BHO

Charles I - volume 441: January 1-14, 1640

Pages 291-335

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1639-40. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1877.

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January 1-14, 1640

Jan. 1. 1. Account of new year's gifts given at the court to officers and servants annually by the Archbishop of Canterbury. Sum total for the year 1639-40, 30l. 17s. 6d. [1 p.]
Jan. 1.
Berwick.
2. Sir Michael Ernley to Sec. Windebank. I answered your letter of the 26th yesterday, and received another of the 28th ult. this morning. I understand you have intelligence that the Covenanters are providing ladders at Edinburgh. Two days since I sent an honest gentleman to Edinburgh to discover and give me notice what is stirring there. You may assure his Majesty that no care nor diligence shall be wanting in me, and I doubt not but I will be able to withstand any force they can bring against this place, if only the townsmen be not false, whose treachery I more fear than the strength of the Scots. I will do my utmost endeavour to prevent both. I have received a letter from the deputy lieutenants of Northumberland promising the 8th inst. to call two companies, viz., Capt. Mustian and Capt. Swinno's, which will be in Berwick by the 10th or 11th inst. Car, the postmaster of this town, has kept back my letters one or two days, notwithstanding express order that they should go immediately. [Seal broken. 1 p.]
Jan. 1.
Berwick.
3. Capt. Charles Lloyd to the same. I have followed your command. I inspected Hexham, which in regard of its circuit will be equal to Berwick, and being overlooked by hills, and lying half a mile from the water, which is fordable almost at any time, I think it not worth the charge [of fortifying]; besides it stands in a place where no carriages can come or go to the Borders. There are two towers defensible enough on the south side overlooking the town and river, in which 150 musketeers might be placed to defend the town from incursions, for an army cannot march that way without great difficulty, but ordnance I would not trust in them. Werk castle is so ruinated that I fear it will not be worth the time and charge, and the circuit so large that it would require more men to man it than I think fitting to hazard, for although it be a passage, yet either below or above it are as many as they [the Scots] might please to use. It would be an alarm place for the Borders, and that I conceive to be all. [In margin, "nothing."] Norham Castle may be made defensible at a small charge for 40 or 50 men, who would be sufficient, seeing this garrison at Berwick is so near. I think it were fitting there were some men placed therein as well to give an alarm, if occasion offer, to this town, as to hinder small incursions. [Margin. "To be done. Directions to be given to the Governor of Berwick to put in the men."] I have heard that there are some foot soldiers to come into this town, I hope you will pardon me if I shoot my other bolt in recommending to your consideration some horse, which would be a great safeguard for the town, especially by night. [Margin. Thank him for it, and let him know that order is given already.] My works I prosecute with as much speed and diligence as the time and weather will permit; nothing new as yet I can present to you. Thus I humbly crave his Majesty's good opinion to think me dutiful and observant. [Seal broken. 1 p.]
Jan. 1.
Berwick.
4. George Payler, paymaster of the Berwick garrison, to [Sec. Windebank]. I replied to your letter of the 19th by the last post. Sir Michael Erneley has informed me that more forces are to be added to the garrison of Berwick, raised out of the train-bands of Durham and Northumberland, to be conducted hither by Capt. Gifford, and that by your command I am to repair to Newcastle to advance money to them. I desire to be informed when their entertainments shall begin, that so I may proceed with regularity in my accounts. In the interim I will be in readiness at Newcastle to disburse what shall be requisite for their transmission. [Margin. From the time they go from Newcastle; from the time the muster taken there.] The fortifications here are prosecuted forcibly, and since there must be a continuation of those works, it were assuredly for his Majesty's advantage and the advancement of the work to contract by the rood [rod ?] for performing what is intended, the day labourers being insufferably slothful and dilatory; besides his Majesty is charged with overseers and sundry officers whose attendance but little advances the proceedings. I tender this to your consideration, for Capt. Lloyd, the director, is not as yet persuaded to this way of working, and is now absent upon the execution of your commands. [Margin. By the rod, and to advise with Sir Michael Erneley and Capt. Fludd [Lloyd] in advising about it.] The posts in these parts are often negligent, and do wilfully retard letters of importance, which are directed with much haste to London, whereby not only myself but many others suffer, but we hope you will redress this abuse.
Jan. 1.
Aldermaston.
5. Sir Humphry Forster to [the same]. I shall never be able to deserve this noble favour which you are pleased to place upon me. My uncle, Capt. George Kingsmill, died in my house at Aldermaston in April last, leaving 150l. in gold, which I kept safe, conceiving it were his own, and whereby I might the better be satisfied the charge for doctors, physic, diet, and funeral. Since that my brother, Sir Richard Kingsmill, has taken out letters of administration. I shall be glad to restore the remainder in my hands, so that I may have some legal discharge. Thus beseeching you to preserve me from the complaint of the French ambassador to the King, I rest intending to come and kiss your hands at London so soon as my health will give me leave. [Discoloured by damp. 1 p.]
Jan. 1.
Office of Ordnance.
6. Certificate from the officers of ordnance what gunpowder has been brought into his Majesty's stores in the Tower and at Portsmouth, also what has been sold out of the same since the 1st December 1639. Totals, powder now in store 238 lasts 18 cwts. 11 lbs.; money raised by sale of powder in December 1639, 90l. [2 pp.]
Jan. 1. 7. Notes by Nicholas, of interest to be received by him for various sums lent to Sir Wm. Russell, Mr. Orlibeare [George Orlabier], John Ashburnham, and Lady Chicheley. Dorso. At Christmas last I had but 12 years to come in my house in Westminster, and at Michaelmas last but 3 years to come in my water there. [½ p.]
[Jan. 2.] 8. Petition of Edmund Chapman, your Majesty's servant, to the King. In Hilary term twelvemonth, Matthew Grymes and Thomas Reeves, two known desperate fellows, having drawn their swords upon petitioner in the street without any cause or provocation, he in his necessary defence accidentally gave a slight hurt to Grymes in the arm, of which hurt Grymes, through disordering himself, died about three weeks after. After Grymes' decease his wife, to wring some composition from petitioner, procured one of the coroners of Middlesex to impannel a jury, who, being all the widow's neighbours, found that Grymes died by reason of the said hurt, and presented a "fugacy" against petitioner, although he never absented himself, for he did nothing but in just defence. The worst that the jury could make of it was manslaughter, which is within compass of your Majesty's accustomed grace and mercy, and the lawful privileges of clergy in such cases. Yet he fears lest other indictments and troubles should be brought against him and his servant Matthew Standley, though the latter was not present at the affray, whilst absent here upon your Majesty's service. Prays your Majesty to grant him and his servant your gracious pardon for the offence, whatever it may be drawn into, and to remit all forfeitures, punishments, penalties, and indictments for the same, and to give order therein accordingly for stay of all further troubles and proceedings therein. Underwritten,
8. I. His Majesty's pardon for the above offence as desired, for which the attorney-general is required to prepare a bill for signature and to stay all further prosecutions. [1 p.]
Jan. 2. 9. Petition of the same to the same. To the same effect as the preceding. Underwritten,
9. I. Grant of pardon to petitioner, as on the preceding petition, but signed by Sec. Windebank. Whitehall, 2nd January, 1639-40. [1 p.] Annexed,
9. ii. Grant of pardon to petitioner and his servant.
Jan. 2. 10. Certificate of Sir John Heydon, lieutenant of the ordnance, in reply to a Council order touching a declaration to be made of the fees received and claimed by the respective officers and clerks of the ordnance. He never demanded or received any more or other fee, allowance, or acknowledgment but only the 6d. in the pound that from the first institution of the office was allowed in consideration of the charges necessarily expended in receiving and discharging the moneys of the crown. His entertainment without allowance of poundage being only 138l. 13s. 4d., he prays the Lords to move his Majesty for the confirmation thereof, so as at least he may have the fruition of those fees and rights which by his Majesty's letters patent were so amply conferred upon him the first day he served as upon any of his predecessors in that office. [1 p.]
Jan. 2. 11. Answer of Francis Coningesby, surveyor of the ordnance, to the Lords' directions signified by Nicholas the 16th December 1639. He never received any fee from any artificer or others delivering provisions into his Majesty's stores, except occasionally a small voluntary gift. He has never upon any consideration advanced the king's price for any private ends. His fee in the exchequer is 36l. 10s., and his allowance upon the ordinary of the office of ordnance 56l., making a total of 92l. 10s. per annum, of which he is at this time 1½ year in arrear. Hopes the Lords will conceive this to be only a competent allowance for his daily pains and attendance in his office, considering the dearness of all provisions in these times. There was formerly paid to his predecessor by the gunpowder maker 200l. per annum, and since his coming into the office he has received of Mr. Evelyn 50l. per annum, but this has been discontinued by Mr. Cordewell. [1 p.]
Jan. 2.
Office of Ordnance.
12. The like of Edward Sherburne, clerk of the ordnance. The fees attaching to his office are, out of the exchequer 36l. 10s., and out of the ordinary upon the quarter books 68l. 5s., making a total of 104l. 15s. per annum, of which he is at this time 1½ year in arrear. There was formerly paid by Mr. Evelyn 40l. per annum, which has been discontinued since the present gunpowder maker [Mr. Cordewell] has been employed. Does not doubt but that the Lords, taking into consideration the continual and extraordinary pains and attendance which his Majesty's service has required for these four last years both by sea and land, and the dearness of all manner of provisions, house rent, &c., in respect of former times when 12d. would go further than 10s. in these days, will vouchsafe their mediation to his Majesty in his behalf for such further increase of wages as they shall think fit. Travelling charges 25s. per diem when employed, besides 10s. per diem for his clerk. [1 p.]
Jan. 2. 13. The like of Richard March, keeper of the stores in the office of ordnance. His fees out of the exchequer are 54l. 15s., and out of the ordinary 60l., making a total of 114l. 15s. per annum. The fee of the keeper of small guns formerly held by his predecessors was 65l. 5s., but from which he is excluded. There was formerly paid by Mr. Evelyn 40l. per annum, which has been discontinued by the present gunpowder maker. Submits to the Lords' consideration whether his standing fee, which was settled in the time of Henry VIII., when 12d. went further than 10s. now, be a competency for his daily attendance in his office. Travelling charges 25s. per diem when employed, besides 10s. per diem for his clerk. [1 p.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
14. Orders of the Committee of Council for War, to be entered on [the Council Register] according to date. The following members were present, Lord Treasurer, Marquis of Hamilton, Lord High Admiral, Earl of Newport, Lord Conway, Wentworth Lord Deputy of Ireland, the Treasurer of the Exchequer, and Sec. Windebank. It was this day ordered by the Lords that John Walley, keeper of the Council chest, be appointed to find paper, pens, and ink for this Council of War, as was used to be done for former Councils of War, and that Henry Keyme and Edward Stockdale, two messengers of the chamber, be appointed to attend upon the said Council. Sir William Uvedall is by his Majesty's appointment to have the charge of issuing moneys concerning his Majesty's services which are referred to this Council, and is to be Treasurer of the Army with like commission as in last year's expedition into the north, to which purpose a copy of his former commission is to be brought on Saturday next for consideration by the Lords. It was this day resolved by the Lords that there shall be forthwith 400 foot raised by way of press in the counties of Nottingham, Lancaster, Derby, and Stafford, to be sent with coats and conduct money, at the charge of those counties respectively, to the rendezvous at York, there to be delivered over to their captains, and mustered by the vice-president of York before marching for Berwick, where they are to enter into pay according to the old list, till the King's army shall march. As concerning the five troops of horse to be forthwith raised, each troop to consist of 60 horse besides officers, whereof four troops are for Berwick and one for Carlisle, it was resolved that the captain of each troop shall receive order for raising the same in what part of the kingdom he shall choose, and shall fix the day and rendezvous, when a commissioner will be sent to view and muster the same, that they may be entered into the King's pay according to the new list of entertainments for cavalry, and receive orders to march for Berwick or Carlisle. The Lords, considering that it would be for the advantage of his Majesty's service in the wars that an addition of 1d. per diem should be allowed both to the leader and bringer up of a file, proposed that in every company of 100 foot there should be 12 files each 8 deep, making 96 in all, leaving the remaining 4 men to be disposed of as the captain should think best, which addition of 1d. would increase the pay of each company by 2s. per diem, of a regiment of 10 companies by 20s. per diem, making 28l. per month or 365l. a year for each regiment, so that if the army consisted of 40 regiments the six months additional pay would amount to 7,300l. or for 12 months to 14,600l. The Lords, after long debate, resolved to attend the King and represent to him that they conceived that this increase of pay to the leader and bringer up of each file was agreeable to the ancient practice of the Greeks, only their files were wont to be 25 deep or more, and would breed emulation amongst the soldiers, which would be much for his Majesty's service. Also that the Lords held it better that this increase of pay should be allowed by his Majesty than in any sort deducted out of the pay of the common soldier's allowance of 8d. per diem, which is no more than has been allowed ever since the time of Henry VIII. [3 pp.]
Jan. 2. 15. Note submitted by the Earl of Northumberland [to the Council of War] concerning the composition of the troops of horse, and ordered to be entered in the Council Register. The horse to be raised, we humbly conceive, are to be distributed into regiments, comprising 508 each, to be thus disposed. The colonel's troop of cuirassiers to consist of a captain, lieutenant, cornet, quarter-master, three corporals, two trumpeters, one smith, and 100 horsemen, which four deep make 25 files, besides three spare horses allowed to the officers of each troop. Four troops of carabineers, each consisting of a captain, lieutenant, cornet, quarter-master, two corporals, two trumpeters, one smith, and 60 horsemen, which four deep make 15 files. Two troops more of carabineers, consisting of officers as above and 52 horsemen, which four deep make 30 files. Total 508. Underwritten,
15. i. Notes in Nicholas's hand. The smith is to have the pay of a cuirassier or carabineer, according to the troop in which he serves. Besides the six regiments of horse there are to be 100 cuirassiers and 60 carabineers for the Lord General's horse guard. [1 p.]
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
16. [Sec. Windebank] to Lord Keeper Coventry. Upon advice from Sir Francis Willoughby, captain and governor of Carlisle and of the forces there, it is found necessary for his Majesty's service that the prisoners who are kept in some part of the citadel or castle there should be removed, and the castle wholly freed of them. The speedy doing of this is of such consequence, and this day commanded by his Majesty, as to make me thus, in the judge's absence, resort to your lordship for your advice and speedy direction to be given therein, being otherwise very loath to have given you the least trouble of business during your indisposition, to the removing whereof I shall, besides my hearty wishes, rather contribute what may be in my ability. [Draft. ½ p.]
Jan. 2. 17. Samuel and Thomas Bland to [Nicholas.] The Lords were pleased, upon the examination of Durham business, to question our messenger who waits upon the commission for discharging those persons who compounded with the patentees [for sale of tobacco] after the warrants were issued against them for non-appearance [before the Council] at our summons, in regard they had no clause in their warrants. The messenger desiring that they may go in a regular way has prayed the writers to intreat [Nicholas] to move the Lords that this may be inserted into their warrants, to discharge all such as shall agree with the patentees upon the approbation of the Commissioners, upon security given for payment of the fees due to the clerks of the Council. [¾ p.]
Jan. 2.
Drury Lane.
18. Robert Reed to his [cousin Thomas Windebank ?] I have not received any letters from you later than 29th December, nor can they be expected in ordinary course, whilst this tempestuous weather lasts. The wind on Friday night did much hurt in divers places. The Lord of Kinalmeaky, who was married last week to Lady Elizabeth Fielding, has not kept his wedding night yet, by reason he is still under medical treatment. This has put Mrs. Harrison a little out of countenance, for fear the like may be her case with the other brother, yet I believe that business is so far advanced, though she will not acknowledge it, that she must adventure herself with him. It is said they are both very debauched, and though perhaps the latter may use more discretion in fixing the wedding day, yet it is feared they will be equally ill husbands. Having no matters of consequence to advertise you of, I adventure to acquaint you with these light passages to serve you for recreation, which I am sure you want rather than business. I commit them to your discretion to be spoken of as matters that concern persons of honor, though light in themselves, they are commonly known here, yet none speak of them aloud. P.S.—Present my service to my cousin Christopher and Mr. Aubert. [2 pp.]
Jan. 2.
London.
19. Capt. George Carterett to his wife. The weather has been so tempestuous that the barques could not possibly come over. I have sent you two letters by way of France, and will write further by the Jersey barque, which is ready to set sail within these three days. Assurances of affection and family matters. [2 pp.]
Jan. 2.
Mar. [Merton ?] College, Oxford.
20. James Levingston to his cousin Levingston. I perceive that my former letter has miscarried, for I entreated you [in it] to send me news of the affairs in Scotland. There appeared here in Oxford upon New Year's Day in the morning, the breaking of a cloud, out of which came a great fire in the air, and spread itself all over the city. Love to your wife and Ann.—P.S. The mayor has it in charge from the Lords to deliver in the names of all in the university and city who are above 16 years and under 60.
Jan. 2.
Whitehall.
Henry Earl of Holland to Timothy Tyrell, lieutenant of the Forest of Shotover and Stowood, co. Oxon. Warrant to search the houses of all persons residing within three miles compass of the forest, for greyhounds, mungrels, handguns, crossbows, nets, traps, and other engines used to destroy deer, the king's game having been much spoiled by divers of the inhabitants and driven from their usual places of feed. [Copy. See Vol. ccclxxxiv, p. 69. 2¼ pp.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
21. Order of the King in Council, upon petition of the Merchants Adventurers, touching the several licenses granted to the Duke of Lennox and the said company for the shipping of white and undressed cloths. His Majesty and the Lords declared that the opinion of the Board expressed in the Order of the 4th November 1617 cannot in any sort conclude the Duke, the same having been made upon a precedent and private agreement between that company and the Earl of Cumberland, who then enjoyed the license which the Duke now has. His Majesty moreover being satisfied that concerning the point of right, the Duke has liberty by his grant to compound with any person whomsoever in amity with his Majesty, which liberty was not gainsaid by the company or their counsel. But in respect of convenience, the deputy of the company moved his Majesty that he would give leave for the company to treat with such as his Grace should appoint, touching the continuance of his Grace's license to the members of that company, and in case they should not agree, then the deputy in the name of the company submitted to abide by such determination as the King shall be pleased to set down concerning the matter of their licenses. His Majesty thereupon directed that there should be a meeting to that purpose, and if an agreement shall not be thereupon made, he would himself vouchsafe to settle and determine the same. [Draft to be entered. 1⅓ p.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
22. Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet. To prepare a bill for signature, containing a Privy Seal for 300,000l., to be issued from time to time out of the Exchequer for sundry and special affairs of great importance, by the order and direction of the Lord Treasurer, the Marquis of Hamilton, the Earl Marshal of England, the Lord High Admiral, the Lord Deputy of Ireland, Lord Cottington, the Treasurer of the Exchequer, and Sec. Windebank, or any three of them, the Lord Treasurer or the Chancellor of the Exchequer to be always one. [Draft to be entered. ¾ p.]
Jan. 3. 23. Minute of a pass for William Russell, Esq., to travel into foreign parts for three years from this date, taking with him one servant, with proviso not to go to Rome. [½ p.]
Jan. 3. 24. John Crane, surveyor of Marine victual, to the Council. There is at this present about 70,000 lbs. of biscuit, which came from Berwick and the Frith of Forth, remaining at the Bridge House and other storehouses, as I have reported to the Lord Admiral, and which is like to perish if the price now offered for it be not accepted, viz., 4s. per cwt., so as the parties may have license to transport the same beyond sea duty free. My desire is, that if you think so fit, to give license for the transporting of it accordingly. [Margin: but to pay the duties. 1 p.]
Jan. 3. 25. Petition of John Wilkinson to the Council. By proclamation, dated 26 May 1638, the importation of hats and caps from beyond sea for sale in England and Wales, having been prohibited upon pain of forfeiture and imprisonment, Letters Patent were granted to petitioner, dated 28 November 1638, empowering him to seize all such commodities to his Majesty's use. Petitioner lately seized 63 hats in the house of John Spy of Hastings, who refused to obey his Majesty's authority so given, and the officer who was required by petitioner to aid him, being Spy's neighbour, refused to assist him, so that Spy took away the hats by force, saying they were all fools to let their goods go upon such authority. Spy afterwards offered him gold in a bribing way, but he desires the offence may be punished, it being to the evil example of others in contemning the prerogative royal and disabling petitioner's authority so given. Prays warrant for Spy to appear before the Board to answer the premises. Underwritten,
25. i. Oath taken by petitioner before Robert Riche that the allegations in this petition are true. [1 p.]
Jan. 3.
Colcombe [House].
26. Sir John Pole, late sheriff of Devon, to Nicholas. I received letters gratulatory from the Lords, with a command for the payment of the small arrear of ship-money, viz., 43l. 9s. 10d., due to his Majesty in my year of office, for the levying of which I have lately obtained warrants from the present sheriff, but it will not be effected without great difficulty and charge. In the execution of this service I will use my best endeavour, but desire your furtherance to the Lords for an allowance for collecting and levying the same, as promised to the present sheriff. [Seal with devise. 2/3 p.]
Jan. 3. 27. Certificate of Capt. William Legge, that Henry le Maire, master-gunsmith, with his six servants, was sent for out of Holland to be employed in the King's service, at the rate of 2s. 6d by the day for himself, and 1s. 6d. for each servant, or 4l. 0s. 6d. per week. He has attended these nine weeks to be employed, but as yet has received neither employment nor pay. [⅓ p.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant of the Commissioners for Saltpetre and Gunpowder to Robert Smith, messenger of the chamber, to repair to the house of Richard Woulfe [Woolf], late alderman of Stamford, co. Lincoln, and bring him before the commissioners to answer to such matters as shall be objected against him on his Majesty's behalf. [Copy. See Vol. ccxcii, p. 112. ¾ p.]
Jan. 3. 28. Brief on the behalf of Arnold Brames and Co., owners of the ship Lioness of Dover, against Nicholas Gold, Daniel Fairfax, and Isaac Legaye, for recovery of 2,658l. for freight and 6l. port dues, under charterparty of the said ship, employed during 15 months and 19 days. [5 pp.]
Jan. 3. 29. Book of notes kept by Nicholas of proceedings of the Council at their several meetings during this month. These notes state the names of the members of the Council present on each occasion, and briefly indicate the several businesses considered and the orders made. The days on which the Council sat, and to which these notes refer, were the 3rd, 5th, 8th, 10th, 15th, 17th, 19th, 24th, 26th, 29th, and 31st of the present month. [62 pp., of which 14 are blank.]
Jan. 3. 29a. Book containing the names of all members of the Council present at various sittings of the Council during the present month, beginning with this day. The King was present on the 3rd, 5th, 17th, 19th, 26th, and 29th. [24 pp., of which 14 are blank.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
Pardon to William Walker, goldsmith, convicted at the last sessions at Newgate, for buying stolen plate, and having the benefit of his clergy was adjudged to be burned in the hand. And is done upon petition of Lyming Dickenson and Hugh Henn, his Majesty's servants. [Docquet.]
Jan. 4. Warrant to the Master of the Jewel House, to pay to James Levingston, keeper of the privy purse, all money coming into his hands for his Majesty's use from the nobility and others at New Years' tides, this order to continue from year to year until revoked. [Docquet]
Jan. 4. Discharge of Sir Anthony Irby, late sheriff of co. Lincoln, from the custody of the messenger, but is to attend the Lords from day to day till he has either satisfied the 200l. remainder of 1,000l. arrears of ship-money in his hands, or obtained his dismissal and leave to depart. [Docquet.]
Jan. 4. Warrant to Edmund Barker, messenger of the Council, to bring William Weston of Newbury and Richard Novis of Tilehurst, co. Berks, returned as defaulters at the musters in co. Berks, before the Board. [Docquet.]
Jan. 4. The like to Matthew Pigeon to bring before the Lords Joseph Whitchurch and Richard Comes, late constables of the hundred of Frome, and Samuel Foye, late constable of Horethorne, co. Somerset. [Docquet.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
30. Order of the Council of War. Montjoy Earl of Newport, MasterGeneral of the Ordnance, Edward Viscount Conway, Sir Nicholas Biron, and Sir Jacob Astley, if he be in town, are desired to attend on the Earl of Northumberland, Lord High Admiral, and to consider with him what number and sorts of ordnance, together with a train of artillery answerable, are fit to be prepared for an army of 20,000 foot and 2,500 horse, and to present the same in writing to the Lords on Thursday next. [Draft to be entered. ½ p.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
31. The same to the same. The Lords desire the parties named to take into consideration whether it be fit to have any corporals of the field for the foot, and how many and what pay is fit to be allowed each of them, also what pay is fit to be allowed to a QuarterMaster General of the horse, and how much to each carabineer, and what to a cuirassier. Whether it be fit to have three colonels general and three sergeant-majors of the brigades. Also to consider of the list of the train of artillery, and of the entertainments allowed in the expedition of last summer. An expression of opinion in writing on all these particulars to be presented to the Lords on Thursday next. [Draft to be entered. ¾ p.]
Jan. 4.
Whitehall.
32. Minute by Nicholas of proceedings this day at the Council of War. Sec. Windebank delivered to the Lords his Majesty's pleasure that the Earl of Arundel and Surrey, Earl Marshal of England, should be added to this Council of War. The Lords resolved that every regiment of foot shall consist of ten companies of 100 men besides officers. The horse to be divided into several regiments, each consisting of seven troops, whereof the colonels to be cuirassiers, making eight regiments in all. The state of the horse troops to be as specified in the Earl of Northumberland's note of Jan. 2. [¾ p.]
Jan. 4. 33. Notes by Nicholas of the scale of pay for the officers and others in the army about to be formed under the Earl of Northumberland. List of pay as formerly the last year it was, contrasted with the new list as now resolved. [1 p.]
Jan. 4.
Barbican.
34. John Earl of Bridgewater to Sec. Windebank. Since your being here I have cordially endeavoured the best I may to find out and resolve with what and how I might serve his Majesty in his urgent and present occasions. The day after my speech with you I sent to several scriveners of my acquaintance to see what money they could procure for me. All but one have already returned answer that they do not at this present know where to procure me 500l., but if they had known sooner it may be they could have done me some service. Whilst they were thus employed I sent to some of my particular friends, who, I thought and hoped, could and would have furnished me with some part, though not with the whole, of what I had intended for this occasion; but I find the like answer from them as from the scriveners. They have it not, the little they have is out of their hands, but if they had known sooner they would willingly have pleasured me; and this is all I am like to look for or expect. My intention was and is to lend 5,000l. if I can possibly procure it, but which I fear I shall not be able to do, in respect of my late notice of the intended loan. Thus have I acquainted you with the care and labour I have taken since your being here, and the [ill] success thereof, by which you may perceive the unhappiness and unfortunateness of my condition; whereof I hope you will make a fair relation and his Majesty a favourable interpretation in my behalf, who will still continue to use my best endeavours for his Majesty's accommodation. Were I as able as I am willing, ready, and desirous to serve his Majesty, there is none should or would more freely declare themselves, than I would, to the uttermost power of my ability, who in these difficulties and pressures dare not adventure to make any further professions, but that I am truly devoted to his Majesty's service in this and all other his occasions.—P.S. Since the writing of this letter, one of the scriveners sends word that he thinks he can provide me 1,000l., but what is that to what I would fain do? [1 p.]
Jan 4.
London.
35. Edward Fenn to Nicholas. Having lived many years in this parish of Allhallows, Barking, where I have filled some offices, and now the time being come when it falls to my lot to be both churchwarden and constable this year, I should be content to pay any reasonable fine to the parish to acquit me thereof, but I am afraid they will not accept thereof. I am therefore become an earnest suitor to you, who know how strictly I am tied to attendance in navy affairs relating to his Majesty's service, to move the Lords to free me from these offices during my attendance, which privilege I conceive has been formerly granted to others in like case. [2/3 p.]
Jan. 4. 36. Brief notes in explanation of charges brought against John Blount, gentleman, who, being drunk, was reported to have said "if the King were there he would kill him," and afterwards added "that he had spoken treason but he cared not." These words are explained to mean, not that he would kill the King but a certain miller, with whom he was quarrelling, even if the King were present. [1½ p.] Annexed,
36. i. Examination of Anne, wife of Capt. Edmond Woodward, on his Majesty's behalf, taken before Henry Townshend, J.P. for Worcestershire, concerning speeches uttered against the King by John Blount. [1½ p.]
36. ii. The like examination of Edmond Woodward of Sambourn. [12/3 p.]
36. iii. Examination of John Jones of Rydnall. [½ p.]
36. iv. The like of Peter Browne of Sambourn. [2/3 p.]
36. v. The like of William Severn of Sambourn. [2/3 p.]
36. vi. The like of Eleanor, wife of Peter Browne, of Sambourn [2/3 p.]
36. vii. The like of Stephen Edgley of Bewdley. [1 p.]
Jan. 4. 37. Account by Sir William Russell, one of the Treasurers of the Navy, of ship-money received by virtue of writs of 1637. Total received, 178,036l. 0s. 8d.; leaving 18,378l. 7l. 0d unpaid. [1 p.]
Jan. 4. 38. The like of ship-money received by virtue of writs of 1638. Total received, 53,101l. 4s. 11d.; leaving 16,648l. 15s. 1d It is added that the late lord mayor of London, since the making of this certificate had paid in 75l. for the borough of Southwark. [1 p.]
Jan. 4. 39. Account of ship-money for 1638 levied and remaining in the hands of the sheriffs. Total 1,182l., making the total levied and paid, 54,283l. The arrears were as follow: 1635, 4,536l.; 1636, 7,049l.; 1637, 17,464l.; 1638, 16,648l. [1 p.]
Jan. 5. 40. The King to Patrick Lord Ettrick. We perceive by yours of the 27th ultimo not only your care of our service in providing a constable [of the Castle of Edinburgh] to be under you in case of your being disabled by sickness or other accident, but likewise your respect to us in the manner of it, being unwilling to make choice of any without our approbation, though by our grant you have power to appoint and constitute whom yourself shall think fit. This we take very well, and likewise the choice you have made of Lieut. Colonel Scrimsoure [Scrimgeour], whom we hold a very fit person for that charge, and hereby give our royal assent to his undertaking it in case you shall at any time be disabled, which we hope shall not be. Concerning your other letter of the same date, we like well your purpose of putting in order the well on the back side of the castle, and of preparing reserves for water, which may be made fit to hold water if you will cause them to be plastered or pitched with stones in the bottom. The arms you desire for those men who are to be sent you by way of supply shall be likewise furnished and transported, together with the rest of the ammunition which is to come to you. Order is already given to the [Earl of Northumberland], Lord High Admiral, and to [the Earl of Newport], Master General of the Ordnance, to take care that both the men and ammunition shall be forthwith embarked and sent away. The captain who shall undertake this service shall be instructed how to land the men by small numbers, as you shall more particularly understand in our next letters. These are to be in the habits of seafaring men and mariners, and to carry the ammunition up to the castle in little quantities, and then you may detain the men there, and others may succeed in their places with the rest of the ammunition, if there shall be no opposition. There shall be some notice given to you of their arrival there, that so you may co-operate with them and facilitate this service. For the works you mention, we leave them to your care to be proceeded in when you shall find best and most seasonable, recommending them and whatsoever else you shall find most conducing to the securing of that important place, wholly to your ordering. [Draft by Secretary Windebank. 1½ pp.]
Jan. 5. 41. Order of the King in Council exempting Edward Fenn, of Allhallows, Barking, in regard of his attendance under Sir William Russell, Treasurer of the Navy, from serving the offices of churchwarden and constable, which this year were like to be put upon him by the inhabitants of that parish, and also at all times hereafter during his attendance in this his Majesty's service he is to be excused from bearing offices or doing any personal service either in Allhallows parish or elsewhere; but for all parochial duties he is, notwithstanding this order, to pay the same rateably and proportionally with others of his quality and ability in that parish. [Draft. 2/3 p.]
Jan. 5. 42. The Council to Thomas Earl of Arundel and Surrey, Earl Marshal of England and Lord Lieutenant of the county of Cumberland. There being present occasion to make use of his Majesty's citadel and castle of Carlisle for some special services of importance, we are, by his Majesty's command, to require you not only to give effectual order to the sheriff of that county presently to remove all the prisoners of the castle and citadel into some other safe place for the present, but also to require the sheriff and justices of peace to cause a rate to be made for erecting a new prison for the use of that county, so that the castle may still remain free upon all occasions for his Majesty's service. [Draft. 1 p.]
Jan. 5. 43. Minute of a Council Warrant to Robert Taverner, messenger, to bring up Nicholas Mayleigh, of Carisbrooke, Isle of Wight, and James Jutt, of Chilbolton, Hants. [½ p.]
Jan. 5. 44. The Council to the Lord Treasurer. There being about 70,000 lbs. of biscuit belonging to his Majesty which came from Berwick and the Frith of Forth remaining at the Bridge House and other store houses, the same as represented by the Victualer of the Navy [see this Vol., No. 24], likely suddenly to perish if present sale be not made thereof to such as shall transport the same. We therefore require you not only to give order to the surveyor of marine victuals to make sale thereof, but to the officers of the Customs to permit the same to be transported to parts beyond sea, the duties being first paid. [Draft. ¾ p.]
Jan. 5. 45. Minute of appearance at the Council Board of William Marshall, of Bridport, co. Dorset. He having sent up a certificate of ship-money charged upon him for the last year, was discharged from the messenger's custody and further attendance. [⅓ p.]
Jan. 5. 46. Remonstrance of the Society of the Inner Temple to the Council. First, we shall demonstrate to the Lords that the government of our society consists of three parts, viz., Masters of the Bench, Masters of the Bar, and gentlemen under the bar, and that our government and all our privileges are grounded only upon ancient custom, which we conceive to be a law, and by that custom the benchers have usually governed in term time, the barristers in vacation, and the gentlemen in the Christmas. In the keeping of this Christmas we conceive that we have not offended or brought in any innovation, or permitted the least disorder whereby our Christmas should be suppressed, or our ancient privilege taken from us to be transferred to other houses, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn having, since we desisted, permitted the very same company to play in both houses, so that the reformation aimed at is no ways redressed. We further declare that many well-affected persons of our society, being sensible of the general inconvenience, have endeavoured a sudden reformation, but which we, upon mature consideration, found impossible to be done any other way than by debarring of all manner of play at dice in our hall; and because we conceived music could not be paid for, nor our butlers rewarded and our other expenses of entertainment defrayed, without excessive charge to the gentlemen in commons, we therefore conceived it fit to allow of play at dice in the libraries, provided none but such as were invited or well known to some gentlemen of our house should be admitted to play, and this order being punctually observed would redress the disorder complained of, which reformation had been put in execution this Christmas but for the reasons here stated. We pray that for this Christmas the Lords will suffer us to begin commons and proceed in our usual way of play for the time to come; and for the loss of the time past, since our desisting upon his Majesty's command, we may keep a week longer than our limited time for the discharging of all former engagements yet unsatisfied; and if the next Christmas there be not a general reformation in our house, according as we have in this remonstrance expressed our intentions, then we shall desire the Lords to make what order shall be thought fit for the absolute dissolution of all future Christmases. We beseech your Lordships to have that honourable regard to the entire preservation of our ancient privilege as to give us leave to be the sole reformers of our own disorders, and the whole society shall acknowledge this as an infinite obligation from the Board. [Half skin of parchment.]
Jan. 6/16.
The Court at the Hague.
47. Dr. Samson Johnson, Chaplain to the Queen of Bohemia, to Archbishop Laud. Your letter of the 13th December was delayed a week by foul weather, but has now come to my hands. For the libel I shall be careful and vigilant. I heard not before of anything in it concerning me; whatsoever it be, I fear not but to unrivet it with ease; such calumnies are easily blown off, and had it not been for your Grace's imposing silence on me I had done it then when I was first moved. Were it not for abusing the poor people by these pestilent pamphlets, contempt were the best answer. I can assure you there is no person of any worth or learning who has any hand in these kind of writings, only some fugitive, discontented men. 1. The preachers here, with whom I sometimes converse, have been very ill-informed concerning the state of our church. I think I have performed that office to set them right, and have desired them not to believe the partial reports of ignorant and malicious vagabonds, 2. The consistory here dare not be angry with the Prince [of Orange]; he said much worse than I wrote to your Grace. Their course is to contest with the magistrate upon all occasions, and to flatter the people, but compass very little; when anything of profit to the state is hoped for there they must yield, but they make a fruitless noise first; they lose ground daily by reason these countries fill with persons of quality more and more. 3. I have heard the Prince and many of the wisest in this state admire our church, and confess that they have no face of a church here, and that they wish our government in the place of it. The study of Oriental books is kept as yet sealed; the pleasure of the executors, who dwell in Silesia, out of which country the Doctor was, is expected; when a catalogue may be had I shall do as you command me. 4. The difference between Salmasius and Heinsius is seen in Salmasius' preface and book "De Usuris," the last part; the book must needs be common in England, but they are like to differ in everything for all that I see. Salmasius says in his book that he will discover multitudes of vanities and falsities in Heinsius' notes on the N[ew] T[estament]. He told me lately that his notes are almost ready for the press. The consistory cannot hinder Salmasius from printing; he is exempt, as honorarius professor, from their jurisdiction. He is a man of greater learning and more ingenuity than any of the other side, and will find more of his party. The consistory being troubled have tried a means of reconciliation, but in vain, for 'tis now desperate. Salmasius is engaged; he has been very ill-used here, only because they cannot make him a sectary. Grotius' notes upon the N[ew] T[estament] are come hither to be printed; they will be a book in folio. 5. It is reported here that Sir William Boswell is likely to succeed Sir Henry Wotton at Eton, and that Sir Robert Honywood, the Queen [of Bohemia's] steward, may be designed for this place. If it should be so, then Mr. Dinley, who is secretary to this Queen, and who is now in England, is thought on for the government of this court. He is a man not well affected to the church; he has been the only supporter of Bandfort [or Bamford] here. His Majesty of England has no opinion of him, and justly; but the ladies will work for him all they can. Her Majesty [of Bohemia] is of a gracious and facile nature, often to her prejudice. This I only write upon supposition if it may be any way useful to your Grace. 6. I must crave leave to speak one thing in my own commendation, and you will find it true upon inquiry. Our church here begins to wish much for common prayers, even Mr. Bamford's own flock, and they are so well affected to me that they come willingly to hear me preach, and very unwillingly to hear their own shepherd. I thank you for your advice for my wariness; I have been always peaceable in religion, and shall be ever. It will be a very hard law for to give account of all words in conversation and discourse. I will be most careful not to speak anything but what is sober, that I may do that too if any will be ready to question me. This is all I have at this time to trouble you with, and I fear it is too much amidst the great number of your cares, but these I could not omit, because my true affection of serving you and the church bid me do it. [Endorsed by Archbishop Laud as received 17th Jan. 3 pp.]
Jan. 6.
Southampton.
48. Nicholas Pescod to Lord Charles Lambert. Upon receipt of your letters of the 28th ulto. to the sheriff and myself, I repaired to the mayor of our town, and caused one of these letters to be read before the aldermen, who after consultation answered that they had given both the Duke of Lennox and the Earl of Portland answer to their honours' letters as much as for the present was in their power, and hoped that their honours were satisfied therewith; but by your letters it seems the contrary, which I find does not a little grieve them, in regard their honours' demands are not within the compass of their powers, having at the least 40 burgesses in our corporation, and not above eight justices of peace, wherefore I am heartily sorry I can do their honours no better service herein. I heartily wish the Duke had occasion to make particular use of my poor endeavours, no man being more forward to execute his commands than myself. As for the Earl of Portland I am his servant, and hope to continue in his favour. Mr. Read I conceive to be a worthy gentleman, and I take it as a favour that you would employ me in your service, but should account myself far more happy that your employment had been within my reach, that you might know you have a servant in Southampton. I am heartily sorry I cannot do you better service in this business. That case is miserable that when men of some command in other matters in this must be ruled by a company of such as make their wills a law, and will give their voices according to their particular affections, and not for the good of the place where they have their livelihood in. I perceive the Recorder and Baronet Mill have procured many friends for their election, and imagine have made too strong a party to have their desires unsatisfied. I wish I could give you an answer more pleasing. [Seal with arms broken. 1 p.]
Jan. 6. 49. Bill of Henry James, Esq., of London, acknowledging to be indebted to Sir Henry Compton, K.B., 10l., payable on demand, under bond of 20l. [⅓ p.]
Jan. 6. 50. Examination of Jehan de la Cams, a Frenchman. He says that Monsr. Savary, a French gentleman, who was here in London six weeks since, gave him the silver, both that which is coined and the other, to pay certain moneys here for him; that Savary came here to buy horses, but finding he could not obtain leave to transport them he came to examinant and told him that business pressed him to return into France, and so desired him to cause this instrument to be made for him according to a pattern which he showed him in wax, and to send the same into France by the ships going to fetch Bordeaux wines; that this gentleman lives at Bordeaux, and sometimes at his house in the country. [1 p.]
Jan. 7. 51. Petition of Sir Thomas Holt, his eldest son Edward, and his wife Elizabeth to the King. King James granted to petitioner a baronetship to him and his heirs, dated 25th Nov. 1611. Petitioners now pray your Majesty to accept of a surrender of that patent and to grant another to him [Sir Thomas] for life, with remainder to George Holt, his second son, and his heirs male. [2/3 p.] Underwritten,
51. i. Petitioners to attend his Majesty at Court about this business with convenient speed. Whitehall, 7th January 1639-40. [1/6 p.]
51. ii. Dorso. Notice of petition of Edward Lord Herbert to the Council. [Pasted on the back of this paper, but probably belongs to some other document.]
Jan. 7. 52. The Council to the Sheriff of Kent. Whereas by writ of November last you are required to set forth and furnish a ship of 640 tons besides tonnage, manned with 256 men and double equipage for six months' service, to be ready at the rendezvous by 1st April next, the charge of which as by letter and instructions of the Lords will amount to 8,000l., which you were directed to assess in that county and its corporations: We understand from you that the mayors and head officers of the corporations in that county, having met at Maidstone about this service, will agree to make no higher rate for setting forth and furnishing the said ship of 640 tons than after the proportion of 1,000l. for 100 tons, alleging that the same is agreeable to the rates of former years severally assessed upon that county and its corporations. Wherefore we are by his Majesty's express command to let you know, that by the experience of former years' services the proportion of 1,000l. for 100 tons will not defray the charge of setting forth, manning, and furnishing a ship for such time and in such manner as is required by his Majesty's writ, which charge has been every year much increased through the slow payment of the moneys required from the counties, inasmuch as his Majesty has issued every year out of the exchequer very great sums of money, over and above what has been paid by the several counties, for defraying the charge of such fleets as have been set forth for guard of the seas, as by the accounts of the officers of the navy and ordnance appears. His Majesty, for that reason and upon other considerations, conceived it better to abate of the tons of the ship than to increase the sum requisite to furnish a ship of 800 tons ; and yet some of the head officers of the corporations of that county can inform you that the burden of a ship of 640 tons besides tonnage is greater than that of a ship of 800 tons, and the word dolium in the writ signifies ton, and not tons and tonnage. Thus much his Majesty has commanded us to let you understand concerning the reasons of the alteration at which those of the corporations seem to stick, and to let you know that it is his express command that according to his writ you take effectual order that a ship of 640 tons besides tonnage fail not to be at the rendezvous at the day prefixed, furnished as required, or else that the full sum of 6,400l. be levied and paid to the Treasurer of the Navy by the 20th of February next, to the end that his Majesty may therewith furnish the like ship by his own officers, which, if all the money shall be paid by that day, he is graciously inclined to do in ease of that county, but in case that neither the ship be provided, nor the 6,400l. paid in by the 20th prox., then he commands that at your peril you fail not to levy on that county the full sum of 8,000l. according to your first instructions. And as his Majesty expects that you fail not in performance of this service, so much importing his honour and the safety of the kingdom, so we require you to give us from time to time an account of your proceedings herein. [Draft. 2½ pp.]
Jan. 7.
Barbican.
53. John Earl of Bridgewater to Sec. Windebank. I sent the enclosed yesterday, but not finding you at court, or at your house, it was returned to me. The reason I had not sent it sooner was that I had hoped to have had better news from the scrivener before yesterday noon. But now I must alter the language into a more, at least to me, unpleasant style, for the scrivener this morning sent me word that the 1,000l. which he thought to have provided for me is otherwise disposed of, so that you may hereby see what difficulties I meet with, and how little hope I may have of being furnished with money for this occasion, according to my desire. [Seal broken. ¾ p.]
Jan. 7.
Berowe House.
54. Sir Thomas Holland to Sir John Lambe, Dean of the Arches. I received your letter on the 4th January by William Hughes, servant to Lady Terringham. It appeared to me that Archbishop Laud had signified to you his pleasure that I should forbear executing my faculty lately granted for building an aisle on the north side of the church of Llanfihangel-Esceifiog, Anglesey, and that it was opposed by Sir Arthur Terringham and his lady, both for themselves and Nicholas Bagenall, Esq., their son[-in-law], until his Grace's pleasure were further declared, and that he had suspended my faculty. I would make known to you that the late Bishop Griffith, of Bangor, viewed the chancel and churchyard, and set out so much of both as he thought fit for me to build my aisle or chapel on, and which he afterwards granted to me under the episcopal seal. This grant being renewed by the present bishop, I obtained a faculty from the archbishop to build the aisle, and before receiving your letter had pulled down 11 feet of the chancel wall and dug the foundations for the same, in length about 15 feet, and in breadth 12 feet, being 6 inches less than my faculty licensed, but after receiving your letter I forbore to proceed further. I confess my house is situated in a hamlet of Llanidan parish, but more than three miles distant from that church, the parishes of Llanfihangel-Esceifiog and Llanddeinol lying between them, whereas Llanfihangel church is somewhat near my dwelling, and there both myself and my ancestors have ever attended divine service. If Lady Terringham should think fit to question my right to these seats I will answer in a legal way, she having the like seat in Llanedwen chancel belonging to her house Plâs-Newydd, and divers others have their seats proper to themselves. In every chancel within this whole county of Anglesey there are ancient seats belonging to special owners in like manner as in churches, the chancels being repaired solely at the charge of the parishioners. My freehold land in Llanfihangel parish is worth yearly 150l., the greater part being in my own occupation and demesne, whereas Lady Terringham and her son, Mr. Nicholas Bagenall, have never been inhabitants of the parish or assessed in any church-mize there. Particulars relative to the family of Sir Henry Bagenall and their connection with Llanfihangel parish since 1596. Taking these things into your consideration, and that I am aged and very heavy, I pray you to employ your good means with the archbishop, that I may be suffered to go on with my aisle in accordance with the faculty granted by his Grace. [Seal with arms broken. 2½ pp.]
Jan. 7. 55. Certificate by Sir Henry Townsend of information given by Edmund Woodward (see this Vol., No. 36, Jan. 4), at the Worcester Quarter Sessions, against John Blount for words supposed to have been uttered against his Majesty. [1 p.]
Jan. 7. 56. Notes by Sir John Lambe of the case between Lady Hatton, relict of Sir Christopher Hatton, and Bishop Wren, of Ely, concerning Ely or Hatton House. [Endorsed by Archbishop Laud. 1 p.]
Jan. 7.
Whitehall.
Deputation by Henry Earl of Holland, chief justice and justicein-eyre of the royal forests on this side Trent, granting to Robert Burghill the keeping of Linchford Walk in his Majesty's forest of Windsor and bailiwick of Surrey. [Copy. See Vol. ccclxxxiv., p. 67. 1⅓ p.]
Jan. 8. Petition of the late Company of Saltmakers of South and North Shields to the King. Petitioners undertook the making and vending of salt at the places named with the hope to do your Majesty acceptable service and increase your revenues, but by reason of many interruptions they failed and gave up their patent of incorporation, which they could never get fully settled on them as they expected. Others have since become undertakers, and a constant revenue is now secured to your Majesty. Petitioners understand that your Majesty having been misinformed that they are in arrear to you 13,000l., whereof if the utmost were demanded it would fall very far short, direction is given to Thomas Lydall and Henry Hodgson to collect the same, or upon non-payment to the AttorneyGeneral to prosecute them for it in a legal way. Petitioners pray you to receive this true information from them, who have not yet been called to answer thereunto, that they are so far from gaining by the late employment that it will appear they have lost many thousand pounds thereby. They are ready to give a true accompt thereof to such as you shall be pleased to refer the examination, with the reasons why they miscarried in their endeavours, and when you shall be thus truly informed of their fidelity to your service, and of their great losses, they will not decline any legal prosecution, but submit to your pleasure. In the meantime they desire to rest in your good opinion. Underwritten,
i. Reference to the Lord Treasurer and Lord Cottington, who are to consider of petitioners' accompts and premises, and to certify their opinions, whereupon his Majesty will signify his further pleasure. Whitehall, 8 January 1639-[40]. [Copy. See Book of Petitions, Vol. cccciii., p. 146. 1 p.]
Jan. 8.
Westminster.
57. Commission directed to Algernon Earl of Northumberland, Lord High Admiral. Whereas by writs directed to the sheriffs of counties in England and Wales, and to the principal' officers of towns, order is given for providing and setting forth of 45 ships and pinnaces this year, but as all cannot of themselves find such ships and pinnaces for the service as are required, we hereby authorise you to give order and warrant to the officers of the navy to prepare and furnish so many of our ships and pinnaces as the Council shall direct, and to man and provision the same; also you shall give order to the Ordnance Office for supplying them with ordnance and munition. The sheriffs and officers of towns are required to pay their ship-money for this service to Sir William Russell and Henry Vane, Treasurers of the Navy. [Duplicate. Half skin of parchment.]
Jan. 8.
Whitehall.
58. Order of Council. Under the will of Sir Nicholas Stodard his daughter Mary was entitled to an annuity of 24l., payable by William, his son and heir, with other payments to his other daughters, who whilst they lived single were assigned one of his houses to reside in at their election. After a while William withholding the payment of the 24l. from his sister Mary, the Lords, upon a reference from his Majesty, ordered the same to be paid, when William, in their Lordships' presence, swore a great oath that he would not perform that order, and was committed to the Fleet prison in December last, and in further contempt has caused the back doors of the house in which his sisters reside to be nailed up, the water cut off, and the pales thrown down, and threatens to eject them. By a letter which was read at the Board it appears that he has most contemptuously written that the first day of next term he will be discharged, in despite of any lord, whereas his commitment was but to enforce the performance of an order of the Lords made upon his Majesty's reference, by his own consent and by his sisters', pursuant to their father's will, who will else be necessitated to become a parish charge. It is ordered that the two next justices of peace and constable of the parish where the house is situated shall take care to restore and preserve the sisters in their quiet possession, and make return to this Board of any who shall disturb them; and in case William Stodard shall not within three days after notice of this order make payment to Mary according to former orders he shall be restrained close prisoner to his chamber, and that for his contemptuous words and writing the Attorney-General, to vindicate the honour of this Board, shall exhibit an information against him the court of Star Chamber. [Draft. 1½ p.]
Jan. 8. 59. Order of Council. The difference between Richard Culme on the one side, and Peter Cape and John Reu on the other, was by an order of this Board referred to the judges of assize for Devon, who with the consent of both parties on the 22nd June last settled an order therein. For the taxing and asserting of the arrearages of the rents and debts due to Mr. Culme, and settling the accompt between the parties, Sir Francis Vincent, John Ackland, and John Banfield were named in the judges' order. Nothing having been done, by reason of the absence of the two former, the Lords by this order direct Sir George Chidley, Sir Thos. Drew, Henry Ashford, John Banfield, and Henry Waldron to settle this business. If Mr. Culme shall refuse to conform himself and perform the judges' order in all particulars, he is required to attend upon the Board the latter end of next term. [Draft. 1½ p.]
Jan. 8. 60. Minute of a warrant to commit John Lascoe prisoner to the Gatehouse. [¼ p.]
Jan. 8. The like to commit Robert Relf to the same prison. [On the same paper as the preceding two lines.]
Jan. 8. 61. Sec. Windebank to Bishop Moreton, of Durham. His Majesty understands that Norham Island and Bedlingtonshire are within your particular jurisdiction, but in regard of their remoteness from the bishopric their trained-bands cannot be properly regulated unless united with those of Northumberland; he has therefore commanded me to signify his pleasure to you that you grant deputations to Sir John Fenwick, Sir John Clavering, Sir Francis Brandling, and Sir William Widdrington, deputy lieutenants of Northumberland, that so they being strengthened by your authority may be better able to do his Majesty service in these active times. [Draft. 1 p.]
[Jan. 8.] 62. Minute of a letter to be written to Bishop Moreton, of Durham, to the same effect as the preceding entry. [½ p.]
Jan. 8. 63. Petition preferred by the grand jury at the Quarter Sessions held at Kettering for co. Northampton to the Bench. At this present there is a great and insupportable grievance lying upon us and the country under the name of ship-money to be raised for providing of ships, our goods and theirs being forcibly taken and detained from us. Our petition is that some redress may be by you obtained, for it is not only our own but the general complaint of the country, and neither we nor they are well able to bear this burden, and therefore crave that this may be in such sort by you represented as in your wisdom you shall think fitting. [Certified copy. ½ p.]
Jan. 8.
Drury Lane.
64. Sec. Windebank to [Sir John Conyers]. By my letter of the 1st November to you, forwarded through Sir William Boswell, his Majesty's resident with the States General, but who is now here in England, I made a proposition to you of an employment here in England in his Majesty's service, which both for honour and profit will be more advantageous than that which you at present hold under the States. I know it is of no slender consideration to remove your dwelling, being so well settled as I understand you are in those parts, but it likewise no less concerns his Majesty's service that you return speedily your answer, which I expected to have received before this. This messenger has been expressly despatched to you in order to bring back your positive answer. This intended employment, if you should accept it, will not be temporary, but for life, and is of more eminency and benefit by far than that wherein you now are. I have ventured very far in being thus importunate upon a slender acquaintance, but his Majesty's service being, if I mistake not, so highly concerned herein, and yourself having the reputation of being so much a gentleman, I hope you will not take it ill that I press thus earnestly for an answer. [Copy. 1⅓ p.]
Jan. 8. 65. Draft of the preceding in Sec. Windebank's hand. [1⅓ p.]
Jan. 8.
Berwick.
66. Sir Michael Ernley to Sec. Windebank. I received your letter of 31st December, and have caused those writs to be served upon the parties named, only Sir James Douglas is at London, and Mr. Phenick [Fenwick ?] and Edward More are out of the town [Berwick], but I expect them this day. I understand that the lords of the Covenant with their adherents are to meet upon the 11th inst., but whether at Edinburgh or Stirling is yet doubtful. That they are preparing ladders, fireworks, and boats is very certain, and they have shipped 28 pieces of cannon at Preston-Ponds; how they intend to dispose of these I cannot learn, but it is supposed they are for Aberdeen. I am certain they have as yet gathered no troops together, but the general opinion of the people there is that this meeting they will conclude of some enterprise very advantageous for them. In this place [Berwick] I will be always prepared for them, though I little expect them, and less fear anything they are able to do here. On the 10th inst. I expect the two companies from Northumberland, and those from Durham shortly after. I shall have much trouble to lodge these 500 men by reason of the perverseness of the townsmen, who are willing to do the King no more service than they are forced to do, notwithstanding we spend all we have amongst them to their great advantage. He who is their solicitor, as I hear, has sent them word that the lord governor is to come hither no more, and that Sir John Conyers is to be governor of this place. I have nothing else to inform you of at this time. You may be confident of my care in this my charge to the uttermost of my power. [Endorsed by Windebank as received on the 11th at 7 o'clock at night, and answered on the 21st. 1 p.]
Jan. 8.
Berwick.
67. Capt. Charles Lloyd to Sec. Windebank. I hope you have received my last letter, wherein I fulfilled your commands. In my previous letter, you may remember, I mentioned a sudden way of fortifying this town, if there were any fear, from any unexpected assault, without any charge to the King, and I would gladly hear your resolution. I prosecute the works [of fortification] as fast as I can, but the frost and ill weather have hindered me much. I shall want more carpenters, whom I cannot get here. P.S.—This day I have finished the curtain which I removed, and am raising the mound. [Endorsed by Windebank, "Captain Fludd. Received 13th; answered 21st." Seal broken. 1 p.]
Jan. 8.
Berwick.
68. George Payler to [Lord Treasurer Juxon]. In my last I acquainted you with the receipt of his Majesty's warrant of the 16th December for a further supply of 3,000l., and also desired your directions about the repayment of moneys to the lord governor [of Berwick] for corn added to his Majesty's store to be issued out to the soldiers in the garrison, the benefit thereof redounding to his lordship's use. If according to his command I must now discount to him for that proportion of 160 quarters which he provided, it will appear that very little of his Majesty's store has been used out, because the weekly allowance to be converted into bread was prescribed by the Lords' order at their being here, which I have exactly observed, and have made defalcations according to their directions. The works of fortification here are continued with as much force as may be, and no accident or impediment has happened since the alteration of the work formerly begun; the gates, drawbridges, and other business of most consequence are in hand, and purposed to be finished with all speed. The 500 men raised in Durham and Northumberland for reinforcing this garrison are upon their march, and expected to arrive on Friday next. As yet I have not received any instructions from you concerning the commencement of their entertainment, wherein I desire to be satisfied, that I may proceed with confidence in my accompts. [Endorsed, "Payler's letter concerning 150 (sic) quarters of rye." 1 p.]
Jan. 8/18.
Nyköping.
69. Sir George Fleetwood to Sir Thomas Roe, English ambassador to the States at Hamburgh. I cannot as yet speak with my merchant doctor, but expect him hourly, and then I will ensure you of either recipe or medicine with full directions. Our parliament is this day begun, and if ought fall in it worth your notice I shall weekly acquaint you. I must beg your assistance to procure Mr. Avery's aid in a money business. [Seal broken. 1 p.]
Jan. 8.
Lambeth.
70. Certificate by Daniel Featley, D.D., justice of peace for co. Surrey, that William Woodworth, of Lambeth, intending to travel to Paris, had appeared before him and taken the oaths of allegiance and supremacy. [Impression of seal. ½ p.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
Minute by Nicholas of proceedings this day at the Council of War. Sec. Windebank signified his Majesty's pleasure that this Council of War meet every morning for the better expediting of the present expedition. The Lord-General delivered the opinion of himself and the other referees touching queries referred to them concerning pay (see Jan. 4). Ordered that the Earl of Newport cause an estimate to be made of the charge of making 50 brass drakes of three-pound bullet, to the end that order may be given for casting the same. The Lords resolved to speak with his Majesty concerning the pay of the horse, and to know his pleasure whether a carabineer shall have 1s. 8d. or 2s. per diem, and a cuirassier 2s. 2d. or 2s. 6d.; the last summer all horsemen having been allowed 2s. 6d. [Written on the same paper as Jan. 4, No. 32. 1 p.]
Jan. 9. 71. The answer of the Earl of Northumberland, Lord-General, and the other referees touching the queries about pay, &c. referred to them the 4th of this month, as the same was this day presented by the Earl to the Council of War. 1. Three corporals of the field at 6s. a man, but we suppose that the name of corporal of the field were better dispensed with, and the pay given to three gentlemen who shall attend the general as those of the Prince of Orange do. Resolved: The Lords will have the name of corporal of the field to stand, but his duty to be to attend the Lord-General. 2. The quarter-master-general of the horse to have 10s. a day, and two horses at 2s. each. Resolved: This is approved of. 3. Because the horsemen in foreign parts gain as much as is equivalent to their pay, by which means they are rendered able to live, which cannot be expected in Scotland, and if they should be necessitated they would spoil the country in England, or, to live themselves, starve their horses; the cuirassier therefore may have 2s. 6d. a day, for which he is to keep a bidet. A carabineer to have 2s. Resolved: The Lords will speak with the King about this pay. 4. It is necessary to have a sergeant-major of a brigade, and to have one who shall command in chief over it by the name of commander of the brigade or tertia. Resolved: This officer is to be called colonel of the brigade, and to have for pay 2l. per diem. The sergeantmajor of the brigade is to have 5s. per diem, and to be appointed by the Lord-General to be one of the lieutenant-colonels of that division. 5. There are 40 drakes of 3-lbs. bullet, and 50 more of the same proportion may be made with all speed, and the more there be of this kind the better. 6. For what belongs to the artillery a longer time is desired to consider of it. [1½ p.]
Jan. 9. 72. Another copy of the preceding, but with the resolutions of the Council of War in the margin. [1⅓ p.]
Jan. 9. 73. New scale of pay to be allowed to the officers in the several divisions of the army, whereof the Earl of Northumberland is to be Lord-General, as settled by the Council of War. [5½ pp.]
[Jan. 9.] 74. List of pay similar to the preceding, but in some instances estimated according to a lower scale. [Draft. 4⅓ pp.]
Jan. 9. 75. Memorial of the Company of Gun-makers of London to the Council. We are ready to deliver carbines with their fittings at 1l. 10s., and pistols with firelocks and fittings per pair at 2l. 16s. These arms having not been many years in use here, nor long made, but we expect hereafter upon encouragement to be more ready in making them, and so shall afford them at cheaper rates. [2/3 p.]
Jan. 9. 76. Tenders of the gun-makers of London, whose names are subscribed, specifying the numbers and price of carbines and pistols which they severally agree to deliver monthly. [2 pp.]
Jan. 9. 77. Copy of the preceding. Endorsed, "14th January 1639[40]. The firelock-makers, and the carbine-makers, undertakings with their prices, the original left with Mr. Barnard at the Earl of Newport's the day and year above written. Formerly left with the Earl of Newport to be presented to the Lords the next day." [3 pp.]
Jan. 9.
Lambeth.
78. Archbishop Laud to Sir Thomas Roe. I have received your letters of the 18th and 19th Nov., and with them both the virulent tract concerning Calvin, cunningly dedicated to myself, and the answers of the Prince of Denmark and Dr. Earnstius [Ernesti] concerning that tract, for all which your care, kindness, and pains, I have no other new-year's gift to send you than my hearty thanks, and as hearty wishes that this year may be happy to yourself and your wife, to whom I pray let me be remembered. For myself my strength decreases and my business increases, which is not a good conjuncture for me, yet must be borne. For the public undoubtedly this year must bring forth some great good or evil, and a great part of the good hoped for, will depend upon the temper and well ordering of the parliament, which God bless and preserve it both from private ends and practices. The particular business of your letters is all concerning the Prince Elector and his being detained in France, on which you have written very clearly and nobly. But that's all one to them, who out of all doubt have other ends in this business than most men think of. What my conceipt of it is, I dare not express, unless I could be fully assured of the safe coming of these letters to your hands. The best is, whosoever has been deceived by the French proceedings hitherto, I have not. Your letter was written so well in this particular, as that I thought I should do you a good office to show it to the King; I did so, and failed not in my expectation, for the King, having read it, said it was honestly, discreetly, and prudently written. But as for the Prince Elector, I for my part do not find yet that he is any nearer his liberty than he was when you wrote to me. I pray God send us to see better times, to whose blessed protection I leave you, and rest your very loving friend to serve you.
P.S.—When I had ended these letters I received another from you, whereby I see your care for the delivery of my letters to Dr. Wedderborne. The rest of the business concerning the French proceedings, and the King of Denmark's message concerning the Prince Elector, can yet expect no other answer from me than I have here given; but I will be sure to call on Sec. Coke to see D[uke] Bernard's will and the secret articles. [1 p.]
Jan. 9.
Auckland Castle.
79. Bishop Morton, of Durham, to Sec. Windebank. In obedience to his Majesty's commands, signified by your letters received on the 31st December, I prepared 300 footmen of the trained-bands with such expedition that they were ready to depart for Newcastle by the 8th instant, under the conduct of Captain Gifford. I doubt not but you will represent to his sacred Majesty my diligence in discharge of this service. [Seal with crest and arms. This letter is dated 9th December 1639, an evident mistake for 9th January. 2/3 p.]
Jan. 9.
Drury Lane.
80. Robert Read to his cousin, [Thomas Windebank]. I have received your letters of the 6th and 13th January [new style], giving hopes of your return home. I find that sending letters by express breeds irregularity, so I shall not be induced to commit again such an error during your residence in those parts. Mistress Harrison continues yet a virgin; some say that the match is broken off, but I believe it was too far advanced to be altered. My wishes for such success in your business as may bring you the honour desired. P.S. by Anne Windebank.—My dearest brother, in these few words receive the hearty affection of your most entirely loving sister. [1 p.]
Jan. 9.
Windsor.
81. Dr. Stokes to Sec. Windebank. I send herewith the key of the trunk wherein Sir Henry Wotton's papers are, and which is to be forwarded to Mr. Pay, as the Dean of Canterbury tells me you gave direction. I beg to apologise for not waiting on you last week whilst I was in London, being enjoined by the college of Eton to present our new provost to his Grace of Canterbury, but intend before long, as I hope to be in town again with the Dean of Windsor about that which is his engagement. [1 p.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
82. The King to the Earls of Dorset and Holland, Lord Lieutenants of co. Middlesex. There being present occasion to reinforce the garrison at Berwick, we, with the advice of the Privy Council, do require you to cause 100 serviceable men for the wars to be levied in the county under your lieutenancy, and to observe such directions as you shall receive from the Council. [Draft. ¾ p.]
Jan. 10. Minute of the same. [Docquet.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
83. Resolutions at the Council of War this day. Ordered that the Earl of Newport, Master of the Ordnance, shall be hereby prayed to cause the 3,000 swords made by Stone on Hounslow Heath to be proved, and an estimate made of the charge for so many as shall be found fit for his Majesty's service, that order may be given by the Lords for payment for the same. Order for a warrant to supply money, by way of imprest, to Sir Francis Willoughby to pay six gunners in Carlisle, according to the last year's establishment, from 1st of November last. Ordered that the Earl of Newport shall send one ton of match to Sir F. Willoughby for his Majesty's service at Carlisle. There are in Cumberland 600 dragoons raised, and constituted out of such as are by their tenures obliged at all times to go against the Scots with their landlords. Of this number 200 are raised amongst the Earl of Northumberland's tenants. These are well armed with the King's arms, and Capt. Trafford, their colonel, and some other officers receive the King's pay. These landlords complain that they are over-burdened with this charge, and pray some allowance in ease thereof. The Earl Marshal and Lord High Admiral to advise with some gentlemen of Cumberland when they return to town how those dragoons may be more equally proportioned for the charge of that service, and to consider how 400 more dragoons may be added, to make them up into a regiment of 1,000, with least charge to his Majesty, and best ease to that county. Resolved that the army, for which a list is to be drawn up, shall be 20,000 foot and 3,000 horse, consisting of 20 regiments of 10 companies of 100 each, besides officers; that the horse shall be divided into six regiments, each containing so many as are expressed in the establishment. [Minutes to be entered. 2 pp.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
84. Duplicate of the first and third entries of the preceding minutes of the Council of War. [½ p.]
Jan. 10. Grant of a gunner's room in the Tower of London to Richard Wilkinson, with the fee of 6d. per diem during pleasure, in reversion of John Hayward. [Docquet.]
Jan. 10. Warrant to the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex and to the gaoler of Newgate, commanding them, at the instance of the Queen, to discharge out of custody William Keath, convicted and attainted for stealing plate from her Majesty. [Docquet.]
Jan. 10. Warrant to the Master of the Great Wardrobe for a livery of 4l. 5s. 4d. for David Murray, his Majesty's tailor, vice Robert Ramsey, deceased. [Docquet.]
Jan. 10. 85. Order of Council upon the petition of William Smith, of London, merchant. Ordered that the report made by Dr. Rives in the difference between petitioner and William Aldred should, by an act of the Board, be confirmed, and the costs and charges of petitioner be taxed, unless Aldred shall show cause to the contrary the next council day after sight hereof. [Minute. 2/3 p.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
86. Council warrant to Mattliew Francis, one of his Majesty's sergeants-at-arms, to take into custody Thomas Pentiloe and 14 others, of Wilby, in Northamptonshire, and bring them before the Lords to answer such matters as shall be objected against them. If cause shall require, the sheriff of that county is to call a force together to assist in the execution of this warrant. [Signed and sealed. 1 p.]
Jan. 10.
Whitehall.
87. Council warrant to George Bingley, auditor of imprest. The money collected by the sheriffs and other officers under writs for ship-money issued in 1637, and particularly expressed in a charge for those moneys signed by this Board, is herewith sent to you. Sir William Russell, as Treasurer of the Navy, is by special commission appointed to receive the same, to be by him issued by virtue of the said commission, and such warrants as he should receive from this Board. We hereby require you to take and audit as well the accompt of Sir William as also the accompts of the Lieutenant of the Ordnance and Surveyor of Marine Victuals for the charge of setting forth his Majesty's fleet employed for guard of the seas in 1638. And whereas we are informed that all these moneys were not fully paid by the sheriffs and other officers to Sir William, according to the charge signed by us, we therefore require you to set upon the heads of the sheriffs and other officers respectively so much of those sums charged upon each as shall appear by oath of Sir William, who is accountant for the whole, to be unpaid to him; and when you shall have examined the said accompts, and made them fit to be declared, you are to present the same to this Board. [1 p.] Enclosed,
87. I. Charge of Sir William Russell, Treasurer of the Navy, touching the moneys received of the several sheriffs named, and by them levied under writs for ship-money issued in 1637. Total charged on Sir William, 196,400l. [Signed by the Council. 10 pp.]
Jan. 10. 88. The Council to the Sheriffs of the several shires. The safety of the kingdom requiring that there should be this year more than ordinary diligence used in hastening the fleet to sea, which cannot be expedited so soon as is necessary, unless the ship-money payable by that county upon writs issued in November last be forthwith levied and paid to the treasurers of the navy, his Majesty requires that you use all possible diligence in levying the same, and that by a day fixed you pay in to the treasurers of the navy so much as you shall have collected, sending in at the same time an accompt to this Board of your proceedings in that business. [Minute. 1 p.]
Jan. 10. 89. This day there was presented to the Lords a proportion or allowance of victuals for such landmen as shall for the present or hereafter be transported by sea upon any occasion for his Majesty's service, viz.: for one week without fish; biscuit one lb. per diem; beer three quarts per diem; for two days in the week, beef two lbs., or pork one lb., with one pint of peas; and for the other five days, butter ¼ lb., and cheese ½ lb. Which proportion the Lords well approved of, and gave order that the same be entered in the Council book, and that the Lord High Admiral be required, upon all occasions of sending landmen by sea for his Majesty's service, to see that the said allowance for victuals be made them accordingly. [Draft. 1 p.]
Jan. 10. 90. Minute of a pass for William Woodworth, of Lambeth, to travel into foreign parts for three years, with the usual clauses. [¼ p.]
Jan. 10. 91. Attorney-General Bancks to the Clerk of the Council. To send a copy of the letter sent from the Lords to the sheriff of co. Hereford touching the shipping business in the years 1637 and 1638; also a copy of the like letter sent to the sheriff of co. Stafford for the years 1638 and 1639. [½ p.]
Jan. 10.
Westminster.
92. Sir Richard Cave to [Sir Thomas Roe]. The last week, by Mr. Adamson, I received your letter of the 9th December. I send herewith a copy of the letter which I sent to the Queen of Bohemia the last week, by which you will perceive the resentment of the Prince Elector's devilish usage; that he has not liberty to write or receive a word from anybody; nor has he had one letter of mine since his imprisonment, nor the King's and Queen's, but upon hateful conditions; nor may he talk to any man or any to him except in French, and that aloud before company. They will make him forget his English and whispering. In short, never was man of his condition used so barbarously, and howsoever the Earl of Leicester and M. D'Augier would persuade us here (out of their good wishes to have it so) to some hope of his sudden relaxation, my affection (if not my reason) makes me fear the worst. The Cardinal [Richelieu] is Bavarian, and has hitherto showed it, to the great prejudice of the Palatine House. He has declared to young Windebank that we, the English, do not love the French. In the French letter which you sent me you have seen that others make the same construction, and therefore, though the King has, according to the Queen of Bohemia's desires, forbidden the Earl of Leicester to treat of anything else until the Prince Elector be set at liberty, some, especially the States' ambassador here, seem to be of opinion that his Majesty will not easily prevail that way, but that the King ought in the first place to propose or hearken to such propositions as may be proposed for his Highness' sudden release. Others demand what conditional propositions ought to be made for the relaxation of a Prince so unjustly detained. But, in short, the King and the Lords of the Junto say, that nothing can be done or thought upon to be resolved till Mr. Windebank shall return with answer to the King's letters. Concerning M. Curtius or his employment I can say but little. I was the less inquisitive after it, being not desirous to serve in any business whereunto my master shall not think fit to call me, although it may be I had as little reason to be pleased therewith as others, for though I was here upon the place, and must know what was in hand, yet his Highness never spoke a word to me thereof more than this: After I am gone Curtius shall go to the Landgravine of Hesse and some others thereabouts. This business was carried between Lord Treasurer [Juxon], Sec. Windebank, and Curtius, but Sec. Coke wrote the letter, because the others knew not how, and Sec. Windebank the instructions. Of this you shall hear more from me very shortly. Now for court news. The Lord Deputy of Ireland is created Baron of Raby and Earl of Strafford, a hundred in Yorkshire, and Lieutenant of Ireland. We are in huge preparations for Scotland. Sir John Conyers is made Governor of Berwick, and captain of a troop of horse. Sir Thomas Lucas is Commissary-General of the Horse in Ireland, and has a troop there. Sir Nicholas Byron, Governor of Carlisle, and (as it is said) shall be Sergeant-Major-General of the Army. Sir Jacob Ashley is not talked of. Sir Simon Harcourt may have employment if he will. You know the great places. The Earl of Northumberland [is] General. The Lieutenant-General's place is not named, but very privately whispered for the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland; but I pray make me no author of that part. Lord Conway, General of the Horse. The Lords Marshal, Essex and Holland, are much discontented. The raising of troops before a parliament begets discourse and censures of several sorts. Thus you see that we are ready to scratch one another's faces. For my part I push not very hard after any employment in these occasions. I shall be glad to live to do my master service in the wars out of Great Britain; I care not much for fighting in this island. I have sent a short letter to M. Rusdorfe, but it is only to refer him to you; yet you may tell him no more than what you shall think fit. When I came from the court after dinner I left Sec. Coke in the resolution presently to write to you; to him and the enclosed I refer you. For, besides the last week's letter, I send likewise a copy of that which I am to send to her Majesty [the Queen of Bohemia] this evening. P.S.—I beseech you let me know what title I must give M. Rusdorfe in my next letter, "ambassador or resident," for I know these things are expected amongst them, but if he were an Englishman I could say for Jack or Will. Rusdorfe. I pray let one of your men write somewhat upon it, and then give it to him. I have only referred him to your letter. [2 pp.]
Jan. 10.
Bishopthorpe.
93. Archbishop Neile, of York, to [Sec. Windebank]. In my last I promised to give you an account of such information as I should receive from Newcastle concerning Dr. Jenison. The truth is that he lives there under jealousy and suspicion of doing no good offices there, but nothing can be proved to fasten an accusation upon him. I am promised that there shall be a watchful eye had upon him, and if anything shall be discovered of his holding secret conventicles or conferences, or any other misdemeanours, that I shall have present notice thereof. Upon receiving my letters, enclosing a copy of yours to me, the Bishop of Durham wrote to Dr. Jenison, and, acquainting him with the effect of yours, advised him to avoid the jealousy conceived of his misdoing there, by removing his dwelling from thence. To which he returned answer by protestation, that he held not any manner of secret conventicles or meetings or conferences with any, nor would do anything to his Majesty's disservice or the disturbance of the government of that place. He complained that by his being suspended from his ministry, and deprived of the place and maintenance which he had there, himself, his wife, and children were undone, and he should be constrained to sell his goods for his relief; that for the present time he was in bodily infirmity, by reason whereof he had been constrained to keep his house some time past; yet in obedience to his Majesty's pleasure he would prepare himself, so soon as possibly he could, to remove his dwelling, as the season of the year, his health, and poor means might enable him to do it. He has in some former passages of his with me professed his willingness to live in due conformity to the laws, canons, and ceremonies of the Church of England; but it is manifest he does not that good there that he might do by his example of conformity. I understand that things are amiss there, that the faction increases, that many of them abandon the Common Prayers of the Church, some not coming to the church till the singing of the psalm before the sermon, of which crime I cannot excuse Dr. Jenison; others of them gadding abroad every Sunday, to the place where Mr. Lapthorne preaches, and to other like places. This is all that as yet I have to inform you concerning Dr. Jenison and Newcastle. It is now time that I should present to his Majesty a certificate of the due observation and performance of his royal instructions throughout this province. I have heretofore been bold to offer his sacred Majesty tedious discourses both of mine own diocese and also such certificates as I received from my brethren, the bishops of this province; I will now make amends with brevity, which I pray you to present to his Majesty, and inform him that I have received certificates from the bishops of Durham, Chester, Carlisle, and Man severally, in which they assure me that these instructions are punctually observed in their several dioceses. For my own diocese I should be unmannerly to trouble his Majesty with things not worthy his cognizance, by only repeating what I said in my last year's certificate. I assure you all his Majesty's instructions and directions are and shall be duly observed by me and all my officers. I trust his gracious Majesty will accept of this for the present. My prayers for his Majesty's health, long life, and prosperous success in all his great affairs. [Endorsed by Windebank as received on the 14th and answered on the 17th instant. 2¾ pp.]
Jan. 10. 94. Capt. William Legge to [Nicholas]. On the 23rd July 1639, one master-gunner at 2s. per diem, a gunner's mate at 1s. 6d., and four gunners at 12d. each, were sent to Carlisle with sufficient money to pay their entertainments until the 31st October, since which time they have received no allowance, as Sir Francis Willoughby has certified. P.S.—One of the four gunners was discharged by me for misdemeanour at my being in Carlisle. [1 p.]
Jan. 11. Petition of the Lord Mayor, Commonalty, and citizens of London, Governors of Bridewell Hospital, to the King. We received your Majesty's reference subscribed to a petition of Peter Welsh, one of the artsmen in the hospital, requiring us to give him satisfaction or to return answer to your Majesty, and since a note from Welsh containing all the particulars of his alleged losses and hindrances, for which he seeks satisfaction. Upon inquiring into the particulars we find all his suggestions and complaints to be causeless and false, and we conceive he ought not to receive from us any other satisfaction than he has had. We certify your Majesty that Welsh, being received an artsman into the hospital in January 1630, was ordered to become bound as other artsmen were wont to be, for preventing their leaving their wives and children a burden upon the hospital in the event of their death, but he delayed getting his covenants sealed for seven years, and afterwards refused utterly to give security, so that a suit had to be commenced to eject him, to frustrate which he has presumed to trouble your Majesty, and feigned this note of grievances. Here follow answers to the specific articles of complaint preferred by Welsh against the Governors. Petitioners having only the public good in view in the administration of the affairs of the hospital, on which they have bestowed much labour, pray that for the better government of the same they may legally proceed against Welsh. Underwritten,
i. His Majesty is well satisfied with this answer of the Governors of Bridewell Hospital to the complaints and suggestions of Peter Welsh, and that his complaints are scandalous, and made in opposition to government and the rules and orders of that house, which his Majesty much dislikes, and therefore is pleased to leave him to be proceeded against and dealt legally with by the Governors according to their orders of government. Whitehall, 11th January 1639-40. [Copy. See Book of Petitions, Vol. cccciii., p. 131. 1⅓ p.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
95. Minute of proceedings at the sitting of the Council of War this day, viz., warrant for payment of 500l. to Sir Francis Willoughby for reparation of the citadel and castle of Carlisle and other works to be done there for his Majesty's service. Resolved, that the Earl of Newport with the officers of ordnance be required to send for some of the gunmakers to treat for making so many carbines and pistols as they can possibly without hindering their making of the 1,600 muskets monthly which they have already undertaken to furnish for the King's service, and to endeavour to draw them to the lowest price he can; also to cause the said gunmakers to set down how many carbines and pistols they will furnish monthly and at what rates. A warrant to be drawn up for payment of a sum not specified to Sir John Heydon, Lieutenant of the Ordnance, for completing defective arms in the Tower and in the north. This day Sir Nicholas Byron and Sir Thomas Lucas were appointed to attend the Earl of Newport to view all the arms, as well for foot as horse, in the Tower, which were bought at Hamburgh and sent over by Sir Thomas Roe for his Majesty's service. [1¼ p.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
96. Warrant of Council of War to Sir Robert Pye. To issue 1,000l. upon accompt to Sir John Heydon, Lieutenant of the Ordnance, to be paid over to Samuel Cordewell, his Majesty's gunpowder-maker, for powder delivered into his Majesty's stores for use of the army intended to be forthwith raised; this sum being part of the 300,000l. appropriated by privy seal of the 8th inst. for such his Majesty's services. [Draft. 1 p.]
Jan. 11.
Bishopthorpe.
97. Archbishop Neile, of York, to Sec. Windebank. I wrote yesterday to advertise you of such informations as I received from Newcastle [see this Vol., No. 93]. I have this day received a letter from thence, which I hold it my duty to send you, and I presume you will show it to his sacred Majesty. The gentleman herein named, Mr. Middleton, of Belsay, is a man no better affected to conformity than he should be; he has a private chapel at Belsay, where all comers are permitted to preach, and to which the humoursome, factious people of Newcastle have ordinary recourse when they are disposed to abandon Common Prayer in their parish churches. [Episcopal seal with arms. ¾ p.] Encloses,
97. I. Yeldham Alvey, vicar of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, to Archbishop Neile. Since I wrote last, there have been in our town two covenanters of Scotland of no mean note, Sir Walter Riddell and Sir John Bohannan [Buchannan]. I heard that Mr. Middleton, of Belsay, and some three or four of our nonconformists held a more familiar correspondence with them than was fit, and accompanied them both in walking about the town walls, and also at their lodgings and other places. Sir John Buchannan continues yet in the town, for what purpose I cannot guess, unless it be to sound the humours and dispositions of the people which way they stand inclined or affected. There is not such a watchful eye kept over these men by our mayor as is requisite in these dangerous times there should be, and therefore I thought it not amiss to give you private intelligence of it. I fear my letters to the Archbishop of Canterbury must have miscarried, because I have heard nothing of them. Newcastle, 9th January 1639-40. [Seal with design. ¾ p.]
Jan. 11.
London House.
98. Notification signed by Bishop Juxon, of London, and Lord Francis Cottington. That his Majesty was pleased to allow to the adventurers of the 800 fen further time until 1st April next for completing their drainage works, the same not having been perfected within the six months formerly allowed them beyond the time fixed in the letters patent. The reasons alleged by the Earl of Lindsey and his partners for this delay were that some of the chief adventurers were employed in his Majesty's service in the northern expedition, the supply of labour diminished by reason of the levy of men in Lincolnshire, and the dissatisfaction expressed by Sir Charles Harbord, his Majesty's Surveyor-General, with the works of their design, which for greater security were ordered to be remade. [½ p.]
Jan. 11.
Gravesend.
99. Thomas Woodcott to Captain Cartwright, Comptroller of the Navy. Sends the enclosed notes, which he had hitherto retained, intending to deliver them to Cartwright when he should come hither. [Seal with device. ⅓ p.] Encloses,
99. i. A list of propositions relative to the projected building of an arsenal for the King's ships. [1¼ p.]
Jan. 11. 100. [The same to the same.] As the navy royal must be a perpetual and great charge to his Majesty and the kingdom, especially the great ships, care should be taken to preserve them from the violent heat of summer and the moisture of winter, which may be done by the use of an arsenal to lay the ships dry in dock. This would conduce to his Majesty's pleasure and profit. It would be a great pleasure to his Majesty to see his largest ships lying safe and dry without danger of rotting in the river, artificially protected from heat and wet, and a great profit several ways, but especially in long durance and readiness for use of a sudden upon all occasions. A very fair proposition may be made to the Lord High Admiral concerning this design for an arsenal, viz., 1,500l. per annum will cost 30,000l. His Majesty may save so much yearly in mere victuals and men's wages by this way, besides a great deal more in wear and tear. Principal advantages to be expected from such an arsenal as here projected. [12/3 p.]
Jan. 11. 101. Bond of John Lascoe and John Mantell, of Croydon, in Surrey, in the sum of 50l. to the King. Conditioned that John Lascoe shall not take, kill, or destroy hares, partridges, or pheasants, then this present obligation to be void. [¾ p.]
Jan. 11.
London.
102. Bond of Jean La Cams, a Frenchman detained at Dover under suspicion of mixing metals, in which he binds himself to depart the kingdom within eight days, and not to return without the King's license. [French. ½ p.]
Jan. 11. 103. Certificate by Sir William Russell what money has been paid to the treasurers of the navy upon the writs issued for shipmoney in 1638, since the last week's certificate. Total 140l. [½ p.]
Jan. 11. 104. Receipt of Valentine Petit for 8l. 6s. 6d. for silk, camlet, and plush delivered to Edward Nicholas. [½ p.]
Jan. 12. 105. The Council to Edward Earl of Dorset, and Henry Earl of Holland, Lord Lieutenants of Middlesex. By his Majesty's letters sent herewith you shall understand his intention for the levying of 100 foot soldiers within the county under your lieutenancy, for reinforcing the garrison at Berwick, and by the same you are referred for instructions to us. We therefore require you to give especial care to the choice of the men, that they be of able bodies, of the proper age for service, and well clothed. These men are not to be taken out of the trained-bands, which are still to be kept entire. They are to be led by their conductors to the Tower wharf, there to be delivered to such captain or officer as shall be appointed by the Lord-General to receive them by the 18th inst. We think fit that they be allowed 8d. per diem from the time of their being delivered to their conductors, who are likewise to have a reasonable allowance assigned by you according to the precedent of former times, having regard to the number of men they are severally to conduct, thus enabling them with some assistance to keep their men from straggling and pilfering. You are to take order that the money for coats and conducting of the men, and pay of the conductors until the former be delivered over to their captains at the Tower wharf, be disbursed by the latter and levied in the country according to precedent; the country to be repaid the same upon accompt made out of the Exchequer as in former times upon the like occasions. You are to take care that indentures be delivered of the number and quality of the persons received at the rendezvous, whereof one duplicate to be sent to the Board that accompt may be given when required. Lastly, we require the justices of peace and all other officers to be aiding to you in the performance of this service. [Draft. 2½ pp.]
Jan. 12. 106. Council warrant for the apprehending of delinquents in retailing tobacco without license contrary to his Majesty's late proclamation, and to the prejudice of the patentees, thereby disabling them to pay their rent, and for contempt in refusing to appear before the Commissioners for Tobacco; the said delinquents to be brought in custody before the Board to answer to such matters as shall be objected against them. [Draft. 1 p.]
Jan. 12. 107. The like directed to John Lysney, a messenger, to bring before the Board John Spy, of Hastings, Sussex. [Minute. ¼ p.]
Jan. 12. 108. Receipt given by Henry Kyme for 52 letters from the Council directed to the sheriffs of all the counties in England and Wales, except Kent, and one to the mayor and sheriffs of Bristol. [¼ p.]
Jan. 12.
Alford.
109. The Commissioners of Sewers to the Council. We received your letters with a petition enclosed exhibited by two of the inhabitants of Sutton-in-the-Marsh, co. Lincoln, wherein they pretend a grievance imposed upon their town by us and other the Commissioners of Sewers in wrongfully taking from them an ancient privilege of swiftage, and in allowing it to the levy towns. For answer to both it may be stated that 20 years since there being found by the Commissioners an error of exempting certain grounds lying within frontage towns from charge of sea-banks, which they called swiftage, and finding no reason for that exemption they did condemn it by decree, and made all acres lying within the like danger alike chargeable. About nine years since, the then Commissioners finding upon accompt that Sutton was in like error they reformed it by like decree. Touching the other complaint that the Commissioners did admit swiftage in the levy towns, may it please your Lordships to be informed that in 7 Hen. VII. a Commission of Sewers was directed to Sir John Kendall, Lord St. John, and others, who took a general survey of all acres lying within danger of the sea from the water of Lymm to Saltfleet Haven, within the parts of Lindsey, and left the more particular survey of the levy towns to two of their fellow Commissioners, who charged the constables and other the chiefest inhabitants of every township to deliver upon oath the number of acres in each town chargeable to the surround of the sea. These indentures, which are enrolled, deliver the parcels of each of the levy towns in danger of the sea overflow, and which were liable to the making of a new bank when requisite, so that there was no allowance of swiftage in any of them. In obedience to your commands we have certified the truth of the case of swiftage in both, that it is neither to be allowed in the frontage nor charged upon the levy towns, referring it with the censure of the petitioners and other inhabitants of Sutton to your consideration, as well for their bold presumptions in misinforming you as for laying an aspersion upon us, who, in regard of our great pains and care for their good, deserve a much better respect from them. [1 p.]
Jan. 12.
Drury Lane.
110. Sec. Windebank [to Sir John Conyers]. Before the receipt of yours of the 24th ult. I had by his Majesty's commandment directed another letter to you of the 8th inst., which I delivered to Sir William Boswell to be conveyed to you, and which I believe was sent by the ordinary post last week. By that you will find the great difficulty removed which, I perceive by your letter, kept back your resolution of accepting that which by my first letter of Nov. 1st I offered to you. This difficulty I conceive was the uncertainty of the continuance of the employment intended for you here, whereas that which you now enjoy in those parts is sure, besides your further hopes of bettering it, and the estate in land which you hold there in right of your wife. But to speak clearly to you, and that not of myself, but by commission and commandment from his Majesty, who has been pleased of his princely goodness and opinion of your merit to take you into his consideration, I have order from himself to acquaint you with the particular employment which he intends to confer upon you, and that is the government of Berwick, where a garrison of 1,200 foot and four troops of horse are stationed for securing that important place against his rebellious subjects of Scotland. The place is to be settled upon you by patent during your life, with an entertainment of 3l. a day. You are besides to have a troop of horse of 60 arquebusiers, with their officers, and a company of foot consisting of 200 men. But no advantage at all is to be taken upon dead pays, which his Majesty will in nowise admit, considering the largeness of the entertainment both to yourself and your officers, which is higher than that given by any other prince. The subordinate officers are to have liberal allowances, viz., the captain of the horse, 24s. a day and six horses; lieutenant, 8s. and three horses; cornet, 4s. and two horses; quartermaster, 4s. and two horses; corporals, 2s. 6d.; trumpet, 2s. 6d.; soldiers cuirassiers, 2s. 6d.; carabineers, 2s. His Majesty makes these liberal allowances to take away all sharking by dead pays, and if any captain or other officer shall be found taking advantage of dead pays, being thus royally paid, it shall be capital to him, and he shall be punished with death. Besides this you are to be Deputy Lieutenant of the counties next adjoining to Berwick, that you may have power for his Majesty's service in those parts upon all occasions. These are the certainties intended for you. But these are not all; his Majesty likewise purposing to make you Lieutenant-General of the Horse of his army designed this year for the north, whereof the adjoined letter from the Lord High Admiral, whom his Majesty has declared General of those forces, will give you more particular information, he having command from his Majesty to let you know what trust he intends to repose in you in these temporary services under the Lord-General. His Majesty will likewise write to the Prince of Orange to dispense with your service there, though it cannot be expected that you shall continue in that employment long, if you accept this. If you can bring with you any gentlemen of consideration experienced in horse service they shall be well entertained here. It remains that now you understand the particulars, and that these motions come from his Majesty, you presently by this bearer, who is expressly sent to you for that end, return me your positive answer and resolution, that so his Majesty's great affairs, which depend much hereupon, may be ordered accordingly. Your friendly expressions to myself in your letter are great obligations laid upon me, which I shall be ready to acknowledge and acquit myself of, whensoever you shall esteem me worthy to be commanded. P.S.—I desire you to give the messenger direction where to deliver the letter from the Lord High Admiral to Mr. Willmott, because it requires a present answer. Endorsed, "Duplicate of Mr. Secretary Windebank's third letter to me in Holland." [Copy. 2½ pp.] Annexed,
110. i. Algernon Earl of Northumberland [to Sir John Conyers]. A letter from me may come unexpected to you, but the King being pleased to declare that he has a purpose to commit the trust and command of the army now intended to be raised to me, has given me leave to let you know that if you like [to accept] of the government and conditions which he has directed Sec. Windebank to offer you, he will likewise confer upon you another mark of his favour, by employing you in his army, where you shall have a regiment of cavalry, and be Lieutenant-General of the Horse. The charge, I hope, will not appear to you unfit for a gallant and deserving man. The entertainment belonging to this command in the army, besides all the profits of your government [of Berwick], will be near 5l. a day. The service you will be able to do the King, my master, is the most powerful invitation I can use to persuade you hither, and if in this I may prevail, no man shall more value your worth nor be more ready to serve you than your friend and servant the writer. P.S.—If you resolve to embrace these offers, you will do the King a service and me a very great pleasure, in drawing hither as many as you can possibly of our nation, who understand cavalry service, and I daresay they shall have better entertainment than is given to [by ?] any other prince or state, and be preferred to good commands. London, Jan. 12, 1639-[40]. Endorsed, "Duplicate of my Lord of Northumberland's first letter to me into Holland." [Copy. 1 p.]
Jan. 12. 111. Draft of the above letter of Windebank to Sir John Conyers, with a few words in shorthand on the back. [2¾ pp.]
Jan. 12.
Bishop Auckland.
112. Bishop Morton, of Durham, to Sec. Windebank. According to his Majesty's commands expressed in your letter, which I received on the 31st ult., I sent to the captains under my lieutenancy that three companies of the regiment might with all celerity be chosen for his Majesty's present service, which was accordingly performed. These companies on the 8th inst. set forward from Durham in their march towards Newcastle. Thus much I certified you by the last post, but fearing miscarriage I have renewed it by this gentleman. The time of mustering, and since their marching having been most unseasonable in this country, has been the cause of some little delay. [Episcopal seal with arms. 2/3 p.]
Jan. 12. 113. Advice addressed to James I. [by Sir Henry Neville ?] touching the holding of a parliament, with marginal notes in the handwriting of Archbishop Laud. [This document has been already calendared under its correct date, July 1613, but as the present copy bears the endorsement "Received January 12, 1639-40," it is probable that it was consulted as a precedent for the expediency of calling a parliament this year. 3½ pp.]
Jan. 13. Petition of Lodowick Wemys, his Majesty's chaplain in ordinary, to the King. Your Majesty recently conferred upon petitioner the parsonage of Wheathampstead, Herts, but within these few days the Bishop of Lincoln has brought a writ from the Common Pleas and served it upon the church door, charging petitioner to appear and render a reason wherefore he has hindered him from presenting a sufficient clerk to the living, being now, as he alleges, in his donation, although the rest of his lesser livings be given by the Lord Keeper, yet he cannot tolerate that your Majesty should dispose of the greater, especially to petitioner, whom he has most notoriously and injuriously oppressed many years ago, by giving away from him a former living which your Majesty did, pleno jure, bestow upon him, being the first ecclesiastical living that ever your Majesty did give, the recovery of which, besides the miserable and unhappy distraction of petitioner from his private studies, put him to a charge of 300l. at least, as was signified to King James. Prays the King to direct some course that petitioner may be freed from the tyranny and malicious intentions of the bishop, whose study is to disturb petitioner from the peaceable enjoying of that blessing which you were pleased to confer upon him. Underwritten,
i. His Majesty's pleasure is that the Chief Justice of the Common Pleas shall cause the writ of quare impedit to be stayed, and take order that petitioner be not prejudiced thereby, but that he may be in quiet possession of the said living, as he was before the granting of the writ. Whitehall, 13th January 1639-[40]. [Copy. See Book of Petitions, Vol. cccciii., p. 134. =1 p.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
Minute of proceedings at the sitting of the Council of War this day, viz., a warrant for Capt. Lloyd, his Majesty's engineer at Berwick, to take up at Newcastle such carpenters as shall be necessary for the works there. Resolved, that the foot soldiers intended to be levied for his Majesty's army shall be raised by way of press in the several counties on this side Bawtry, in co. York, and that officers be sent into every county to see that good and able men be taken, which officers are to enter into pay from the time they shall be so employed. Resolved, that every troop of cuirassiers shall consist of 100 horse besides officers, and that the captain for raising such troop shall have 20l. for each horse. The arms for the horsemen shall be completely furnished out of the King's store, but the saddle and all other furniture for his horse, estimated to be worth 2l. 10s., to be found by the trooper. Every troop of carabineers is to consist of 52 or 60 horse soldiers besides officers, and the captain to be allowed 15l. for raising each horseman of his troop; the arms to be furnished by the King, but the saddle and furniture for the horse by the trooper, as is ordered for the cuirassier. Resolved, that a weekly deduction be made of 5½d. per diem out of the pay of every captain and troop of cuirassiers for the arms delivered to them by the King, but upon the return of such arms into the store their money deducted to be repaid in full; also a like deduction of 4¾d. out of the pay of every captain and troop of carabineers for the arms delivered to them by the King; so as his Majesty may by such deduction be fully reimbursed in a year for such arms as are delivered out of his stores, and if the captain shall die within the year the deduction to be continued from his successor. The price and charge of a cuirassier's arms is 8l. 10s., and of a carabineer's 7l. 6s. A weekly deduction is likewise to be made from the pay of each captain and company of foot for their arms, which are priced at 40s. apiece. The like for the clothes of the foot soldiers, valued at 40s. Resolved, that there shall be a proportion of bread allowed daily to the common soldier, deduction for the same being made out of his pay, according to the King's rate. The Lord-General to give special order that the bread be well conditioned and justly rated. [Written on the same paper as No. 95 of the present volume, which see. =2 pp.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
114. Council warrant to the farmers and officers of the ports in Sussex and Southampton, to suffer John Ashburnham, Esq., Nicholas Woolfe, gent., and William Margerome, merchant, in accordance with their petition, to export 300 lasts of wheat, 100 lasts of rye, the like of barley and of malt, the same being under the prices allowed by statute, they paying his Majesty's customs and all other dues. [Draft. 1 p.]
Jan. 13.
Whitehall.
115. The like to Capt. Lloyd, his Majesty's engineer, authorising him to take up by way of press or otherwise so many carpenters and other workmen as shall be required for the fortifications at Berwick. [Copy endorsed as entered ¾ p.]
Jan. 13. 116. Minute of a warrant to release John Lascoe from the Gatehouse Prison. [¼ p.]
Jan. 13.
Oxford.
117. Sir Nathaniel Brent to Archbishop Laud. On Wednesday as soon as our election was finished I forwarded to you an account of our doings, but having received no answer I suppose it was not delivered in due time. Now I crave leave to write the same again. We elected, 1st, Sir Hill, of St. Mary Hall, formerly a postmaster in our college [Merton]. He was not eligible by his country, but being the best learned of all who stood we consented to choose him, and he had every voice. 2nd, Sir Jones, not eligible, and elected unanimously as Hill. 3rd, Sir Whisler, of Trinity College, who was eligible, and, being proposed in opposition with another, had every voice. 4th, Lee, of Brazenose, son of Mr. Lee, who was sometime fellow of All Souls, and died prebendary and treasurer of the church of Salisbury. I proposed him with one Locket, of St. Mary Hall, and formerly a postmaster in our house. Lee had 8 voices out of the 13, and Locket 5. I desire to know your pleasure for the time of their admission in annum probationis, and for the admission of the bachelor fellows in numerum magistrorum. I purposed to have been in London the first day of term, but shall be detained by private business a few days longer, except you command the contrary. We never have anything to do on the first court of the delegates because Mr. Freeman does not use to come up so soon, and in the Court of High Commission your Grace will be abundantly assisted. I will not fail to bring with me the injunctions and queries. [1 p.]
Jan. 13. 118. Deputation from Theophilus Earl of Suffolk, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, to Richard Langley, to be droit gatherer in the town and liberties of Ramsgate, with authority to seize to the Earl's use all prohibited and uncustomed goods and merchandise as shall be unlawfully and without sufficient warrant embarked to be exported or unlawfully imported and landed at any place within the town and liberties of Ramsgate or within the jurisdiction of the Cinque Ports, and likewise to inquire what murders, piracies, felonies, quarrels, or assaults have been committed at sea or on shore under high-water mark. [Parchment, half skin.]
Jan. 13.
Drury Lane.
119. Robert Read to his cousin [Thomas Windebank]. Yours of the 17th of February [December ?] came to hand yesterday very orderly, the posts being lately more regular than they were wont to be. The Secretary's diet, as I told you in my last, is fallen to our lot, but I do not find that we have much more sign of seniority, Mr. Treasurer having full as much of the foreign business as Sec. Coke had. The Spanish, Italian, and Flemish correspondence falls to us, and the German, French, and Dutch to Mr. Treasurer. Thus the King has allotted to them their jurisdictions, yet so as that the ministers of all parts are to send duplicates of their ordinary intelligences to either of them, but of businesses of secrecy which shall be given in charge to any of his Majesty's ministers abroad accompt is to be made only to that secretary who signified his Majesty's pleasure therein to them. Francis Windebank's pretences to the widow ceased with her going out of town, which was a little after your departure hence, since which time I believe she has been very little in his thoughts. It is not yet resolved whether he shall have horse or foot, but I advise him if he cannot have the former to refuse the latter, since I hear there be many his inferiors who are like to have cavalry commands. Mrs. Harrison is yet a virgin (at least goes for one), and I hear will not consent to be married before Easter. Though none of my intelligences are of much value, yet I thought a relation of the generals of our army would have been needless, since I doubted not but you had heard it long since. The Earl of Northumberland is declared General, Lord Conway General of the Horse, and Sir John Conyers is designed for Lieutenant-General and Governor of Berwick, the Earl of Lindsey having left that last employment. But Sir John is yet in employment in the Low Countries, so it is not yet certainly known whether he will leave his charge there, where he is married and settled, to accept of this, though certainly this latter is far more honourable and beneficial than any he has or is like to have there. All martial affairs are consulted and ripened by a Council of War lately formed by commission to the Earl of Northumberland, who is President, the Lord Treasurer, Marquis Hamilton, Earl Marshal, Lord Lieutenant-General of Ireland, for that is the Lord Deputy's style now, Earl of Newport, Viscount Conway, Lord Cottington, the two Secretaries, Colonel Goring, Sir William Uvedale, Sir Jacob Asteley, Sir John Conyers, and Sir Nicholas Byron. These sit constantly three mornings a week, and, I assure you, ply their business hard. There are some Lords and others Covenanters, in all four, coming from Scotland; some call them Commissioners, but I cannot think rebels worthy of such a title, especially being employed from rebels. They had been here ere this, had not one of them fallen sick by the way. The King was contented at the [Covenanters'] earnest suit to suffer some of them to come, and will be so gracious as to hear what they will propose, but makes little accompt of anything to be done by them, and therefore his preparations slacken not an inch. P.S.—Present my service to my cousin Kitt, and to Mr. Aubert, and tell him I am extremely sorry he has such ill luck in his business; I hope it will be my fortune one day to serve him to some purpose. [3 pp.]
Jan. 13.
Cornbury Park.
120. Henry Earl of Danby to Sec. Windebank. As is meet for men of my years, having irrevocably conveyed the most part of my estate both real and personal to my brother or his children, and settled the rest in feoffees for performance of my will, I could not of a sudden reply to the King's letter lately received, but I dare now undertake to lay down 5,000l. at least this next term, being ready to obey his Majesty's further pleasure in all particulars appertaining thereunto.
Jan. 13.
Sandwich.
121. The Mayor and Jurats of Sandwich to [Theophilus Earl of Suffolk, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports]. By your letter of the 31st December you presented to this poor decayed town Edward Nicholas, Esq., to be one of the burgesses for the ensuing parliament. We confess he is a gentleman whom we love and honour, and one who has well deserved of this corporation, and from our hearts we wish that we had known his desire sooner, so many are there who have solicited for the place. Yet for our own parts, being but a few, only 13, having reserved ourselves free from any private engagements upon your entreaty, we shall do our full endeavour to move and persuade the multitude of freemen here, who have voices in this election as well as we, by reasons and otherwise to fix their eyes upon him, the rather for your sake, who if you vouchsafe but to cast a favourable glance upon the deplorable estate of this poor frontier town, one of the Cinque Ports and keys of the kingdom, it may thereby retain and raise up its head again out of the ashes of imminent ruin and decay. Endorsed, "Copy of a letter from the mayor and jurats of Sandwich to his Excellency." [1 p.]
Jan. 14. Petition of the Company of Merchants Adventurers of England to the King. Petitioners according to your order of the 3rd inst. attended the Duke of Lennox, and expressed their earnest desire to be his servants in the farm of his patent for transportation of white undressed cloths, but the conditions not being accepted by his Grace they humbly crave pardon to trouble you therewith once more, and, continuing in their former submission, offer the whole cause as it now stands to your royal determination. Petitioners when admitted to treat with his Grace, calling to mind the great loss they had sustained in 4½ years of more than 2,700l. by the farm of this license, under the late Duchess of Richmond and Lennox, at 2,600l. per annum, offered the Duke 2,000l. a year rent besides the charge they were to be at in the service of the patent, and in case that in any one year the cloths issued out should advance more than 2,000l. they engaged to accompt for the same to his Grace. The Duke insisting upon 2,600l. per annum petitioners offered a rent of 2,200l. without any other conditions, the same to be paid half-yearly in advance. This offer they have now once more tendered to the Duke, being the most they dare venture upon, considering the state of their company and the experience they have had of this license, which upon an average of seven years has not yielded much above 2,100l. per annum, and was never more likely to decrease than now in respect of the great quantity of white cloth made in the United Provinces. Yet, together with the renewing of petitioners' last offer, there was something by the way propounded how indifferent it would be to the company either to deal with the Duke for a yearly rent or otherwise, that from time to time the company would pay him 2s. 8d. according to his patent from all such cloths as they could not ship upon their own free license, although that this alteration from 16d. upon every cloth which has been in train so many years may cause some disturbance in trade. All which petitioners humbly submit to your Majesty, and with all obedience attend such order as you shall direct herein. Underwritten,
i. Petitioners having been contented to refer the differences between them and the Duke to his Majesty's decision, he is pleased to declare that they shall pay to the Duke a rent of 2,600l., to be paid half-yearly in advance, and besides shall entertain and pay all such servants as were formerly employed in that business by the late Duchess, or otherwise if they shall dislike these conditions his Majesty leaves the Duke to the legal right of his patent, and them to the like of theirs. Whitehall, 14th January 1639-[40]. [Copy. See Book of Petitions, Vol. cccciii., p. 133. = 1½ p.]
Jan. 14. 122. Certificate of Sir Francis Knollys that William Weston, of Newbury, and Richard Novys, of Tilehurst, formerly complained of as defaulters at musters in co. Berks, had conformed and paid the messenger's fees. [Endorsed as entered. 2/3 p.]
Jan. 14. Note of appearance of Richard Woolfe, of Stamford, co. Lincoln, being sent for by warrant of the Commissioners for Saltpetre and Gunpowder [see Jan. 3], but is to remain in the messenger's custody. [See Vol. ccxcii., p. 112. 4 lines.]
Jan. 14.
Whitehall.
123. Warrant to the clerk of the signet in attendance to prepare a privy seal for payment of 200l. to Edward Nicholas, clerk of the Council, out of the profits of the Admiralty remaining in the hands of the registrar of the Admiralty, as of free gift without accompt for services already rendered by him to his Majesty, and an annuity of 200l. to be paid out of the fines, compositions, and other profits of the Alienation Office by the receiver of that revenue quarterly, to commence from Lady Day next during pleasure. [Draft. 1 p.]
Jan. 14. 124. Statement by Nicholas of the arms in store and of the proportion to be supplied towards furnishing the army for the north. There are to be provided for the army arms for 35,000 foot and 3,000 horse. For a magazine to remain in the Tower, arms for 20,000 foot besides horse. Also for other services, arms for 5,000 foot. Total for 52,000 foot, whereof muskets 35,000, and pikes 17,000, besides 3,000 horse. Total of money demanded for completing the arms for foot and horse, besides the 500l. already impressed, 1,597l. 7s. 6d. Total of the money demanded for furnishing the arms wanting for foot, 55,319l. The like for furnishing the arms wanting for horse, 9,364l. 2s. Total in all, 66,280l. 9s. 6d. [Draft. 3 pp.]
[Jan. 14.] 125. Notes by Nicholas relative to the proportion of arms required to be provided and the cost of the several sorts. Total, 10,652l. 2s. [Strip of paper.]
Jan. 14. 126. Note of the charge of a cuirassier's and a carabineer's arms, viz., the former comprising a cuirasse, case of pistols, sword, and belt, 8l. 10s., and the latter a harquebuse, armour, case of pistols, carabine, sword, and belt, 7l. 6s. [½ p.]
[Jan. 14.] 127. Petition of Peter Robinson, feltmaker, to the Council. That petitioner having served Mr. Mackerill, a freeman of the Haberdashers' Company, for 8 years, was about 13 years ago sworn and admitted into that company, and has ever since paid quartering and been obedient to the said company. The Company of Feltmakers about a year since often warned petitioner to their hall, as well to make his master's piece, which he never denied to do, as to pay quartering. That the Company of Feltmakers were not denied search in obedience to their charter, not having demanded it. The company nevertheless sent their officer to require petitioner's attendance at their hall, but he went not, conceiving that he had been guiltless of offence, whereupon he was apprehended by a messenger on the 17th June [1639] and carried before Sir Edward Bromfield, alderman of London, who hearing the matter in difference moved the company to refer it to the Council or to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, which the company denied to do. Petitioner is a poor man and ignorant of the law, but finds in the letters patent granted to the Company of Feltmakers an express provision that no grant made to the same should be construed or extended to the prejudice of the Haberdashers' Company, to which he pays quartering. Prays order that his cause may be referred to the Lord Mayor to examine, or else that he and the Feltmakers' Company may be left to the law, and in the meantime he may be dismissed from attendance and payment of fees. [¾ p.]