these festivities I have observed from certain signs which passed between the Spanish Ambassador and some of his confidants, that they are pushing forward the hopes of a matrimonial alliance between these Sovereigns.
The talk at Court about the peace is not so confident as it was; for it seems that the States did not display that great inclination towards it that was expected.
London, 24th January, 1607. [m.v.]
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Jan. 28. Senato, Secreta. Despatches from Padua. Venetian Archives.156. Most Serene Prince,
I repeat my despatch of the 23rd.
The English Ambassador has again written to me and a large body of English students has made a representation to me to-day; they both, however, affirmed that the affair happened in a manner totally different from that which appears from the enquiry instituted. They demand that the accused should be arrested wherever he may have taken refuge. I replied that no steps permitted by the Law have hitherto been omitted, and the accused has been summoned to surrender himself at the prison of this city; and so when they have proved their accusations they may rest assured that the slayer will be arrested wherever he may be, and that I will proceed rigorously against him in conformity with your Serenity's intentions. Moreover they declared that they had heard that the body had been removed from its resting place, a step taken by the Ecclesiastics, and carried out in the night time, on the ground that it was incapable of burial in a sacred place. The English demand an enquiry about this also and I have promised it.
Padua, 28th January, 1608.
[Italian.] Almorò Zane, Podestà.
Jan. 29. Minutes of the Senate, Venetian Archives.157. That the English Ambassador be invited to the Cabinet to hear as follows:—
Our Ambassador Giustinian has informed us of the readiness with which the Earl of Salisbury has assumed the protection of our subjects in the matter of the booty made by the pirate Ward and sent to London in the ship “Husband.” We beg you to thank the Earl and his Majesty. You will add that the goods are undoubtedly those belonging to the “Soderina,” although the agents of the pirates declare that they were bought in Tunis.
You will recall to his Majesty's mind* what we have done about the Earl of Tyrone out of our sheer wish to please the King; and you will say that many days ago we caused the Earl to be requested not to enter our dominions at his peril.
Ayes28.Second vote,Ayes20.
Noes29.Noes27.
Neutrals95.Neutrals104.
Amendment to the paragraph marked* “that it is our firm intention that the Earl shall find no reception in our dominions, for we can not receive the disgraced subjects of his Majesty.”
Ayes34.Second vote,Ayes27.
Noes17.Noes14.
Neutrals99.Neutrals108.
Jan. 29. Minutes of the Senate, Venetian Archives.158. To the Ambassador in England.
Following your prudent advice we have asked the English Ambassador here to convey to the Earl of Salisbury the message we now enclose.
We enclose a memorandum from the parties interested in the cargo of the “Husband.”
You are to assure his Majesty of our good will in the matter of the Earl of Tyrone.
We enclose a copy of the representation made to us by the English Ambassador as regards the death of a young Englishman in Padua, and the Podestà's report thereon.
Ayes26.Second vote,Ayes20.
Noes29.Noes27.
Neutrals95.Neutrals104.
reballotted with the amendment to the last motion,
Ayes34.Second vote,Ayes27.
Noes17.Noes14.
Neutrals99.Neutrals106.
[Italian.]
Jan. 29. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.159. Piero Priuli, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Ambassador and Villeroy discuss steps to be taken against pirates in the Mediterranean.
The English Ambassador is pressing for the extinction of the debt.
Paris, 29th January, 1608.
[Italian.]
Jan. 31. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.160. Zorzi Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I have now heard the exact words that the King used about the Republic. It was the day of the Masque and he was surrounded by a great concourse of people; he said that there was no other Sovereign whose friendship he valued more highly.
The Earl of Tyrone begins to finds himself cheated in those hopes which led him to fly precipitately from Ireland. He is now trying various ways to obtain pardon. He has not only written a letter to his Majesty, in which he attempts to justify his departure, but he endeavours to open up negotiations through the English Ambassador in Flanders. It is well understood here that sheer necessity compels him to take this step, for the King of Spain being aware of the King of England's wishes, has not as yet granted the Earl access to Spain, and the Archduke, for the same reason, has given him a fixed time within which he must quit Flanders. Nothing therefore remains for him but the Pope who, they say, shows little wish to receive him in Rome on the plea that he does not desire to cause greater religious trouble in Ireland, but really because he does not wish to be at the expense of supporting him. They are well pleased with the attitude of Spain and rumour says that France would have acted in the same way had they known the facts of the case.
In Ireland all is quiet. The royal troops are awaited in order to attack the rebels whose numbers diminish daily.
M. d'Alye, who was sent by his Most Christian Majesty to condole on the death of the Princess Mary, is going back to France.
London, 31st January, 1607. [m.v.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 31. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.161. Zorzi Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The Archduke Albert, knowing that the King's Commissioners were to take part in the peace negotiations, has instructed his Ambassador to beg for their intervention, and he has made the same request to the King of France. The States have presented a resolution in writing to the Archduke. They declare that they will not proceed until the point of independence has been settled; if any difficulty is raised about it they will dissolve the congress. The war party argues from this resolute attitude that the States have little desire for peace; but those who review the situation impartitally hold that this martial attitude is assumed merely to improve the conditions of peace, which are so honourable for them that it is not to be supposed that they will refuse them merely to be plunged again in war.
We don't know yet who are the Archduke's representatives, for the Flemish took umbrage at the orders sent from Spain appointing the Marchese Spinola as first representative; they complain of the nomination of a foreigner.
The English are complaining of losses by piracy in the Levant, and this may serve them as an excuse to encourage their own ships to a like course and to shut their eyes to their acts.
The second ship I arrested with Ward's plunder has not reached London yet.
London, 31st January, 1607. [m.v.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 31. Minutes of the Senate, Venetian Archives.162. That the English Ambassador be invited to attend the Cabinet and to hear as follows:
The same as the preceding communication, but in last clause relating to Tyrone, it is moved that should the Ambassador touch on the subject the Doge is to say that the necessary steps have been taken, and should the Ambassador press to know what those steps are the Doge may tell him.
Ayes117.
Noes5.
Neutrals28.
Carried.
[Italian.]
Jan. 31. Minutes of the Senate, Venetian Archives.163. To the Ambassador in England.
The same as the motion of January 29th, omitting the passage about the Earl of Tyrone.
Ayes117.
Noes5.
Neutrals28.
Carried.
[Italian.]
Jan. 31. Minutes of the Senate, Roma. Venetian Archives.164. When the English Ambassador comes to the Cabinet the following shall be read to him:
We consider it right to inform you that there are rumours of an alliance between the Pope, the Emperor, the King of Spain and the Grand Duke of Tuscany, nominally against the Turk.
Ayes108.
Noes2.
Neutrals3.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Lord Maxwell and Sir James Macdonell escaped from Edinburgh Castle. Cal. S.P. Dom. Dec. 19, 1607.
2 The decipher reads Principi, but is in error. The sign N39 means Spanish.