BHO

Close Rolls, Richard II: August 1377

Pages 22-24

Calendar of Close Rolls, Richard II: Volume 1, 1377-1381. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1914.

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August 1377

Aug. 6.
Westminster.
To the mayor of Bristol. Like order, upon petition of Thomas Danyel merchant of Bristol, to dearrest a ship of his there arrested for the king's service, suffering him as pertains to a true merchant to make his profit therewith. By C.
Aug. 4.
Westminster.
To William de Sleford dean of the king's free chapel of St. Stephen within Westminster palace. Order to deliver by indenture [containing] the number and particulars thereof to Thomas Lynton the king's clerk dean of his chapel such vestments, books and ornaments of the late king in his keeping as by advice of the said Thomas shall be needful for the king's chapel, there to serve until order be by the king and council lawfully taken for administration of the late king's goods. By K. and C.
[Fœdera.]
To the same. Order in presence of Richard Lescrope steward of the household and Guy de Brien the chamberlain or one of them, by indenture [containing] the number and weight thereof, to deliver to the king's clerk William de Pakynton keeper of the great wardrobe certain silver vessels of the late king in his keeping to serve in the household until etc. (as above); namely four cups with covers silver gilt, twenty four pieces of white silver, eight 'chargeours' of white silver, four dozen dishes of white silver, two pairs of bowls (pelvium) silver gilt, eight bowls of white silver parcel gilt, and seven basins (lavatoria) of white silver. By K. and C.
[Ibid.]
To John de Ipre late steward of Richard de Beverle keeper of the great wardrobe, and William Strete controller of the late king's household. Order in presence of the said steward of the household and chamberlain or one of them, by indenture [containing] the number and price thereof, to deliver to the king's clerk William de Pakynton keeper of his great wardrobe the late king's vessels and utensils of silver used in his household, which are by them put in Westminster palace in the keeping of the said William de Pakynton, to serve in the king's household until etc. (as above); namely fifty four candlesticks, twenty five salts, and thirty five silver spoons for the office of the pantry, thirty eight silver pots (ollas), whereof twelve gilt, and forty silver cups for the office of the buttery, six silver dishes, and six salts for the mail (pro mantica), one pot and one 'chargeour' for the office of the almonry, eight plates whereof four are gilt and forty four silver dishes for the office of the spicery, one hundred and ninety four dishes, twenty two 'chargeours,' two cauldrons, one 'ladil' and two 'broches' of silver for the office of the scullery, thirty seven silver salts for the office of the saucery, seven bowls of silver whereof two are gilt, and five basins of silver for the office of the ewery.
By K. and C.
[Ibid.]
Aug. 6.
Westminster.
To the mayor of the city of London. Order, upon petition of John Philipot, John Fifhide, Adam Stable, Simon Aylisham, William Staundon, Richard Losey, Robert de Parys and John Wilsdon and many other merchants of London, shewing that during the truce between the late king and Charles of France in 50 Edward III the enemies of France took their goods and chattels to the amount of 1,340l. 17s. 4½d. in divers ships at sea coming from Flanders and Calais, brought them to St. Walery and Harflu, and are there unlawfully detaining them, to take of each of those merchants security for saving the king harmless for such goods as each shall receive, and in part of their losses to deliver to them in reprisal such quantity of the enemies' goods now arrested as pertains to each of them, certifying in chancery the security taken and the quantity of goods delivered to each; as feeling aggrieved by those wrongs the said merchants caused certain goods and chattels of the said enemies to the amount of about 701l. 14s. found in the hands of divers people of the said city to be arrested. By pet. of C.
Aug. 7.
Westminster.
To the sheriff of Kent. Order, in consideration of the great peril in the country for lack of guard of the sea coast in Kent, to assign the tenants of the liberty of the archbishop of Canterbury at their peril to guard the coast at Saltwode, Hethe and Romene, as was appointed by common assent of the country. By C.
Aug. 7.
Westminster.
To the collectors of customs in the port of London. Order, upon petition of Peter de la Stage and Arnald de Gyrond merchants of Bordeaux, shewing that the collectors are demanding of them customs and subsidies for certain merchandise by them brought to London from Flanders in divers tuns and 'roundelettes' to be taken thence for greater security to Bordeaux, and are unlawfully keeping the same under arrest, to dearrest such merchandise if not put ashore nor exposed for sale, delivering the same to the said merchants without payment of custom or subsidy. Proviso that custom and subsidy be paid upon any exposed for sale or put ashore before it be taken over. By C.
Aug. 6.
Westminster.
To the bailiffs of Gippewich. Order, upon petition of William Johanson of Sirresey master of a ship of Sirresey in Seland and the seamen thereof, shewing that the ship and they were arrested for the king's service, and that by long detention they are brought to poverty, to dearrest them and the ship, suffering them to pass therewith to their own parts. By C.
Aug. 18.
Westminster.
To James Botiller earl of Ormond justiciary of Ireland, or to his representative. Order, upon petition of Ellis Spelly, Richard Spicer, Robert Gardyner and William Keynes merchants of Bristol, to dearrest the ship, wines and merchandise hereinafter mentioned, discharging the said merchants and their mainpernors, and doing them justice for the wrongs they have suffered; as their petition shows that a ship of the said Ellis called 'la cogge Johan' of Bristol freighted at Lucebon with 30 tuns of wine, 2 pipes of oil, 500lb. of wax and 26 'couples' of fruits of theirs to bring to the city of Dublin or to England was driven by a storm to the port of Kynsale in Ireland and there came to land, that Philip Barry an esquire in Ireland and the vicar of Kynsale, not being ministers of the king or of the town, arrested and long detained the said ship and goods there without cause but seeking feigned colour between them, namely for that four or five of the seamen were of the allegiance of Spain, until at the suit of the said merchants before the justiciary the ship and merchandise were delivered to them to be brought to England by mainprise of merchants, namely that the said merchants of Bristol should within a set time bring to the justiciary the king's command or warrant for delivery thereof, otherwise they should forfeit the same; and the king reckons the cause of arrest frivolous and insufficient. By C.
Aug. 16.
Westminster.
To the mayor and bailiffs of Herwich. Order, upon petition of Stacy Bonravene master of a ship called the 'Crusenbergh' of Dounkirk, to dearrest the said ship, the master and seamen, suffering them to pass towards Sandewich; as his petition shews that they would bring thither the said ship, laded at Newcastle upon Tyne, and that the said mayor and bailiffs have arrested the same for the king's service.