BHO

The City of Coventry: List of streets

Pages 24-33

A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 8, the City of Coventry and Borough of Warwick. Originally published by Victoria County History, London, 1969.

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Citation:

LIST OF STREETS (fn. 1)

THE area covered is somewhat larger than that shown on the street plan. Street named on this plan are marked with an asterisk (*) in the gazetteer. The results of wartime destruction and reconstruction after the Second World War are indicated in the descriptions of certain streets. A plan showing the reconstructed area is on p. 16.

In brackets after each street name is either the date of the first known reference to the street by that name or an indication of early forms of the name (or of former names) with dates. Sometimes the date is that of construction, but where this is the case it is stated.

ABBORTTS LANE *(1748-9; (fn. 2) or Naul's Mill Lane, 1807). (fn. 3) So far no earlier evidence for this name has been found (Speed shows the street but does not name it) but there is every possibility that the thoroughfare was more ancient, since it led to the important Hill Mill. A stone bridge by Hill Mill was made or repaired in 1683. (fn. 4) A reference in 1434 to a bridge in Hill Street* which was to be made or repaired can probably be identified with this bridge. (fn. 5) The inhabitants complained in 1838 that the bridge was unfinished and dangerous. (fn. 6)

AGNES LANE.See St. Agnes Lane.

ALBANY ROAD* (1898), (fn. 7) also known as the Jetty, runs from the Butts* to Earlsdon Avenue and follows the line of an earlier footpath. (fn. 8)

ALL SAINTS LANE (probably named when All Saints Church was built in 1869) runs W. and SW. from Payne's Lane to Lower Ford Street*, more or less parallel to Far Gosford Street. It appears to have been an ancient lane (fn. 9) and to correspond with a lane marked in 1748-9 which would have continued as Lower Ford Street. (fn. 10)

ANGLE LANE, Angles Lane. See St. Agnes Lane.

ARCHDEACONS LANE. See Vicar Lane.

BABLAKE STREET (constructed 1927-31) (fn. 11) ran S. from Corporation Street* to West Orchard*. It has ceased to exist as a result of the reconstruction of the area after the Second World War.

BACHELOR'S WALK. See Whitefriars Street.

BANCROFT LANE (1541) apparently ran W. from Cross Cheaping*, crossing Maxstoklane. (fn. 12)

BARKERS BUTTS LANE (1748-9) (fn. 13) runs NW. as a continuation of Hill Street* and Coundon Road*, in the direction of Coundon. The Barkers' Butts were in existence by 1496. (fn. 14) Parnar Lane (vicus parnar'), which is mentioned in the late 13th century (fn. 15) and appears to have run almost parallel to Spon Street*, may have been the original name for Barkers Butts Lane.

BARONS LANE. See Barras Lane.

BARRAS LANE* (Barrs Lane, 1748-9). (fn. 16) Its junction with Hill Street* was probably the site of Spon Cross. It almost certainly marks the site of the bars in Spon Street* which preceded the gate by St. John's Church. Barons Lane (1426), (fn. 17) which has not otherwise been identified, was possibly an early form of this name.

BARRS LANE. See Barras Lane.

BAXTER LANE. See Palmer Lane.

BAYLEY LANE* (le Baylylone, 13th century; (fn. 18) Flouterlane, 1410-11). (fn. 19) The form le Baillive Lone (1354) has given rise to the suggestion that the origin is in the word 'bailiff', (fn. 20) but the origin may lie rather in the word 'bailey' - the outer defences of a castle - since the lane probably followed the line of the ditch of the earls' castle. (fn. 21)

BINLEY ROAD (1887, continuing as Lutterworth Road) (fn. 22) is one of the main exits from the city and runs SE. from the end of Far Gosford Street to Stoke Biggin, Binley, and Lutterworth. The stretch S. of Gosford Green was called Gosford Green Causeway in 1851. (fn. 23)

BIRD STREET* was constructed between 1848 (fn. 24) and 1851 (fn. 25) as part of a scheme (following an Act of 1845) (fn. 26) for developing the area, which had belonged to Sir Thomas White's trustees. The corporation acquired the land and cut eight streets, naming them after the founders of local charities (see also Fairfax, Ford, Hales, Jesson, Norton, Wheatley, and White Streets). (fn. 27)

BIRMINGHAM NEW ROAD. See Holyhead Road.

BISHOP STREET* (vicus episcopi, 12th century) (fn. 28) was an important thoroughfare and contained several houses of some size; from it was named the leet of the Prior's Half. The Rode Hall, which was on the corner of Bishop Street* and Rood Lane*, had belonged to the Trinity Guild but by 1410-11 had been turned into dwelling houses. (fn. 29) There is a single reference to a stone bridge in Bishop Street in 1321. (fn. 30) Neither bridge nor stream is marked on the maps of 1610 (fn. 31) and 1748-9. (fn. 32) There was, however, a stream behind houses in Cook Street* and St. Agnes Lane* in 1410-11, (fn. 33) and this may have had a small tributary running down from the higher land by Bishop Street.

Figure 5: Street plan in 1923

BOND STREET* (1845) (fn. 34) was originally known as the Town-wall; it followed the line of a footpath that ran 'on the ruins of the wall' in 1748-9, (fn. 35) and in the earlier 19th century retained fragments of the wall 'and an unwholesome ditch running its whole length'. (fn. 36) It contained some good examples of early19th-century 'top shops'. The first houses in the street are said to have been erected in 1823. (fn. 37)

BREWERY STREET (1837) (fn. 38) ran S. from Leicester Street*. The street disappeared as a result of reconstruction after the Second World War.

BRICKILN LANE. See Gulson Road and Leicester Street.

BROADGATE* (lata porta, late 12th century) (fn. 39) has its origin in the broad gate of the castle of the earls of Chester, referred to in the charter of Hugh, Earl of Chester (d. 1181), to the priory, granted between 1161 and 1175. (fn. 40) The street was widened in 1820. (fn. 41) It has been converted into an open square forming the focal point of the reconstruction of the area after the Second World War.

BULL RING, THE* (1448) (fn. 42) lay at the northern end of the Great Butchery in front of the gate of the priory. In 1448 the leet ordered that the poulterers should stand there. It was destroyed during preparations for the construction of Trinity Street* which was opened in 1937 (see Great Butcher Row).

BULL YARD* (Bull Street, 1851). (fn. 43) 'The back way to the Bull', an inn in Smithford Street*, existed in 1748-9 (fn. 44) and was probably a good deal older. It later became the entry to the Barracks, erected in 1793, and then the approach to the Barrack Square Market, now replaced by a car park.

BURGES* (vico qui vocatur inter pontes, 1309; bitwene the brugges, 1343; (fn. 45) inter pontes Sancti Johannis, 1410-11). (fn. 46) It was known as St. John's Bridge(s) until at least 1851, (fn. 47) and by 1869 (fn. 48) as Burges. It took its name from the bridges over the River Sherbourne and its tributary the Radford Brook, near St. John's Hospital. The bridges, which were in existence by the 13th century, (fn. 49) can probably be identified with the bridge with two arches 'within the town self of Coventry', referred to by Leland. (fn. 50)

BUSHBY LANE (Busbylone, mid 14th century) (fn. 51) ran W. from Ironmonger Row, N. of West Orchard*. It led to the tenement formerly held by the Buschby family. (fn. 52)

BUTCHERY, THE. See Great Butcher Row.

BUTTS, THE* (Summerlands Butts Lane, 1748- 1749) (fn. 53) may have originated in the 'Somerlesow lane' mentioned in 1423. (fn. 54) The Summerlands Butts were certainly in existence in 1635, (fn. 55) and probably, as 'Somerlesue butts', as early as 1468. (fn. 56) In the 1830s the whole road was called the Butts; in addition, houses built on either side of the road at its NW. end formed Sovereign Place and Summer Land Place, those on either side of the opening of Union Street formed Union Place, and the stretch of road between the two ends of Hertford Place* was known as Hertford Terrace. (fn. 57) The eastern end of the Butts was called Queen's Road* by 1887. (fn. 58)

CALAIS STREET (1675) (fn. 59) was the name applied to the short stretch of street outside Gosford Gate between Callice (Calais) Bridge and Dover Bridge. (fn. 60)

CATESBY LANE (1469) (fn. 61) has not been identified, but possibly ran E. from Potter Row, just S. of the River Sherbourne, since Catesby Place was in Potter Row. (fn. 62)

CHAUNTRY PLACE* (constructed 1816). Building first began on the Chantry Orchard, formerly property of the priory, in 1816. (fn. 63) The area became a slum and in 1930 work was begun on the clearance of the site for Lady Herbert's Garden, which was completed in 1939. (fn. 64) Chantry Place still forms the western boundary of the garden.

CHAPEL COURT. See Chapel Yard.

CHAPEL STREET* (c. 1860). (fn. 65) The Well Street Independent chapel, from which this street took its name, was built in 1827. The approach to the chapel was marked but not named in 1837 (fn. 66) and 1851. (fn. 67)

CHAPEL YARD (Chapel Court, 1837) (fn. 68) leads N. from Spon Street* near its junction with Spon Causeway, taking its name from Spon Street chapel (fn. 69) which stood on the street corner. (fn. 70) The name Chapel Court seems to have been replaced by 1851 by that of Chapel Yard. (fn. 71)

CHEYLESMORE* (Chellesmore Lane, 1565). (fn. 72) The lower part of Greyfriars Lane*, or Cheylesmore Lane, was known as Cheylesmore by 1748-9. (fn. 73)

CHEYLESMORE LANE. See Greyfriars Lane and Cheylesmore.

COLEPIT CAUSEY (1748-9) (fn. 74) ran N. from Dog Lane or Brickiln Lane, and may well have been used for the construction of Leicester Place*.

COOK STREET* (vicus coci, late 13th century; (fn. 75) le Cokkestrete, temp. Edw. II). (fn. 76) The lower end of it was called Cook Street in 1410-11 (fn. 77) but had become Silver Street* by 1748-9. (fn. 78) At the NW. angle lay the sheep market.

COPE STREET* (adopted 1875). (fn. 79) The street disappeared as a result of reconstruction after the Second World War.

CORN MARKET. See Cross Cheaping.

CORPORATION STREET* (constructed 1931) (fn. 80) was designed to provide a by-pass for through traffic and a new shopping centre. It replaced an area of slums which had developed in the courts W. of Well Street*.

CORPUS CHRISTI LANE (1610) (fn. 81) ran E., as a continuation of New Street*, from Mill Lane, and appears to have been a cul-de-sac. It does not appear in 1748-9. (fn. 82)

COUNDON ROAD* (Coundon Lane, 1423) (fn. 83) runs as a continuation of Hill Street* to Barkers Butts Lane.

COW LANE* (le Cowlone, 1335; (fn. 84) Paulyne's lone, Pawlyns loon, (fn. 85) late 13th century). (fn. 86)

COX STREET* (Erlesmulne-lone, 1291; (fn. 87) Mullone, Erlesmullane, 1410-11). (fn. 88) It was frequently called Earl's Mill Lane to distinguish it from the Mill Lane which formed a continuation of Much Park Street* outside the New Gate. Earl's Mill Lane ran N. to the Derngate or Bastille Gate; the Earl's Mill was just N. of the gate. (fn. 89) The continuation of the road northwards to Swanswell Pool was known as Spinney Lane in 1851. (fn. 90) By 1869 the whole road was called Cox Street. (fn. 91)

CROSS CHEAPING* (vicus quo vendunt bladum, 13th century; forum bladi, 1299; (fn. 92) le Croschepyng, 1335; forum cruets, 1363 (fn. 93) and 1410-11). (fn. 94) In 1410-11 it ran from West Orchard* and the Little Butchery to Broadgate*; (fn. 95) The southerly part of the street, which before 1410-11 had been included in Broadgate*, was the site of the Cross. (fn. 96) This southerly part has ceased to exist as a result of reconstruction after the Second World War, the street being diverted eastwards into Trinity Street.

CROW LANE* (Crowe lane, Croumulne lane, late 12th century) (fn. 97) led to the former Crow Lane Bridge, Crow Moat (called Cromulneham in 1294), (fn. 98) and Crow Mill. In 1748-9 (fn. 99) the 'Mott' appears as a moated area partly enclosed by ramparts. The bridge, which may have been contemporary with the lane, was not specifically mentioned until 1636 when it was ordered to be destroyed because of the plague in London. (fn. 100)

CUCKOO LANE. See Trinity Lane.

DAISY LANE (Daysilane, 1410-11) (fn. 101) was probably named after, and approached the dwelling of, Roger Daysie, bailiff of Coventry in at least 1300-3. (fn. 102) The lane ran W. from Cross Cheaping*, near the site of the Cross. (fn. 103) Its line was probably followed by the later Market Place*.

DALTON'S SQUARE. See Ryley Street.

DAY'S LANE (1851) (fn. 104) runs E. from Canterbury Street to Payne's Lane. It appears to have been an ancient thoroughfare, widened in its central portion at a later date, (fn. 105) and it may correspond with a lane, the beginning of which was marked in 1748-9. (fn. 106)

DEAD LANE. See St. John Street.

DEAD LANE (venella mortua, 1410-11) (fn. 107) ran in the direction of Hill Mill, or Abbot's Mill, but it is uncertain whether it was the original name of Barras Lane*, or whether it left Spon Street* near the bridge. (fn. 108)

DERBY LANE* (Derbylane, temp. Edw. II; (fn. 109) Tirrystonlayne and Salamefordlane, 1410-11). (fn. 110) It formerly extended as far as High Street*.

DOG LANE. See Leicester Street.

DUNSTAPLE LANE (1410-11) (fn. 111) ran W. from Bishop Street*.

EARL STREET* (vicus comitis, late 12th century). (fn. 112) In 1410-11 it stretched from Mill Lane to Broadgate*. (fn. 113) In the 13th century the street contained many substantial houses, shops, and crypts; one house is described as of stone, another as a mansion, and the Album Celarium or Whytecelar stood on the west corner of Much Park Street* and Earl Street. (fn. 114)

EARL'S MILL LANE. See Cox Street.

EAST STREET (1837) (fn. 115) runs E. as a continuation of Raglan Street to meet Payne's Lane. In 1837 its western limit was the Spitalmoor Brook (see Lower Ford Street).

FAIRFAX STREET* (constructed after 1851) (fn. 116) was one of the streets made by the corporation on land purchased from Sir Thomas White's trustees (see Bird Street). It had ceased to exist by 1959. (fn. 117)

FAR GOSFORD STREET (extra or ultra Gosford, 12th century; (fn. 118) ultra pontes de Gosforde, late 13th century; (fn. 119) vicus de Gosforde extra portam, 1410-11) (fn. 120) runs E. from Gosford Bridge to Gosford Green. In 1410-11 it stretched from the bridges towards Harnall and Stoke, (fn. 121) and was one of the four medieval suburbs of Coventry.

FLEET STREET* (Fletestrete, 1434). (fn. 122) In 1410-11 this was part of Spon Street*. (fn. 123)

FLOUTER LANE. See Bayley Lane.

FOLESHILL ROAD (c. 1874; (fn. 124) alternatively Leicester Road, 1851 and c. 1859) (fn. 125) is one of the main exits from the city and runs NE. originally as a continuation of Leicester Row* (q.v.) in the direction of Foleshill and Bedworth.

FOLEYHUL LANE (Foleyhullane, 1410-11; alternatively Folxhullane) (fn. 126) ran S. from Well Street* to the Poleyard and the Radford Brook.

FORD STREET* (constructed after 1851) (fn. 127) was one of the streets made by the corporation on land purchased from Sir Thomas White's trustees (see Bird Street). Lower Ford Street* seems to have existed in 1748-9, (fn. 128) as a continuation of the lane later called All Saints' Lane.

FREETH STREET* (1830). (fn. 129) The street disappeared as a result of reconstruction after the Second World War.

FRETTON STREET* (constructed 1927-31) (fn. 130) ran NW. from Corporation Street* to the junction of Well Street* and Bond Street*. It was opened when Corporation Street* was cut and was named after W. G. Fretton, the local antiquary.

GAOL LANE. See Pepper Lane.

GAS STREET* (1837) (fn. 131) runs SE. of the gas works, which were erected in 1821. (fn. 132) The stretch NE. of the Radford Brook was called Hill Cross Street in 1851. (fn. 133) The street disappeared during the construction of the Inner Ring Road.

GLOVERS ROW. See Ironmonger Row.

GODIVA STREET* (c. 1898). (fn. 134) The site of the Derngate or Bastille Gate is at its junction with Cox Street*.

GOLDING LANE (Goldynglane, 1410-11; alternatively Solihullane) (fn. 135) ran N. from Well Street* just inside the Well Street Gate. N. of it were tenter grounds and Waller or Well Croft.

GOSFORD GREEN CAUSEWAY. See Binley Road.

GOSFORD STREET* (vicus de Gosseforde, goseworde stret, late 12th century) (fn. 136) originally ran from Gosford Bridge to Broadgate*, but Earl Street*, then High Street*, and finally Jordan Well* were names applied to certain sections of it. In 1410-11 it stretched from the further side of Gosford Bridge beyond the bridge and from the cross there to the end of Mill Lane on the N., and on the S. to Much Park Street*. (fn. 137) On the N., towards the gate, was land held by Adam Botener, whose family held much property in the street. To the S. lay the house of the White Friars. (For the Gosford bridges, see Far Gosford Street.)

GOSFORD TERRACE. See Walsgrave Road.

GREAT BUTCHER ROW* (vicus ubi pulteria venditur versus portam prioratus, 1309-10; (fn. 138) les flesshameles, 1399; (fn. 139) le boucherie sive pultrye, magnum macellum, 1410-11). (fn. 140) The whole length of the street seems to have been known as the Great Butchery, but the N. part also as the Poultry, where poulterers were ordered to sell in 1448, (fn. 141) or the Bull Ring*, and sometimes generally as contra portas Prioratus. (fn. 142) A section on the E. side, south of the Poultry, seems to have been called Spicer Stoke, where fresh fish was sold. (fn. 143) The Great Butchery was demolished during the construction of Trinity Street* which was opened in 1937.

GREYFRIARS LANE* (venella de Cheylesmor, Cheylesmorelone, 13th century; (fn. 144) in vico fratrum minorum, 14th century; (fn. 145) le Frerelone, 1323-4; (fn. 146) vicus sive venella fratrum minorum, 'formerly called in the ancient books Cheyllesmorelane', 1410-11). (fn. 147) In 1410-11 three cottages on the E. side of the street were near the gate of the cemetery of the Fratrum Praedicatorum; (fn. 148) this almost certainly means the Grey Friars, as it is the only known reference to the Dominicans in Coventry.

GROVE STREET* (c. 1835) (fn. 149) runs E. to the Phoenix Foundry.

GULSON ROAD* (Mylnelane, 1358; (fn. 150) Brickiln Lane, 1830; (fn. 151) Gulson Road, by 1912) (fn. 152) is a continuation of Much Park Street* outside the New Gate, and runs parallel to Gosford Street*. The bridge over the River Sherbourne was shown in 1748-9. (fn. 153)

GUPHILL LANE (Guphul-lane, 1423) (fn. 154) runs S. from the Allesley road, near where the latter crossed a tributary of the River Sherbourne at Guphill Ford.

HALES STREET* (constructed 1848). (fn. 155) A large part of St. John's Hospital, then the Free Grammar School library, was demolished for its construction.

HAY LANE* (Heylone, 1384; (fn. 156) Ludlowloon, before 1410-11). (fn. 157) Two members of the Lodelawe family held land on either side of the street. (fn. 158)

HERTFORD PLACE* (1830). (fn. 159)

HERTFORD STREET* (constructed 1812) (fn. 160) was cut as the result of an Act 'for improving the public roads in and through the City of Coventry', and provided a better exit for traffic in the direction of Warwick.

HERTFORD TERRACE (1830). See Butts, The.

HIGH STREET* (altus vicus, 13th century; (fn. 161) le haute rue, temp. Edw. II). (fn. 162) An alternative name for the westernmost part of Earl Street*. Vicus comitis sive altus vicus stretched in 1410-11 as far as Broadgate*. (fn. 163)

HILL CROSS* (1329; (fn. 164) Hillecrossestrete, 1542). (fn. 165) There was a cross there in 1329 and E. of it a quarry or ditch.

HILL CROSS STREET. See Gas Street.

HILL STREET* (super hulle, 13th century; vicus de hulle, late 13th century; (fn. 166) Hullestrete, 1334; in vico montis, 1358) (fn. 167) was one of the four medieval suburbs of Coventry. (For Hill Street Bridge, see Abbotts Lane.)

HILL TOP* (1748-9) (fn. 168) does not appear in Speed's map of 1610. It may have originated soon afterwards as a road used for carting away stone from the ruins of the priory church and for access to the waterworks. (fn. 169)

HILPOUS LANE (Ylpus lane, 13th century; (fn. 170) Hilpous lone, 1317) (fn. 171) probably ran W. from Ironmonger Row. (fn. 172)

HOLYHEAD ROAD* (Birmingham New Road, 1851; (fn. 173) Holyhead Road, 1887) (fn. 174) was cut by Thomas Telford in 1827-30 to replace the longer route by Spon Street* and the Allesley road. It rejoined the old road at Allesley.

HORNWOOD LANE (late 13th century) (fn. 175) has not been identified.

HOUNDS LANE. See Vicar Lane.

IRONMONGER ROW (ubi ferrum venditur, 13th century; (fn. 176) le Irenrowe, temp. Edw. II; Iren chepyng, in foro ferri, 1316; le Irenmongeres rowe, 1332) (fn. 177) ran NW. from Cross Cheaping*, on the W. side of the street, and from West Orchard* to the bridge over the River Sherbourne. It was later regarded as part of Cross Cheaping*. For the later Ironmonger Row, see separate entry.

IRONMONGER ROW * (Potter Row, 1410-11; (fn. 178) Glovers Row, 1552; (fn. 179) Tuttle Row, 1657; (fn. 180) Tittle Row, 1748-9; (fn. 181) Ironmonger Row, by 1807). (fn. 182) The section E. of Palmer Lane* was also described as contra portas prioratus in 1410-11 (fn. 183). Its E. end disappeared with the construction of Trinity Street* and the S. side after the Second World War. For the medieval Ironmonger Row, see separate entry.

JESSON STREET* (constructed 1848-51) (fn. 184) was one of the streets made by the corporation on land purchased from Sir Thomas White's trustees (see Bird Street).

JETTY, THE. See Albany Road.

JORDAN WELL* (le Jordanwell, c. 1274). (fn. 185) The section westwards from Mill Lane was originally called Gosford Street, and later Earl Street*, and that eastwards from Mill Lane, Gosford Street*. In 1410-11 the name, Jordan Well, still applied only to a well there, (fn. 186) but by 1421 it was applied to the street. (fn. 187) The well lay by a tenement held by the heirs of the Schepey family since the time of Jordan Schepey. (fn. 188)

KEVETT'S LANE (1617) (fn. 189) lay outside Gosford Gate and may have been the approach to the house of Thomas Keivet, mayor in 1548. (fn. 190)

KING STREET* (New Rents, 1518; (fn. 191) King Street, 1843). (fn. 192) Buildings in the street (which was outside the city wall) were demolished during the Civil War and were rebuilt in 1647 with tiles and timber from the park keeper's house at Cheylesmore. (fn. 193) Land for widening the street was given by a Miss King in 1843. (fn. 194)

LAMB STREET* (c. 1860). (fn. 195)

LEICESTER NEW ROAD. See Stoney Stanton Road.

LEICESTER ROW* (1807) (fn. 196) runs NE. and continued as the Foleshill Road until the S. end of Foleshill Road became a car park during post-war reconstruction.

LEICESTER STREET* (Doggelone, 1221; (fn. 197) Brickiln Lane, 1748-9; (fn. 198) Leicester Street, 1851). (fn. 199) The eastern end was called Swanswell Terrace* by 1830. (fn. 200) Most of the street ceased to exist when the Inner Ring Road was constructed.

LEWIN LANE (Lewynloon, 1410-11) (fn. 201) probably ran E. from Potter Row and was so named after William Lewyn to whose tenement it led. (fn. 202)

LIGHT LANE (c. 1913) (fn. 203) runs NE. from the Radford Road* to St. Nicholas Street*.

LINGAMS LANE (1600) (fn. 204) has not been identified.

LITTLE BUTCHER ROW* (parvum macellum, stallum carnificum, 1410-11), (fn. 205) also known as the Little Butchery, was demolished during the construction of Trinity Street* which was opened in 1937.

LITTLE PARK STREET* (in minori vico parci, in inferiori vico parci, vicus parvi parci, Littleparkstreth, 13th century) (fn. 206) led to the Little Park of Cheylesmore, which was entered by Little Park Gate. The gardens of houses S. of Cow Lane* stretched westwards to the palisade and ditch of Cheylesmore manor. (fn. 207) It was widened and almost entirely rebuilt as part of the reconstruction after the Second World War.

LONDON ROAD* is one of the main exits from the city and runs towards Whitley and Willenhall.

LOWER FORD STREET* (1855) (fn. 208) runs SE. to Far Gosford Street. It follows the line of a lane, marked in 1748-9, (fn. 209) which was probably a continuation of that later called All Saints Lane. The cutting of Lower Ford Street was part of the development of the Spitalmoors district, when Raglan Street, Alma Street, and Hood Street were constructed.

LUCAS LANE* (1410-11). (fn. 210)

LUDLOW LANE. See Hay Lane.

LUTTERWORTH ROAD. See Binley Road.

MARKET PLACE* (passage to New Market or Women's Market, 1720). (fn. 211) The Friday or Women's Market Place was moved from the Great Butchery to the yard of the Peacock Inn in 1719; (fn. 212) the passage leading to this new market or Women's Market beside the Mayor's Parlour in Cross Cheaping* became known as Market Place and probably followed the line of the medieval Daisy Lane. It has ceased to exist as a result of the reconstruction of the area after the Second World War.

MARKET STREET*. In 1719 the Friday or Women's Market Place was moved to the yard of the Peacock Inn (see Market Place) between Smithford Street*, Cross Cheaping*, and West Orchard*, but there is no indication that Market Street was cut to give access to it until after 1749. The street has ceased to exist as a result of the reconstruction of the area after the Second World War.

MARSHALL LANE. See Palmer Lane.

MAXSTOK LANE (Maxstoklane, 1410-11) (fn. 213) ran N. from West Orchard* to Cross Cheaping* opposite Ironmonger Row*. (fn. 214)

MIDDLEBOROUGH ROAD*, or Street (c. 1879).

Middleborough Terrace (c. 1862) (fn. 215) was built nearby on Radford Road*, probably on the site of a parcel of ground known as Medelborowe in 1545. (fn. 216)

MILL LANE. See Cox Street and Gulson Road.

MILLERS ALLEY (1748-9) (fn. 217) ran N. from New Street*. From its position in Bradford's Survey, it looks as if it might have been the eastern boundary of the priory precinct. It led to the River Sherbourne by Bastille House, and seems to have been marked, though not named, in 1610. (fn. 218)

MOWBRAY LANE (Moubraylane, 1410-11) (fn. 219) ran N. from Well Street*, near its eastern end, and was so called after Thomas Mowbray, who lived there. At its northern end were tenter grounds.

MUCH PARK STREET* (in vico parci, 12th century; in superiori vico parci, in maiori vico parci, 13th century) (fn. 220) ran to the site of the Great Park of Cheylesmore and of the New Gate and continued as the road to London. Some of the earliest mayors held tenements in the street. (fn. 221) Outside the New Gate, S. of the street and N. of the Little Park, was a quarry called le Spytall. (fn. 222) The south end was demolished when the Inner Ring Road was constructed.

NAUL'S MILL LANE. See Abbotts Lane.

NEW BUILDINGS* (1671) (fn. 223) was cut in 1645, when the priory dye house and grounds were granted to John Barker to build a street of houses to the value of £500; (fn. 224) this was probably to compensate some of those whose houses in the suburbs had been pulled down in 1643 when the city was in danger of siege. (fn. 225) These 'New Buildings' were ordered to be pulled down in 1671. By 1748-9 the street was known as Priory Lane, (fn. 226) but by 1807 it had resumed its original name. (fn. 227)

NEW RENTS. See King Street.

NEW STREET* (New strette, 1384; (fn. 228) Newstret, vicus Sancte Marie, 1410-11). (fn. 229) All the tenements in New Street and on the W. side of Mill Lane belonged to the priory in 1410-11 and had been built on Earl Ranulf's orchard, which had been given to the priory by Richard Gardiner before the Statute of Mortmain. (fn. 230) On the N. side of the street the tenements backed upon the garden of the Bishop's Palace. (fn. 231) The street disappeared as a result of reconstruction after the Second World War.

NORTON STREET* (constructed 1848-51) (fn. 232) was one of the streets made by the corporation on land purchased from Sir Thomas White's trustees (see Bird Street).

PALMER LANE* (Marschalleslone, 1306; (fn. 233) le Palmerslone, temp. Edw. II; (fn. 234) Baxterloone, Marschallone, before 1410-11; (fn. 235) Vikersloon, 1410-11). (fn. 236) The Vicar of Holy Trinity at some time lived there. William Palmer, who appears frequently in 13thcentury deeds, had a tenement there known in 1410- 11 as the Old Drapery. Behind it lay the stables of the Priory Guest House. (fn. 237) Palmer Lane Bridge, at the northern end of the street, bridging the River Sherbourne, was built or repaired in 1434. (fn. 238) The S. end is now (1965) blocked by a row of shops.

PARK SIDE* (Park Wall, 1851; (fn. 239) Park Side, c. 1874) (fn. 240) was constructed along the line of the city wall, which here formed the boundary of Cheylesmore Park. Its line, as it curves round to the S., followed that of a footpath marked in 1748-9 (fn. 241) to the junction with Quarryfield Lane.

PARNAR LANE. See Barkers Butts Lane.

PAULINES LANE. See Cow Lane.

PAYNE'S LANE (1851) (fn. 242) runs N. from the end of Far Gosford Street to Primrose Hill. It appears to have followed the line of the street named Primrose Street in 1837. (fn. 243)

PEKET'S LANE (Peketesloone, 1410-11) (fn. 244) ran E. from St. Nicholas Street*.

PEPPER LANE* (le Peperlone, 1335; (fn. 245) Gaol Lane, 1748-9). (fn. 246) The broad gate of the castle of the earls of Chester may have lain on the site of, or just NW. of, Pepper Lane.

POTTER ROW (le Potterisrowe, 1310) (fn. 247) ran NW. from Cross Cheaping* and the Little Butchery, on the E. side of the street, to the bridge over the River Sherbourne. It was later regarded as part of Cross Cheaping*. Potter Row seems to have applied to the E. side of the street, and to the portion of the modern Ironmonger Row* W. of Palmer Lane*. Ironmonger Row applied to the W. side of the street. (fn. 248) In 1410-11 Potter Row and Ironmonger Row stretched from the bridge over the Sherbourne near St. John's Hospital to the corners of the Little Butchery and West Orchard*. (fn. 249)

POULTRY, THE. See Great Butcher Row.

PRIMROSE HILL PLACE (1837) (fn. 250) ran in a curve from the E. end of Primrose Hill Street* to the N. end of Primrose Street. It appears to have followed the line of the modern Victoria, King William, and Berry Streets, and was probably constructed sometime after 1828. (fn. 251)

PRIMROSE HILL STREET* (constructed after 1828) (fn. 252) was one of the streets cut through the fields lying between Swanswell Pool and Primrose Hill and south of Harnall Lane. This development began in 1828, when the first houses of the 'New Town' were erected. (fn. 253)

PRIMROSE STREET. See Payne's Lane.

PRIORY LANE. See New Buildings.

PRIORY ROW* (1807) (fn. 254) was as late as 1815 known as 'the lane withoutside St. Michael's churchyard'. (fn. 255) The lane may well have existed in medieval times, especially as its eastern portion would have formed the boundary between the Earl's Half and the Prior's Half. Before 1807 it made a detour at its eastern end (fn. 256) to avoid the gardens of what had been the Bishop's Palace. By 1807 it had been straightened, (fn. 257) possibly in 1793 to provide access to St. Michael's new burial-ground which was consecrated in that year. (fn. 258)

PRIORY STREET* (constructed 1856-7). (fn. 259) Towards its southern end it cuts through the site of the Bishop's Palace. There is a bridge over the River Sherbourne in the middle of the street.

QUEEN STREET (1869) runs E. from Swanswell Street. (fn. 260)

QUEEN VICTORIA ROAD* (1887) (fn. 261) formed a by-pass for traffic from Holyhead Road* to Warwick Road* before the new Inner Ring Road was built.

QUEEN'S ROAD. See Butts, The.

RADFORD ROAD*, called the street from the bars to Radford in 1296, (fn. 262) was also the road to Atherstone. (fn. 263)

RED HOUSE STREET (1837) (fn. 264) ran NE. from the end of Primrose Hill Street*, and was probably constructed about the same time. It seems to have followed the line of the modern Castle Street.

ROOD LANE* (Rode Lane, 1410-11) (fn. 265) led to the sheep market (known in 1851 as the pig market). The Rode Hall lay at the corner of Rood Lane and Bishop Street*, probably N. of the lane (see Bishop Street).

RYLEY STREET* (c. 1874; Dalton's Square, 1851). (fn. 266) Part is now (1965) covered by a car park.

ST. AGNES LANE* (Angeloneslone, 1315; Agnes lone, temp. Edw. II; (fn. 267) Angel lane, Angleslane, 1410- 1411; (fn. 268) St. Agnes Lane, 1748-9). (fn. 269)

ST. JOHN STREET* (Dedelone, 13th century) (fn. 270) was still called Dead Lane in 1807 (fn. 271) but by 1830 had become St. John Street. (fn. 272) The street was demolished when the Inner Ring Road was constructed.

ST. JOHN'S BRIDGE(S). See Burges.

ST. MARY STREET* was constructed c. 1863 on the site of the yard of the Half Moon Inn. (fn. 273)

ST. MARY STREET. See New Street.

ST. NICHOLAS STREET* (in bivio de Coventr' versus ecclesiam S. Nicholai, 12th century, applying to the land between St. Nicholas Street and the Radford Road*; vicus Sancti Nicholai, 1295). It was one of the four medieval suburbs and was described as such in the 13th century. (fn. 274) In 1410-11 most of the properties adjoining the street consisted of cottages with tenter grounds or barns and one included a horse-driven mill. (fn. 275) The suburb centred round St. Nicholas's Church.

SALAMEFORD LANE. See Derby Lane.

SALTER LANE (le Salterlone, 1336) (fn. 276) ran E. from Potter Row just N. of the Little Butchery. (fn. 277)

SANDY LANE (1574) (fn. 278) curves N. from St. Nicholas Street*.

SCHOOL LANE (venella scole gramaticalis, le Scolelane, 1410-11) (fn. 279) ran N. from West Orchard* and was named from the medieval Grammar School, which probably lay on its W. side. (fn. 280)

SHERBOURNE PLACE (1837) (fn. 281) ran NE. from the Butts* past Sherbourne House to the river.

SHERBOURNE STREET(1837) (fn. 282) runs SW. from the W. end of Spon Street* to the river.

SHORT STREET* (c. 1903) (fn. 283) was needed to serve the factories bounded by Park Side*, and to relieve the narrow and difficult exit towards London.

SHUT LANE(1589) (fn. 284) runs S. from Far Gosford Street, just E. of the former gate. The site of Shut Lane Mill is near the southern end of the lane. (fn. 285)

SILVER STREET* (1748-9) (fn. 286) was formerly part of Cook Street*.

SLEPERS LANE(1410-11) (fn. 287) ran W. from Cross Cheaping*, between West Orchard* on the N. and Daisy Lane on the S. (fn. 288)

SMITHFORD STREET* (vicus de Smythesford Smythesfordestret, between 1290 and 1300) (fn. 289) led to the ford through the River Sherbourne at Smythefford, between 1161 and 1175. (fn. 290) In 1410-11 it stretched to Smythford Bridge. (fn. 291) A bridge probably replaced the ford during the 13th century. (fn. 292) There were buildings on the bridge when it was repaired in 1469. (fn. 293) Still called Smithford Bridge in 1610, (fn. 294) it was also known as Fleet Street Bridge in 1630, and Fleet Bridge in 1636-7. (fn. 295) In 1748-9 (fn. 296) and 1807 (fn. 297) it was called Ram Bridge, probably after Ram House or Inn which was in existence in 1574 and 1650. (fn. 298) The river itself at this point was called Ram Brook in 1700. (fn. 299) Both street and bridge have ceased to exist as a result of the post-war reconstruction of the area.

SMITHS ROW(le Smethisrouwe, late 13th century) (fn. 300) has not been identified, but was perhaps the same as Ironmonger Row.

SOLIHUL LANE. See Golding Lane.

SOMERLESOW LANE. See Butts, The.

SONGSCHOOL LANE.(Songescoleslone, 1335) (fn. 301) has not been identified, but may have lain within the priory precinct. (fn. 302)

SOUTH STREET (1837) (fn. 303) runs S. from East Street to All Saints' Lane.

SOVEREIGN PLACE (1830). See Butts, The.

SPICER STOKE (1410-11) (fn. 304) was the market for fresh fish and lay along the E. side of the Great Butchery, and towards the lychgate SW. of Holy Trinity Church.

SPINNEY LANE. See Cox Street.

SPON STREET* (vicus Sponnet', Sponn', Spanne, late 12th century) (fn. 305) runs W. to Spon Bridge. In 1410-11 it stretched from Smithford Bridge to the chapel of St. Mary Magdalen (the leper hospital), at the end of the town. (fn. 306) The portion outside Spon Gate constituted the suburb of Spon, one of the four suburbs of medieval Coventry. In 1837 houses which lay on the S. side of the street before it crosses the Sherbourne were called Summer Row. (fn. 307) Spon Bridge was in existence by the late 13th century. (fn. 308) A new bridge was built in 1771 partly with stone from Spon Gate. (fn. 309)

STARLEY ROAD* (constructed after 1881). Its name commemorates James Starley, who made Coventry the centre of the cycle trade.

STONEY STANTON ROAD* (c. 1850) (fn. 310) is one of the main exits from the city, running NE. towards Bell Green, Hinckley, and Leicester. It continued as Leicester New Road in 1851. (fn. 311)

SUMMER LAND PLACE (1837). See Butts, The.

SUMMER ROW. See Spon Street.

SUMMERLANDS BUTTS LANE. See Butts, The.

SWAN STREET (1837) (fn. 312) ran S. from Leicester Street*. Now exists as entry to a car park.

SWANSWELL STREET (1837) (fn. 313) runs N. to Stoney Stanton Road on the E. side of Swanswell Pool.

SWANSWELL TERRACE. See Leicester Street.

THOMAS STREET* (c. 1832) (fn. 314) follows the line of a lane existing in 1748-9. (fn. 315) It was named after Thomas Ryley, a silk dyer, who had owned Crow Moat. (fn. 316)

TIRRYSTON LANE. See Derby Lane.

TITTLE ROW, Tuttle Row. See Ironmonger Row.

TOWER STREET(1837) (fn. 317) ran S. from Leicester Street*. Ceased to exist as a result of construction of the Inner Ring Road.

TOWN WALL, THE. See Bond Street.

TRINITY LANE* (Cuckoo Lane, 1353; (fn. 318) Trinity Lane, 1748-9). (fn. 319) In 1675 it marked the boundary between the parishes of St. Michael and Holy Trinity. (fn. 320)

TRINITY STREET* (constructed 1937). (fn. 321) The opening of this new thoroughfare involved the demolition of ancient and decayed properties in Great and Little Butcher Rows* and the Bull Ring*.

UNION PLACE (1830). See Butts, The.

UNION STREET* (constructed 1820). (fn. 322)

UNION STREET (1837) ran NE. from the Butts* towards the Sherbourne, (fn. 323) apparently following the line of a lane existing in 1748-9. (fn. 324)

UPPER WELL STREET. See Well Street.

VICAR LANE* (Vikerslone, 1335 (fn. 325) and 1410-11; (fn. 326) Houndes lone, Archdeacones lone) (fn. 327) has ceased to exist as a result of reconstruction of the area after the Second World War.

VICARS LANE. See Palmer Lane.

WALSGRAVE ROAD is one of the main exits from the city, running NE. from the end of Far Gosford Street to Stoke, Caludon, Ansty, and Hinckley. The stretch N. of Gosford Green was called Gosford Terrace in 1851. (fn. 328)

WARWICK LANE* (1548). (fn. 329)

WARWICK ROAD* is one of the main exits from the city, running SW. towards Stivichall, Kenilworth, and Warwick.

WARWICK ROW* (1830). (fn. 330)

WELL STREET* (vicus fontis, 12th century; (fn. 331) Wellestrete, 1359). (fn. 332) In 1410-11 it extended from the corner opposite St. John's Hospital to Hill Mill. (fn. 333) The family of de Fonte held a capital messuage by the well (which lay on the S. side towards the E. end of the street), several houses on the N. side, and much property in other parts of Coventry. The stretch of street running N. to Hill Cross* was known as Upper Well Street by at least 1830. (fn. 334) The course of Well Street between Chapel Street* and Upper Well Street has now ceased to exist.

WEST ORCHARD* (in vasto gardino, 13th century; (fn. 335) Westgardin, 1204; (fn. 336) le Westorchardlone, 1327). (fn. 337) A stone house, the burgage of Robert Chilton, bailiff of Coventry in the late 13th and early 14th centuries, stood on the S. side of the street, together with his bakery and a blacksmith's shop. (fn. 338) Also on the S. was the hall of the Guild of Corpus Christi and St. Nicholas, built shortly before 1410-11. (fn. 339) West Orchard Bridge was in existence by the late 13th century. (fn. 340) It was leased in 1440 to William Pere to rebuild it, (fn. 341) and eight years later an order of the leet provided for its cleansing and repair. (fn. 342) Both street and bridge have ceased to exist as a result of the reconstruction of the area after the Second World War.

WESTON STREET (1837) (fn. 343) runs E. from Swanswell Street. It was constructed about the same time as Primrose Hill Street*.

WHEATLEY STREET* (constructed after 1851) (fn. 344) was one of the streets made by the corporation on land purchased from Sir Thomas White's trustees (see Bird Street).

WHITE STREET* (constructed 1848-51) (fn. 345) was one of the streets made by the corporation on land purchased from Sir Thomas White's trustees (see Bird Street).

WHITEFRIARS LANE* (Whitefrere lane, 1544) (fn. 346) originated as the way from the friary to its outer gate.

WHITEFRIARS STREET* (southern part constructed 1820). (fn. 347) Before the construction of the street the site was occupied by an orchard; a footway called Bachelor's Walk then ran from Whitefriars Lane* to the top of Much Park Street*, (fn. 348) perhaps following the line of a lane marked in 1748-9. (fn. 349) The street was later extended to Jordan Well*.

WINDSOR STREET* (southern section by 1903-4) (fn. 350) runs SW. to the Butts*.

YARDLEY STREET (1851) (fn. 351) runs E. from Canterbury Street. It is part of the 'New Town' which began to be developed in 1828 (see Primrose Hill Street).

Footnotes

  • 1. This section was prepared by Joan C. Lancaster in 1961, and completed with amendments and additions, by Celia B. Clarke and Margaret Tomlinson in 1966.
  • 2. Bradford, Survey (1748-9).
  • 3. T. Sharp, Map of Cov. (1807).
  • 4. A. 14(b), 298.
  • 5. Leet Bk. 157.
  • 6. A. 14(s), 264.
  • 7. Cov. City Council Mins. 6 Dec. 1898.
  • 8. Map in end-folder in [A. E. Feltham] Cov. Past and Passing, reproducing O.S. Map 1/328 (1851) in C.L.
  • 9. O.S. Map 1/2,500, Warws. XXI. 12 (1889 edn.).
  • 10. Bradford, Survey.
  • 11. Official Opening of Corporation St. (1931).
  • 12. Leet Bk. 766; W. G. Fretton, Local Nomenclature, 8.
  • 13. Bradford, Survey.
  • 14. Leet Bk. 576.
  • 15. Corpn. deeds.
  • 16. Bradford, Survey.
  • 17. Leet Bk. 104.
  • 18. Corpn. deeds.
  • 19. E 164/21 ff. 31 and 165v.
  • 20. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 161.
  • 21. For evidence on the site of the castle, see p. 18.
  • 22. O.S. Map 1/2,500, Warws. XXI. 12, XXII. 9 (1889 edn.).
  • 23. Map in [A. E. Feltham] Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 24. Poole, Cov. 397-8.
  • 25. Map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 26. 8 & 9 Vic., c. 17 (priv. Act).
  • 27. Poole, Cov. 345, 397-8.
  • 28. Corpn. deeds.
  • 29. E 164/21 f. 147v.
  • 30. Cat. Anct. D. iii, A. 4311.
  • 31. J. Speed, Ground Plot of Cov. (1610).
  • 32. Bradford, Survey.
  • 33. E 164/21 ff. 149v-150.
  • 34. A. 14(t), 298.
  • 35. Bradford, Survey.
  • 36. Fretton, Local Nomenclature, 9.
  • 37. Poole, Cov. 397.
  • 38. C.L., map of Cov., 1837.
  • 39. Corpn. deeds.
  • 40. Cal. Chart. R. 1341-1417, 101.
  • 41. Poole, Cov. 345.
  • 42. Leet Bk. 233.
  • 43. O.S. Map 1/328 (1851), 22.
  • 44. Bradford, Survey.
  • 45. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 162.
  • 46. E 164/21 f. 35.
  • 47. Map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 48. Poole, Cov., map facing p. 424.
  • 49. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 162, 163.
  • 50. Leland, Itin. ed. Toulmin Smith, ii. 106.
  • 51. Corpn. deeds.
  • 52. E 164/21 f. 154v.
  • 53. Bradford, Survey.
  • 54. Leet Bk. 48. 'Somerlesow field' is referred to in the same entry.
  • 55. A. 14(a), 639.
  • 56. Leet Bk. 338.
  • 57. West, Dir. Warws. (1830), 766, 769, 771; cf. C.L., map of Cov., 1837.
  • 58. O.S. Maps 1/2,500, Warws. XXI. 12 (1889 edn.).
  • 59. Poole, Cov. 175, 397.
  • 60. Ibid.; Fretton, Local Nomenclature, 5; see p. 8.
  • 61. Leet Bk. 348.
  • 62. E 164/21 f. 185.
  • 63. White, Dir. Warws. (1850), 503.
  • 64. Lady Herbert's Garden and Homes [c. 1939].
  • 65. Poole, Cov. 237.
  • 66. C.L., map of Cov., 1837.
  • 67. Map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 68. Map of Cov., 1837.
  • 69. See p. 390.
  • 70. Map of Cov., 1837.
  • 71. Map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 72. A. 14(a), 96.
  • 73. Bradford, Survey.
  • 74. Ibid.
  • 75. Corpn. deeds.
  • 76. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 162.
  • 77. E 164/21 f. 148.
  • 78. Bradford, Survey.
  • 79. A. 14(z), 533.
  • 80. Official Opening of Corporation St. (1931).
  • 81. Speed, Ground Plot of Cov.
  • 82. Bradford, Survey.
  • 83. Leet Bk. 48.
  • 84. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 162.
  • 85. E 164/21 f. 168v.
  • 86. Corpn. deeds.
  • 87. Ibid.
  • 88. E 164/21 f. 162v.
  • 89. Speed, Ground Plot of Cov.
  • 90. Map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 91. Poole, Cov., map facing p. 424.
  • 92. Corpn. deeds.
  • 93. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 162.
  • 94. E 164/21 f. 34.
  • 95. Ibid. f. 156.
  • 96. Ibid. f. 157.
  • 97. Corpn. deeds.
  • 98. Ibid.
  • 99. Bradford, Survey.
  • 100. A. 14(a), 656.
  • 101. E 164/21 ff. 156v-157.
  • 102. Corpn. deeds; C.R.O., Cal. Gregory-Hood deeds, no. 58.
  • 103. The lane may be marked, though not named, in 1610: Speed, Ground Plot of Cov.
  • 104. O.S. Map 1/328 (1851), 12.
  • 105. O.S. Map 1/2,500, Warws. XXI. 12 (1889 and later edns.).
  • 106. Bradford, Survey.
  • 107. E 164/21 f. 173.
  • 108. Leet Bk. 50.
  • 109. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 162.
  • 110. E 164/21 ff. 157v, 159.
  • 111. Ibid. f. 146v.
  • 112. Corpn. deeds. See also Gosford Street, High Street, and Jordan Well.
  • 113. E 164/21 f. 26.
  • 114. Corpn. deeds.
  • 115. C.L., map of Cov., 1837.
  • 116. Map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 117. O.S. Map 1/2,500, SP 3379 (1961).
  • 118. Corpn. deeds.
  • 119. Ibid.
  • 120. E 164/21 ff. 160, 179v.
  • 121. E 164/21 ff. 160, 179v.
  • 122. Cal. Close, 1429-35, 308.
  • 123. E 164/21 f. 29v.
  • 124. Curtis and Beamish, Dir. Cov. (1874), 26.
  • 125. Map in Cov. Past and Passing; Poole, Cov., map facing p. 424.
  • 126. E 164/21 f. 36v.
  • 127. Poole, Cov. 345; map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 128. Bradford, Survey.
  • 129. West, Dir. Warws. (1830), 770.
  • 130. Official Opening of Corporation St. (1931).
  • 131. C.L., map of Cov., 1837.
  • 132. See p. 294; Poole, Cov. 346.
  • 133. Map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 134. Robertson and Gray, Dir. Cov. (1898), 53.
  • 135. E 164/21 ff. 37, 151.
  • 136. Corpn. deeds.
  • 137. E 164/21 ff. 25, 162v.
  • 138. C. 93.
  • 139. Cal. Fine R. 1399-1405, 26.
  • 140. E 164/21 ff. 32, 32v, 189v.
  • 141. Leet Bk. 233.
  • 142. E 164/21 f. 33.
  • 143. Ibid., ff. 31v, 159.
  • 144. Corpn. deeds; C. 7, 62, 84; C.R.O., Cal. GregoryHood deeds, nos. 45, 56.
  • 145. Corpn. deeds.
  • 146. C. 108.
  • 147. E 164/21 ff. 27v, 169v.
  • 148. Ibid., f. 28.
  • 149. Poole, Cov. 244; C.L., map of Cov., 1837.
  • 150. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 163.
  • 151. West, Dir. Warws. (1830), 773.
  • 152. O.S. Map 1/2,500, Warws. XXI. 12 (1914 edn.).
  • 153. Bradford, Survey.
  • 154. Leet Bk. 50.
  • 155. Poole, Cov. 345, 397-8.
  • 156. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 162.
  • 157. E 164/21 f. 166v.
  • 158. Corpn. deeds.
  • 159. West, Dir. Warws. (1830), 775.
  • 160. 52 Geo. III, c. 157 (priv. Act); Poole, Cov. 409.
  • 161. Corpn. deeds.
  • 162. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 163.
  • 163. E 164/21 f. 162v.
  • 164. C. 114.
  • 165. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 163.
  • 166. Corpn. deeds.
  • 167. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 163.
  • 168. Bradford, Survey.
  • 169. See p. 128.
  • 170. Corpn. deeds.
  • 171. Cat. Anct. D. iii, A. 6049.
  • 172. Ibid.
  • 173. Map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 174. O.S. Map 1/2,500, Warws. XXI. 11 (1889 edn.).
  • 175. Corpn. deeds.
  • 176. Ibid.
  • 177. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 163.
  • 178. E 164/21 ff. 33, 184v.
  • 179. Cal. Pat. 1550-3, 343.
  • 180. A. 14(c), 11.
  • 181. Bradford, Survey.
  • 182. T. Sharp, Map of Cov. (1807).
  • 183. E 164/21 f. 33.
  • 184. Poole, Cov. 345, 397-8; map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 185. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 163.
  • 186. E 164/21 f. 160.
  • 187. Leet Bk. 37.
  • 188. E 164/21 f. 164.
  • 189. A. 14(a), 410.
  • 190. Leet Bk. 788; Mun. Handbk. (1960-1), 189.
  • 191. Leet Bk. 664.
  • 192. A. 14(t), 205.
  • 193. A. 14(b), 68.
  • 194. A. 14(d), 205.
  • 195. Poole, Cov. 237.
  • 196. T. Sharp, Map of Cov. (1807).
  • 197. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 163.
  • 198. Bradford, Survey.
  • 199. Map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 200. West, Dir. Warws. (1830), 766.
  • 201. E 164/21 f. 189v.
  • 202. Ibid.
  • 203. City engineer's dept., deposited plan 5975.
  • 204. A. 14(a), 263.
  • 205. E 164/21 ff. 32v, 33, 189v.
  • 206. Corpn. deeds; C. 17, 23, 51, 76; C.R.O., Cal. Gregory-Hood deeds, no. 43; Warws. Ft. of Fines, i, p. 209.
  • 207. E 164/21 ff. 168v, 169.
  • 208. Poole, Cov. 398.
  • 209. Bradford, Survey.
  • 210. E 164/21 f. 185.
  • 211. A. 14(c), 276.
  • 212. A. 3(b), 386; Poole, Cov. 330.
  • 213. E 164/21 f. 155.
  • 214. W. G. Fretton, Local Nomenclature, 8.
  • 215. Poole, Cov. 254.
  • 216. C.R.O., Cal. Holy Trinity Church deeds, no. 72.
  • 217. Bradford, Survey.
  • 218. Speed, Ground Plot of Cov.
  • 219. E 164/21 ff. 37, 151.
  • 220. Corpn. deeds; C. 8, 43, 70, 73, 74; C.R.O., Cal. Gregory-Hood deeds, nos. 6, 28, 38.
  • 221. E 164/21 ff. 164v, 165, 190v.
  • 222. Ibid. f. 191.
  • 223. A. 14(b), 211.
  • 224. Ibid. 46.
  • 225. Ibid. 35.
  • 226. Bradford, Survey.
  • 227. T. Sharp, Map of Cov. (1807).
  • 228. Leet Bk. 5.
  • 229. E 164/21 f. 162v.
  • 230. Ibid.
  • 231. Ibid. f. 181.
  • 232. Poole, Cov. 345, 397-8; map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 233. Corpn. deeds.
  • 234. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 163.
  • 235. E 164/21 ff. 33, 160, 185.
  • 236. Ibid. f. 160.
  • 237. Ibid.
  • 238. Leet Bk. 157.
  • 239. O.S. Map 1/328 (1851), 25.
  • 240. Curtis and Beamish, Dir. Cov. (1874), 57.
  • 241. Bradford, Survey.
  • 242. O.S. Map 1/328 (1851), 12.
  • 243. C.L., map of Cov., 1837.
  • 244. E 164/21 ff. 144, 177v.
  • 245. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 163.
  • 246. Bradford, Survey.
  • 247. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 164.
  • 248. E 164/21 ff. 33, 153v, 154, 184v, 189v.
  • 249. Ibid. f. 153v.
  • 250. C.L., map of Cov., 1837.
  • 251. Poole, Cov. 397; White, Dir. Warws. (1850), 503-4.
  • 252. Poole, Cov. 397.
  • 253. White, Dir. Warws. (1850), 503-4.
  • 254. T. Sharp, Map of Cov. (1807).
  • 255. Poole, Cov. 207.
  • 256. Bradford, Survey.
  • 257. Sharp, Map of Cov. (1807).
  • 258. Poole, Cov. 171.
  • 259. Ibid. 13.
  • 260. Ibid., map facing p. 424.
  • 261. O.S. Map 1/2,500, Warws. XXI. 12 (1889 edn.).
  • 262. Corpn. deeds.
  • 263. Bradford, Survey.
  • 264. C.L., map of Cov., 1837.
  • 265. E 164/21 f. 147v.
  • 266. Map in Cov. Past and Passing; Curtis and Beamish, Dir. Cov. (1874), 63.
  • 267. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 161, 163.
  • 268. E 164/21 ff. 37v, 149v.
  • 269. Bradford, Survey.
  • 270. C.R.O., Cal. Holy Trinity Church deeds, no. 2.
  • 271. Sharp, Map of Cov. (1807).
  • 272. West, Dir. Warws. (1830), 777.
  • 273. Poole, Cov. 129.
  • 274. Corpn. deeds.
  • 275. E 164/21 ff. 39v-40.
  • 276. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 164.
  • 277. E 164/21 f. 154v.
  • 278. A. 14(a), 130.
  • 279. E 164/21 ff. 183v, 184.
  • 280. See V.C.H. Warws. ii. 319.
  • 281. C.L., map of Cov., 1837.
  • 282. C.L., Map of Cov., 1837.
  • 283. Robertson and Gray, Dir. Cov. (1903), 121.
  • 284. A. 14(a), 205.
  • 285. O.S. Map 1/2,500, SP 3478 (1961); for the mill, see pp. 191-2.
  • 286. Bradford, Survey.
  • 287. E 164/21 f. 156.
  • 288. Ibid.
  • 289. Corpn. deeds.
  • 290. Cal. Chart. R. 1341-1417, 101.
  • 291. E 164/21 f. 28v.
  • 292. Corpn. deeds.
  • 293. Leet Bk. 339.
  • 294. Speed, Ground Plot of Cov.
  • 295. A. 14(a), 587, 588, 664.
  • 296. Bradford, Survey.
  • 297. Sharp, Map of Cov. (1807).
  • 298. A. 14(a), 129; (b), 88.
  • 299. A. 14(c), 68.
  • 300. Corpn. deeds.
  • 301. Cal. Close, 1333-7, 409-11.
  • 302. E 164/21 f. 178.
  • 303. C.L., map of Cov., 1837.
  • 304. E 164/21 ff. 31v, 159.
  • 305. Corpn. deeds.
  • 306. E 164/21 f. 29v. The hospital, which has sometimes been confused with the chapel of St. James and St. Christopher by Spon Bridge, is thought to have stood near the junction of Allesley Old Rd. and Hearsall Lane: see pp. 135, 332.
  • 307. C.L., map of Cov., 1837.
  • 308. Corpn. deeds.
  • 309. L. Fox, Cov.'s Heritage, 178.
  • 310. F. B. Burbidge, Old Cov. and Lady Godiva, 205.
  • 311. O.S. Map 1/328 (1851), 3.
  • 312. Map of Cov., 1837.
  • 313. Ibid.
  • 314. Poole, Cov. 397.
  • 315. Bradford, Survey.
  • 316. Burbidge, Old Cov. and Lady Godiva, 192.
  • 317. Map of Cov., 1837.
  • 318. C.R.O., weavers' deeds 23a/4.
  • 319. Bradford, Survey.
  • 320. B.M. Harl. MS. 6839, f. 167, printed in Poole, Cov. 175-8.
  • 321. Official Opening of Trinity St. (1937).
  • 322. White, Dir. Warws. (1850), 503.
  • 323. Map of Cov., 1837.
  • 324. Bradford, Survey.
  • 325. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 164.
  • 326. E 164/21 f. 29.
  • 327. Ibid.
  • 328. Map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 329. Cal. Pat. 1547-8, 389.
  • 330. West, Dir. Warws. (1830), 765.
  • 331. Corpn. deeds.
  • 332. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 164.
  • 333. E 164/21 f. 36.
  • 334. West, Dir. Warws. (1830), 769, 779.
  • 335. Corpn. deeds.
  • 336. Warws. Ft. of Fines, i, p. 29.
  • 337. P.N. Warws. (E.P.N.S.), 164.
  • 338. E 164/21 f. 155v; corpn. deeds.
  • 339. E 164/21 f. 151v.
  • 340. Corpn. deeds.
  • 341. Leet Bk. 194.
  • 342. Ibid. 234.
  • 343. Map of Cov., 1837.
  • 344. Poole, Cov. 397-8, and map facing p. 424; map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 345. Poole, Cov. 345, 397-8; map in Cov. Past and Passing.
  • 346. Leet Bk. 770.
  • 347. White, Dir. Warws. (1850), 503.
  • 348. Burbidge, Old Cov. and Lady Godiva, 197.
  • 349. Bradford, Survey.
  • 350. O.S. Map 1/2,500, Warws. XXI. 11 (1906 edn.).
  • 351. O.S. Map 1/328 (1851), 6.