BHO

Schools and colleges

Pages 440-460

A History of the County of York: the City of York. Originally published by Victoria County History, London, 1961.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:

Table of contents

SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

Acomb County Primary Schools.

Acomb and Knapton Board School was opened in August 1894 in a new building in Front Street. (fn. 1) There was accommodation for 280 in the mixed department and 250 in the infant department. (fn. 2) In 1897 the average attendance was 274. (fn. 3) The average attendance in 1910 was 229 in the mixed department and 142 in the infants'; (fn. 4) in 1932 there were 220 and 112 in these departments respectively. (fn. 5) The school was transferred from the West Riding to the York education authority in April 1937. Accommodation for 50 children in a new classroom was added in 1940. (fn. 6) The senior department was moved to a new school in Gale Lane in 1954. There were two schools at Front Street in 1956: junior mixed with 330 and infants with 180 children enrolled. (fn. 7)

Acomb County Secondary Modern School.

This mixed school was opened in Gale Lane in September 1954. The senior department of the Acomb Board School in Front Street was transferred to the new building. There were 470 children enrolled in the school in 1956. (fn. 8)

Acomb Voluntary Primary School.

Acomb Church School was opened in January 1856 in a building close to St. Stephen's Church on The Green which was the property of John Barlow and which it occupied rent free. It probably replaced a parochial school opened in 1816 or 1817. (fn. 9) There were said to be 34 boys and 31 girls attending in 1859; there was one schoolroom and an uncertificated master and a mistress. The fee was 2d. but if more than two of the same family attended it was 1½d. (fn. 10) The remainder of the school income was subscribed voluntarily until 1859 when the first annual government grant was received. (fn. 11) An income of £5 from Lady Hewley's charity (fn. 12) was probably received by the school until 1882 when the money was applied to a different purpose. By a trust deed of 1874 half the interest on £300, 4 per cent. stock, amounting to £6 a year and known as Mrs. Harriet Percival's charity, was received towards the expenses of the school. (fn. 13)

The average attendance was 318 in 1894 and 150 in 1910. (fn. 14) There were two departments in the school in 1938, mixed and infants; 86 children were enrolled. (fn. 15) After 1948 the school became a voluntary aided primary school; 140 children were enrolled in 1956. (fn. 16)

Albion Street Wesleyan School.

This boys' school was opened in 1840 in a Sunday school attached to Albion Chapel, Skeldergate, (fn. 17) which was rented from the chapel trustees. (fn. 18) In 1847 the average attendance was 132; there was a master with 3 apprentices. (fn. 19) An annual government grant was first received in that year. (fn. 20) An inspector's report of 1848 stated that this was 'an admirable school in a very confined schoolroom, which is somewhat relieved, however, by a classroom overhead. . . . The class of children is somewhat above that which is commonly found in the primary school, and the "little ones" are few in proportion to the rest.' (fn. 21) Fees were from 3d. to 9d. in 1848. The curriculum included geography, English grammar, and history, 'sacred and secular'. (fn. 22) In 1850 there were 200 boys in the school (fn. 23) but attendance declined after that date. (fn. 24) In 1853 it was reported that the school fittings and course of instruction were to be altered to the Westminster model. (fn. 25) In 1858 the school was closed and the children moved to new buildings attached to Priory Place chapel. (fn. 26)

Aldwark National School.

This school, the first of its kind in York for girls, was opened in the Merchant Tailors' Hall in 1813. (fn. 27) The premises were leased from the company. (fn. 28) In 1819 the average attendance was said to be 233. (fn. 29) Fees were 1s. a quarter. In 1835 'English grammar, history, geography, the elements of general history and mensuration' were advertised at an extra charge of 3s. a quarter. (fn. 30) Between 1846 and 1847 the average attendance was 120 girls and, in the infant school, 52 boys and 53 girls. There was then a mistress aided by 10 monitors. (fn. 31) In 1848 a report stated that there were 'six classes of girls under untrained mistresses, in very poor order and making little progress'. (fn. 32) The infants' class was held in a separate room. (fn. 33) An annual government grant was first received in 1854. (fn. 34) There were said to be 188 girls attending in 1873 when the school was closed; (fn. 35) the pupils appear to have been moved to the new Bedern school. (fn. 36)

All Saints and St. Peter-the-Little National School.

This school (sometimes known as Peter Lane School) was opened in 1862 in leasehold property and was managed by the Dean of York and the rector of the parish. There was accommodation for boys, girls, and infants in the same building and the fees were 2d. and 3d. The income from fees was augmented by voluntary contributions and £2 from a parochial charity. In 1862 there were said to be 45 girls and 45 boys in attendance. (fn. 37) An annual government grant was received from 1865 until 1872 when the school was removed from inspection. (fn. 38) In 1878 the school was said to be private, maintained by the parishes and managed by the rector. (fn. 39) In 1880 it was reported that the rector had in the past virtually provided for the school and would continue to do so: hence it is sometimes referred to as 'Canon Raine's School' in reference to the then incumbent of All Saints, Pavement. (fn. 40) The school was condemned in 1887 when it was described as the last remaining elementary school in the centre of the city; it was closed before 1890 and the buildings later demolished. (fn. 41)

Archbishop Holgate's School. (fn. 42)

In 1899 140 boys were attending Archbishop Holgate's School. Extensions to the accommodation were made in 1904 and in 1913 new classrooms and a laboratory were added. The premises of Brook Street School were taken over in 1945. The school was given a direct grant up to 1944: the governors then removed it from the list and until 1949 it functioned as an independent school. At that date it became a controlled voluntary secondary grammar school for boarding and day pupils. About 520 boys were attending in 1955. (fn. 43)

Avenue Schools see Tang Hall Schools.

Bar Convent Grammar School.

A boarding school for Roman Catholic girls was opened in 1686 in the Convent of St. Mary, later known as the Bar Convent, in Blossom Street outside Micklegate Bar. This house was founded by the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary for the education of Roman Catholic girls and was the first Roman Catholic institution for teaching girls in the country. The foundress of the convent bequeathed to the school money 'for the maintenance of those who shall employ their labour and pains in breeding up children in piety and learning' in the houses of the Institute at York and Hammersmith. A day school was opened in the convent about 1699. (fn. 44)

Drake described the convent in 1736 as 'no more than a boarding school for young ladies of Roman Catholic families'. (fn. 45) There were said to be between 60 and 70 pupils in the boarding school in 1818, some of whom had been sent from a 'considerable distance' for their education; the day school was described as free for the children of poor Roman Catholics. (fn. 46) There were said to be 50 children in each of the schools in 1833. (fn. 47) The day school was transferred to St. Mary's Girls' School in 1844. (fn. 48)

In 1870 there were 48 girls enrolled in the school some of whom were probably boarders; 20 infants were given preparatory education. (fn. 49) In 1929 the school was recognized for direct grant; at this time about half the pupils were boarders. The school infirmary was destroyed by enemy action in 1942. After the Second World War the accommodation was doubled by the addition of 7 classrooms, a laboratory, a needlework room, and a dining-room. (fn. 50) In 1954 there were 321 girls enrolled in the school and 16 boys in the preparatory department. (fn. 51) There were 4 girls boarding in the school in 1957. (fn. 52)

Beckfield County Secondary Modern School.

This mixed school was opened in Beckfield Lane in September 1948. It replaced the senior department of Poppleton Road School which had been transferred to Scarcroft Road School in 1942. There were 560 children enrolled in 1956. (fn. 53)

Bedern Catholic School see St. Wilfrid's Schools.

Bedern National School.

This school for boys, girls, and infants was built between 1872 and 1873 by the York National School Society with aid from the state and the central funds of the National Society. The site, at the corner of Bedern and St. Andrewgate, was given by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. (fn. 54) The boys' school was opened in August 1873 and the girls' and infants' departments three months later. There was accommodation for 570 in 3 schoolrooms and 3 classrooms. The attendance in 1873 was 325; fees were 1d. to 4d. for boys, 2d. to 6d. for girls, and 1d. to 2d. for infants. (fn. 55) The school first received an annual government grant in 1880. (fn. 56) The accommodation had been increased to 608 by 1897; the average attendance was then 544. (fn. 57) In 1913 the infants' department was closed and the school reorganized to accommodate 407 pupils; alterations to the buildings were made after 1914 with the aid of a grant from the National Society. (fn. 58) The average attendance decreased from 332 in 1919 to 107 in 1938. From 1932 there were junior mixed and infants' departments only. (fn. 59) The school was requisitioned for military purposes in 1939 and closed in 1940. The building still stands and is used for commercial purposes. (fn. 60)

Bilton Street Voluntary Primary School.

St. Cuthbert's or Bilton Street School, Layerthorpe, was built in the autumn of 1831 and opened the following April. There were a schoolroom and a classroom with accommodation for 150 boys. The premises belonged to Revd. Jocelyn Willey who provided financial support for the school. (fn. 61) In 1836 there were 220 boys aged 5 to 15 years attending. (fn. 62) In 1838 the school was described as Lancasterian. (fn. 63) The first annual government grant was received in 1849. (fn. 64) By 1850 there were 166 children in average attendance of whom one-third were under 7 years; there were 8 classes taught on the monitorial system. The school was then said to be arranged on the British and Foreign plan. (fn. 65) A school for girls, which was probably chiefly a Sunday school at first, (fn. 66) was opened by Mrs. Willey in 1826 (fn. 67) in a building on the east side of Layerthorpe (the street of that name). (fn. 68) A department for girls and infants, which probably replaced the Layerthorpe School, was opened in 1859 in Redeness Street close to the boys' school and under the same management. There were a schoolroom and a classroom. (fn. 69) By 1863 the school was in union with the National Society. Jocelyn Willey retained his interest in the school until his death in 1863 and subsequently Lady Wheler, his relict, endowed the school with an annual sum of £25. (fn. 70) There was an average attendance of 117 in the boys' department and 25 boys and 49 girls in the girls' and infants' department in 1870. (fn. 71) By 1887 the total accommodation had been increased to 488 places. (fn. 72) In 1913 the infants were moved to the new Layerthorpe School and there were then boys', girls', and junior mixed departments at Bilton Street with an average attendance of 354. (fn. 73) By 1932 the school had been reorganized to accommodate junior mixed and infants' departments only and the numbers declined to 77 children in 1938. (fn. 74) The school became a voluntary aided infants' school after 1950 and was closed in 1956. (fn. 75)

Bishopgate Street Church School.

This school for girls and infants was opened in June 1851 in a building next to the Navigation Tavern leased from the York Church Sunday School Committee. (fn. 76) In 1852 there were 80 girls in 5 classes taught by a certificated mistress and pupil teachers; 110 infants in 6 classes were taught by an untrained assistant. Fees were 1s. a quarter for the girls. (fn. 77) In 1852 there were 2 schoolrooms; a classroom was added with the aid of a government grant in 1855. (fn. 78) An annuity of £72 left by Dr. Stephen Beckwith, a York physician, supplemented the income from subscriptions and fees. (fn. 79) The school first received an annual government grant in 1854. The attendance decreased from 188 in 1867 to 116 in 1876 and the school closed in the following year. (fn. 80)

Bishophill British Girls' School.

A British school for girls was opened in 1813. (fn. 81) in a room in the upper floor of a house in Newgate the remainder of which was said to be used as a slaughterhouse; 100 children were said to be attending. (fn. 82) The school was moved in 1816 to a room in St. Saviourgate and the attendance rose in the following years from 109 to 120. In 1818 the school was supported by subscriptions, chiefly from Friends in York, and by fees which were 1d. a week. The school was organized on the Lancasterian system; scripture history was taught. (fn. 83) In 1829 a school to accommodate 150 girls was built on unused land in the Friends' Bishophill burial ground; the girls from St. Saviourgate moved to this new school and it was henceforth known as the Bishophill British School. The premises cost £485, a sum defrayed by the sale of the St. Saviourgate building and by a loan from the York Preparative Meeting. The building was leased from the Preparative Meeting by the subscribers until 1850 when it was purchased for £87 10s. (fn. 84) In 1833 190 girls were attending; fees were 1d. and 3d. (fn. 85) In 1854, when the ground was closed for burials, extensive alterations were made to the school; (fn. 86) there were then 124 girls on the register and the average attendance was 73. (fn. 87) The first annual government grant was received in the same year. (fn. 88) The attendance increased to 181 in 1887, (fn. 89) but declined subsequently and the school was closed in June 1896. (fn. 90)

Bishopthorpe Church School see St. Clement's School.

Blue Coat School.

This charity school was opened in 1705 in St. Anthony's Hall which was provided and furnished for the purpose by the corporation. A subscription fund was opened to provide for the annual expenses; the archbishop and the chapter were also concerned in the foundation. In 1707 the income from subscriptions was said to be £200. Subsequently several endowments were received. (fn. 91) The school was managed by a committee appointed from the subscribers. (fn. 92) There was boarding accommodation for 40 boys between the ages of 7 and 12 years who were either orphans or the children of poor freemen with large families. They were taught reading, writing, and the rudiments of arithmetic and were instructed in the catechism. Each boy received clothing annually; the coats were of blue cloth faced with yellow. No children but those provided for by the charity were to be admitted to the school. (fn. 93) In 1764 there were said to be 45 boys and 2 girls (who did domestic work) in the school; besides attending to their lessons they were employed in spinning wool. (fn. 94) There were 56 boys and 3 girls in 1819; there had been 70 boys until the previous year. The master's salary was then £42, the assistant's £38; the income was £1,100 derived from lands and property; subscriptions were also received. (fn. 95) There were 64 boys between 9 and 14 years in the school in 1833. (fn. 96) The number of boys increased to 70 in 1850 after the receipt of a bequest from Dr. Stephen Beckwith of £2,000. (fn. 97)

In 1914 new classrooms, an isolation hospital, and gymnasiums were built at a cost of £1,200. There were 60 boys in the school in 1922. (fn. 98) Teaching accommodation for the girls from the Grey Coat School was provided from 1929. A new playing field and pavilion were opened in 1938. The school was closed in 1946 and the boys sent to other schools in the city. (fn. 99)

Bootham School.

York Quarterly Meeting School was opened as a private boarding school in 1822 in a house in Lawrence Street outside Walmgate Bar by a Friend, William Simpson, with the encouragement of York Friends, notably William Tuke. The premises, which were leased from the trustees of The Retreat, were purchased by the York Q.M. in the following year and in 1829 a committee of the Q.M. took over the management of the school. (fn. 100) There were 50 boys attending the school in 1833. (fn. 101) The school's natural history society was founded in August 1834 and is claimed to be the first of its kind in the country. (fn. 102) The school was moved in 1846 to the nucleus of its present site, No. 20 Bootham. An observatory was added in 1850, new classrooms in 1858, and warm baths in 1860. (fn. 103) In 1865 there were 56 boarders and a staff of 5; the average fee was £63. H.M. Inspector reported at that time that 'the provision made for the systematic study of Natural Science is more ample than in any school I have visited'. (fn. 104) Additions to the accommodation were made in 1871, 1879, and in 1882 when No. 49 Bootham was taken over for use as a headmaster's house and dormitories. Most of the schoolrooms were destroyed by fire in 1899 and were rebuilt and opened in 1902. (fn. 105) There were said to be 90 pupils in 1915. Further accommodation was provided in 1920 at No. 38 St. Mary's and No. 57 Bootham. The numbers increased to 153 in 1930 and 240 in 1956 when all, except 7 boys elected by the City of York, were boarders. (fn. 106)

Brook Street Board School see Groves Wesleyan School.

Building School see Technical College.

Burdyke County Primary School.

This infants' school in Kingsway North, Water Lane estate, was opened in September 1954. There were 55 children enrolled in 1956. (fn. 107)

Burnholme County Secondary Modern School.

This mixed school was opened in Bad Bargain Lane in September 1948. The children attending the senior department of Tang Hall school were transferred to the new building. There were 560 children enrolled in 1956. (fn. 108)

Burton Stone Lane County Secondary Modern School.

This girls' school, sometimes known as Water Lane School, was under construction in 1939 in Evelyn Crescent on the Water Lane estate. The building was continued slowly and completed in a modified form for opening in October 1942. The senior girls' department from Shipton Street School was transferred and formed the nucleus of the school. (fn. 109) There was accommodation for 320 girls, and in 1943 104 were enrolled. (fn. 110) The building was completed in 1945. There were 560 girls enrolled in 1956. (fn. 111)

Burton Stone Lane School see Clifton Voluntary School.

Canon Raine's School see All Saints' School.

Carr County Primary Schools.

An infants' school in Ostmann Road, Beckfield Lane estate, was opened in September 1948. Carr Junior School was opened on an adjacent site in May 1950. There were 260 children enrolled in the infants' school and 560 in the junior school in 1956. (fn. 112)

Castlegate Catholic School.

A Roman Catholic school, sometimes called a 'charity' school, was opened in Castlegate at least by 1814. (fn. 113) In 1819 there were said to be over 40 children attending and in 1823 60 boys were taught gratuitously. (fn. 114) In 1833 an endowed Roman Catholic school, presumably the same one, is mentioned in the same parish in which 90 boys were taught and where the fee was 1d. (fn. 115) The school appears to have been closed before 1845. (fn. 116)

Castlegate Girls' and Infants' School.

Castlegate Council School was opened in January 1913 in the premises of the former Castlegate Higher Grade School which were purchased by the corporation for £10,000. Accommodation was provided for 530 girls and infants; the infant department of Bedern School was transferred to Castlegate. (fn. 117) In 1913 278 girls and 252 infants were enrolled. (fn. 118) The school was reorganized and in 1932 there were junior mixed and infant departments only. There were 136 children enrolled in these two departments in 1938. (fn. 119) The school was closed in 1954 when the children were transferred to Fishergate and other city schools. (fn. 120) The building was acquired by the Technical College. (fn. 121)

Castlegate Higher Grade School.

This Church school for girls was opened in 1890 in a building erected by the Church Extension Association whose offer to supply a deficiency in school accommodation was accepted by the School Board in 1889. There were 2 girls' schoolrooms, 2 for infants, and 8 classrooms which provided 720 places. The curriculum included instrumental music, domestic economy, cooking, and book-keeping. The school was managed and staffed by the community of the Sisters of the Church who were closely linked with the Extension Association. In 1891 102 girls and 83 infants were attending and were taught by 2 mistresses and 2 assistants. Fees were 9d. for girls and 6d. for infants. (fn. 122) The first annual government grant was received in 1892. (fn. 123) In 1897 there were 107 children in the school. (fn. 124) In 1905 the managers withdrew the school from the jurisdiction of the Board of Education and the York authority. The school was closed in July of that year; the 248 children attending were accommodated in other schools. The removal of railway workers and their families to Darlington is said to have compensated for the decrease in school places. (fn. 125) The school was reopened in the September of 1905 as St. Margaret's Girls' School. (fn. 126)

Clifton Voluntary Primary School.

Clifton National School for girls and infants, sometimes known as Burton Stone Lane School, was opened in 1841 in a building erected with a government grant and with some aid from the National Society, on a site conveyed by deed in 1840. There were a schoolroom and a classroom with accommodation for 66 girls. (fn. 127) The average attendance was 36 in 1851. (fn. 128) In 1874 the fees were 3d. for girls and 2d. for infants; there were 26 girls and 35 infants enrolled. (fn. 129) In 1878 the girls were transferred to the new Clifton girls' school and Burton Lane continued as an infants' school. (fn. 130) The schools received their first annual government grant in 1880. (fn. 131) In 1881 the average attendance at the infants' school was 59. (fn. 132) It was closed by 1892 and the building has since been demolished. (fn. 133)

The girls' school opened in 1878 was in a new building adjacent to the Church of St. Philip and St. James. (fn. 134) There was said to be accommodation for 128 girls in 1882; the average attendance was then 93. (fn. 135) The fee was 1d. in 1891. (fn. 136) The infants from Burton Lane were moved to the new school in 1892. (fn. 137) Endowments arising from the Salmond bequest and from the value of the former school building were regulated by a charity scheme of 1896. (fn. 138) The average attendance was 65 in 1910. (fn. 139) In 1914 additional accommodation for the infants was obtained in the parochial hall in Water Lane and the school itself was used for girls only. (fn. 140) Before 1932 the school was reorganized to provide infant accommodation only. (fn. 141) The school became a controlled voluntary primary school in 1950; there were 60 infants enrolled in 1956. (fn. 142)

Commercial School see Technical College.

Danesmead County Secondary Modern School.

This mixed school was opened at Fulford Cross in May 1954. The school replaced the senior department of Fishergate School. There were 480 children enrolled in 1956. (fn. 143)

Derwent County Primary Schools.

Derwent Temporary Junior School, Flaxman Avenue, Tang Hall, was taken into the York education authority's area from the North Riding in 1936. There was accommodation for 300 juniors and infants; 238 children were enrolled. (fn. 144) This school was replaced by Derwent Junior Schools, Osbaldwick Lane, which opened in July 1938. There was accommodation for 450 children. (fn. 145) In 1956 there were two schools with 380 children enrolled in the junior department and 190 in the infants'. (fn. 146)

Dodsworth's Schools.

Between 1798 and 1803 three schools were founded in York by John Dodsworth (d. 1813), a York ironmonger, who had a warehouse in North Street and a house at Nether Poppleton (W.R.). The York foundations, together with another at Poppleton, were subsequently known as the Dodsworth Schools. (fn. 147)

The schoolhouse on the north side of Lawrence Street, outside Walmgate Bar, is said to have been erected by Dodsworth in 1798. (fn. 148) By deed of 1799 it was conveyed in trust, part as a schoolroom for boys and girls and part for the teacher's appartments. By deed of 1800 the school was endowed with £200 stock for teaching 20 poor children to read and write. The school was to be managed and the master appointed by the York Sunday School Committee. The pupils were to be chosen by a vestry meeting of 5 persons from each of the parishes of St. Lawrence, St. Peter-le-Willows with St. Margaret and St. Denys. (fn. 149) There were said to be 20 children in the school in 1819; the master's salary was £10. (fn. 150) The interest on the endowment had fallen in value by 1833 and the master's salary was then £7 7s.; the charity children were then paying 6d. a quarter, —a fee that had been introduced without the committee's authority. There were 20 other children in the school in that year. (fn. 151) The school was closed before 1865 and the income used to pay the fees of children attending National schools. By a scheme of the Charity Commissioners of 1896 the use of the endowment was altered: it was joined with Dodsworth's other endowments and was subsequently known as the Educational Charity of John Dodsworth. The income from the endowment in St. Lawrence's parish was used for exhibitions tenable in secondary schools by children chosen from the four parishes to which the original charity was limited. (fn. 152) The school building was sold in 1888; (fn. 153) in 1956 it was occupied as business premises.

The Dodsworth school in the parish of St. Mary, Castlegate, was founded and endowed under the same deeds as that in St. Lawrence's parish. The schoolhouse was situated in an alley on the south side of Far Water Lane (or Friargate) close to the river; there were a schoolroom on the ground floor, a teacher's room above, and a small garden. (fn. 154) The endowment was identical with that of the Lawrence Street School and managed by the Sunday School Committee. The 20 pupils were to be chosen from the parishes of St. Mary, Castlegate, St. Michael, Spurriergate, and All Saints, Pavement. (fn. 155) There were said to be 20 boys attending in 1819. (fn. 156) Reading and writing were taught free of charge but a 'moderate quarterage' was paid for arithmetic. (fn. 157) There were 30 children attending in 1833. (fn. 158) The school was closed before 1865 when the income was used in the same way as that for Lawrence Street School, the exhibitions being tenable by children from the three parishes to which the original charity applied. (fn. 159) The site of the school was later built over.

The Dodsworth school in the parish of St. Mary, Bishophill, Junior, adjacent to the church, was opened in 1803. (fn. 160) By Dodsworth's will, dated 1811, the schoolhouse was left in trust and endowed with £200 for the education of 20 boys, 4 each from St. Mary, Bishophill, Junior and Senior, 4 from St. John, Ouse Bridge End, 3 each from All Saints, North Street, and Holy Trinity, Micklegate, and 2 from St. Martin-cum-Gregory parishes. The school was to be managed in the same way as the other Dodsworth schools. (fn. 161) There were said to be 20 children in the school in 1819; the teacher's salary was £10. (fn. 162) In 1825 the curriculum was the same as that of the Water Lane School. (fn. 163) There were 38 boys in the school in 1833. (fn. 164) The school was described as 'a dame school of the lowest order' in 1865; it was then the only Dodsworth school in York still open. (fn. 165) It was apparently closed before 1870. (fn. 166) The endowment was altered by the scheme of 1896, to provide exhibitions for children from the six parishes south of the river for which the original charity was provided. (fn. 167) The building was used as a dwelling house in 1956; it bore the inscription 'School House 1803'.

Dringhouses County Primary Schools.

St. Edward's National School, Dringhouses, was opened in 1849, in a schoolroom, adjacent to the church, which was the property of Mrs. Trafford Leigh. The room was used rent free and deficiencies in income were supplied by the benefactress. (fn. 168) There were said to be 54 children attending in 1852. (fn. 169) In 1853 a new school, on a site adjacent to The Fox public house on the east side of the Tadcaster Road, was erected by Mrs. Leigh, from whom it was rented by the managers. (fn. 170) The first annual government grant was received in 1854. (fn. 171) There were said to be 108 children attending in 1897. (fn. 172) In 1901 Dringhouses School Board was formed by order of the Board of Education and in the same year the management of the school had been taken over by the Board. The infants' school was then removed to temporary buildings to relieve the overcrowding in the school. (fn. 173) In 1904 the school was transferred to new buildings provided by the local authority (Yorks. W.R. 9th district) on a site at the end of Mayfield Grove. There was accommodation for 120 in the mixed school and 100 in the infants' school. (fn. 174) In 1910 the average attendance was 102 and 50 children respectively. (fn. 175) It was then said that gardening had been introduced and that the children tended plots adjacent to the school. In 1923 when the infants' school headmistress retired, the school was amalgamated with the mixed school. In 1937 when the school was transferred to the York education authority there were 153 children enrolled; in 1939 there were 17 children above 11 years of age and arrangements were being made to transfer these to senior schools. (fn. 176) After 1949 the school was described as a county primary school; 230 children were enrolled in 1956. The former school building on the east of the Tadcaster Road was then used as a branch public library. (fn. 177)

Elmfield College.

This school was established in Elmfield Villa on the east side of Malton Road in 1864 as a Primitive Methodist boarding school. There were 92 boarders, 8 day pupils, and a staff of 6, with 3 part-time assistants in 1865. The average fee for boarders was £31. (fn. 178) The school was enlarged in that year and 15 students for the ministry were admitted. There were 61 boys enrolled in 1905. In the following year the school was closed by the trustees for the Connexion, because of financial difficulties, but was reopened in 1907 when a company was formed to support it. A laboratory, workshop, and classroom costing £1,500 were added in 1909. (fn. 179) There were said to be over 100 boys, half of whom were boarders, enrolled in 1932, when the school was closed. (fn. 180) The buildings were subsequently demolished.

English Martyrs' Voluntary Primary School.

The English Martyrs' Roman Catholic School was opened in March 1882, in buildings probably in Blossom Street, belonging to St. Mary's Convent. There was a mixed department accommodated in 2 rooms and an infants' department under separate management at St. Mary's Convent. (fn. 181) There were 58 children in average attendance in 1883. (fn. 182) The school moved to new buildings at 17 Blossom Street in 1884; (fn. 183) there was said to be accommodation for 290 children in 1887. (fn. 184) There were 129 children attending the mixed department and 52 the infants' department in 1910. (fn. 185) After reorganization into a junior and infants' school there were in 1932 134 children enrolled. (fn. 186) In 1949 the school became an aided primary school. There were 320 children enrolled in 1956. (fn. 187)

Female Practising School.

A practising school for the Diocesan Training College for Schoolmistresses in Monkgate, was opened in the college premises in 1850. (fn. 188) The average attendance in 1852 was 70 girls. Fees were paid but the school was mainly supported by the Diocesan Training School authorities. (fn. 189) The equipment was said to be deficient in 1852. (fn. 190) The first annual government grant was received in 1854. (fn. 191) The school was closed when the college moved to Ripon in 1862. (fn. 192)

Fishergate County Primary Schools.

Fishergate Board School was opened in new buildings in August 1895; it replaced George Street Temporary Board School. There were mixed and infants' departments; the total accommodation was for 1,156 children. There were 980 children attending the school in 1897. (fn. 193) In 1910 there were three departments: senior mixed with 581 children attending, junior mixed with 123, and infants' with 280. Accommodation for 100 children was added to the junior school in 1930. (fn. 194) There were senior mixed and infants' departments only in 1932, with accommodation for 700 and 402 children respectively. By 1936 the infants' department had been replaced by a junior mixed school. (fn. 195) The senior department was closed in 1954. There were 370 children enrolled in the junior school and 170 in the infants' school in 1956. (fn. 196)

Fulford Road Special Schools.

An open-air class was started at 11 Castlegate, in the same building as the Tuberculosis Dispensary, in 1913. Classes were held in a garden adjacent to the premises. There were 39 children enrolled in 1919. (fn. 197) In 1920 the school was removed to a converted army hut in the grounds of Fulford House and became known as Fulford Road School for Delicate and PartiallySighted Children. After an increase in accommodation in 1925 there was provision for 116 children. (fn. 198) There were 108 children enrolled in 1956. (fn. 199)

The Holgate Bridge School for mentally defective boys was opened in 1911 on a temporary basis, with accommodation for 70 boys. (fn. 200) This school was moved to Fulford House, later known as Fulford Road School for Educationally Sub-Normal Children, in 1923. There was residential accommodation for 62 boys and 41 girls. (fn. 201) In 1956 there were 99 children enrolled. (fn. 202)

George Street Board School see Fishergate Schools.

Glen School see Tang Hall Schools.

Green Coat School see Wilson's Boys' School.

Grey Coat School.

This girls' charity school was opened in a house in Marygate, on the west side of the lane leading to Almery Garth, in 1705. A Mrs. Frances Thornhill and Mrs. Sharpe, wife of the archbishop, were among the principal subscribers. The school was managed in the same way as the Blue Coat School; the girls were fed, clothed, and prepared for domestic service. There was accommodation for 40 girls. (fn. 203) There were said to be 30 girls in the school in 1764. (fn. 204) The premises in Marygate were found to be unsuitable by 1784 and a new school was built on the present site in Monkgate. This building was said to contain spinning and sewing rooms on the ground floor with a large lodging chamber above. (fn. 205) The school was reorganized between 1786 and 1787 by Mrs. Catharine Cappe and others: wool spinning was introduced; all the girls were to be given a thorough instruction in household duties; the practice of apprenticing the girls was stopped; they were not to be boarded with the matron; and they were to be provided with clothes on going out to service. (fn. 206) In 1819 there were 42 girls in the school and 2 mistresses 'with £40 between them'. (fn. 207) There were 43 girls in 1833. (fn. 208) The Grey Coat School benefited by Dr. Beckwith's will (fn. 209) and the number of girls was increased to 44 in 1850. This number was also in attendance in 1893 but declined to 35 in 1934 and 19 in 1953. (fn. 210) From 1929, if not before, the girls attended the Blue Coat School for their education. They were still accommodated in the Monkgate building in 1956, but attended local authority schools.

Groves Church School see St. Thomas's School.

Groves Wesleyan School.

This school was opened in 1869 in the Brook Street school-chapel, erected in the previous year at a cost of £2,435. (fn. 211) The school accommodated boys, girls, and infants in a school room and 3 classrooms. In 1869 there were 120 boys and 80 girls on the roll and an average attendance of 150. Fees were from 2d. to 6d. (fn. 212) The first annual government grant was received in 1870. (fn. 213) By 1877 there were 289 pupils attending and this number increased to 586 in 1887 when there was said to be accommodation for 763. (fn. 214) In 1893 the Wesleyan Managers closed the school. The premises were immediately leased from the Wesleyan trustees by the School Board as Brook Street Temporary Board School until Park Grove School was completed in 1895. The staff of teachers was retained. (fn. 215) The building was reopened in 1899 by the School Board as a temporary school to relieve the overcrowding in the lower standards of Park Grove Board School, until the new Haxby Road School should be completed. The school was leased from the Wesleyan trustees. (fn. 216) In 1900 there was said to be accommodation for 579 children. (fn. 217) Haxby Road Board School was opened in 1904, and it appears that Brook Street School was then closed. (fn. 218) The school was later used as a temporary pupil-teacher centre and from 1906 as a temporary secondary school for girls. (fn. 219) In 1912 it was once again opened to accommodate the boys' department of Shipton Street Council School. It was finally closed in 1915. (fn. 220) The building was sold to Archbishop Holgate's School in 1944 and was still used by that school in 1957. (fn. 221)

Haughton's School.

This school was founded by William Haughton, who left by will, proved 1773, an endowment of £1,300 to pay for a master to educate 20 poor children of St. Crux parish. (fn. 222) The school master's salary in 1819 was £180; 20 children were attending the school. (fn. 223) In 1824 there were said to be '28 or 30 poor boys taught by the rector, English, writing, and arithmetic free, and such whose parents desire it and are properly qualified, Latin'. The school then appears to have used a schoolroom belonging to St. Crux parish in Whipmawhopmagate; the master was the rector of the parish. (fn. 224) Later the school used a house in Fossgate. (fn. 225) In 1838 the school was reorganized and a new master appointed to 'provide at his own cost a suitable schoolroom with proper furniture', and to 'receive all children of the parish brought to him, not exceeding 40 ... and not to accept any paying scholars'. (fn. 226) The school was at 58 Fossgate in 1851. (fn. 227) In 1864 there were said to be 34 boys attending in a small room rented by the master; the furniture and school apparatus were poor, and the standard of instruction lower than that in other parochial schools in the city. (fn. 228) In 1872 the school was still in Fossgate. Three years later it was occupying premises formerly a warehouse in St. Crux parish, which had been altered for school purposes; it was then described as an endowed free elementary school. (fn. 229) In 1897 the school was held in St. Andrew's Hall, Spen Lane, but had moved by 1901 to a house in St. Saviourgate, adjacent to Lady Hewley's Chapel. (fn. 230) The school remained in these premises as a day and boarding establishment for fee-paying pupils, but governed by the trustees of the charity and receiving an income from the endowment until 1947. Subsequently it was a private school but children entitled to benefit from the endowment are said to have continued to attend. The school closed in 1956 and the premises were subsequently used as a warehouse. (fn. 231)

Haxby Road County Primary Schools.

Haxby Road Council School was opened in 1904 in a new building. There were mixed and infants' departments. (fn. 232) The cost was £19,115. (fn. 233) In 1907 the accommodation was said to be for 1,156 children, there were then 956 children enrolled. (fn. 234) There were senior mixed, junior mixed, and infants' departments in 1910. (fn. 235) The senior mixed department closed before 1932; there were then 317 enrolled in the junior mixed and 130 in the infants' departments. (fn. 236) The organization of these schools was unchanged in 1956, when there were 310 in the junior and 190 in the infants' school. (fn. 237)

Heworth Voluntary Primary School.

Heworth Church School, Heworth Road, (fn. 238) opened in 1873 in a building erected with the aid of a government grant. Boys, girls, and infants were accommodated in 2 schoolrooms and a classroom. The fees were 2d. and 3d. for boys, 2d., 3d., and 4d. for girls and 1d. and 2d. for infants. There were 2 mistresses. (fn. 239) In 1877 the average attendance was 140. (fn. 240) In 1897 when the first annual government grant was received the school had accommodation for 314 children and the average attendance was 183. (fn. 241) In 1910 there were 2 departments, mixed and infants; after reorganization in 1932 there were junior mixed and infants' departments in which the average attendance was 187 in 1938. (fn. 242) The school continued as a voluntary aided junior and infant school after 1950; 90 children were enrolled after 1956. (fn. 243)

Hob Moor County Primary Schools.

An infants' school was opened in Green Lane, Acomb, in 1954. In 1955 a junior school was opened on an adjacent site. There were 270 children enrolled in each of these schools in 1956. (fn. 244)

Hope Street British School.

This boys' school was opened 1827-8 in a new building erected by subscribers many of whom were Friends. (fn. 245) The buildings were later bought by York Preparative Meeting. (fn. 246) In 1833 there were said to be 226 boys on the register and the school was said to be Lancasterian; it was supported by subscriptions and fees. (fn. 247) There appears to have been a great decline in attendance after this time, for in 1850 an inspector reported that though the master had not had 'many advantages in the way of education' he had through his 'great energy' raised the school from 30 to 200 in a short time. (fn. 248) In 1854 the school received its first annual government grant. (fn. 249) In addition to the usual curriculum the working of the Electric Telegraph was taught, the Electric Telegraph Company supplying the school with instruments and the school supplying the company with clerks. (fn. 250) The reputation of the teaching was so high that many applications for admission were received from 'parents of higher rank' than that for which the school was intended. (fn. 251) By 1867 the attendance had reached 546; it declined subsequently. The school was closed in 1890, and the buildings later demolished. (fn. 252)

Institute of Popular Science see Technical College.

James Street British School.

This school for girls and infants was opened in 1871 in a new schoolchapel, built by William Pumphrey, a York photographer, for Free Church Methodists, by whom it was leased to the managers. There were a schoolroom and 2 classrooms. In 1871 the average attendance was 25 girls and 75 infants. Fees were 6d. for girls and 3d. and 4d. for infants. (fn. 253) A government grant was received in 1872 and 1873. The school closed in 1874. (fn. 254)

Knavesmire County Primary and Secondary Modern Schools.

South Bank Temporary School was opened in St. Clement's mission room, South Bank Avenue, in 1906. (fn. 255) South Bank Temporary Infants' School was opened in the premises of the Adult School, Balmoral Terrace, in 1911. (fn. 256) There were 159 children enrolled in the 2 temporary schools in 1914. (fn. 257) Both these schools were closed in 1916 when the Knavesmire Council School, Campleshon Road, Bishopthorpe Road, was opened. (fn. 258) There was accommodation for 800 boys, girls, and infants. (fn. 259) In 1919 202 boys, 211 girls, and 227 infants were enrolled. (fn. 260) Extensions, including a new wing, were made in 1931 to increase the accommodation by 160 places. (fn. 261) The school was reorganized before 1932 when there were 151 senior boys, 183 senior girls, and 336 juniors and infants attending. (fn. 262) In 1956 there were 380 girls enrolled in the secondary school and 350 juniors and infants in the primary school. (fn. 263)

Layerthorpe Infants' Council School.

This school was opened in January 1913 in a building in St. Cuthbert's Road, Layerthorpe, given by F. C. Mills, a city magistrate. Children from Bilton Street Infants' School, which was then closed, removed to the new buildings. (fn. 264) There was accommodation for 128 children and 174 were enrolled in 1919. (fn. 265) The accommodation had been increased before 1927 and 243 children were then attending the school. (fn. 266) The school was closed in August 1928 and the children were accommodated at Tang Hall School. (fn. 267)

Manchester College.

This college was founded in Manchester in 1786 as a dissenting academy; it moved to Monkgate from Manchester in 1803. The work of the college at York was carried on under the direction of Charles Wellbeloved, minister of St. Saviourgate Chapel, who was divinity tutor for the 37 years that the college stayed in York. Wellbeloved's acceptance of the directorship was the chief cause of the removal of the college to York. (fn. 268) The college was described in 1819 as a Unitarian seminary supported by endowments; there were then about 20 pupils attending. (fn. 269) Lay students were admitted for a three-year course, that for divinity students was for five years. (fn. 270) In addition to voluntary contributions, the college was in 1821 said to receive annual incomes from charities in Hull, Manchester, and Liverpool, and £120 from Lady Hewley's fund in York. (fn. 271) Those attending in 1827 were mainly Presbyterians; the college was said to be open to any denomination and no distinctive doctrines were taught, but most of the students were Unitarians. (fn. 272) The college endowment from Lady Hewley's fund was one of the three chief subjects of litigation when Lady Hewley's charities were investigated in the 1830's. The endowment was finally lost under Lord Lyndhurst's judgement of 1836, confirmed by the House of Lord's in 1842. (fn. 273) The work of the college was at first carried on in Wellbeloved's house, 38 Monkgate, and after 1811 in premises at 33 Monkgate. The college moved back to Manchester in 1840, went to London in 1853, and finally to Oxford in 1889. James Martineau was a student at York between 1822 and 1827 and John Kenrick tutor in classics, history, and literature from 1810. (fn. 274)

The college premises at York were bought in 1840 by St. John's College and were later used by the Diocesan Training College for Schoolmistresses. (fn. 275)

Manor Voluntary Secondary Modern School.

The Manor National School for boys was opened in January 1813 (fn. 276) in rooms in the King's Manor rented from Lord de Grey, the Crown lessee. This was the first National school for boys in York; there was said to be accommodation for 500. (fn. 277) About 1818 440 boys were said to be attending and the Manor School together with the girls' National school in Aldwark were used to train teachers for National schools elsewhere. (fn. 278) Fees were 1s. a quarter in 1818. (fn. 279) Under the Crown Lands Act of 1829 the accommodation in the Manor was, in 1835, secured for the permanent use of the school. (fn. 280) Instruction in 'English grammar, history, geography, the elements of general history and mensuration' was advertised at an extra charge of 3s. a quarter at this time. (fn. 281) Extra rooms for 130 girls and 71 infants, under the boys' school, were opened in 1844 with the aid of a grant from the National Society. (fn. 282) There was an average attendance of 348 boys and 154 girls between 1846 and 1847. (fn. 283) On inspection in 1850 it was found that no scripture was read in the school and that there were 9 classes in 1 room taught by a master and 6 pupil teachers. This inspection appears to have referred only to the boys' department. (fn. 284) Alterations to the school were made in 1855 with the aid of a government grant. (fn. 285) There were 89 pupils enrolled in the girls' department in 1870 but this had closed before 1888. In that year there was accommodation for 355 boys. (fn. 286) An annual government grant was first received in 1847. (fn. 287) In 1922, the accommodation in the Manor having been condemned, the school moved to the former premises of the York Industrial School in Marygate, (fn. 288) which were purchased for £3,800 with the aid of a grant from the National Society. (fn. 289) The school was reorganized before 1932 to accommodate 400 senior boys. (fn. 290) The average attendance was 233 in 1938. (fn. 291) After the destruction of the Marygate premises by enemy action in 1943, the school was accommodated in a part of the premises of Priory Street Methodist School. (fn. 292) The two schools shared these buildings until 1947, when the Priory Street Girls' School was closed. The Manor School was then reorganized as a mixed voluntary secondary modern school and continued to occupy the Priory Street premises in 1957. (fn. 293)

Mechanics' Institute see Technical College.

Micklegate Voluntary Primary School.

Micklegate Trinity National School for boys was opened in 1835. The building was erected with the aid of National Society and government grants on a site at the corner of Queen Street outside Micklegate Bar, given at a nominal rent by the corporation. There was accommodation for 250; fees were 1d. a week. (fn. 294) The average attendance was 160 in 1838. (fn. 295) A separate girls' and infants' school had been opened in a private house before 1847. The average attendance was then 130 boys and 84 girls. There were a master and a mistress assisted by a monitor and assistant. (fn. 296) A new schoolroom and classroom for girls was built with the aid of a government grant in 1853, on a site in Blossom Street adjacent to Micklegate Bar. The average attendance was 100 girls. (fn. 297) The school first received an annual government grant in 1854. (fn. 298) All the accommodation in the school was filled by 1893 when the managers suggested that more accommodation was needed in the district. (fn. 299) The average attendance was 517 in 1894; after 1897 there was a steady decline in the attendance. (fn. 300) In 1923 the senior department in Queen Street was closed and the building subsequently demolished. The average attendance in the junior mixed and infants' school in Blossom Street was 151 in 1927; (fn. 301) the school became a voluntary controlled school in 1949 and was closed in 1956. (fn. 302)

Mill Mount County Grammar School for Girls.

This school was opened in 1920, in a house purchased and adapted by the municipal authority. There were 124 girls enrolled in March 1921, some of whom were transferred from Queen Anne School, which was overcrowded. (fn. 303) A chemistry laboratory was added in 1922 and a cookery centre in 1925. (fn. 304) There were 272 girls enrolled in 1933. Extensions to provide accommodation for 150 girls were opened in 1935. A games field at Nunthorpe was opened in 1938. (fn. 305) There were 383 girls attending the school in March 1946. (fn. 306)

Model School see St. John's Voluntary School.

Nunnery Lane Board School see Scarcroft Schools.

Nunthorpe County Grammar School for Boys.

This school was opened in 1920, in a house in Southlands Road purchased and adapted by the city. There were 64 boys enrolled in March 1921. (fn. 307) An assembly hall was added in 1925 and a headmaster's house built before 1932. (fn. 308) There were 425 attending in March 1933. (fn. 309) Extensions to provide accommodation for 120 boys were added in 1938. (fn. 310) There were 478 boys attending in 1945. (fn. 311)

Ogleforth Catholic School see St. Wilfrid's Schools.

Park Grove County Primary and Secondary Modern Boys School.

Park Grove Board School was opened in 1895 in a new building. (fn. 312) There was accommodation for 1,393 children in two departments, mixed and infants'. In 1897 the average attendance was 1,115. (fn. 313) In 1899 the lower standards were removed to Brook Street School because of overcrowding. (fn. 314) In 1910 the average attendance was 678 in the mixed school and 305 in the infants'. (fn. 315) There were three departments in 1932; senior mixed with an average attendance of 223, junior mixed with 249, and infants' with 215. (fn. 316) By 1956 the senior school was for boys only and 250 were enrolled; there were 210 enrolled in the junior and 100 in the infants' schools. (fn. 317)

Peter Lane School see All Saints' School.

Poppleton Road County Primary Schools.

Poppleton Road Council School was opened in 1904; (fn. 318) there was accommodation for 1,200 children. (fn. 319) There were senior mixed, junior mixed, and infants' departments in 1910. (fn. 320) By 1936 there were 198 enrolled in the senior mixed, 318 in the junior mixed, and 177 in the infants' departments. (fn. 321) The school was severely damaged by enemy action in May 1942: the senior department was then transferred to the Scarcroft Road School and the junior department was accommodated temporarily in other schools until the classrooms were repaired. (fn. 322) In 1956 there were 460 children enrolled in the junior school and 210 in the infants' school. (fn. 323)

Practising School see St. John's Voluntary School.

Priory Place Wesleyan Schools.

These schools for boys, girls, and infants were opened in 1857 in new school buildings adjacent to Priory Street Chapel. A government building grant was received. (fn. 324) In 1870 there was said to be accommodation for about 600 and there was a teacher's residence. (fn. 325) The boys' school comprised the former Albion Street School, whose numbers 'greatly increased' after this move. (fn. 326) Sixty girls and 40 infants were attending the girls' school in 1858. (fn. 327) An annual government grant was received from the beginning. (fn. 328) By 1870 318 boys, 128 girls, and 177 infants were enrolled in the school. Fees were 3s., 4s., 5s. and 7s. 6d. a quarter depending on the standard. In addition to the normal curriculum a 'select class' was taught composition, book-keeping, algebra, Euclid, mensuration, land surveying, advanced drawing, and ornamental penmanship. (fn. 329) By 1894 the accommodation had been increased to 848 places and the average attendance was 648. (fn. 330) In 1897 the school was first described as a higher-grade school. (fn. 331) The school had been reorganized before 1932 into two departments; senior mixed with an average attendance of 376 and junior mixed and infants with 115. In 1936 only the senior department was left. (fn. 332) The school remained under Methodist management until it was closed in 1948. (fn. 333)

Queen Anne County Grammar School for Girls.

A pupil-teacher centre in Brook Street School was opened in 1905. This school was leased to provide temporary accommodation and as such was approved by the Board of Education; the building was adapted at a cost of £471. The new day centre classes replaced classes held in the evenings and on Saturday mornings in Fishergate Board School. Accommodation was provided for boy and girl pupil-teachers and intending pupil-teachers from the three Ridings and York. (fn. 334) The school became known as the Municipal Secondary School for girls in 1906 and was officially recognized as a secondary school in 1908. The boy pupil-teachers were then accommodated at Archbishop Holgate's School. (fn. 335) In 1908 there were 210 girls enrolled in the Municipal Secondary School; pupils paying a fee of £7 17s. 6d. were also admitted. (fn. 336) The Brook Street premises were closed at the end of 1909 when the pupils were transferred to a new school building, on a 5½-acre site at the bottom of Queen Anne's Road, Clifton. This building, which was the first built exclusively by the municipal authorities for secondary education, provided accommodation for 270 girls; the cost was approximately £16,000. (fn. 337) Four new classrooms and additional cloakrooms were erected in 1914 and provided 86 more places. (fn. 338) There were 411 girls attending in 1933; this number had increased to 465 by 1946. (fn. 339)

St. Aeldred's Voluntary Primary School.

St. Aeldred's Roman Catholic School, at first known as Fifth Avenue Temporary School, opened in 1929 in Fifth Avenue, Tang Hall Estate. This school provided accommodation for 100 infants (fn. 340) and was used until the permanent building adjacent to it was opened in 1932. The new building provided accommodation for 300 juniors and infants; (fn. 341) in 1938 the average attendance was 267. (fn. 342) The school was an aided primary school in 1956 and there were 270 children enrolled. (fn. 343)

St. Andrewgate National School.

This school for infants was opened in 1829 in St. Andrew's Hall. (fn. 344) In 1836 162 children between the ages of 2 and 6 years were enrolled, and were taught arithmetic, scripture, grammar, history, singing, spelling, and natural history. (fn. 345) Between 1846 and 1847 there were said to be 59 boys and 59 girls attending. There was one master with an assistant. (fn. 346) The school was closed at some date before 1868 when St. Saviour's School was opened in the same premises. (fn. 347) The school does not appear to have received government aid.

St. Barnabas's Voluntary Primary School.

St. Barnabas's Church (later National) School, at first known as St. Paul's Foundry, was opened in 1877 in a temporary wooden building. There was 1 schoolroom and in the first year 10 boys, 15 girls, and 55 infants were attending. Fees were 3d. for boys and girls and 2d. for infants. (fn. 348) The first annual government grant was received in 1878. (fn. 349) In 1885 a new school was erected at the corner of Gladstone Street and Hanover Street, with the aid of government and National Society grants, at a cost of £2,161. There was accommodation for 221 boys and girls and 221 infants. Fees were then 2d., 3d., and 4d. according to standard. The schoolroom was licensed for divine service. (fn. 350) The average attendance in 1887 was 112. (fn. 351) In that year 2 classrooms were added with accommodation for 57 more children; the cost was £413 and a grant was received from the National Society. In 1895 accommodation for 60 more children in 3 classrooms and 2 schoolrooms was added with the aid of a further grant. (fn. 352) Total accommodation was then 560 and in 1897 there was an average attendance of 424 children. (fn. 353) In 1913 the name of the school was changed to St. Barnabas's. (fn. 354) The senior department was closed before 1932 when there was accommodation for junior mixed and infants only. In that year there was an average attendance of 235. (fn. 355) After 1950 the school was continued as a voluntary controlled junior and infant school; there were 180 children enrolled in 1956. (fn. 356)

St. Clement's Voluntary Primary Schools.

St. Clement's, sometimes known as Bishophill and Clementhorpe Church School, Cherry Street, was opened in 1872 in a new building which had been erected by subscription and with the aid of a government grant. Accommodation was for boys', girls', and infants' departments with a schoolroom and a classroom for each. There was a staff of 3, a master and 2 mistresses. Fees were 2d., 3d., and 4d. for boys and girls and 1d. and 2d. for infants. (fn. 357) The school first received an annual government grant in 1877. (fn. 358) In 1878 there was an average attendance of 366 boys and girls and 33 infants. (fn. 359) The accommodation was increased before 1894 to 1,019 places and attendance rose to 930 by 1910. (fn. 360) In 1932 there were 172 attending the junior school and 169 the infants'. (fn. 361) After 1950 there were two voluntary aided schools; 130 juniors and 80 infants were enrolled in 1956. (fn. 362)

St. Cuthbert's School see Bilton Street School.

St. Denys and St. George National School.

This school was opened in 1870 in a new building close to St. Denys's Church in Piccadilly with accommodation for 108 boys, 105 girls, and 81 infants. The cost was £1,465 and grants were received from the National Society and the government. When the school opened there were a master and a mistress; fees were 2d. to 6d. for boys, 3d. for girls and 2d. for infants. (fn. 363) An annual government grant was first received in 1878; the average attendance was then 241. (fn. 364) Further accommodation was added before 1897 with the aid of a government grant and there were then 479 places. (fn. 365) In 1910 the average attendance was 112 boys, 117 girls, and 97 infants. (fn. 366) By 1932 there remained only a senior mixed department with an average attendance of 158. (fn. 367) The school premises were closed in 1941 and the school transferred to the first floor of Castlegate Council School. In 1945 there were 75 children attending in the Castlegate premises. The school was closed in 1946. (fn. 368) The school building in Piccadilly was used in 1957 for other purposes.

St. George's Voluntary Primary and Secondary Modern Schools.

St. Mary's Roman Catholic School for girls and infants was opened in 1844 in premises, probably in Blossom Street, owned by St. Mary's Convent. There were 2 schoolrooms and 1 classroom. In 1850 there were 2 mistresses. (fn. 369) In that year a grant was received from the Catholic Poor Schools Committee for the purchase of books and maps. (fn. 370) In 1851 the school was described as 'in a state of active and continued progress'; there were then 136 girls attending. (fn. 371) In 1851 the school moved to the newly-built St. George's School close to St. George's Roman Catholic Church, near Walmgate. This school accommodated boys', girls', and infants' departments and cost £1,700, £200 of which was given by the C.P.S.C. (fn. 372) In 1852 the curriculum for the girls included spelling, grammar, writing, geography, arithmetic, and history; 167 girls were attending. (fn. 373) The boys' department, which was established when St. George's School was opened in 1851, accommodated 186 in 1854. An income of £23 was received from an endowment and the congregation of St. George's Church subscribed for the upkeep of the school. Fees were from 1d. to 6d. for boys and 1d. and 2d. for girls and infants in 1854. (fn. 374) In that year the school first received an annual government grant. (fn. 375) There were a certificated master, a certificated mistress and 8 pupil teachers in 1856. (fn. 376) The average attendance for the whole school was 305 in 1867. (fn. 377) St. George's Wesleyan Chapel in Chapel Row was purchased in 1897 and opened for the use of the school in 1900; the average attendance in 1907 was 536. (fn. 378) Between 1927 and 1932 the school was reorganized into 3 departments: senior boys, mixed, and infants with standard one; in 1936 the average attendance was 425. (fn. 379) A new building for the senior boys was begun in 1939 and opened in 1948. Both schools became voluntary aided schools; in 1956 240 children were enrolled in the primary school and 290 boys in the secondary modern school. (fn. 380)

St. George's Wesleyan School.

This school was opened in St. George's Wesleyan Chapel, Walmgate, in 1847. (fn. 381) In 1848 there were 160 boys, girls, and infants on the roll with an average attendance of 135, one-third of whom were infants. They were accommodated in a schoolroom and a classroom; fees were 2d. to 4d. (fn. 382) It was said in 1848 that 'this school has had to make its way under difficult circumstances'; these were said to include 'the fluctuating attendance and the disturbing influence of so large a number of infants'. (fn. 383) The first annual government grant was received in 1847; there were then 3 apprentice teachers to assist the master. (fn. 384) Most of the children attending in 1853 were said to be from the poorer classes. (fn. 385) In 1857 a new infants' school was built with the aid of a government grant. (fn. 386) In 1887 there was accommodation for 637 and the average attendance was 450. (fn. 387) The managers closed the school at the end of 1892 and the School Board accepted the temporary transfer of the school on the recommendation of the Education Department. George Street Board School, as it was then known, was opened in 1893. (fn. 388) The average attendance was 590 in 1894. (fn. 389) The school was closed in 1895 when it was replaced by Fishergate Board School. (fn. 390) In 1897 the premises were bought by the managers of St. George's Roman Catholic School. (fn. 391)

St. John's College.

The York and Ripon Diocesan Training College for schoolmasters, later known as St. John's, was opened in May 1841 as a residential training school for the diocese of York. The premises were those lately occupied by the Manchester Col lege in Monkgate and were purchased by the Diocesan Board of Education for £3,100. By an arrangement made in 1843 the college was to be supported equally by the diocesan boards of York and Ripon and to train schoolmasters for National schools in both dioceses. A new building was opened in 1845 in Lord Mayor's Walk; it cost £11,955 and grants in aid were made by the government and the National Society. There were 56 students in the college in 1847 when 21 exhibitions valued between £10 and £20 were offered. There was a close financial and academic connexion between the college and the Yeoman School which was managed by the same authority: the students of the college and the more advanced pupils of the school were taught together in an 'Upper School'. A 'Middle School' comprising day pupils of the Yeoman School was used as a practising school for the students but was described as unsuitable for training National schoolmasters. The instruction in the college was described as 'almost entirely catechetical' in 1847. In the following year only 20 per cent. of the students and 25 per cent. of those who had attended but were then teaching obtained certificates; reasons for this were said to be lack of staff, the poor quality of entrants, the short average period of attendance (14 months) and the unsuitable nature of the practising school. (fn. 392) A new practising school of the National school type was opened in 1851. (fn. 393) The accommodation in the college was increased and a chapel built before 1859 when there were 82 students. (fn. 394) There were 69 students in 1874, 31 in the first year and 38 in the second; all were Queen's scholars. (fn. 395) An increase in accommodation was achieved in 1908 when the 'Nottingham Wing' was erected. There were 135 attending a two-year course in 1920. Subsequent alterations included the addition of the 'Temple Wing' and a gymnasium in 1929 and another new wing in 1936. Teaching and residential accommodation were further increased by annexes in Gray's Court in 1946, Heworth Croft in 1950 and The Limes in 1953. A biology laboratory was built in 1950, a library in 1952, a lecture theatre in 1954, and an arts and crafts block in 1955. There were 267 students in 1956 including some attending specialized third-year courses. School practice was conducted in several local schools. The governors of the college then included representatives of the dioceses of York, Ripon and Wakefield, of the University of Leeds, and of the three Yorkshire county councils. (fn. 396)

St. John's Voluntary Secondary Modern School.

The Practising School and the Model School of the York and Ripon Diocesan Training College were opened in 1851 and 1859 respectively in schoolrooms attached to the college buildings in Lord Mayor's Walk.

The Practising School replaced, for training purposes, the Middle School of day and boarding pupils from the Yeoman School. (fn. 397) In 1853 there were 121 boys attending; 6 classes were taught under a monitorial system in one room. (fn. 398)

The Model School was opened in 1859, also in the Training College building, as a demonstration school; the fees were 4d. and 6d. Graduated fees of 5s. to 10s. a quarter were paid in 1865; the pupils were said to receive 'superior instruction'. No government aid was received; (fn. 399) there were then 80 boys in the school. (fn. 400)

In 1874 there were 82 boys in the Practising School and 79 in the Model School. (fn. 401) The two schools were supported by the Training College funds and were complementary, the best teaching methods being illustrated in the Model School for the students who then practised them in the other. A new combined school building was erected on a site close to the Training College in 1899, with some aid from the National Society and Diocesan Boards. From this time the schools appear to have been considered as one. The new building accommodated 338 boys; fees were 5s. and 7s. 6d. a quarter. (fn. 402) The average attendance was 193 boys in 1910. The school was reorganized before 1932 into a senior boys' school; 84 were enrolled in 1938. (fn. 403) The school was continued as a voluntary aided secondary modern school for boys after 1948; 200 boys were enrolled in 1956. (fn. 404)

St. Lawrence's Voluntary Primary Schools.

St. Lawrence's National School was opened in 1872 in a new building in Lawrence Lane behind St. Lawrence's Church. The cost was £2,300; National Society and government grants were received. There were three schoolrooms and two classrooms, with places for 428 boys, girls and infants. Fees were from 2d. to 6d. (fn. 405) An annual government grant was first received in 1873. The average attendance was then 235. (fn. 406) In 1878 accommodation for 250 more children was added. (fn. 407) In 1910 the average attendance was 249 in the boys', 200 in the girls', and 230 in the infants' departments. (fn. 408) There were only two departments in 1932: junior mixed and infants. (fn. 409) In 1936 the average attendance was 580. (fn. 410) The schools were continued as voluntary aided primary schools after 1950; 230 were enrolled in the junior and 120 in the infants' schools in 1956. (fn. 411)

St. Margaret's Independent Grammar School for Girls.

This school was opened in the building of the Castlegate Higher Grade School in 1905. It was managed and staffed by the Community of the Sisters of the Church who had closed the Higher Grade School in order to obtain freedom of religious instruction in their teaching. In 1905 about 80 girls were attending. The premises in Castlegate were sold in 1912 to the corporation and subsequently housed Castlegate Council School and the Technical College; St. Margaret's moved into an 18th century house at no. 54 Micklegate in the same year. In 1925 115 girls were attending the school. Extra accommodation was leased at no. 55 Micklegate in 1944. Some boarders were taken until 1947. In 1957 188 girls from 5 to 17 years were attending the school with 10 boys under 8 in an infants' department; the school was recognized by the Ministry of Education. (fn. 412)

St. Margaret's National School.

This school for boys and girls was opened in St. Margaret's Terrace, Walmgate, in 1842; building grants from the National Society and the government were received. A teacher's house was added in 1847. (fn. 413) There were said to be 136 boys and 132 girls attending in 1846. (fn. 414) In 1847 an inspector reported that the boys' school was in a poor state of discipline and the children those of the poorest inhabitants in York; the progress in the girls' school was said to be only moderate. (fn. 415) In a similar report in 1850 the schools were said to be organized on the monitorial system. (fn. 416) The first annual government grant was received in 1854. (fn. 417) Further additions were made to the accommodation in 1858, with the aid of a government grant. (fn. 418) There were boys', girls', and infants' departments in the same building in 1870; (fn. 419) 178 boys were enrolled of whom 110 were in attendance; 110 girls of whom 63 were in attendance; and in the infants' school 55 boys and 57 girls with an attendance of 33 and 37 respectively. (fn. 420) Further accommodation for 60 children was provided in 1898 with the aid of National Society and government grants. (fn. 421) There were 200 children attending the mixed department and 80 the infants' in 1910. (fn. 422) In 1926 the mixed department was closed and subsequently the school accommodated infant and standard-one children only. (fn. 423) There were said to be 65 children attending in 1936; (fn. 424) the school was closed in 1938. (fn. 425)

St. Mary's Girls' School see St. George's Voluntary Schools.

St. Patrick's School see St. Wilfrid's Schools.

St. Paul's Foundry School see St. Barnabas's School.

St. Paul's Nursery School. Nursery classes established during the Second World War in Acomb and Holgate were, in 1947, formed into one nursery school in St. Paul's Square by the education authority. (fn. 426) Between 1956 and 1957 there was an average attendance of 33. (fn. 427)

St. Paul's Voluntary Primary School.

St. Paul's Holgate, sometimes known as St. Paul's Micklegate National School, was opened as an infants' school on a site at the corner of St. Paul's Terrace and Watson Street in 1872. From 1874 a mixed boys' and girls' school was held in this building. At the end of that year new boys' and girls' schools were opened on the site and the infants' school was reconstructed: there was accommodation for 107 boys, 107 girls, and 50 infants. The total cost was £1,029; a grant was received from the National Society. The fees were 2d. and 3d. (fn. 428) In 1875 when the average attendance was 115, the first annual government grant was received. (fn. 429) In 1883 accommodation was added for 276 boys and in 1889 a playground and 2 new classrooms, intended to accommodate 49 girls and 49 infants, were built with further grants from the National Society and the Diocesan School Board. (fn. 430) In 1889 the average attendance was 346 and there was said to be accommodation for 543 children. (fn. 431) In 1932 there were 213 children in the junior mixed and infants' departments into which the school had been reorganized. (fn. 432) The school continued as a controlled voluntary junior and infant school after 1950; 180 children were enrolled in 1956. (fn. 433)

St. Peter's School. (fn. 434)

There were 65 boys in St. Peter's School in 1900 and the number remained constant until after 1913. During this period many branches of scientific study were introduced and a preparatory school provided by taking over St. Olave's, a private school close at hand. A new science block was opened in 1903. Between 1908 and 1919 various properties adjacent to the school were acquired for additional accommodation. A swimmingbath was built in 1922, new playing-fields were opened in 1924, and a library in 1927. In 1925 there were 85 junior boys and 215 seniors (boys over 12) in the school. Extensive alterations were made in 1935 and a new school block erected. In 1956 there were about 330 boys in the senior school. (fn. 435)

St. Sampson's Church Infant School.

This school was opened in 1861 in premises in Swinegate, leased from a Mrs. Moore. There were a schoolroom and 2 classrooms and in 1861 there were 25 boys and 60 girls attending. The fee was 1d. The incumbent provided financial support. (fn. 436) The first annual government grant was received in 1868, when there were 40 children attending. (fn. 437) The school was said to be an infants' and girls' school in 1870 (fn. 438) and was closed in 1873. (fn. 439) The site in Swinegate has not been located.

St. Saviourgate British School see Bishophill British School.

St. Saviour's National School.

This school for boys was opened in 1868 in St. Andrew's Hall. (fn. 440) The hall was leased from the chapter by the York Church Sunday School Committee who sub-let it to the York National Schools Society. There was 1 schoolroom in which 83 boys were accommodated. Fees were 1d. and 2d. in 1869. (fn. 441) The first annual government grant was received in 1870; the attendance was then 57. (fn. 442) The school was closed in 1873. (fn. 443)

St. Thomas's Voluntary Primary School.

Groves Church School appears to have been opened in 1831 in a new building in Cole Street erected by an unidentified local person. The building later became the property of the York Church Sunday School Committee; there was one schoolroom. (fn. 444) In 1836 there were said to be 55 boys and 34 girls attending the school which had 2 teachers. (fn. 445) In 1855 there were 51 boys and 54 girls in average attendance; 3 classrooms had been added to the school by this date. (fn. 446) In 1856 the school was described on inspection as overcrowded. (fn. 447) The first annual government grant was received in 1855. (fn. 448) The school received an income of 13s. from Ripley's charity. (fn. 449) In 1858 the school was closed and the children transferred to new buildings adjacent to St. Thomas's Church in Lowther Street, known as St. Thomas's School. (fn. 450) This school was provided by the Diocesan Board with the aid of a government grant and was in union with the National Society. (fn. 451) There were boys', girls', and infants' departments; in 1867 the attendance was 165. (fn. 452) The accommodation was increased from 315 places to 420 before 1887; the average attendance was then 379. (fn. 453) The boys' department was closed before 1893. (fn. 454) The average attendance was 356 in 1910 and fees were still paid. (fn. 455) The school was reorganized before 1932 into junior mixed and infants' departments and in 1936 there were 238 children. (fn. 456) The school continued as a voluntary-aided junior and infant school after 1950; 160 children were enrolled in 1956. (fn. 457) The original school in Cole Street has been demolished.

St. Wilfrid's Voluntary Primary and Secondary Modern Schools.

A Roman Catholic boys' school was established in Ogleforth in 1796. In 1836 there were 85 boys attending. (fn. 458) In 1849 it was held in a rented schoolroom on the north side of Ogleforth and was providing temporary accommodation until a new school could be erected. (fn. 459) In 1867 there was a school known as St. Patrick's at 24 Ogleforth. (fn. 460) A Roman Catholic school known as St. Patrick's, and probably the same, was held in a large room in the Bedern in 1870; it was described as a temporary provision. (fn. 461) The new school, St. Wilfrid's, Monkgate, was completed in 1875; there was accommodation for boys, girls, and infants in 3 schoolrooms and 3 classrooms. Fees were 4d., 6d., and 8d. for boys, 2d., 3d., and 4d. for girls and 2d. for infants. (fn. 462) The first annual government grant was received in 1876. The average attendance was then 190 (fn. 463) and increased to 405 in 1910 when there were two departments, mixed and infants. (fn. 464) Before 1932 a senior girls' department was added. (fn. 465) In 1938 there were 159 in this department and 293 in the junior mixed and infants' department. (fn. 466) In 1956 there were two schools; 290 children were enrolled in the aided primary school and 220 in the aided secondary modern girls' school. (fn. 467)

Salem Day School.

A girls' and infants' school was held in premises in Salem Chapel, St. Saviourgate, at least from 1844. (fn. 468) In 1857 there was an average attendance of 100. (fn. 469) There were 158 children enrolled in 1870 when the school was described as a private school. (fn. 470) The school is recorded in 1872 but not thereafter. (fn. 471)

Scarcroft County Primary and Secondary Modern Boys' Schools.

Temporary accommodation for 150 children of infant and standard-one age was provided by the Board in 1895 in the Primitive Methodist mission room, Nunnery Lane. The building was leased from the Victoria Bar Primitive Methodist Connexion. (fn. 472) The Nunnery Lane School was closed in July 1896 (fn. 473) and in August of that year Scarcroft Road Board School was opened on the north-east side of Micklegate Stray. There were 2 halls and 21 classrooms with accommodation for 1,200 children. (fn. 474) There were 168 children enrolled in 1897. (fn. 475) In 1910 there were 852 in the mixed and 323 in the infants' departments. (fn. 476) The school was reorganized into three departments before 1932, when there were 244 enrolled in the senior mixed, 228 in the junior mixed, and 231 in the infants' departments. (fn. 477) The senior school was subsequently altered to accommodate boys only and in 1956 there were 280 enrolled; there were then 270 in the junior and 110 in the infants' schools. (fn. 478)

School of Art.

A school of design was opened in 1842, as a branch of the Normal School of Design in London (later the Science and Art Department); William Etty, the painter, was concerned in its foundation. Accommodation was rented in the Freemasons' Hall and an adjacent public house (both later demolished) in Little Blake Street; the school was supported by subscriptions and a grant from the London school. The former premises of St. Peter's School in the minster yard were acquired in 1848. There was said to be an average attendance of 131 in 1854. (fn. 479) In 1865, after a decrease in the grant from the Science and Art Department and an increase in the fees, there was a decline in numbers especially amongst the artisan pupils. (fn. 480) There were 76 pupils enrolled for the day classes and 124 for the evening classes in 1890; the premises were then described by Her Majesty's Inspector as unsuitable for teaching. (fn. 481) About this time the school transferred to premises in the north gallery of the Exhibition Building in St. Leonard's Place, which had been purchased by the corporation in 1891. (fn. 482) The art school which had been held in connexion with the Technical Institute in Clifford Street was joined with that in St. Leonard's in 1905; there were then 220 pupils enrolled in the latter and 215 in the former; the school was subsequently administered by the York Education Committee. (fn. 483) Extra accommodation was opened in 1906 after the school had been rebuilt at a cost of £2,213 on the same site. (fn. 484) Two studios were acquired in Marygate in 1949; there were then 594 students of whom 32 attended full-time. (fn. 485)

Shipton Street County Primary Schools.

Shipton Street Board School was opened in 1891 with accommodation for 660. (fn. 486) There were boys', girls', and infants' departments; 440 children attended in 1892. (fn. 487) Accommodation for 140 children was added before 1897. (fn. 488) In 1910 there were 288 enrolled in the boys' department, 278 in the girls', and 202 in the infants'. (fn. 489) In 1912 the boys' department was closed and transferred to Brook Street School; subsequently Shipton Street was used for girls', junior mixed, and infants' classes. (fn. 490) There were two departments in 1932: senior girls with 193 enrolled and junior mixed and infants' with 301. (fn. 491) The junior department had been enlarged by 100 places in that year. (fn. 492) In 1942 the senior department was transferred to the new Water Lane School; in the same year the school was slightly damaged by enemy action. (fn. 493) In 1956 there were 580 enrolled in the junior school and 180 in the infants'. (fn. 494)

South Bank Temporary School see Knavesmire Schools.

Speculation Street Church School.

A school erected by the Church of England Sunday School Committee in Speculation Street, Navigation Road, Walmgate, about 1820 was rented for use as a day school for infants in 1844; there were a schoolroom and a classroom. (fn. 495) In 1844 it was agreed that no child over 6 should be admitted and none under that age to the Walmgate National School which had recently been opened close at hand. (fn. 496) The school was not in union with the National Society. In 1846 there was said to be an average attendance of 100. (fn. 497) There were 75 children attending in 1856; (fn. 498) the fee was 1d. The school appears to have closed before 1870 when there was an infants' department at the Walmgate National School. The site has since been cleared. (fn. 499)

Spinning School.

A Spinning School for girls was opened in St. Andrewgate in 1784 by a committee of ladies led by Mrs. Catharine Cappe, wife of the minister of the St. Saviourgate Chapel. Earlier attempts to open an evening school for children employed in a hemp factory had failed, and the spinning school was begun so that they might work and learn at the same time. Thirty children spun worsted from 7.0 a.m. to 5.0 p.m.; from 5.0 p.m. to 8.0 p.m. they were to sew, knit, and read; they attended church and Sunday school; and they were clothed and were paid for their work. There were two mistresses. A knitting school was added in 1786 for children too young to spin. The school was maintained by subscription and further funds were found in 1797 to provide the children with milk. (fn. 500) By 1818 spinning had been abandoned for the senior girls and they were taught to sew and knit. (fn. 501) Forty girls attended the school in 1833. (fn. 502) It was closed before 1859 and the funds transferred to the Grey Coat School under a scheme of the Charity Commissioners. (fn. 503) The building may be that which, in 1957, occupied the site of no. 25 St. Andrewgate.

Tang Hall County Primary Schools.

Four schools were opened in one large new building in Sixth Avenue between 1928 and 1929. This unusual arrangement appears to have been made to meet the needs of a growing housing estate. The Glen and The Avenue Junior Mixed and Infant Schools were opened in 1928 each with accommodation for 400 children. Tang Hall Junior Mixed with Infants School and Tang Hall Senior Mixed School were opened in 1929; there was accommodation for 336 and 360 respectively. (fn. 504) The attendance in 1932 was 185 in Tang Hall Senior School and 289 in Tang Hall Junior School; 372 and 362 attended The Glen and The Avenue Schools. (fn. 505) The three primary schools were reorganized into two schools in 1949, Tang Hall Junior being merged with the other two; there were then 475 enrolled in Tang Hall Avenue School and 366 in Tang Hall Glen School. The senior school, by that time known as Tang Hall Secondary Modern School, had 380 enrolled, (fn. 506) but this senior school was itself closed in 1950 and the accommodation reorganized for juniors and infants. In 1956 there were 780 children enrolled in Tang Hall Junior School and 370 in Tang Hall Infants' School. (fn. 507)

Technical College.

Evening lectures and classes were held in the Mechanics' Institute in St. Saviourgate from 1827, when the Institute was founded for 'the diffusion of useful and entertaining knowledge'. (fn. 508) In 1831 there were lectures on chemistry, astronomy, history, geology, political economy, and the use of the telescope. (fn. 509) There were 202 members enrolled in 3 classes in 1838 when the name was changed to The Institute of Popular Science and Literature. (fn. 510) Until 1846 the Institute used a converted house in St. Saviourgate but in that year a hall in the same street was built by subscription. (fn. 511) A library and later an art school were opened. A new building in Clifford Street, erected at a cost of more than £8,000, was opened in 1885; (fn. 512) 196 new members were enrolled in that year together with 43 in the class department and 54 in the art school. (fn. 513) In 1891, after the passing of the Technical Instruction Act, the committee of the Institute agreed to an offer of the corporation to take over the building and furniture for about £4,000 which was the debt remaining on the Clifford Street building. There were then 496 students enrolled in the Institute which was to be used as a technical school, reserving to the Institute the lease of the library, news room and lecture department. In the following year the building was acquired by the Corporation Library Committee from whom the Technical Instruction Committee leased several classrooms. The administration of the library and technical school were linked with that of the Institute by the appointment of its secretary to the posts of librarian and technical instruction secretary. (fn. 514) There were 276 day and evening students enrolled in the building, woodwork, book-keeping, commercial and shorthand courses of the technical school, and 246 in the art school in 1899. (fn. 515) The art school was joined with that in St. Leonard's in 1905. (fn. 516) There were 45 part-time day students enrolled in the technical school in 1909. (fn. 517)

A day school of commerce was opened at nos. 72 and 74 Bootham in 1920. There were 85 full-time and 75 part-time students enrolled in 1921. (fn. 518) In 1929, when the Technical School accommodation was extended to the whole of the Clifford Street building, the Commercial School was transferred there; 119 students were enrolled in 1930. (fn. 519) There were two courses in 1943: a junior two-year course in which 132 were enrolled and an ex-secondary one-year course with 10 enrolled. (fn. 520) The school became the department of commerce within the Technical College in 1950 and in 1956 was accommodated in Castlegate School. (fn. 521)

A junior school of building was begun in 1943 and was later held at the Technical school's extension at Ashfield, Dringhouses. (fn. 522)

There were 1,045 part-time day and evening students enrolled in the whole Technical College in 1949; 452 were enrolled for day classes and 1,395 for evening classes. (fn. 523)

The Mount School.

The York Quarterly Meeting Girls' School was opened in 1831 (fn. 524) at 1 Castlegate; the school was managed by the Quarterly Meeting and was primarily intended to provide for the daughters of Friends within the Meeting an education similar to that of their boys' school. There was said to be boarding accommodation for 30 girls in 1835; the fees were £30 a year. A teacher-training department was opened in 1836 which became an important part of the establishment. (fn. 525) The school moved to a larger house on The Mount in August 1857, purchased for £6,488. There were 42 pupils and a staff of 6 with 3 part-time assistants in 1865; half the pupils were over 16 years old and the fees were £50 a year. (fn. 526) Extensions to the training department were made in 1873 and to the school generally in that year, 1883, and 1891. A junior school at 1 Dalton Terrace, close to the senior school, was opened in 1901. Further extensions were made in 1903, in 1920 when the junior school moved to 134 The Mount, and in 1931. The average number of pupils was 113 in 1936. (fn. 527) The accommodation had been increased to 240 places by 1956. (fn. 528)

Wastrel School.

Spen Lane or Aldwark Wastrel Unsectarian School was opened in 1877 by the York National School Society in the Merchant Tailors' Hall. The premises were leased from the Merchant Taylors' Company. Boys, girls, and infants were accommodated in a schoolroom and a classroom; the fee was 2d. (fn. 529) An annual government grant was received in 1878. (fn. 530) The attendance rose from 2 or 3 children in 1877 to 104 in 1884 but fell subsequently and the school was closed in or about 1889. (fn. 531)

Water Lane Secondary School see Burton Stone School.

Wesley Place Schools.

Wesley Place Wesleyan Infants' School, Fossgate, opened in 1823 in the Wesleyan Sunday school buildings erected in 1822 with accommodation for 200 children. A girls' school was opened after 1829. (fn. 532) In 1838 the school was said to be organized on the Lancasterian system. (fn. 533) There were 65 girls and 100 infants enrolled in 1848. Reading and sewing were the principal subjects taught together with geography, grammar, and arithmetic. The school was supported by subscriptions, by grants from a common fund for the Wesleyan schools in York and by the proceeds of the sale of pupils' needlework. A certificated mistress was in charge. (fn. 534) Fees were 1d. and 2d. for girls, 1d. and 1½d. for infants in 1850. (fn. 535) No government grants were received. The school was closed by 1853. (fn. 536) The buildings have been demolished.

Westfield County Primary Schools.

Westfield Infants' School, Askham Lane, Acomb Moor estate, was opened in 1951. Westfield Junior School was opened in 1952 on an adjacent site. There were 340 children enrolled in the infants' school and 530 in the junior school in 1956. (fn. 537)

Willey's School see Bilton Street School.

Wilson's Boys' School.

Wilson's Green Coat Boys' Charity School, Foss Bridge End, was founded in 1717 under the will of Dorothy Wilson, dated 1710. The charity provided for the education of 20 poor boys between the ages of 8 and 14 in the founder's house. An annual allowance of £1 was made for clothing each boy in blue cloth faced with green. An allowance of £2 was made to each of three boys apprenticed annually from the school. The master was provided with a house adjacent to the school and a salary of £20. He was to read prayers in the morning and evening. A pew in St. Denys's Church was reserved for the use of the children on Sundays. (fn. 538) The master was a clergyman in 1764; English, Latin, writing, and arithmetic were taught. (fn. 539) A new school and hospital (fn. 540) were erected on the same site in 1765; these were rebuilt at a cost of £2,000 when the new Foss Bridge was erected in 1812. The schoolmaster's house, built in 1805, was behind this new building. (fn. 541) There were 20 boys in the school in 1819; the master's salary was then £30. (fn. 542) In 1820 the number of children admitted was raised to 40, the clothing allowance was increased to 30s. for each boy and the master's salary to £70 because the income from the endowment had increased. The boys were instructed in reading, writing, and arithmetic; applications for admission were said to be very numerous. Previously private pupils had been admitted but this was now forbidden. (fn. 543) There were 40 pupils in 1833; the number had increased to 50 in 1855. (fn. 544) The school was closed in 1895 when the endowment was the subject of a scheme of the Charity Commissioners; it was subsequently known as 'Dorothy Wilson's Exhibition Foundation' and helped pupils of York elementary schools going to secondary schools. (fn. 545) The former schoolroom behind Wilson's Hospital was used as a warehouse in 1956.

Wilson's Girls' School.

By a codicil to her will, dated 1712, Dorothy Wilson (d. 1717) provided that £2 be paid annually to a 'school dame' in St. Denys's parish for teaching 6 poor children of that parish to read. (fn. 546) A school endowed with £5 10s. a year in which 10 poor children were taught existed in the parish in 1819 and was probably the same. (fn. 547) The mistress's salary was increased from £4 to £12 and the number of children admitted from 6 to 12 in 1820 by which time the income from the endowment had improved. (fn. 548) There were 12 girls in the school in 1833. (fn. 549) The school was held in the Merchant Adventurer's Hall, Fossgate, in 1855; there were 20 girls enrolled. (fn. 550) Sixty were enrolled in 1870. (fn. 551) The endowment was altered to provide exhibitions by the same scheme as that for Wilson's Green Coat School in 1896. (fn. 552)

Wilton Street Wesleyan School.

A Wesleyan day school was opened in the Wilton Street (now Wilton Rise) Mission Room in 1873. (fn. 553) In 1874 135 children were enrolled and the average attendance was 83. There was one mistress. (fn. 554) There were 76 children attending in 1888. The school was closed in 1889. (fn. 555)

Yeoman School.

This school was opened by the York and Ripon Diocesan Education Boards in 1846. It was described as a 'middle-class' boarding school and was connected with the Diocesan Training College for which its pupils, together with day pupils, provided a practising school known as the Middle School. There were 20 boarding pupils in January 1846 accommodated in hired premises close to the college; in August of the same year the school was moved into a wing of the college and 50 pupils were then accommodated. By 1848 the Yeoman School had moved to new buildings adjacent to the west end of the college; there were then 86 boarding pupils and the fees were £22 a year. The more advanced pupils were taught in an Upper School with the college students. The school was described as a financial aid to the college in 1848 but was criticized as unsuitable as a practising school for National schoolmasters and was never recognized as such by the Education Department. (fn. 556) Its use as a practising school ceased in 1851 (fn. 557) but it was supervised by the vice-principal of the college until 1858 when it was amalgamated with Archbishop Holgate's School. The Yeoman School buildings were used by the combined schools. (fn. 558)

York and Ripon Training College for Schoolmistresses.

This college was established in 1846, by the two Diocesan Boards of Education and accommodated in the building in Monkgate, which had been occupied by St. John's College between 1841 and 1845. There were 2 schoolrooms, a sittingroom, and 20 bedrooms. There were 10 students in 1847 and 33 in 1848; the increase resulted from the endowment of 20 exhibitions. In 1849 there was a staff of two and a visiting religious instructor; the students were said to be 'mostly middle-class . . . a great portion of time is consumed in instructing them in those elementary branches of learning which belong more properly to a National school than a training institution.' (fn. 559) A practising school was opened in 1850 in the college. (fn. 560) The staff, the equipment, and the practising school were described as inadequate in a report of 1853; there were then 20 students. (fn. 561) The staff was increased by 2 in the following year and an improvement in the examination results was reported. (fn. 562) An adverse report of the domestic accommodation was made in 1859, but as the removal of the college to Ripon was imminent no alterations were made. (fn. 563) The college moved to Ripon in 1862. (fn. 564)

York College for Girls.

York Church High School for Girls was founded by the Church School Company in 1891. The school used premises in Minster Yard which had formerly housed the School of Design, and premises in High Petergate. It appears to have closed in 1900 when the accommodation was taken over by the York High School for Girls. (fn. 565) In 1907 when this school closed the buildings were again taken by the Church School Company, who opened the York College for Girls. (fn. 566) This was a day-school for fee-paying pupils. In 1919 boarding accommodation for 30 girls at St. Helen's, Burton Grange, was opened. (fn. 567) In 1956 the school was described as an independent day and preparatory school; the boarding accommodation at Burton Grange had then been closed. (fn. 568)

York Girls' Certified Industrial School.

This school, sometimes known as St. Hilda's, was separated from the boys' Industrial Ragged School in 1874, because of the lack of accommodation in Marygate. The girls were sent to school in Leeds until a residential school was opened at 28 Monkgate in 1877. The school was moved to the militia barracks at Lowther Street in 1884 and remained there until it was closed in 1932. The girls were educated at York elementary schools from 1917. (fn. 569) In 1932 the building was purchased by the corporation and was used as a girls' home. (fn. 570)

York High School for Girls.

This school was opened by the Girls Public Day School Company in Fishergate House, Blue Bridge Lane, in November 1880. A kindergarten attached to the school was opened in 1891. The school moved to 69 High Petergate in 1900. (fn. 571) There was then said to be accommodation for 140 and in 1906 the average attendance was 105. The school was closed in 1907 because of the unsuitable nature of the accommodation and the difficulty of acquiring a new site. (fn. 572)

York Industrial Ragged School.

This school was opened as a ragged school in College Street in 1848. The pupils were recruited from a Ragged Sunday School opened in the Bedern in 1847. The children were given two meals a day; the boys were occupied in clog-making, tailoring, gardening, and net-making, the girls in domestic work and needlework. There were said to be 90 children attending in 1849. The school was maintained by subscription. (fn. 573) By 1850 the premises in College Street were too small for the increasing number attending and the school moved to the old workhouse building in Marygate. In 1855 there was said to be an average of 80 children attending in the winter and 40 in the summer. When necessary the children went out to work; all received three meals a day and some lived in the school. (fn. 574) There were 113 girls and 63 boys enrolled in 1870. (fn. 575) By 1876 the school had become a Certified Industrial School for Boys and the girls had been moved to a separate school. (fn. 576) The school continued as a residential industrial school until 1921, when it was closed; the building was subsequently used by the Manor School. (fn. 577)

York Minster Choir School.

The secular and nonmusical education of minster choristers was probably undertaken by the precentors and masters of the choristers at least during the Middle Ages: (fn. 578) some provision for their education was made sporadically from the 16th to the 18th centuries. In the 19th century the boys were sent to various city schools but in 1903 the chapter instituted a day school for them in the building formerly used by St. Peter's School on the site of the Old Deanery. (fn. 579) There were places for the permanent number of 20 choristers together with 6 or more probationers: after 1954 a few fee-paying pupils, not intended for the choir, were taken for preparatory school work. (fn. 580)

Yorkshire School for the Blind.

This school was founded in 1834 as a memorial to William Wilberforce. A subscription of £600 was raised at a meeting for the promotion of the school in 1833; in 1834 the lease of the King's Manor was acquired, excepting the rooms occupied by the National school. The school was residential and maintained by subscriptions, but fees were sometimes paid. (fn. 581) There were 74 boys and 26 girls resident in 1870; 11 adult workers attended the 'out-mates' or out-workers' department and received wages for the work they did in manufacturing baskets and brushes. The children were taught basket-making, weaving, and music, as well as the usual school subjects. The sale of baskets and brushes produced over £800 in 1870. There was a staff of 3. (fn. 582) The school received several endowments and some were used for scholarships; in 1866 a fund was raised by Mrs. Spencer Markham to aid pupils in establishing themselves independently. A fund raised in 1883 to commemorate the jubilee of the foundation provided for new buildings, the extinction of the rent of the premises, and the establishment of a department for teaching handicrafts to non-resident adult pupils. (fn. 583) There were 4 pupils in this department in 1890; 41 boys and 20 girls in the residential school and 15 basket- and brush-makers in the out-workers' department. By 1910 mat-making and mattress-making had been introduced in the out-workers' department. In 1950 there were 57 boys and 43 girls in the residential school and 41 adults in the out-workers' department, with a staff of 21. (fn. 584) The school was occupying the original premises in the King's Manor in 1956, although arrangements for removal to a new building had been made.

Adult Schools.

An adult school was established by the Society of Friends in York in 1816; there were said to be 24 pupils attending at one time and Samuel Tuke, the founder of the Retreat, was one of the teachers. (fn. 585) The school appears not to have survived for long and another opened by the Friends in Hope Street in 1848 may more properly be said to have formed the basis of the adult school movement in York. The school moved to a room in the Herbert House, and later had some accommodation in Cumberland House on King's Staith. In 1876 the Central Adult School was opened on the site of the United Methodist Chapel in Lady Peckitt's Yard. The building was in the trusteeship of members of the Monthly Meeting of the Society of Friends (fn. 586) and many Friends were amongst its founders and teachers. Nevertheless the school was non-sectarian in its aims, and pupils and teachers of other denominations were associated with it. Several adult schools were opened in the suburbs between 1892 and 1905 and in the latter year a company was formed to acquire and hold premises for the adult schools in York. The schools probably declined during the First World War and by 1924 none was active. (fn. 587)

York Educational Settlement was opened in 1909 as a non-residential college for adult education. From its inception it provided a wide variety of practical courses and lectures. The government and administration of the Settlement is in the hands of its members but there is a full-time paid warden. The Settlement moved to Holgate Lane in 1933 and in 1959 celebrated its jubilee; its work was then expanding and it needed additional accomodation. (fn. 588)

Footnotes

  • 1. Ed. 7/139.
  • 2. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1940, 29.
  • 3. Schs. in receipt Parl. grants, 1897, [8989], H.C. (1898), lxix.
  • 4. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 5. Ibid. 1932.
  • 6. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1940, 29.
  • 7. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 8. Ibid.
  • 9. 12th Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 348, p. 674 (1825), x; Endowed Char. Yorks. W.R. IV, H.C. 183, p. 15 (1899), lxxii; Digest Returns Sel. Cttee. Educ. Poor, H.C. 224, p. 1075 (1819), ix (2).
  • 10. Ed. 7/139.
  • 11. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1859 [2681], H.C. (1860), liv.
  • 12. Endowed Char. Yorks. W.R. IV, p. 15.
  • 13. Ibid. pp. 17-18.
  • 14. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1894; Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 15. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1938.
  • 16. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 17. J. Lyth, Glimpses of Early Methodism in York (York, 1885), 259.
  • 18. Ed. 7/149; Rep. Wesleyan Cttee. Educ. 1848, 50-51.
  • 19. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1847 [998], H.C. (1847-8), cclxxxvii.
  • 20. Ibid.
  • 21. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1850.
  • 22. Rep. Wesleyan Cttee. Educ. 1848, 50-51.
  • 23. Ibid. 1850, 101.
  • 24. Edwin Benson, 'Hist. of Educ. in York, 1780-1902' (London Univ. unpublished Ph.D. thesis, 1932), 282.
  • 25. Rep. Wesleyan Cttee. Educ. 1853, 74-75.
  • 26. Ibid. 1858, 32; see Priory Place Wesleyan Schs.
  • 27. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 87.
  • 28. Ed. 7/149.
  • 29. Digest Returns Sel. Cttee. Educ. Poor.
  • 30. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 87, 171.
  • 31. Nat. Soc. Church Schs. Enquiry, 1846-7.
  • 32. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 184.
  • 33. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1850.
  • 34. Ibid. 1854.
  • 35. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1873.
  • 36. See Bedern Nat. Sch.
  • 37. Ed. 7/149.
  • 38. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1865, 1872.
  • 39. Ed. 7/147.
  • 40. See p. 371.
  • 41. York Herald, 7 June 1890; York Nat. Sch. Cttee. Min. Bk. penes, 1957, H. C. Scott, York.
  • 42. For the earlier history of the Sch. see V.C.H. Yorks. i. 474-5.
  • 43. Abp. Holgate's Grammar Sch. 1546-1946 (priv. print. York).
  • 44. St. Mary's Convent, Micklegate Bar, ed. H. J. Coleridge, 77-79, 90.
  • 45. Drake, Ebor. 247.
  • 46. Hargrove, Hist. York, ii. 501-3.
  • 47. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833.
  • 48. Ed. 7/149; see St. George's Vol. Sch.
  • 49. City of York, Rep. of educ. cttee. to the council, 1870 and Statistics of Elem. Schs. in City compiled by Town Clerk, 1871: hereafter cited as Town Clerk's Return, 1870-1.
  • 50. Ex inf. the headmistress, 1957.
  • 51. Cath. Educ. Council, Cath. Schs. in Eng. and Wales (1954).
  • 52. Ex inf. the headmistress, 1957.
  • 53. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 54. Sch. file, penes Nat. Soc.
  • 55. Ibid.; Ed. 7/136.
  • 56. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1880.
  • 57. Ibid. 1887.
  • 58. Sch. file, penes Nat. Soc.; Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1913.
  • 59. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1919, 1932, 1938.
  • 60. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1940, 9-10.
  • 61. Ed. 7/136.
  • 62. Manchester Stat. Soc. Rep. Educ. York, 1836-7, p. xiii.
  • 63. W. White, Dir. W.R. York and Hull (1838).
  • 64. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1849.
  • 65. Ibid. 1850.
  • 66. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833.
  • 67. Manchester Stat. Soc. Rep. Educ. York, 1836-7, p. xiii.
  • 68. O.S. Map 1/1056, 1850.
  • 69. Ed. 7/136.
  • 70. Ibid.; Sch. Log. Bk. 1863-1902, penes York Educ. Dept.
  • 71. Town Clerk's Return, 1870-1.
  • 72. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1887.
  • 73. Bd. of Educ. List. 21, 1913.
  • 74. Ibid. 1932, 1938.
  • 75. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 76. Ed. 7/149.
  • 77. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1852.
  • 78. Ibid. 1857; Ed. 7/149.
  • 79. Ed. 7/149.
  • 80. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1854; Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1867, 1876-7.
  • 81. Ed. 7/149.
  • 82. Hargrove, Hist. York, ii. 390-1; Mins. of Managers, 1812-22, penes York Public Libr.
  • 83. Hargrove, Hist. York, ii. 390-1.
  • 84. York M.M. Statement of Charitable Funds (priv. print. York, 1906), 16-17; York P.M. Min. Bk. (in Yorks. Q.M. Record Closet), 4 Aug. 1827, 15 Mar. 1829.
  • 85. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833.
  • 86. Statement of Charitable Funds, 16-17.
  • 87. Ed. 7/149.
  • 88. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1854.
  • 89. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1887.
  • 90. Statement of Charitable Funds, 16-17.
  • 91. Sheahan and Whellan, Hist. York and E.R. i. 562-3; E. Chamberlayne, Angliae Notitia (1707), 639; E. [and J.] Chamberlayne, Magnae Britanniae Notitia (1710), 624.
  • 92. Rep. Blue Coat Boys' and Grey Coat Girls' Schs. 1835 (priv. print. York).
  • 93. Articles agreed upon . . . to be the Standing Rules . . . for the . . . Management of the Charity School (pamph. n.d. in York Public Libr.).
  • 94. York Dioc. Regy. (St. Ant. Hall), R. BP. b.
  • 95. Digest Returns Sel. Cttee. Educ. Poor; see pp. 428, 438.
  • 96. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833.
  • 97. Rep. Blue Coat and Grey Coat Schs. 1850.
  • 98. Ibid. 1914, 1922.
  • 99. York Educ. Dept. sch. file 160. 1; Programme, Opening of New Playing Field, 1938 (priv. print. York).
  • 100. Bootham School, 1823-1923, ed. F. E. Pollard, 24-28.
  • 101. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833.
  • 102. Pollard, Bootham School, 40.
  • 103. Pollard, Bootham School, 41, 46, 48.
  • 104. Schs. Enquiry Com. Vol. 18 [3966-XVII], H.C. (1867-8), xxviii (15.)
  • 105. Bootham School, 104, 205.
  • 106. Bootham School, Rep. 1815, 1920, 1930, 1956.
  • 107. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 108. Ibid.
  • 109. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1943, 8.
  • 110. Ibid. 26.
  • 111. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 112. Ibid.
  • 113. York Courant, 27 June 1814.
  • 114. Digest Returns Sel. Cttee. Educ. Poor; Baines, Dir. Yorks. (1823).
  • 115. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833.
  • 116. Catholic Poor Schs. Cttee. Rep. 1849, 67.
  • 117. Ed. 7/136; Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1913.
  • 118. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1913.
  • 119. Ibid. 1932, 1938.
  • 120. Sch. Log. Bk. p. 99, penes York Educ. Dept.
  • 121. Yorks. Eve. Press, 22 July 1954.
  • 122. Ed. 7/149; Yorks Herald, 5 Feb. 1890; ex inf. headmistress, St. Margaret's Sch. Micklegate.
  • 123. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1892.
  • 124. Schs. in receipt Parl. Grants, 1897.
  • 125. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1903-6, 108; Public Elem. Schs. 1905.
  • 126. See St. Margaret's Grammar Sch.
  • 127. Ed. 7/148; sch. file penes Nat. Soc.
  • 128. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1851.
  • 129. Ed. 7/148.
  • 130. Ed. 7/136; York Nat. Sch. Cttee. Min. Bk.
  • 131. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1880.
  • 132. Ibid. 1881.
  • 133. Ibid. 1892.
  • 134. Ed. 7/136.
  • 135. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1881.
  • 136. York Nat. Sch. Cttee. Min. Bk.
  • 137. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1892.
  • 138. Endowed Char. Yorks. E.R. (1876).
  • 139. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 140. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1914, 27-28.
  • 141. Ibid. 1932.
  • 142. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 143. Ibid.
  • 144. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1936; York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1937.
  • 145. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1938; York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1939.
  • 146. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 147. 12th Rep. Com. Char. 667-70; York Courier, 19 July 1813.
  • 148. Hargrove, Hist. York. ii. 552.
  • 149. 12th Rep. Com. Char. 667-70.
  • 150. Digest Returns Sel. Cttee. Educ. Poor.
  • 151. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833; 13th Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 349, p. 667 (1825), xi.
  • 152. Char. Com. Scheme, C./26, 733.
  • 153. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 367.
  • 154. Hargrove, Hist. York, ii. 216-17.
  • 155. 12th Rep. Com. Char. 667-70.
  • 156. Digest Returns Sel. Cttee. Educ. Poor.
  • 157. 12th Rep. Com. Char. 667-70.
  • 158. Educ. Enquiry, Abstract, 1833.
  • 159. Char. Com. Scheme, C./26, 733.
  • 160. Inscription on sch. bldg.
  • 161. 12th Rep. Com. Char. 667-70.
  • 162. Digest Returns Sel. Cttee. Educ. Poor.
  • 163. 12th Rep. Com. Char. 667-70.
  • 164. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833.
  • 165. Schs. Enquiry Com. Vol. 9 (1867-8), 201-2.
  • 166. Town Clerk's Return, 1870-1.
  • 167. Char. Com. Scheme, C./26, 733.
  • 168. Ed. 7/140.
  • 169. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1852.
  • 170. Ibid. 1853.
  • 171. Ibid. 1854.
  • 172. Schs. in receipt Parl. Grants, 1897.
  • 173. Sch. Log. Bk. 1863-1903, penes, 1957, the headmistress.
  • 174. Sch. Log Bk. 1904 to date.
  • 175. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 176. Ibid. 1937; Sch. Log. Bk. 1904 to date.
  • 177. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 178. Schs. Enquiry Com. Vol. 18 (1867-8).
  • 179. Anon. Story of Elmfield College (priv. print. Manchester, n.d.), 5, 24, 28, 33.
  • 180. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1932, 16.
  • 181. Ed. 7/136.
  • 182. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1883.
  • 183. G. Stevens, Dir. York (1885).
  • 184. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1887.
  • 185. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 186. Ibid. 1932.
  • 187. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 188. See York and Ripon Training Coll. for Schoolmistresses.
  • 189. Ed. 7/149.
  • 190. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 276-7.
  • 191. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1854.
  • 192. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1863.
  • 193. Ed. 7/136; Schs. in receipt Parl. Grants, 1897; York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1938, 37.
  • 194. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910; York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1938, 37.
  • 195. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1932, 1936.
  • 196. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 197. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. Sch. Medical Officer, 1919.
  • 198. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1921, 27; 1941, 25.
  • 199. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 200. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1921, 30.
  • 201. Ibid. 1941, 25.
  • 202. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 203. E. Chamberlayne, Angliae Notitia (1707), 639; Edward Robinson, York Blue Coat Char. Sch. (priv. print. York, 1887, 5; Catharine Cappe, Account Girls' Char. Sch. York (priv. print. York, 1810), 4-5; see pp. 433, 438.
  • 204. York Dioc. Regy. (St. Ant. Hall), R. B.P. b.
  • 205. Hargrove, Hist. York. ii. 569-70.
  • 206. Cappe, Account Girls' Char. Sch. 8-22.
  • 207. Digest Returns Sel. Cttee. Educ. Poor.
  • 208. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833.
  • 209. See Blue Coat Sch.
  • 210. Rep. Blue Coat and Grey Coat Schs. 1850, 1893, 1934, 1953.
  • 211. Ed. 7/136; Wesleyan Chapel Cttee. Rep. 1869; see p. 411.
  • 212. Ed. 7/136.
  • 213. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1870.
  • 214. Ibid. 1877, 1887.
  • 215. York Sch. Bd. Rep. 1894 (priv. print. York, 1895), 11; see Park Grove Sch.
  • 216. York Sch. Bd. 4th Triennial Rep.
  • 217. Schs. in receipt Parl. Grants, 1900.
  • 218. Ed. 7/136.
  • 219. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1906-7, 8; see Queen Anne's Sch.
  • 220. Ed. 7/136.
  • 221. See p. 411.
  • 222. 12th Rep. Com. Char. 642.
  • 223. Digest Returns Sel. Cttee. Educ. Poor.
  • 224. 12th Rep. Com. Char. 610, 642-4; the schoolhouse was still standing in 1957.
  • 225. W. White, Dir. W.R. York and Hull (1838).
  • 226. Schs. Enquiry Com. Vol. 18 (1867-8).
  • 227. F. White, Dir. Hull and York (1851).
  • 228. Schs. Enquiry Com. Vol. 18 (1867-8).
  • 229. P.O. Dir. York (1872); Ed. 7/147.
  • 230. Kelly's Dir. York (1901); Char. Com. Scheme, E./55, 783, p. 13.
  • 231. Ex inf. C. A. Heron Esq. one time headmaster.
  • 232. Ed. 7/136.
  • 233. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1938, 37.
  • 234. Public Elem. Schs. 1907 [Cd. 3910] H.C. (1908), lxxxiv.
  • 235. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 236. Ibid. 1932.
  • 237. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 238. The site, in Heworth Terrace, was the subject of a Scheme of the Char. Com. in 1873: Char. Com. files.
  • 239. Ed. 7/136.
  • 240. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1877.
  • 241. Schs. in receipt Parl. Grants, 1897.
  • 242. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910, 1932, 1938.
  • 243. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 244. Ibid.
  • 245. York M.M. Statement of Charitable Funds (priv. print. York, 1906), 17-18; Ed. 7/147.
  • 246. York P.M. Min. Bk. 1838-9, Yorks. Q.M. Record Closet.
  • 247. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833.
  • 248. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1850.
  • 249. Ibid. 1854.
  • 250. Sheahan and Whellan, Hist. York, i. 566.
  • 251. Schs. Enquiry Com. Vol. 9, p. 246.
  • 252. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1867, 1891.
  • 253. Ed. 7/149.
  • 254. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1872-4; see p. 416.
  • 255. Ed. 7/149.
  • 256. Ed. 7/136.
  • 257. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1914.
  • 258. Ed. 7/136.
  • 259. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1938, 37.
  • 260. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1919.
  • 261. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1938, 37.
  • 262. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1932.
  • 263. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 264. Ed. 7/136.
  • 265. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1919.
  • 266. Ibid. 1927.
  • 267. Ibid. 1932.
  • 268. Hargrove, Hist. York, ii. 562; V. D. Davis, Hist. Manchester Coll. 71; D.N.B. see p. 405.
  • 269. Digest Returns Sel. Cttee. Educ. Poor.
  • 270. Hargrove, Hist. York, ii. 563.
  • 271. Anon. The Manchester Socinian Controversy (Lond. 1825), 182-5.
  • 272. Lady Hewley, by deed of 13 Jan. 1704, had provided 5 exhibitions for young men 'designed for the Ministry of Christ's Holy Gospel': 17th Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 426, pp. 808, 813-14 (1826-7), x.
  • 273. J. Hunter, Hist. Defence of the Trustees of Lady Hewley's Char. (Lond. 1834), 60-62; see p. 405.
  • 274. Davis, Hist. Manchester Coll. 74 et passim; D.N.B.; V.C.H. Oxon. iii. 34.
  • 275. Sheahan and Whellan, Hist. York and E.R. i. 560; see St. John's College and York and Ripon Training College for Schoolmistresses.
  • 276. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 87.
  • 277. Sch. file penes Nat. Soc.
  • 278. Hargrove, Hist. York, ii. 582.
  • 279. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 87.
  • 280. 10 Geo. IV, c. 50; Ed. 7/136; Voluntary Schs. Returns, 1906, H.C. 178-XXXIV (1906), lxxxviii.
  • 281. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 171.
  • 282. Sch. file penes Nat. Soc.; York Nat. Sch. Cttee. in. Bk.
  • 283. Nat. Soc. Church Schs. Enquiry, 1846-7.
  • 284. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1850.
  • 285. Ibid. 1857.
  • 286. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 265, 364.
  • 287. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1847.
  • 288. See York Ind. Ragged Sch.
  • 289. Sch. file penes Nat. Soc.; Ed. 7/136.
  • 290. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1932.
  • 291. Ibid. 1938.
  • 292. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1942, 9; see Priory Place Wesleyan Schools.
  • 293. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1947, 8.
  • 294. Ed. 7/136; sch. file penes Nat. Soc.
  • 295. Nat. Soc. Rep. (priv. print. 1838), 145.
  • 296. Nat. Soc. Church Schs. Enquiry, 1846-7.
  • 297. Ed. 7/136; Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1852.
  • 298. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1854.
  • 299. York Sch. Bd. Mins. 1893, 11.
  • 300. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1894; Schs. in receipt Parl. Grants, 1897.
  • 301. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1923, 1927.
  • 302. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 303. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1921, 9.
  • 304. Ibid. 1923, 15; 1925, 23.
  • 305. Ibid. 1933, 32; 1940, 33.
  • 306. Ibid. 1946, 37.
  • 307. Ibid. 1921, 9.
  • 308. Ibid. 1925, 23; 1932, 35.
  • 309. Ibid. 1933, 32.
  • 310. Ibid. 1940, 33.
  • 311. Ibid. 1946, 15.
  • 312. Ed. 7/136; York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1938, 37.
  • 313. Schs. in receipt Parl. Grants, 1897.
  • 314. York Sch. Bd. 4th Triennial Rep. 11.
  • 315. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 316. Ibid. 1932.
  • 317. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 318. Ed. 7/136.
  • 319. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1938, 37.
  • 320. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 321. Ibid. 1936.
  • 322. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1942, 9.
  • 323. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 324. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1857; Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1858.
  • 325. Ed. 7/136; Town Clerk's Return, 1870-1.
  • 326. Rep. Wesleyan Cttee. Educ. 1858, 32.
  • 327. Ed. 7/136.
  • 328. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1857.
  • 329. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 286-7.
  • 330. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1894.
  • 331. Schs. in receipt Parl. Grants, 1897.
  • 332. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1932, 1936.
  • 333. York Educ. Cttee. Educ. Act, 1944, Development Plan.
  • 334. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1903-6, 14.
  • 335. Ibid.; and 1906-7, 8; 1908-9, 10.
  • 336. Ibid. 1907-8, 20.
  • 337. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 338. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1921, 11.
  • 339. Ibid. 1933, 32; 1946, 37.
  • 340. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1932.
  • 341. Ibid. 1936.
  • 342. Ibid. 1938.
  • 343. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 344. See pp. 376, 418.
  • 345. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 166-7.
  • 346. Nat. Soc. Church Schs. Enquiry, 1846-7.
  • 347. See St. Saviour's Nat. Sch.
  • 348. Ed. 7/136.
  • 349. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1878.
  • 350. St. Paul's Foundry Sch. file penes Nat. Soc.
  • 351. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1887.
  • 352. St. Paul's Foundry sch. file.
  • 353. Schs. in receipt Parl. Grants, 1897.
  • 354. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1913.
  • 355. Ibid. 1932.
  • 356. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 357. Ed. 7/136.
  • 358. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1877.
  • 359. Ibid, 1878.
  • 360. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 361. Ibid. 1932.
  • 362. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 363. Ed. 7/136; sch. file penes Nat. Soc.
  • 364. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1878.
  • 365. Schs. in receipt Parl. Grants, 1897.
  • 366. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 367. Ibid. 1932.
  • 368. York Educ. Dept. sch. file 460. 1.
  • 369. Ed. 7/149.
  • 370. The Catholic Sch. Sept. 1851, 176.
  • 371. Ibid. Oct. 1852, 318.
  • 372. Ed. 7/136; Catholic Poor Schs. Cttee. Rep. 1850.
  • 373. The Catholic Sch. Oct. 1853, 44.
  • 374. Ed. 7/136.
  • 375. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1854.
  • 376. Catholic Poor Schs. Cttee. Rep. 1856.
  • 377. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1867.
  • 378. Public Elem. Schs. 1907; inf. from plaque on wall of sch.
  • 379. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1932, 1938.
  • 380. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 381. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 365; see p. 410.
  • 382. Rep. Wesleyan Cttee. Educ. 1848, 51; Ed. 7/136.
  • 383. Rep. Wesleyan Cttee. Educ. 1848, 51.
  • 384. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1847.
  • 385. Rep. Wesleyan Cttee. Educ. 1853, 74-75.
  • 386. Ibid. 1857; Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1858.
  • 387. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1887.
  • 388. York Sch. Bd. 2nd Triennial Rep. 4.
  • 389. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1894.
  • 390. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 397; see Fishergate Schs.
  • 391. See St. George's Vol. Sch.
  • 392. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1847, 1849.
  • 393. See St. John's Vol. Sch.
  • 394. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1859; Sheahan and Whellan, Hist. York and E.R. i. 560.
  • 395. Ibid. 1874.
  • 396. Ex inf. Messrs. W. C. Chapman and J. E. Coleclough, St. John's College.
  • 397. Ed. 7/136; Voluntary Schs. Returns, 1906.
  • 398. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1853.
  • 399. Ed. 7/136; Schs. Enquiry Com. Vol. 9 (1867-8).
  • 400. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1859.
  • 401. Ibid. 1874.
  • 402. Sch. file penes Nat. Soc.
  • 403. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910, 1932, 1938.
  • 404. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 405. Ed. 7/136; sch. file penes Nat. Soc.
  • 406. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1873.
  • 407. Sch. file penes Nat. Soc.
  • 408. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 409. Ibid. 1932.
  • 410. Ibid. 1936.
  • 411. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 412. Ex inf. the headmistress, 1957; see Castlegate Higher Grade Sch.
  • 413. Sch. file penes Nat. Soc.; Ed. 7/149.
  • 414. Nat. Soc. Church Schs. Enquiry, 1846-7.
  • 415. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1847.
  • 416. Ibid. 1850.
  • 417. Ibid. 1854.
  • 418. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1858.
  • 419. The infants' dept. was probably taken over from Speculation Street; see Speculation Street Sch.
  • 420. Town Clerk's Return, 1870-1.
  • 421. Sch. file penes Nat. Soc.
  • 422. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 423. Ibid. 1926.
  • 424. Ibid. 1936.
  • 425. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1938.
  • 426. Ibid. 1946, 9.
  • 427. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 428. Ed. 7/136; sch. file penes Nat. Soc.
  • 429. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1875.
  • 430. Sch. file penes Nat. Soc.
  • 431. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1889.
  • 432. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1932.
  • 433. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 434. For the earlier history of the sch. see V.C.H. Yorks. i. 416-23.
  • 435. A. Raine, Hist. St. Peter's Sch. (1926), 171 et passim; St. Peter Sch. New Buildings (priv. print. York 1935).
  • 436. Ed. 7/149; Yorks. Gaz. 16 Jan. 1864.
  • 437. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1868.
  • 438. Town Clerk's Return, 1870-1.
  • 439. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1873.
  • 440. See pp. 376, 418.
  • 441. Ed. 7/149.
  • 442. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1870.
  • 443. Ibid. 1873.
  • 444. Manchester Stat. Soc. Rep. Educ. York, 1836-7, p. xiii; Ed. 7/149; Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 185 (where the date of opening is given as 1837: this is perhaps the date at which the unidentified founder placed the management into the hands of trustees); Nat. Soc. Church Schs. Enquiry, 1846-7, refers to 2 girls schs. in The Groves one of which may be connected with this sch.
  • 445. Manchester Stat. Soc. Rep. Educ. York, 1836-7.
  • 446. Ed. 7/149; Yorks. Gaz. 6 Feb. 1858.
  • 447. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 273.
  • 448. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1855.
  • 449. Ed. 7/149.
  • 450. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 273.
  • 451. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1859.
  • 452. Ibid. 1867.
  • 453. Ibid. 1887.
  • 454. Return of Schs. 1893 [C. 7529], H.C. (1894), lxv.
  • 455. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 456. Ibid. 1932, 1938.
  • 457. Ex inf. York Educ. Cttee.; the school was closed in 1957.
  • 458. Manchester Stat. Soc. Rep. Educ. York, 1836-7, p. xiii.
  • 459. Ed. 7/149.
  • 460. W. White, Dir. Hull, York, &c. (1867).
  • 461. Town Clerk's Return, 1870-1.
  • 462. Ed. 7/136.
  • 463. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1876.
  • 464. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 465. Ibid. 1932.
  • 466. Ibid. 1938.
  • 467. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 468. Health of Towns Com. Rep. on State of York (by Thomas Laycock, 1844; off-print in York Pub. Libr.).
  • 469. Sheahan and Whellan, Hist. York and N.R. i. 587; see p. 407.
  • 470. Town Clerk's Return, 1870-1.
  • 471. P.O. Dir. York (1872).
  • 472. Ed. 7/136; York Sch. Bd. Mins. 1895, 13.
  • 473. York Sch. Bd. 3rd Triennial Rep. 10.
  • 474. Ed. 7/136; York Educ. Cttee. Rep, 1938, 37.
  • 475. Schs. in receipt Parl. Grants, 1897.
  • 476. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 477. Ibid. 1932.
  • 478. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 479. Yorks. Herald, 30 Dec. 1905; 10 and 17 Feb. 1906.
  • 480. Schs. Enquiry Com. Vol. 9, 379.
  • 481. Rep. York Art. Sch. Cttee. 1890 (priv. print. York).
  • 482. Yorks. Herald, 17 Feb. 1906; York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1903-6, 18.
  • 483. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1903-6, 18; 1910, 14.
  • 484. Ibid. 1903-6, 12-13.
  • 485. Ibid. 1949, 20-22.
  • 486. Ed. 7/136; York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1938, 37.
  • 487. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1892.
  • 488. Public Elem. Schs. 1907; York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1938, 37.
  • 489. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1910.
  • 490. Ed. 7/136; see Groves Wesleyan Sch.
  • 491. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1932.
  • 492. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1938, 37.
  • 493. Ibid. 1942.
  • 494. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 495. Ed. 7/136.
  • 496. York Nat. Sch. Cttee. Min. Bk.
  • 497. Nat. Soc. Church Schs. Enquiry, 1846-7.
  • 498. Ed. 7/136.
  • 499. Town Clerk's Return, 1870-1; see St. Margaret's Nat. Sch.
  • 500. Catharine Cappe, Acct. of Two Char. Schs. (York, 1800), 7-12; York Courant, 19 Oct. 1784; Hargrove, Hist. York, ii. 632-3.
  • 501. Hargrove, Hist. York. ii. 633.
  • 502. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833.
  • 503. Char. Com. Scheme.
  • 504. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1941, 24; Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1932.
  • 505. Bd. of Educ. List 21, 1932.
  • 506. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1949, 35.
  • 507. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 508. 5th Annual Rep. Yorks. Union Mechanics' Institutes (priv. print. Leeds, 1842), 42; Yorks. Gaz. 1 Mar. 1828.
  • 509. Rep. York Mechanics' Institute, 1831 (priv. print. York).
  • 510. Ibid. 1838.
  • 511. Ibid. 1846.
  • 512. The St. Saviourgate Hall was later used as a Masonic Lodge.
  • 513. Rep. York Mechanics' Institute, 1885.
  • 514. Ibid. 1891; York Corp. Mins. 1890-1, 411, 514; Yorks. Gaz. 28 May 1910; York Pub. Libr. Cttee. 1st Gen. Rep. 1891-4.
  • 515. York Corp. Mins. 1898-9, 540-2.
  • 516. See Sch. of Art.
  • 517. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1909-10, 38-39.
  • 518. Ibid. 1921, 21.
  • 519. Ibid. 1930, 17.
  • 520. Ibid. 1943, 19-20.
  • 521. Yorks. Gaz. 14 July 1950.
  • 522. York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1943, 17.
  • 523. Ibid. 1949, 19.
  • 524. A proprietary sch. for the children of Friends was begun at Trinity Lane, Bishophill, in 1785 and closed in 1814 after it had moved to Tower Street. This sch. has been called a predecessor of the Mount: J. S. Rowntree, York Q.M. 20, and see H. Winifred Sturge and Theodora Clark, The Mount Sch. York.
  • 525. The Mount Sch. York, 35-37, app.
  • 526. Schs. Enquiry Com. Vol. 18, 692.
  • 527. The Mount Sch. York, app.; Mount Sch., Ann. Rep. 1936.
  • 528. Girls' Sch. Year Bk. 1956.
  • 529. Ed. 7/147.
  • 530. Ibid.; Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1878.
  • 531. Ibid. 1884, 1889; Ed. 7/147.
  • 532. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 75.
  • 533. W. White, Dir. W.R. York and Hull (1838).
  • 534. Rep. Wesleyan Cttee. Educ. 1848, 51-52.
  • 535. Ibid. 1850, 101.
  • 536. Ibid. 1853.
  • 537. Ex inf. York Educ. Dept.
  • 538. 4th Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 312, pp. 381-6 (1820), v; Hargrove, Hist. York, ii. 289-90.
  • 539. York Dioc. Regy. (St. Ant. Hall), R. BP. b.
  • 540. See p. 425.
  • 541. Hargrove, Hist. York, ii. 290-1; 4th Rep. Com. Char. 381-6.
  • 542. Digest Returns Sel. Cttee. Educ. Poor.
  • 543. 4th Rep. Com. Char. 381-6.
  • 544. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833; Sheahan and Whellan, Hist. York and E.R. i. 564.
  • 545. Char. Com. Scheme, E./60, 488.
  • 546. 4th Rep. Com. Char. 383.
  • 547. Digest Returns Sel. Cttee. Educ. Poor.
  • 548. 4th Rep. Com. Char. 386.
  • 549. Educ. Enquiry Abstract, 1833.
  • 550. Sheahan and Whellan, Hist. York and E.R. i. 564.
  • 551. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 294.
  • 552. See Wilson's Boys' Sch.
  • 553. Kelly's Dir. York (1889); see p. 411.
  • 554. Rep. Wesleyan Cttee. Educ. 1874, 22.
  • 555. Ibid. 1887, 127; York Herald, 6 Sept. 1889.
  • 556. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1847, 539-40; 1849, 684.
  • 557. Ed. 7/136.
  • 558. V.C.H. Yorks. i. 475; Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 326-7.
  • 559. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1849, 698-705.
  • 560. Ed. 7/149.
  • 561. Mins. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1853, 281-2.
  • 562. Ibid. 1854, 351.
  • 563. Rep. Educ. Cttee. Council, 1859, 380.
  • 564. Ibid. 1862, 250.
  • 565. See York Girls' High Sch.
  • 566. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 417-18.
  • 567. Yorks. Gaz. 28 June 1919.
  • 568. Girls' Sch. Year Bk. 1956.
  • 569. P.O. Dir. York (1879); Yorks. Gaz. 25 March 1932.
  • 570. York Corp. Mins. 1931-2, 378; see p. 436.
  • 571. Benson, 'Hist. Educ. York', 386, 418.
  • 572. Yorks. Gaz. 28 Dec. 1907; York Educ. Cttee. Rep. 1903-6, 9.
  • 573. 1st Annual Rep. York Ragged Schs. 1849.
  • 574. Ibid. 2nd Rep. 1850.
  • 575. Town Clerk's Return, 1870-1.
  • 576. See York Girls' Cert. Ind. Sch.
  • 577. Yorks. Gaz. 2 April 1921.
  • 578. V.C.H. Yorks. i. 416 sqq.
  • 579. Us and Our Song-Sch. ed. C. C. Bell (York, 1931).
  • 580. Ex inf. Choir Sch.
  • 581. Sheahan and Whellan, Hist. York and E.R. i. 561-2; At a Public Meeting ... 1833 for promoting the establishment ...of a Yorks. Sch. for the indigent Blind (Broadsheet, York).
  • 582. Yorks. Sch. for Blind, Annual Rep. 1870.
  • 583. Ibid. 1883, 1930, 1933.
  • 584. Yorks. Sch. for Blind, Annual Rep. 1890, 1910, 1950.
  • 585. Unless otherwise stated the following is drawn from F. J. Gilman, Story of York Adult Schools (priv. print. York, 1907).
  • 586. York M.M. Statement of Charitable Funds.
  • 587. York City Year Bks. (1920-4).
  • 588. Yorks. Gaz. 9 Oct. 1909; Yorks. Eve. Press, 14 May and 10 Oct. 1958; Jubilee Prog. 1958-9 (priv. print. York).