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Charles II: February 1676

Pages 539-586

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1675-6. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1907.

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February 1676

Feb. 1. Order by the Earl of Arlington, Lord Chamberlain, that the orders made concerning the serjeant chirurgeons, chirurgeon to the person and chirurgeon to the Household, dated 1 May, 1674, and signed by the Earl of St. Albans, then Lord Chamberlain, be duly observed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 1.] Prefixed,
Orders for the chirurgeons at Healings. Whereas many inconveniences and disorders have happened at public and private healings by reason of disagreements between the serjeant chirurgeon, chirurgeon to the person, and chirurgeon of the Household, which many times have made a disturbance in his Majesty's presence at the time of healing, for prevention whereof and for better regulating the same in future, I have heard the said chirurgeons and advised with his Majesty's physicians and make the following orders:—
1. All public healings shall begin after Ash Wednesday every year, and continue till the end of May for the spring season, and shall begin 1 Sept. and continue till the last of Nov., unless publication be made to the contrary in the Gazette by his Majesty's special command.
2. That the serjeant chirurgeons shall wait in their turns monthly, and the one that waits shall give out the tickets only and shall register in a book the names of all admitted to be healed with their dwellings, and, if the serjeant chirurgeon in waiting be out of town or sick so that he cannot wait, the chirurgeon to the person shall wait in his place and give out the tickets and keep the register both for public and private healings according to his ancient right, when there was but one serjeant chirurgeon. The serjeant chirurgeons shall not wait one for another, but, if the serjeant chirurgeon in waiting and the chirurgeon to the person are both sick, then any other of the serjeants shall wait.
3. The serjeant chirurgeon or chirurgeon in waiting shall admit any to be healed, who shall be sent to them by any of his Majesty's physicians in ordinary in waiting with a note under his hand that he has the evil.
4. All persons coming to be healed shall bring a certificate under the hands of the minister and churchwardens of their parish that they were never touched for the evil.
5. Neither the serjeant chirurgeon in waiting nor any other chirurgeon nor their servants shall demand anything for tickets, or for admitting or presenting them to be healed.
6. None are to presume to wait at the healing but his Majesty's physicians in waiting and his apothecary, serjeant chirurgeon in waiting, chirurgeon to the person, and chirurgeon to the Household, and not any chirurgeons' men to exclude or hinder his Majesty's servants that are to attend the service.
7. If his Majesty shall not appoint a day in that month for a healing, the serjeant chirurgeon in waiting shall not give out the tickets, but shall leave it entire to the chirurgeon in waiting next month. But, if a day be appointed for one month, and the healing be put off by accident to the next month, the chirurgeon in waiting for the first month shall have the sole ordering of the healing.
8. At every public healing the serjeant chirurgeon in waiting being civilly sent to shall give the chirurgeon to the person six tickets, and three to the chirurgeon to the Household, and at every private healing he shall give to the chirurgeon to the person one ticket for every nine that are to be healed, and to the chirurgeon to the Household one for every nineteen, and so proportionable to the number of pieces of gold in the hands of the Clerk of the Closet.
9. That no serjeant chirurgeon in waiting and no other person whatsoever shall present any person to be healed, unless a ticket be first obtained by the chirurgeon in waiting.
10. That no disturbance, quarrellings or any disorderly carriage shall be by any of the chirurgeons before his Majesty at the healing, but they shall bring any differences between them before the Lord Chamberlain, or in his absence to the ViceChamberlain.
11. If any of the aforesaid chirurgeons do not conform themselves to these orders, on proof of the neglect or refusal the persons offending shall be suspended their places. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 1i.]
Feb. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for swearing and admitting Thomas Ratcliffe to be a Privy Councillor in Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 432.]
Feb. 3. Sir Philip Musgrave to his son, Sir Christopher, Dean's Yard, Westminster. I am glad to find in yours of 29 Jan. that my lord and you have had so long a discourse, and that Mr. Secretary is to hear both, for I have never wished more than that an indifferent person might hear both, not only concerning the late differences but from the original of all differences since 1660, for I think it would then appear neither his lordship nor myself nor you have given so much occasion for mistakes among us as that person, who encouraged Eglanbie (Aglionby) in his undertaking against me, and the young lord to such a dispute as might have attended with sad consequences, had I been forward to make use of advantages, who rewards Mr. Simson with his countenance, his purse and the assistance of his greatest friends to give me and you what trouble he can. Probably this matter about the justices would have been less stood upon by my lord, if the same man had not espoused the thing as his great concern, which appears in the eager pursuit in this affair wherein it is supposed there is opportunity to put a reflection on me. What I can at present offer about the two justices is only in general, comparatively with other justices in the county, as you will find in a paper I lately sent you, which you may use. On any further charge against them I shall make further return and not desert myself or you in matters to which justice and honour call me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 2.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
Henry Coventry and Sir J. Williamson to the Stationers' Company. Whereas by an Act for regulating printing it is provided that all books of History concerning the state of this realm, or other books concerning any affairs of State be licensed by the Secretaries of State pro tempore or by one of them or by their appointments, and whereas we are informed that daily many things come out of the press pretended to be licensed by some deriving their authority from us, we have thought it necessary to acquaint you, that neither of us have hitherto deputed or authorized any person or persons for licensing any books, which according to the said Act ought to be licensed by us or our deputies, and, when we or either of us shall depute any such person or persons, their name or names shall from time to time be signified to you to be entered on your books, that so you may be the better able to govern yourselves in order to the seizing and suppressing any books or pamphlets pretended to be licensed by deputations or authority derived from either of us otherwise than aforesaid. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 72.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Poulett. Apologizing for his delay in acknowledging his last commands, which he does now. Noted, that enclosed went a deputation to his lordship to appoint Mr. Miller of Priddie a deputy lieutenant. [Ibid. p. 73.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir John Fowell. Mentioning that he had shown his letter, as he thought it deserved, to the King, and requesting him, as anything occurs to his observation of any kind relating to the public, to give them notice of it. [Ibid.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Duke of Monmouth. Enclosing a list of the officers of the Regiment of Dragoons, as it stands in Lord Arlington's Entry Book, being uncertain if he rightly understood the command he gave him two or three days ago about the regiment. [Ibid. p. 74.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley to cause to be sent by sea 8 pieces of ordnance, twelve-pounders and demi-culverins, with carriages and gunners' stores proportionable, to Holy Island, to be delivered there to Major Daniel Collingwood, the Governor, or, in his absence, to the officer in chief commanding there. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 25.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Rothes, Lord Chancellor, to be communicated to the Commissioners of the Treasury and Exchequer. Signifying his pleasure that no gift of ward or non-entry of the estate of Leven on the death of the late Countess of Leven pass till his pleasure be further declared. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 398.]
Feb. 4. Herbert Aubrey to Williamson. Requesting him to get him an enlargement of his time for a month longer from Sir John Duncombe, as he is now on the settlement of all his affairs in order to a full satisfaction of his debt to the King, and, if he is called thence suddenly, all his attempts will be frustrated. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 3.]
Feb. 4.
Hameshill House.
Elizabeth Senhouse to Williamson. Soliciting him for even the meanest and most subservient attendance under himself for the first-fruits of her second harvest, her son Patritius, who has an extraordinary desire to give his humble attendance abroad to gain improvement. Her great ambition was to prefer these petitions in her own person, but God has disposed of her otherwise, and now in her weary bed enabled her to bring forth and bury one more son, which completes the full number of fifteen children. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 4.]
Feb. 4. Notes [by Williamson] of arguments in Council in which the King took part, on the complaints brought by the clothiers, especially those of Suffolk, against the Guinea Company, of the injury to their trade from the great reduction in the number of cloths formerly sold by them to the company. [Ibid. No. 5.]
[Feb. ?] Robert Scott of London, bookseller, to the King. Petition, stating that he had purchased the proprietary and right of all the copies of the works of the late Mr. Selden, and is likewise at further charge in procuring such of his works as were written in English to be translated into Latin with the intention of publishing all the said works in 4 volumes folio, and praying for a licence for the sole printing of the said works, with a prohibition to all others of printing, importing or vending any copies of the same for 20 years. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Feb. 4.
Whitehall.
The King to White Titchburne. Being given to understand that there are considerable quantities of stone within the manor of Fremeley (Frimley) very fit for the building and repairing of Windsor Castle, which is now in hand, recommending to him as the King's desire that he permit the persons appointed by the Controller of the Works there to dig and carry away stone out of the said manor for the said use, from such part of it as he and the Controller shall agree upon, but not near his dwelling-house where it may be prejudicial to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 23.]
Feb. 4.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir J. Robinson. Requesting him to use what interest he can possibly make in the Merchant Taylors' Company in favour of this young man, the bearer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 74.]
Feb. 4.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir W. Turner. Requesting him to favour the bearer, Mr. Hayes, a young man he has conceived a very good opinion of, who is a candidate for employment in the Merchant Taylors' Company. Noted, that similar letters were sent to Col. Mew, Sir Patience Ward and Sir W. Pritchard. [Ibid. p. 75.]
Feb. 4.
Whitehall.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, to be communicated to the Senate. Recommending Edward Lake, M.A., domestic chaplain to the Duke of York, for the degree of D.D., to be admitted thereto by proxy because of his attendance on the said Duke's children. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 23.]
Feb. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant for making the Advice a free ship in pursuance of the Order in Council of 26 Jan., calendared ante, p. 529. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 120.]
Feb. 4.
Whitehall.
Licence to Robert Scott of London, bookseller, who has purchased the propriety and right of the works of the late John Selden in Latin, and is procuring all his other works written in English to be translated into Latin with the intention of printing all the said works in 4 volumes folio in Latin, to print the same, with a prohibition of reprinting any part thereof within the King's dominions, and with a prohibition of the importation for 20 years of any of them reprinted abroad without the said Scott's consent. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 122.]
Feb. 4. Grant to Thomas Chiffinch, the younger, of the place of chief searcher at Gravesend in reversion after Thomas Chiffinch, his father, the present searcher, and Francis Leeke. Minute. [Ibid. p. 125.]
Feb. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a licence to Roger Twisden to enclose a highway between East Malling Cross and Lerkfield in the parish of East Malling, Kent, it being found to be no damage, on condition of his laying out another way in his own ground of the same length and breadth as convenient for passengers. [Precedents 1, f. 132.]
Feb. 5.
New King Street, Bloomsbury.
Dr. William Clarke, Dean of Winchester, to Williamson. Requesting to be heard, if any come to procure his Majesty's letter to the church of Winton for the bailiwick of Magdalene Fair. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 7.]
Feb. 5.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Sir Gilbert Talbot and Bernard Grenville praying a confirmation of a former grant of 20,000l. out of forfeited and concealed estates of nocents, they placing deficiencies, with an addition of so much as will defray their costs and charges, and that the clause of preference to Col. Dillon may be wholly made void. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 84.]
Feb. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Henry Eelles, messenger, to search for, apprehend, and bring before the Privy Council, William Venden, of Egham, Surrey, husbandman, against whom information has been given that about two months ago he killed a hind calf at Parker's Grove Gate in the said parish and carried the same home. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 124.]
[Feb. ?] Richard Townesend to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioner contributed much to the restoration and was one of the general convention in Ireland to that end, that he is seised in fee of the town and lands of Bridgetown alias Coronea and divers other lands containing in all about 8,000 acres in the barony of Carbery, co. Cork, which lands are very remote from trade and under a heavy quit-rent to the King and have little or no improvement made for want of fairs and markets and other conveniencies, and therefore praying a grant to the petitioner and his heirs erecting the premises into a manor to be called the manor of Bridgetown alias Coronea, with a grant of fairs and markets and all other privileges incident to a manor. On the back,
Feb. 5.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 5.] Annexed,
His report in favour of the grant prayed on the petitioner's making out that he is seised in fee of the lands mentioned in the petition. 10 Feb. [Ibid. No. 5i.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 83.]
Feb. 6. Appointment of Henry Oldenburg by Williamson to license the printing of such books of history or books concerning State affairs as by the Act of 14 Car. II. are subject to his authority. [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case F., No. 73.]
Another copy thereof. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 124.]
Feb. 6. Notes by Williamson of proceedings in the Foreign Committee. Mediation, Sir L. Jenkins, 22 and 26 Jan. Necessity of a further neutral country. What to be done for the security of the French ambassadors' horses, equipage brought into the town without passport in case &c.—Sir W. Temple to be writ to to prevent any such effect, in case things should come to that. First visit with Beverning. Stands to have it made in form.—See what orders the States have sent about it, on Sir W. Temple's instance.
Holland. Sir W. Temple, 4 Feb. French King's difficulties upon passports and couriers. Duke of Lorraine's titles. Would have the King say he had prescribed them.—No, the King will not answer (?) that, for it was not so. The Mediator is to adjust, but the parties have to be first heard &c.—States' paper about Prince William of 3 Feb. States' resolution of 3 Feb. about enlarging the neutral country about Nimeguen. Leave it to the King, upwards &c. He presses to get Meurs in for the Prince of Orange's sake.—Impossible.—Danes' passes for all parties arrived and that minister's memorial.
Hamburg. Their letter of 21 Jan. To be restored to neutrality during the war and to be included in the peace. That Skelton might interpose with the Emperor in their favour. If Mr. Skelton goes on, it looks but reasonable for the King as mediator to propose it to the Emperor.
New England. Leverett's letter to me of 18 Dec. Not to lose this favourable conjuncture.
France. Mons. de Ruvigny's reasons why his master persists in his difficulties &c.
Memoranda. Bishop of Oxford's homage, horses for the Duke of Neuburg, Polish medals. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 93.]
Feb. 7. Certificate that William, Lord Widdrington, was mustered as governor and captain of a foot company in the garrison of Berwick at the muster of 1 Nov., 1675. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 8.]
Feb. 7. Notes by Williamson. The French. They certainly brought the King into the strait of working (?) out Prince William of Furstemberg's liberty. Nobody else knew a word, only J. W[illiamson] to frame the dispatches. When the King had required (?) all care to keep concealed his promise to the Bishop of Strasburg of endeavouring his brother's liberty &c., not a word said of it in the copies we gave out of the rest of the papers relating to that affair &c., the French king, without a word to the King, prints his memorial braving the Emperor &c., and in a manner fixing upon the King to have promised to him what indeed he never promised.
When he had a mind to recall his Ambassadors from Charleville, he sends a letter directly to Sir W. Temple from Pomponne to know immediately if the Ambassadors were to hope for passes or not. If not, then &c. without saying that through the King's hands as all other points had been hitherto transacted &c., nay scarce telling the King that any such thing had been sent to Temple &c. Query, the date of Pomponne's letter to Temple and of the King of France's on that point to Ruvigny. To that end to see why Ruvigny had not given us even a copy of Pomponne's letter, if that letter were already writ when Ruvigny's came from Paris. What Ruvigny let fall to me. Vide Journal. The King to come well out of the mediation &c.
Their (illegible) in the business of commerce between Sweden and Holland with the knowledge certainly, as Ruvigny whispered to Du Clos, and yet not a word said of it to the King. The last memorial of Sparre about our succours certainly known in France and by them directed, and that upon a message (?) from Sweden by Smith, our English merchants' (illegible). Query, if not. Query, The time he will own he came from Sweden to France, and when arrived at Paris, and then compare, whether probably he did not bring from Sweden orders on which was grounded in France the resolution of repeating those last instances for succours in favour of Sweden. Query, if Smith did not carry to France the overtures touching the Treaty of Commerce from Sweden. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 101.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent constituting John, Earl of Athole, Marquis of Athole, Earl of Tullibardin, Viscount of Balquidder and Lord Murray, Balveny and Gask, to hold to him and the heirs male of his body. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 398.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Being resolved on a full representation of the condition of the revenue and of the last supply, to lessen the charge, and, as he now entertains but one regiment for a Foot Guard, so only to keep up one troop for a Horse Guard, authorizing and requiring them to give immediate orders for disbanding the troop commanded by the Earl of Rothes as soon as possible. [Ibid. p. 401.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Directing them to provide money for the complete pay of the troop ordered to be disbanded by the last letter with due regard to the payment of what they owe for their quarters, and to have their arms carried to Edinburgh Castle and there laid up in the magazine. [Ibid. p. 402.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to John, Earl of Athole, and to his heirs male of the office of constabulary and keeping of the Castle of Kinclevine, with a fee of 286l. 11s. Scots per annum, with a gift for the payment thereof of all the yearly few ferm duties payable out of the lands and lordship of Kinclevine, with a reservation to Robert Lesly of the said office and few duties for the years yet to come of the gift and tack thereof granted him 4 Nov., 1646. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 403.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to John Baine of Pitcairlie of the few, teind, and blench duties payable out of the lands and baronies of Mull, Moreveine and Terrie by Sir —. McLeane, now laird of McLeane, or by umquhile Sir —. McLeane, his father, or any of their ancestors. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 404.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for the admission to the Council of Charles, Earl of Aboyne, and Sir John Keith of Keith Hall, Knight Marischal. [Ibid. p. 405.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Charles, Earl of Aboyne, of a pension of 200l. sterling a year during his life. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 406.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant for a gift to Æneas, Lord McDonnell, of a pension of 200l. sterling a year in addition to his former pension of 300l. a year until he shall enter into possession of the few duties of the island of Hay granted him 23 Aug., 1665, after the expiration of the late Duke of Lenox's and Richmond's tack of the same, or till the same be redeemed from him according to the tenor of the gift. [Ibid. p. 406.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant for payment to John Kirkwood of 80l. sterling, money laid out by him for four new silver trumpets for the use of the troop of Guards in Scotland, whereof the Earl of Athole is captain. [Ibid. p. 408.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to James, Hellen, and Jannett, the children of the deceased James Gregory, Professor of Mathematics in the College of Edinburgh, of a pension of 40l. sterling yearly to be equally divided amongst them. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 408.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of John Hardy, student in divinity, to be minister at the kirk of Fowles in the diocese of Dumblane. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 409.]
Feb. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to James Somervell, usher in the Exchequer of Scotland, for his life, and after his decease to James, his eldest son, for his life to be keepers of the Council Chamber in Scotland and furnishers of coal and candle thereto, with a salary of 30l. a year for keeping the said Council Chamber and for their servants' attendance thereon and furnishing the same with coal and candle, and also to be furnishers of pen, ink, paper, and parchment to the Commissioners of the Treasury and Exchequer and of coal and candle to the Treasury and Exchequer rooms with a salary of 40l. a year. [Nearly 4 pages. Ibid. p. 409.]
Feb. 9.
The Anne yacht.
Sentence of a Court-martial, Capt. Christopher Gunman president, that Capt. Joseph Harris, commander of the Quaker ketch, convicted of having lowered his topsail to a Spanish man-of-war, in the Bay of Biscay, Nov. 11, and also of receiving merchandize on board at Rochelle for Lisbon, be shot to death for striking to a foreigner in the King's seas. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 9.]
Feb. 9.
Chester.
Henry Lloyd, Mayor, to William Williams, Recorder of Chester, at his chamber, Gray's Inn. Yesterday I received the enclosed from Richard Hatton, a London carrier. It appears to be a very dangerous letter reflecting on the King and his royal progenitors, and I have thought it necessary to desire your speedy direction, and that you will have it communicated to one of the Secretaries of State. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 10.] Enclosed,
A long letter written apparently by a madman. It declares that Queen Mary was not Henry VIII's daughter, but was begotten by a tutor, that King James was begotten by a forester, that Queen Elizabeth had a daughter, called Jane, who was to be won by the sword, and that the writer's grandfather, William Letterup, killed nine competitors before Queen Elizabeth, and so was married to her daughter and was made Earl Marces (Marshal), that the relations of those he had slain in revenge poisoned Queen Elizabeth and hurried up the Scotch King and poisoned the writer's grandfather. Then the letter gives long accounts of plots and persecutions against the writer, in which "cursed Penn, the Quaker," figures largely. The writer asserts that James I "being a riggell" had no issue, that Charles I was begotten by a forester, that Charles II, whom he calls Charles Barry, was begotten by one Barry, a cobbler, on "the French witch," and that the Duke of York, whom he calls James Chiffen, was begotten by one Chiffen on her. The letter is written very closely in an almost illegible hand. The fair copy of a duplicate hereafter calendared consists of 8 pages. [Ibid. No. 10i.]
Feb. 9.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir Stephen Fox. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that Capt. Daniel Macarty, formerly a pensioner, be again entered on the list in place of Patrick Vosse, deceased, to receive 2s. per diem. from 1 Sept. last. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 47.]
Feb. 9. Note by Williamson. Dr. Cary was desired by a friend of his, a patient, and ancient gentleman, to get it printed, and that he did it only as at his prayer. If he was the author or not he knows not. To tell his name were not ingenuous, and he begs his Majesty's pardon in it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 97.]
Feb. 10. Sir Philip Warwick to Williamson. The trustees for his Majesty's bounty to the Isle of Man, Mr. Cholmondeley and Mr. Bankes, when they were here the last session of Parliament, recommended to Mr. Thomson to procure his Majesty's order on this annexed paper in my presence which I am desired to certify to you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 11.]
Thursday morning, [Feb. 10], at 7,
London.
John Paige to Williamson. I waited yesterday morning on you, but did not meet with you. Messrs. Houblons and the rest of the merchants desire to know when they shall wait on you. If possible, they would fain be excused for to-day. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Feb. 10.
Fishmongers' Hall.
Sir John Shorter to Sir Robert Southwell. According to his commands sending him an abstract of the fees usually paid for malefactors that are pardoned for transportation. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Feb. 10. Daniel Fleming to Williamson. Divers of our Justices are dead, and others are but seldom amongst us, so that I think it would be for the service of his Majesty and the country to have some added. Those dead are Sir George Middleton, Mr. Ducket of Grayrigg, and Mr. Braithwait of Burneshead, whose heirs are not capable of succeeding them, being Papists. Mr. Braithwait of Ambleside and Mr. Fisher are also dead, but Mr. Robert Braithwait, brother of the one and enjoying most of his estate, who is uncle to Sir John Otway's lady, and Mr. John Fisher, son and heir of the other, a very good scholar as Dr. Halton can inform you, may very well be made Justices in this county of Westmorland, as also Mr. Alan Pricket, Recorder of Kendal and of Queen's College in your time, and Mr. Jo. Moor, another lawyer, and now a justice in Lancashire, though his estate and residence are in this country. Sir Thomas Strickland acts nothing amongst us, and Sir John Otway and Mr. Ro. Philipson are but seldom with us, which often retards the dispatch of affairs, and increases our trouble as well as the country's. If any objections be made, I think it will not be difficult to answer them, since they be rather of a private than a public concern. If you shall order our commission to be renewed and the Dedimus to be directed to me, I shall take care to answer the fees of so many as I shall swear.
I have ventured to send you another small tribute of chars, which I wish the Kendal carrier may hand safely to you about Thursday night. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 14.]
Feb. 10. Caveat in favour of Sir Robert Killigrew that no grant pass of the estate of one Smithfield, late of Shepton Mallard, Somerset, without notice to Secretary Williamson. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 21.]
Feb 10. Pass for Thomas Hartop, merchant, of Antwerp, who is by the King's special command to repair to England, to give an account of certain important matters wherewith the King has entrusted him, to come from any port of Flanders to England, and to return. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 137.]
Feb. 10.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant of the title and dignity of Baron of Agherin, Galway, Viscount of Clonmore, Tipperary, and Earl of Gowran, Kilkenny, to Lord John Butler, the third son of the Duke of Ormonde, and the heirs male of his body in the peerage of Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 406.]
[Feb.?] Robert Clynton to the King. Petition for pardon for his life, all his estate being already seized and sold by the bailiff of Westminster, for the death of John Ashbury, showing that about 4 Nov., 1674, returning late to his house in St. James's Fields, Ashbury, a watchman in Pall Mall, stopped him, called him ill names, set his dog at him and struck him, till he drew his sword to defend himself, and in the encounter was killed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 15.] Annexed,
List of four names.
[Ibid. No. 15i.]
Deposition of Fabian Duckett, servant to William Paston, son of Viscount Yarmouth, that he witnessed through his window the beadle, John Ashbury, swear at a gentleman, and strike him furiously several times, that the gentleman said he was going home and made no resistance at first, but was at length obliged to defend himself, and the beadle or bellman, who was in drink, fell, receiving his death's wound. Feb. 11, 1676. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 15ii.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the memorial from the Ambassador Extraordinary of the States General representing that a French privateer took and carried into Hull a Dutch ship and that they are selling her lading contrary to Article 21 of the Treaty of Breda and praying an order for seizing the said prize, and causing the goods sold to be restored to the proprietors without any repayment of the price. pursuant to the said article; that Mr. Secretary Williamson cause enquiry to be made whether the said ship really belongs to Holland, and, if it so appears, then justice must be done according to the tenor of the said article and the Ambassador's request. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth that Thomas Cole, ensign to Capt. Walters' company, ought to have been mustered in the September muster of 1674, and that he desires his commission may be dated accordingly. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Feb. 11. John Creed to Williamson. The committee for Sir Hugh Cholmeley's accounts is to sit at 3 to-morrow at your office. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Feb. 11.
Chester.
Sir Thomas Mainwaring to Williamson. Last Monday Mr. Barker of Nantwich received the enclosed letter or paper and brought it me last Tuesday at my house at Baddeley, and gave me the account expressed in the enclosed copy of his examination, whereupon I sent for Starkie and Woodward who are mentioned therein to appear before me early on Wednesday, as I was to go to Chester that day for a general meeting of the Cheshire deputy lieutenants the following day, and, it appearing to me that probably the said letter was brought down either by John Falkenor, the younger, or Francis Fraggot, who are carriers, and being informed they were both gone to Chester, I endeavoured to reach Chester so that I might examine them on Wednesday and give you an account by the post that day, but, Starkie not coming so early on Wednesday as I expected, and Woodward not coming till after Starkie was examined, the post was gone at Chester before I could reach it. On Thursday morning I met with Fraggot and his master, Richard Hatton, and examined them, but was informed the said Falkenor, who most probably brought down the letter, was not come to Chester, but I have issued out a warrant for him to be brought before me at my return to be examined and intend to make him find sureties to appear before the Privy Council if required. I thought it my duty to give you this account, the Mayor of Chester having had also a most traitorous and scurrilous letter brought him this week. [Ibid. No. 19.] Enclosed,
The said letter similar to that to the Mayor of Chester, calendared ante p. 547, but shorter. [Ibid. No. 19i.]
Examination of Richard Barker, mereer. Yesterday John Starkey delivered to him a traitorous and scurrilous paper wrapped up like a letter, having no name subscribed, and without any date, directed to the examinant and sealed, which the examinant believes had been broken open and resealed as appears by the marks of the wax on the paper, and he believes some part of it had been cut off at the beginning before it came to his hands. He does not know from whom it came or the handwriting, nor has he made any alteration in it except opening it to read it. He has now delivered it into Sir T. Mainwaring's hands. Starkey told him the paper was delivered to him by John Woodward of Nantwich, who is a porter or servant to most of the common carriers that travel from Nantwich to London. 8 Feb.
Examination of John Starkey. Last Monday morning John, son of the above-named John Woodward, delivered him a sealed paper or letter directed to Richard Barker, his master, which he immediately delivered to his master, and which he believes is the paper now shown him. 9 Feb.
Examination of John Woodward, the elder. He believes the letter or paper directed to Richard Barker and now shown him was brought down last Saturday to Nantwich by John Faulkner, the younger, son of John Faulkner, the elder, carrier, or by Francis Fraggott, servant to Richard Hatton, a carrier, but knows not by which, and that he sent it by his son to Mr. Barker's house. He does not know the handwriting. 9 Feb.
Examination of Francis Fraggott. Is a servant of Richard Hatton, of Acton, Cheshire, carrier, and drives his horses from Nantwich to London and back. (Gives particulars of all the letters he brought down the previous Saturday.) Last Saturday sennight at Blossom's Inn in London, a short, fat man, with yellowish or light hair, of about 40 years old (as the examinant believes), whom he does not know, came to the examinant with two large thin letters in his hand, and said he was to send them down by the examinant and would pay him for them, but would go to direct them and bring them afterwards, and said one was for Alderman Lloyd of Chester. The examinant saying that Mr. Lloyd is now mayor, the person asked him whether Mr. Lloyd's name was William or John, and, the examinant not knowing, the person said he would go and enquire somewhere else, but did not come again or send the letters to the examinant. There came down a portmanteau with John Faulkner's horses by John Faulkner, his son, which had several letters and other parcels in it, which the examinant believes were received in by the porters at Blossom's Inn. 10 Feb.
Examination of Richard Hatton, of Acton, Cheshire. He was not at London this last journey, but several letters were brought down in a portmanteau last Saturday by John, son of John Faulkner, another carrier, to Nantwich, and the examinant took away such letters as were for Chester and delivered them, among which was one directed to Mr. Lloyd. The reason he did so is because John Faulkner is his brother-in-law, and he travels not to Chester but Wrexham. The porters at Blossom's Inn, London, usually receive the letters brought by the Chester or Cheshire carriers. Their names are John Shawe and Thomas Barratt. 10 Feb. [Copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 19ii.]
Feb. 11. Caveat at Secretary Coventry's desire that no grant pass of the estate of Mr. Gallard of Edmonton, Middlesex, found guilty of the manslaughter of Mr. Gillim, till notice be given him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 21.]
Copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 20.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the reprieve, if convicted, of Lieut. William Roche and John Sheene, Gunner at Hurst Castle, who stand accused of killing Richard Newman, lieutenant of a foot company in the Isle of Wight. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 125.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter granting to John Lyon, writer to the Signet, bastard natural to the deceased John, Earl of Kinghorn, full power in all his lifetime and at his decease to dispose of all his lands and goods, as freely as if he had been born of lawful bed, and granting further that his nearest of kin on his father's and mother's sides should be his heir by virtue of the present legitimation as if he were of lawful bed. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 413.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to Sir John Wood of Bonnietowne and his heirs male, which failing to his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands of Bonnietowne and other lands formerly united in the barony of Bonnietowne and of other lands all in Forfarshire, on the resignation of the said Sir John Wood, with an annexation of the other lands to the said barony and with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 415.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to James Graham of Orchell, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands and barony of Pitcairnes in the parochine of Doyning, and stewardry of Stratherne, Perthshire, which formerly pertained to George Graham of Pitcairnes, deceased, and now pertain to his Majesty, being fallen into his hands by reason of recognition by the alienation of the same by the said George Graham without his Majesty's consent. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 416.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Alexander Murray, secretary to the Earl of Athole, of the escheat and forfeiture of William Veitch in his Majesty's gift by a doom of forfeiture pronounced against the said Veitch for crimes of treason, rebellion and læse Majesty committed by him. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 418.]
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protection in the ordinary form to Sir Mungo Murray and Patrick Ogilvie of Murie for three years respectively and to Robert Menzies of Glassie for two years. [Ibid. p. 419.]
[Feb.?] John, Lord Kingston, to the King. Petition, showing that notwithstanding several provisos in the Acts of Settlement and Explanation and several letters and orders of his Majesty for the petitioner's reprizals, and several reports from Lords Lieutenant and others, he is yet deficient 2,000l. per annum as will appear by the Lord Lieutenant's report of 26 Feb., 1674[–5], in which he certifies that he conceived 2,000l. per annum above the quit-rent and all charges and incumbrances may be a sufficient proportion to be allowed the petitioner as reprizals due to him by the said Acts, and that, pursuant to his Majesty's former letters, he was at great charges in finding out forfeited concealed lands, the particulars whereof were delivered to the Earl of Essex, several of which have since been granted to other persons, and others are about to be passed from the petitioner, and, forasmuch as many of the persons that should make out the King's title to the said forfeited concealed lands are ancient and some since dead, and that the said lands have hitherto rendered his Majesty no rents, praying that, for so much as the Lord Lieutenant has certified to be allowed him, his Majesty will give effectual orders that that yearly sum be forthwith granted him out of the lands in the list formerly delivered to his Excellency and such other concealed lands as he shall discover, that are not yet in charge in the quit-rent books nor found to belong to his Majesty in the books lately made up by his Excellency's order. At the side,
Feb. 11.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Chancellor and the Lord Treasurer of England, and to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 6.]
Reference dated 4 Feb. of the above petition to the Lord Lieutenant, with note that it was renewed on the 11th to the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Treasurer, and the Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 83.]
[Feb. ?] Sir John Otway to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioner was formerly Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge, and was the first Fellow ejected for his loyalty, that he employed a great part of his time in labouring for the restoration, that there is now a fellowship vacant there by the death of Mr. Clarke, which was founded by Lady Rookby, and limited to Beverley School, and for want of candidates therefrom to Yorkshire at large, with a direction that such fellow should take Orders within six months after his admission, and that none from that school is qualified, and praying a letter to the Master and Seniors dispensing with the statutes in those particulars in favour of the petitioner's son, who is qualified to be Fellow, but was not born in Yorkshire, and is now 21 and cannot take Orders till he is 24. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 21.]
[Feb.?] Richard Wise to the King. Petition for pardon for a share which he had about 16 years ago, when very young, in a robbery at the house of Sir Henry Littleton, who assured him he should not be prosecuted for it, but forgave him because of his youth; but one Smyth, who was his seducer, and obtained his own pardon by discovering his accomplices, now maliciously prosecutes him because in a suit at law the petitioner is an important witness against him. [Ibid. No. 22.]
Feb. 12. Statement of Mr. Wise's case almost in the same words as the above petition. [Ibid. No. 23.]
S. Pepys to Williamson. By your command I have ventured to put down my conception of the warrant needful for his Majesty to sign to the Lords of the Admiralty, empowering them to respite the execution of the sentence of death on Captain Harris, which I submit to your correction, praying you will let it be perfected time enough for my preparing another subsequent thereto for my Lords before Monday morning. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 24.] Enclosed,
Order to the Lords of the Admiralty to issue their warrant to the Marshal of the Admiralty to respite till further order the execution of the sentence on Captain Harris on account of his long and faithful services, particularly in both the late wars with the Dutch, and of the wounds he has received therein, particularly in his head to the contracting great weakness therein and ill effects thereof at some seasons on his judgment. Draft. [Ibid. No. 24i.]
Feb. 12.
Chaunston, Herefordshire.
Sir Thomas Morgan to Williamson. You may perceive by the enclosed from the Lieutenant Bayly of Jersey how the poor merchants and seamen are abused there by small picaroons, Ostenders and Biscayners. I request you to represent it to his Majesty for some reasonable and speedy remedy, and, if any of them should come into any of our harbours in Jersey, whether it may stand with his pleasure that we may stop them till restitution be made, or any other way he shall think convenient, for, if some speedy stop be not put to their barbarous actions, that poor island will suffer much. Let the bearer, my agent, know his Majesty's pleasure therein.
I have been these six weeks or two months sorely afflicted with gout. As soon as God restores me to my limbs again, I shall repair to London to attend his Majesty in order to my going for Jersey. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Feb. 12.
Dorchester.
William Twiss, Mayor, to Williamson. Last Saturday, the 5th, I received from a porter belonging to a waggoner of this town the enclosed letter, but on examination it appears not by whom it was delivered to him in London from whence it was brought. I communicated it to my brethren of this corporation and advised the endeavouring the explication thereof. Though it be written in an uncertain, confused, and irregular character, enough to have amazed the inventor of letters, I conceive it as well transcribed as possible, which I hope will plead my excuse, should I be thought culpable for not transmitting it sooner, for it proceeds not from my being in any way remiss but from my desire to facilitate your labour by making what discovery I might by conference with persons living here and nominated in the letter. I am this morning informed by Mr. Arthur Gould of this town, whose son James is of Gray's Inn, as the letter says, that there is also a James Gould, a ribbon weaver, living in Holloway Street, Shoreditch, to whom one Reape in the said letter mentioned was lately an apprentice, and that there is another James Gould, late of this town, but now a clerk to Sir Thomas Bide at his brewhouse in or near Shoreditch, by whom I suppose this scandalous distracted libel may be discovered. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 26.] Enclosed,
The said letter almost identical with that to the Mayor of Chester, calendared ante, p. 547. [Ibid. No. 26i.]
Transcript thereof. [8 pages. Ibid. No. 26ii.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Robert Leigh. As I told you in my last, his Majesty has been moved in the proposition your friend makes. But the King will not hear of the conditions he insists on, viz., to have the grant passed in England and without the Lord Lieutenant's knowledge, especially of the last in any sort, and the former being against a late rule passed at the Council Board here is not like to be obtained. But, what the King thinks as good as both is, that he will have it recommended particularly to the Lord Lieutenant to favour the thing, when it comes before him by reference, as a thing the King wishes done. This the King thinks will be tantamount to the other two conditions demanded, in case the thing be in itself at all fit to be done. And, if your friend please to proceed on this assurance, I am ready to serve in it, for the advantage is to be to another hand, not to me at all, but such a person as will have interest to carry much greater matters than this. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 75.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Walker. I am not forgetful of the commands you left with me to watch over your friend's interest recommended to the Dean and Chapter of that Church. If I were, the King himself is pleased to have that care over it. A great instance I found a week ago, when a letter was offered to him of another nature but relating to the Church of Exeter. He asked of himself with wonderful goodness whether that letter would not prejudice your friend, and whether I was sure of it. I answered, it would not, but he ordered me to take it back and be yet more sure of it, ere he would sign it. This goodness of his was so great and generous, that I could not but acquaint my Lord of Bath with it, who has an extreme care over all that concerns you. I think it but just you yourself should know it, that you may not be ignorant how truly just the King is to those who are kind to him and his service. [Ibid.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Edward Jennings and Edward Cooksey, desiring power to inspect the accounts of the hearth-money in the counties of Nottingham, Lincoln and Middlesex for 5 years and in London and Westminster for 2½ years, and to receive to their own use such sums as shall be found due on inspection. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 85.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Seniors of St. John's College, Cambridge. Having been informed by Sir John Otway, formerly a Fellow of that College, from which he was ejected for his loyalty to the late King, that there is a Fellowship, now vacant by the death of Robert Clarke, founded by Lady Rookby and given to the town of Beverley, and for want of such to Yorkshire at large, with directions that such Fellow should be a priest at the time of his election or within six months after, who, none of that town being now qualified, has besought a dispensation in behalf of his son, Charles, who, not having been born in the said county, and being by reason of his want of age incapable of being ordained a priest within the time prefixed, is not qualified without a dispensation, granting a dispensation as desired to the said Charles Otway, so as to capacitate him to stand for and be elected to the said vacant Fellowship. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 24.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
Pardon to Richard Wise of the crime of felony, burglary and robbery committed by him in 1661, and of all indictments, convictions, &c., incurred thereby. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 125.]
Feb. 12. Notes by Williamson of proceedings in the Foreign Committee Mediation. Sir L. Jenkins, 29 Jan., 2-12 Feb. What instructions to the ambassadors to meddle in the authorizing players or to leave it to the magistrates.—Not fit to trouble the King with such a trifle, and the assembly may have it, if they desire it. Till then let the magistrates do what they will.—A pass demanded by M. de Vitry's people.
Emperor's answer to the French memorial.
Elector Palatine's desire of the King's offices towards France for his accommodement. J. W. to answer that the King's part is to mediate a general peace not a particular, though in case the Emperor, Empire and allies agreeing, the King would be glad, &c.
Emperor. Mr. Skelton. If to be left to his former orders. Yes, till the King see whether the French ambassadors be called back or that his Majesty can remove the difficulties, &c.
University of Heidelberg to the King. To be commended as to their own revenues, estate, tenants, &c., to the Most Christian King by Lord Berkeley and Monsieur de Ruvigny through Secretary Coventry, not as to the town of Heidelberg.
La[dy] Portland's petition debated. Let it be brought to Council and the Lords' opinion asked one by one. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 103.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for suspending execution on the process against Thomas Menzies, brother of the decased laird of Pitfoddells, for the slaughter of — Haliburton. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 419.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to James Carnegie of Phinhaven, second son of David, Earl of Northesk, and the heirs male gotten between him and Anna Lundin, his spouse, which failing, to the other heirs male of his body, which failing, to return to the said Earl and his heirs male, of the lands of the Westmains of Phinhaven, Eastmains and other lands in the barony of Phinhaven, and forest of Plastoune, Forfarshire, and of other lands in the parochine of Othlaw in the said barony with William Gray of Haystoune's portion of the right of patronage of the parish kirk of Othlaw, proceeding on the resignation of the said Earl and the said Gray; and also granting to the said Anna Lundin for her life the lands of the Eastmains of Phinhaven and the other lands abovementioned which are portions of the said barony of Phinhaven, proceeding on the resignation of the said Earl and the said James Carnegie, with an erection of all the said lands into the barony of Phinhaven, with a novodamus and a ratification of sundry contracts, &c., concerning the said lands and barony. [2 pages. Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 420.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of Callaghan, Earl of Clancarty, which prayed that the quitrents of the lands mentioned in the certificate of Charles James, late Viscount Muskerry, for the new estate thereby settled and confirmed, amounting to about 758l. per annum, might be so reduced that he may receive thereout 600l. per annum over and above all reprizes and deductions, and that, in case Capt. Owen McCarty shall not by Trinity term next make out a legal title to the lands mentioned in the said certificate which are claimed by him, the same might be granted to the petitioner and his heirs according to the King's original intentions, recommending the whole matter to his especial care and favour, and authorizing him to take such a speedy and effectual course for the said Earl's relief as may be agreeable to the King's gracious intentions and the Act of Parliament made for settling the lands on his family, pursuant to the instructions signified in the letter of 3 Dec. last concerning the reducement of the quit-rents issuing out of the coarse and barren lands (calendared ante, p. 429). [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 407.]
Feb. 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Capt. Philip Howard for a grant of the bark and offal wood of such timber as shall be fallen in the Forests of Whittlewood and Salcey for the rebuilding of Northampton. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 85.]
Feb. 13. Warrant to the Lords of Admiralty for the reprieve of Capt. Joseph Harris, in the same form as the draft order calendared ante, p. 553. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 126.]
Feb. 14.
Baddeley.
Sir Thomas Mainwaring to Williamson. Enclosing the examinations of John Faulkner, the elder, and John Faulkner, the younger, taken that day, adding that he had taken sufficient sureties from the latter for his appearance before the Privy Council, if required. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 27.] Enclosed,
Examination of John Faulkner, the younger, of Acton, Cheshire. He came from London last Saturday fortnight towards Cheshire with the horses of John Faulkner, his father, who is a Cheshire carrier. There then came a person, whom he knows not, to him at Blossom's Inn, and asked him whether he was a Chester carrier, and whether he knew the name of the Mayor of Chester, and this examinant, saying he did not know his name, and that he was not to travel to Chester, called Francis Fraggott, a servant of Richard Hatton, another carrier, whose horses were then designed to go to Chester, and the said person then spoke to Fraggott, and the examinant then went away about his business, and does not know what discourse the person had with Fraggott. The said person is a middle-sized man with light-coloured hair and then had on him sad coloured clothes, but the examinant saw no letter or parcel he then had with him. Last Saturday fortnight at Blossom's Inn he saw the wife of John Shawe, one of the porters to the Cheshire and Chester carriers, take several letters and parcels out of a bag, and put them into a portmanteau belonging to the said Richard Hatton, the examinant's brother-in-law, and the said Hatton's horses, and Fraggott, who drove them, being gone out before, the examinant locked up the said portmanteau, but did not read the direction of any of the said letters or parcels, and laid it on one of his father's horses, till it came to St. Albans, where it was removed and laid on one of the said Hatton's horses and by them carried down to Nantwich, where the examinant unlocked the portmanteau and saw the letters and parcels taken out, and he believes that amongst them was one letter directed to Mr. Richard Barker of Nantwich and one to the Mayor of Chester. He does not know and has not heard what person brought the said letters or either of them to Blossom's Inn, nor did he know that the said letters or either of them came upon any other design but with some carriage. He did not at Nantwich or elsewhere read the superscription of either of them, but believes there was one directed to Mr. Barker and one to the Mayor, because he was told so by his father, who read the directions when they came to Nantwich. 14 Feb. Baddeley.
Examination of John Faulkner, the elder. Last Saturday sennight at Nantwich he saw the above-mentioned portmantean opened, and read the directions of several letters and parcels therein, amongst which was one letter directed to Mr. Richard Barker of Nantwich and one to the Mayor of Chester, but he does not know in whose handwriting is the direction of the letters or either of them, nor does he know of what concerns the said letters or either of them were. 14 Feb. Baddeley. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 27i.]
Feb. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley to cause to be sent by sea such culverin and demi-culverin to the number of 10 in all with carriages, as shall be convenient for the better securing of merchant ships passing by Scarborough Castle, with gunners' stores proportionable, to be delivered at Scarborough Castle to Sir Thomas Slingsby, the Governor, or in his absence to the officer commanding in chief there. [Draft. Ibid. No. 28.]
Minute thereof dated 14 Feb. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 22.]
Feb. 14. Commission for Thomas Stradling to be captain of the company of foot whereof Lieutenant-Colonel Grey, deceased, was captain, in the regiment of Guards under Colonel John Russell. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 149.]
Feb. 14.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir William Petty. In the standing water your matter of the farm is in, I know not whether I should trouble you with a suit that should be so impertinent as is that of Mr. Giles Juy, an old friend of mine, for a place under you in that farm. He is an old practised officer in the English Customs, and, as you will see by the enclosed testimony of a very considerate merchant, Mr. John Page, honest in his trust. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 77.]
Feb. 14.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Robert Lobbe desiring, in consideration of his loyalty and sufferings, a grant of the estate of John Spicer alias Goodman, deceased, come to the King. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 86.]
Feb. 14. Presentation of Robert Ancher (Aucher), M.A., to the vicarage of Eastchurch, Kent. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 25.]
Feb. 14.
Whitehall.
Grant on the resignation of letters patent dated 14 May, 1670, to Hugh May, unto the said Hugh May and Thomas May, and the survivor of them of the office of Clerk of the Recognizances to be taken before the Chief Justices of the King's Bench and the Common Pleas, and in their absence or out of term before the Mayor of the Staple of Westminster or the Recorder of London, and also of the office of clerk for making and enrolling the said recognizances. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 127.]
Feb. 14. Approbation of John Boynton of Rawcliffe, Yorkshire, to be Recorder of Doncaster. Minute. [Ibid.]
Feb. 14. Warrant for the appointment of the 15 persons hereinbefore appointed Commissioners for licensing hackney coaches, with the addition of Sir Nicholas Armorer. [Precedents 1, f. 132.]
Feb. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift of a pension of 500l. sterling yearly to Charles, Earl of Ancram, for his life. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 422.]
Feb. 15.
Whitehall.
The King to William, Earl of Derby, Thomas Cholmondeley of Vale Royal and William Bankes of Winstanley, the trustees for disposing of 100l. per annum granted by him for the clergy and schools in the Isle of Man, and other the trustees for the time being. After reciting the letters patent of 19 April, 1675, and the appointment of the said three persons as trustees, directing that they should allot and pay to six petty schools at Castletown, Douglas, Ramsey, Kirk Andrewes, Kirk Bryde and Ballaugh 3l. per annum each, making together 18l., and whereas of the 17 parish churches there, but 3 are of any considerable value, and of the remaining 14 but 3 are worth 17l. per annum, in order that the other 11 may also be made 17l. per annum, directing them to pay to the respective incumbents of the following churches the yearly sums thereinafter mentioned, viz., of Kirk German 8l., of Kirk Jurby 11l., of Kirk Christ le air 13l., of Kirk Maughall 1l., of Kirk Lonnan 5l., of Kirk Conchan 9l., of Kirk Braddon 9l., of Kirk Muroune 7l., of Kirk Santon 9l., of Kirk Arbory 1l., of Kirk Christ, Rushen 9l., amounting together to 82l. per annum, which makes up the whole 100l. per annum. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 24.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 377, No. 29.]
Feb. 15.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir T. Mainwaring. The last post brought me yours of the 11th with an enclosed mysterious letter, which had come to your hand. I have not yet had time to produce it at any Council meeting, but shall do it the first occasion that offers. By the very same post a letter the same in substance, and almost in every expression, was also sent me up by the Mayor of Dorchester, so, as you may see, the same foolish or malicious humour works in several parts. I shall acquaint his Majesty with it the first Council meeting, and in the meantime am obliged to acknowledge your care and diligence which I beg you to continue. Noted, that a similar letter was sent to the Mayor of Dorchester. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 77.]
Feb. 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Chancellor of the petition of the Earl and Countess of Lichfield, stating a grant some years since to Sir Joseph Ash of the office of custos brevium of the Common Pleas for three lives, and, one of them being determined, desiring a grant of the said office in reversion for such term as his Majesty shall think fit. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 86.]
Feb. 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Judge of the Court of Admiralty of the petition of John Petersen, commander of a French privateer, for leave to sell or deposit so much of the goods of two Hamburg ships lately taken by him as may be sufficient to supply the necessities of his men till they can arrive at a French port, his Majesty's pleasure being, if the case be as stated, that what can be done by the law of nations and according to the course of the Admiralty be done in the petitioner's behalf. [Ibid.]
Feb. 15. Pass for Charles, Lord Lansdowne, eldest son of John, Earl of Bath, Sir Peter Wyche, Nicholas Durell, his governor, his servants and attendants, to pass into any parts beyond the seas and there to remain for 4 years. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 127.]
Feb. 15 and 16. Narrative by Williamson of his conversation with the Earl of Shaftesbury:—
Tuesday, 15 Feb. His Majesty sent for me in the morning, and coming to him about noon in the garden, he told me, he would have me go to Lord Shaftesbury, and let him know from him, that he had information that he was very busy here in town in matters that he ought not, and that his Majesty thought it were much better he were at home in the country; that now the term was done, and he could not have any business of that kind, and that it is the King's advice to him that he rather go home; that the King knows more than it maybe he thinks he does, and that this is the King's advice, and so leaves it to my Lord, as it may follow, &c.
It happened that he was not within that afternoon. I gave the King an account of his commands in the evening. The next morning he went to Windsor for a day or two, and commanded me to execute his commands in his absence.
Wednesday. Accordingly next day about 3 in the afternoon I went to the Earl of Shaftesbury's, where I found him in his dining room with Sir Edward Harlow (Harley) and one of the Earl's gentlemen. Being sat, and Sir Edward and the gentleman withdrawn, I delivered my message in these words, as near as I possibly could remember them, for I had for the greater sureness writ down beforehand what I meant to say: "I am commanded by the King to let you know his Majesty has information that your Lordship is very busy here in town in matters that you ought not, and that his Majesty thinks it were much fitter you were at home in the country; that now the term is done, and consequently your Lordship can have no business of that kind further in town; his Majesty therefore commands me to let you know, 'tis his advice you should rather be about your own affairs at home in the country; that his Majesty knows more than it maybe your Lordship thinks he does of your being busy up and down here in the town, and therefore has thought fit to give you this warning; that this is his Majesty's advice to you, and that his Majesty thinks you would do well to follow it. This is what I had it in command from his Majesty to signify to you as by his order."
He answered, that he prayed me to return his humble duty to the King, and to assure him that he was the humblest of his subjects; that his Majesty's desire, advice, inclination, fancy, or call it what I would, should be in all things observed by him with all dutifulness; that he knew what it was possible for the King to know by any true information of him, and what he did here in town; that it was possible the King might have received some wrong information of him, but he would continue with submission to say, he himself knew all the King could possibly be informed of him.
He had nothing to do here in town relating in any way imaginable to the Government or the King's service; he did not use to see any company, two or three it may be or so, but nothing in the least relating to public business; at no time had he in any company meddled with anything relating to the King or the public, possibly a word now and then in jest he might come out with, but nothing serious or in earnest, nor had he ever said anything of that kind as to the King himself, of others possibly he might.
His business in town was not only of the term; some of that kind he had, but he had a great deal of other business and that concerned him much, as, his disposing of Exeter House, which he was at this very time dealing about, whether to let or sell, whether to dispose of, as it is, or whether to pull down and let into tenements, within this week he is treating with the City surveyor about it.
Another business was his interest in the African Company, being 900l., which was a considerable sum, which he was thinking how to dispose of.
A third was his share in the Carolina business, which, he said, Mr. Vice-Chamberlain would inform the King of. Besides his share in the common stock he has further a considerable plantation of his own in the country, and he was now thinking how best to dispose of it.
These were the businesses that kept him in town, and he had rather be made a prisoner here in town where his business was, than make himself a prisoner in the country separated from his business. Indeed his business is more properly here in town than in the country. He beseeched his Majesty to be assured he would never do anything prejudicial to his service, neither his duty, his inclination nor his principles could let him do it. Not being called to business he meddled with none but his own private business, which was enough for him. In Parliament he declares his opinion to the King, as matters call for it, but otherwise he meddles not, a word in jest or so he may possibly let fall but never of the King, of others maybe he may. He guessed what this information his Majesty had received of him was, viz., of having been on the Exchange lately. He had been there, but only upon his own particular business and without speaking to anybody save a little, &c., where his business carried him. He filled his head with his own little business. A man's head must be full of something; some statesmen suffered themselves to die for fear of troubling their heads with business, but that he loved to fill his head with business.
Rising up to take my leave, he told me, he would have been glad to see me there upon another kind of occasion. I replied, I should have been glad that it might have been rather of some other kind. And so he conducted me down to my coach. [In the handwriting of one of Williamson's clerks. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 80.]
Another copy of the above account of what took place on the 16th written by Williamson himself. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Another copy of the last paper. [In the handwriting of one of Williamson's clerks. Ibid. No. 32.]
Feb. 16.
London.
The Countess of Portland to Williamson. The Duke told me he had left my petition with you to be read at Council, which I entreat may not be till you hear further from me. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Feb. 16.
Eton College.
John Rosewell to Williamson. I have examined the child you have sent me, and take him to be a boy of good parts, but he is not advanced so far as to come under my immediate teaching. Yet he will be carefully looked to, and I will often take an account myself how he profits and assist him all I can. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Feb. 16.
Hull.
Col. Anthony Gylby to Williamson. The prize ship I told you of at London is yet in Humber, and is now almost empty, but another prize is since brought to them. The disorder is great, the country people on both sides the river coming to buy of them. They tell me this morning a man-of-war is since come to them, and, if any demand a reason of their doing, they threaten to shoot them. Being the thing concerns the treaty of peace. I humbly beg your advice and directions what to do. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Feb. 16. Three balance sheets dated 27 May and 8 Sept., 1675, and 16 Feb., 1675–6, between Ambrose Holbeach and John Mackernes, showing receipts and payments by the former on the latter's behalf. (Found in the pocket of Mackernes' pocket book.) [Ibid. No. 36–38.]
Feb. 16.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Henry Howard and Sir Cecil Howard, Commissaries General of the Musters. George Churchill, ensign to his brother Lieutenant-Colonel John Churchill's company, has been for some time at sea under Sir John Narbrough, in the Swan, and has therefore been respited on the muster rolls. The respite is now to be taken off and he is to receive his pay during absence until further orders to the contrary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 149.]
Feb. 16. Notes by Williamson concerning the jurisdiction of the Court of Admiralty at Bristol. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 107.]
Feb. 17. Note by Williamson. Lord O'Brien told me last night he called at the Earl of Shaftesbury. There were the Earl of Salisbury, Littleton, Barnardiston Papillon, and Littleton acquainted him with the message I had delivered to the Earl of Shaftesbury, blaming him that he had not told them of it, seeing, as they said, he could not but know it. They had expected this some time, but by the other secretary. They had watched one door, and were caught by another. He observed the company much surprised and a little rude at it, whether really so, or whether expecting what the Earl would himself say of it to them. The Earl talked after his usual rate, without any appearing change at all.
Coming to Thomson's this day, there he found him, Nelthorpe and Sir T. Player full of this news and crying it was a hard thing, when a man had placed part of his fortune in trade to be thus forced away from his business. They supposed the law would counsel (?) a man to be where his business was. If trade were thus destroyed, they would all think of retiring.
In his return he called at the Earl of Shaftesbury's, where he found Sir Robert Clayton, Sir Robert Peyton and some others with him. The others immediately stepped into another room, as he came in, only the two first remained in the room with him, talking of indifferent things. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 39.]
Feb. 18.
Newbold Pacey.
Matthew Hunter to Williamson. Thanking him for obtaining from Sir Henry Puckering a promise that he would favour the writer whenever he should have an opportunity. Williamson, unlike many people, though raised to an exalted station, does not forget his former friends. [Latin. Ibid. No. 40.]
Feb. 18. Col. Samuel Sandys to Williamson. I wondered much at the confidence of the writer of the enclosed, he being reputed a wise man. I thought it my duty to acquaint you with it. The enclosed is a copy of the letter. If I apprehend more to be in it than there is, I beg your pardon and impute it to my zeal for his Majesty's service, but, if it be worth inquiring into it, I shall easily know to whom it was wrote, that the letter itself may be produced, for it has not been kept private. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Feb. 18.
Exeter
Thomas Walker to Williamson. Having been some days in the country delayed my receiving your letter. I am highly sensible of his Majesty's extraordinary kindness, and am infinitely obliged to yourself and my Lord of Bath, by whose interest I am sure I have arrived at this happiness. I know not of what nature the letter is that was desired from his Majesty, but, if it be for the next dignity, I doubt the canonry will go with it, unless the dignity be give to one already a canon. [Ibid. No. 42.]
Feb. 18. Notes by Williamson. Lord O'B[rien] told me:—The AttorneyGeneral was much in with that knot of Player, Thompson, &c. Titus, &c. That their meetings were mostly Sunday nights.
That one offering to come in and make one of that company (he said he suspected it was Sir J. Lowther), the Attorney he declared he could not allow any more to be taken in. That Titus told the said Lord O'B. this, but that a certain person in the company cried out to Titus, as he was reporting the thing: No name, mum's the word. However, Lord O'B. told me he guessed it to be Sir J. Lowther.
That these people rely much on the Attorney's opinion in all things. They say frequently, He is a brave man.
That the meeting at the Palgrave's Head is but of Talkers, a meeting much mixed. Meers is but used (?) as a talker.
That the coffeehouse where the Earl of Shaftesbury vents out all his thoughts and designs is John's coffeehouse.
Speaking of this knot of people in the city, he said, their corner (?) in the House of Commons was spirited (?) and actuated by three or four Lords and as many of the City, insinuating those of the City were Player, Thompson, &c.
He seemed to say that Player, &c. still own they come and drink now and then with the King at Will. Chiffinch's, but that of late they seem not so well satisfied of their reception by the King, saying they had better not hazard themselves further, but, since they cannot be so entirely well with the King, as they could wish, they must take care not to lose themselves elsewhere, &c. There was a great meeting last night at Earl Shaftesbury's. The Earl makes merry with the message, said that he has 20,000l. in trade, and it is diffused (?) all over the town, that now trade must be (word illegible).
Lucy there. Very bitter against Lord Treasurer. A good and gracious king, but a vermin (?) was got in that corrupts all. He must be cut up root, &c.
Feb. 22. Idem. That we wanted vigour. It kept many back from coming in to see we were not resolute, and courage enough to go through with anything.
The Earl of Shaftesbury's friends condemned him for saying to J. W., when he delivered his message, that he would be glad to see the six Privy Councillors that would sign the warrant, &c. (for it seems he himself has reported that he said something like that to me).
That they are only waiting to have us be the aggressors, being assured of a sufficient number to stand by them in any hard point put upon them.
N.B.—I dining this day with Mr. Chiffinch observed him to be leaning to that side, that it had been better not to have sent any such message, &c. He hinted some friends of the City had been with him in another part of his discourse. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 43.]
Feb. 18. Caveat by Sir J. Williamson on behalf of Mistress Gwynn that no grant pass of the office of Registrar in Chancery in reversion or possession without notice to him. [Marked as subsequently cancelled. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 21.]
Feb. 18.
Whitehall.
Pardon to Benjamin Hinton, citizen and goldsmith of London, of all usurious contracts by him made or committed before 16 Feb. last. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 128.]
Feb. 18.
Whitehall.
Pardon to Despotine Poley, of Jesus College, Cambridge, concerning the death and killing of William Reynolds, late of the same College. Minute. [Ibid. p. 129.]
Feb. 18.
Whitehall.
Grant of a baronetcy of England to Benjamin Maddox, of Wormeley, Hertfordshire, and the heirs male of his body. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 129.]
[Feb. ?] Statement that George Stoodley, the present incumbent of Redriffe parish, is lately instituted and inducted by the presentation of one Thornburgh, and claims under Henry Selby, who purchased the advowson from the late usurper, Oliver. The parishioners, understanding the right of presentation to be in his Majesty, applied to the Lord Chancellor, who has granted a presentation to Samuel Alderson, M.A. They also have brought a Quare impedit in his Majesty's name against the said Stoodley and Thornburgh, and are proceeding therein with all possible celerity to bring the same to trial. Therefore they beseech his Honour that Stoodley may not have his Majesty's mandamus or presentation ad corroborandum, till the churchwardens and parishioners be first heard for an able preaching minister in respect of the many conventicles now set up round about the said parish, though none as yet in it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 44.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Mayor and Jurats of Dover. The King wishes them to govern their proceedings according to the report of the Attorney and Solicitor General on their petition therein mentioned. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 148.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to Edward Longueville for wounding mortally William Coe, at Grindon, co. Northampton, in sudden passion and after great provocation, Longueville being very young, and having provided for Coe's widow and children. [Ibid. f. 149.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
Caveat, at the desire of the churchwardens, and of Mr. Alderson, who is presented to the said church by the Lord Chancellor, that no presentation or corroboration pass of the church of Redriffe to George Stoodley, the present incumbent, without notice to Williamson. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 21.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen and Sheriffs of London, praying that a quo warranto be ordered against the Earl of Dorset in order to bring the validity of his pretended jurisdiction in Salisbury Court to a legal trial. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 87.]
Feb. 19. Warrant for a grant to Edward Proger, Groom of the Bedchamber, of all the estate real and personal of Thomas Killigrew, another Groom, which belong to the King by reason of any outlawry against him at the suit of any persons whatsoever. [Precedents 1, f. 134.]
Feb. 19.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to Williamson. Both your letters of the 8th and 12th came in here together yesterday, and to-day, having discoursed with my friend that made the proposition I sent you, I find him still possessed with a belief that the grant he propounds will never pass here with the Lord Lieutenant's consent, the persons concerned having so great influence on him, and yet he affirms that it is a thing clearly in the King's gift, but, he not being willing to open the case further to me at present, and believing the Lord Lieutenant so just and prudent a person as not to deny any just thing the King shall command him, I know not what to advise, nor am I so desirous now to engage so deep in the business, seeing it is not like to go to your own use, for whose sake I hitherto took pains. However, my friend has taken time till next Tuesday to give me his full resolution what to do, and, if then he resolves to proceed on any reasonable terms, you shall have an account of it. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 7.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of Francis, Lord Bermingham, Baron of Athenry, setting forth that he was provided for by the Acts of Settlement to be restored to his ancient estate, but received no benefit thereby, that by orders of the Commissioners for transplantation the parcels of lands thereafter mentioned were set out to him by transplantation, viz., lands therein described in the parish of Athenry and half barony of Athenry, and in the parishes of Dunmore, Tuam, Addergoole, and Miltown in the barony of Dunmore, co. Galway, and that he had purchased the parcels of lands thereafter mentioned which had been set out by the said Commissioners to transplanted persons, viz., lands therein described in the said parishes of Miltown, Dunmore, and Tuam, and that other parts of his said ancient estate are now possessed by persons that have no right thereto, and praying letters to the Lord Lieutenant for letters patent to him of the said lands set out to him by transplantation and purchased by him and also for orders to the Attorney-General to exhibit informations of intrusion against the persons in possession of the other parts of his estate without title, and that the same might be likewise granted him when recovered, a reference thereof to the Committee for Irish Affairs, and their report that they think it reasonable that letters patent should be passed as prayed, and, as to the part of his ancient estate that he alleges to have been intruded into, they think it safest to refer that part of the petition to the Lord Lieutenant to know by what title the said lands are detained, and whether it be in the King's power to restore them, which report has been approved in Council; requiring and authorizing him to cause effectual letters patent to be passed containing a grant to the said Francis, Lord Bermingham, and his heirs of all such lands as he holds by transplantation or by purchase from transplanted persons, reserving thereout the services and quit-rents reserved thereon by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, and further to give orders to the Attorney-General to inquire touching the King's right in the lands which the said lord alleges to be wrongfully detained and to report the state of that matter to the King in Council. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 408.]
Feb. 19.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that Callaghan, Earl of Clancarty, has informed the King that there is a great arrear of quit-rents due out of his estate in the barony of Muskerry, co. Cork (which lately was decreed by the Commissioners of Claims to Charles James, late Lord Muskerry, and has since descended to him as heir in tail) to Christmas last, amounting to 7,110l. or thereabouts, which, if levied, would swallow up his whole estate and render it for ever of no value to him, and has also besought in regard of the coarseness and barrenness of the said lands that not only the quit-rents might be reduced for the future, but the estate freed from any arrears for the past, a reference thereof to the Lord Treasurer and the Lord Lieutenant and their report advising that in lieu of the whole arrear to Christmas last 3,000l. be accepted to he paid in three years at the rate of 1,000l. per annum, accepting, in consideration of the lands granted to the petitioner and his family not proving of so much value as was intended, 3,000l. in full satisfaction of the whole arrear due, to be paid in three years at the rate of 1,000l. per annum by equal halfyearly portions at Midsummer and Christmas, the first payment to be made next Midsummer, and directing him to take care that the said 3,000l. and no more be levied and paid at the said times; and, after reciting an Order of the Irish Privy Council dated 17 Oct., 1673, which directed that commissions should issue to inquire the yearly value of the said lands, and that the said Earl should make leases for 99 years to several of the respective former proprietors of the said lands under certain yearly rents therein mentioned, and that each of the said persons should be charged with a proportion of the arrears of quit-rents due to the King according to the proportion of the clear profits of the said lands during that time received by each of them respectively, further requiring him to take special care that each of them pay their respective proportions of the said 3,000l. with respect to the proportion of the clear profits of the said lands received by them respectively, and also, if it shall appear to him that any part of the said 7,110l. be levied and paid for quit-rent or custodium rent or any bonds or bills taken for part thereof, directing him to allow the money so paid as answered out of the said 3,000l., and on payment of the said 3,000l. to give directions for cancelling such bonds or bills, if any, for any part of the said arrear, and thereupon letters patent are to be passed containing a full discharge to the said Earl and the said lands of all the residue of the said arrear. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 411.]
Feb. 20. Notes by Williamson of proceedings in the Foreign Committee. Mediation. Sir W. Temple, 8–18 Feb. They in Holland are framing an answer to the late French memorial and to Monsr. de Ruvigny's paper of reasons about the passes. They seem inclined there to make the King arbiter of the disputed points, if France will agree. Query, if he would have any such offer encouraged in this or other cases hereafter. The King cannot think fit to encourage any such offers.
Nimeguen. Sir L. Jenkins, 5–15 Feb. In Holland they are inquiring into what passed in the Maes at Sir Leoline's arrival by one of their men-of-war striking to the yacht. Query, if anything to be directed Sir Leoline about it, in case they proceed to speak further in it.—Only let us watch what they do, and accordingly the King will see what is to say.—About the clause in the States' passes about couriers. If they provide sufficiently for couriers sent to the plenipotentiaries as well as from them.—The practice always having been for freedom to couriers from the masters, though the words were no other than those in the present passes, let them suffice.
Idem, 9–19 Feb. The French ambassadors agree to make no solemn entries at Nimeguen. They desire 6 months for their domestics to stay at Nimeguen. Doubted if it will be granted. Query, if not to add, if the mediators stay so long.—If the assembly last so long, &c.
Hamburg. Sir W. Swan. 4 Nov. Complaints of Skelton's insolence.
Germany. Mr. Skelton. 1–11, 3–13, 8–18 Feb. Has received the King's orders, but is proceeded as far as Ratisbon. There will stay. Query, if not well enough ?
Ducker 3–13 Feb. Copy of Prince William's letter to the King.
Denmark. Paul, 25 Jan., 1 Feb. They answer in Denmark there needs no answer to the King's letter about freedom of the ports.—If any, to be framed (?) of all these ports as well.—Our merchants neglect to carry passes. They must this year.—They must be warned to take passes.
Sweden. Wood, 26 Jan.
Holland. The commissioners' opinion upon revising. Send it to Sir W. Temple to have it settled thus if it may be.
England. The foolish letter from Dorchester, &c.—Not worth further trouble. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 311.]
Feb. 21.
Gloucester.
George Clarke to John Ramsey at the Lord Treasurer's in London. I am fallen into some trouble, and the greater being fallen into my adversaries' hands, Aldermen Wagstaff and Fowler, who have waited a revenge. The case is this clearly as to myself. One from Hereford belonging to the Excise sent a scandalous paper of verses by one Belding alias Baldwin of this city, as he says to me, but they were neither enclosed nor directed, and he keeps them in his hands three or four days before I had them, and in the meantime suffers copies to be transcribed and published contrary to the late proclamation, and afterwards delivers them to me in the street. I, not knowing what they were, read them next day, but showed them not to any nor took copies of them. Next day after I heard a clamour about the town that I should be the author of them. I went to a justice with them, who told me they were made public, and that it were best to burn them, which I did. The said Justices granted warrants for the rest and for me, on which I appeared and gave them the above account, and the others confessed the same and not otherwise; but their malice rests not here; they have bound me over to answer at the next sessions, and sent last Saturday a letter to Sir J. Williamson for directions. My humble request is that you would stand between me and my ruin what in you lies, to hinder my being sent for by a messenger or coming up at all, if possible. I suppose there will be something from the Marquis of Worcester and Col. Cooke to the Lord Treasurer on my behalf. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 45.]
Feb. 21.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. An order is come from the Bishop of Norwich for our minister and churchwardens to inquire what number in our parish are by law in a capacity to receive the Holy Communion, and what number of Popish Recusants are resident here, and what number of other Dissenters, who obstinately refuse or wholly absent themselves from the Communion of the Church at such times as by law they are required. To the two first the inquirers agree, but to the last they seem to be at a loss, fearing, if they should make the Dissenting party so great as they are, it might put some fears in his Majesty and discourage him in attempting to reform them, they judging their number has been the only cause they have been so favourably dealt with hitherto. Of the same opinion they are in other parts as well as here, so that there is like to be an imperfect account. If an inquiry were made how many of the Church of England receive the Communion here, they would not be found in all 500, and, if the like inquiry were made of the Dissenters here of all sorts whatever, how many of them were in Church fellowship as they term it, or broke bread together, I am certain there are not 100 men besides the women, so that the grand number here are, as I believe they are elsewhere, the profane and unstable, and this number daily increases, who being unsettled side with anything that tends to an unsettlement either in Church or State.
They report here of Lord Townshend's being laid aside, and that we are like to have a new Lord Lieutenant, which very much pleases all here that have been always faithful to the King and true to the Church, whom he had no kindness for, but put all the discouragements he could upon them, insomuch that they were put out of the militia and the champions for the Nonconformists brought in, such as have declared the Nonconformists as good subjects to the King as those that comply with his laws, and that they could as freely receive the Sacrament at the hands of a tinker as a minister of the Church in Orders, and before the Indulgence was taken off frequented the grand conventicle here. These things were said and done by one of the captains my Lord put in, since he made him captain, and, before he put him in, several things in writing were given in against him to show his disaffection to his Majesty and the Church by Sir T. Meadowes, who was then major of this town, who was put by my Lord out of commission for his unwillingness to receive this captain under him, and Mr. James Johnson was made major in his room, and afterwards by my Lord's means knighted and made a justice for this county, and all this judged to be done to eclipse Sir T. Meadowes and make a creature of his own. The like discouragements have been put upon those who have endeavoured the suppressing of the conventicles, insomuch that they have been threatened by his Lordship at the time the King commanded the laws to be put in execution, so that ever since the King's and the Church's friends have been so cast down, that their spirits are little less cowed than they were under old Oliver, and the power here being in those hands they are, they dare as little stir, if there were occasion. What I have writ I know to be true, and they are no fancies but real truths. The captain's name is Richard Huntington, brother to Major Huntington, one of the Commissioners for the Excise. Our Major Johnson and this Capt. Huntington are both now at London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 46.]
[Feb. 21.]
London.
"The Exciseman's Journal or Stock-Book, being a general method to be observed by all supervisors and others in keeping their account of the increase and decrease of the victuallers' stock" by John Mayne. Preface dated 21 Feb., 1675[–6], Coleshill. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case F.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of the Mayor, Aldermen and inhabitants of Northampton which showed that the habitations and goods of above 700 families and most of the town were burnt 20 Sept. last, and prayed a gift of 2,000 tons of timber out of Salcey and Whittlewood Forests towards the rebuilding of the town and also so much of the month's tax in that county for the militia as was not yet returned, and so much of the excise and hearth money as arises out of the said town for some short term. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 87.]
Feb. 21. Declaration by the King, after reciting that the King's heralds and pursuivants of arms are ministers subordinate to the authority of the Earl Marshal to whom the nomination of their successors belongs, and that the said officers have always been invested with coats of the Royal Arms denoting their quality, which and also liveries have been provided and delivered to them by the Keepers of the Great Wardrobe, and also collars of S.S. for the Kings and Heralds by the Masters of the Jewel House on warrants of the Earls Marshal directed to them, as appears by memorials thereof in the late King's time, but that the books and registers thereof, as also of other like warrants directed to them in the time of previous sovereigns and the original warrants and orders themselves have been embezzled during the late troubles, and that, no Earl Marshal having been constituted since the restoration till lately, such warrants during the vacancy of the office have been issued either immediately from the King or from the Lord Chamberlain, and that therefore the officers there make difficulty of obeying the Earl Marshal's warrants for providing and delivering such coats and collars for want of precedents, which for the reason aforesaid cannot be produced: That from henceforth the Keeper of the Great Wardrobe and the Master of the Jewel House shall from time to time on the warrant of the Earl Marshal provide for and deliver to the Kings and other officers of arms such coats of arms, liveries, and collars respectively as have been used since the restoration, this declaration to be registered in their respective offices. [2 pages. Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 129.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 47.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir John Howell on his report in the case of Francis Jones, prisoner in Maidstone Gaol, for inserting him in the next general pardon without the clause of transportation. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 131.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
The King to the Treasury Commissioners in Scotland. Warrant, having considered their letter of the 15th instant to the Duke of Lauderdale, approving of the total sum mentioned in their estimate, being 4,374l. 3s. 4d. sterling, for finishing the works at Holyrood House, levelling the gardens, gravel and grass works, and bringing in water to the house, and authorizing and requiring them to advance the said sum for completing the said works, not doubting they will take special care that the money be laid out to the best advantage.—We have received information from the Duke of Lauderdale concerning the west quarter of the palace and we order you to cause the part thereof built by the usurpers, which darkens the court, to be taken down, to the end that the inside of that quarter may be finished in pillar work agreeable with the other three quarters, the undermost story of which west quarter being already ordained to be in pillar work conform to the first, as is contained in the mason's first contract for the sum agreed on, there will be only a second story of pillar work to be built at our charge. You shall consider if it is not fit that the gate be passable for a coach, and that the great iron windows in the front be taken away and made handsome. We have also considered what you write concerning the applications made to you by Robert Milne, master mason of that work, regarding his losses on that occasion, with your opinion thereon, and authorize you, when the whole work shall be finished as undertaken by him, to give him 500l. sterling besides what is to be paid him by the contract. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 424.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
Commission to John Strachan to be ensign of the lieut.-colonel's company in the regiment of Guard in Scotland. [Ibid. p. 425.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Sir William Sharp of Stoniehill, the King's cashkeeper, of the ward and non-entry of — Scott of Tushielaw with the marriage of Walter Scott of Tushielaw, son and apparent heir of the said —Scott, the said Sir William being obliged to dispose of the same as his Majesty shall appoint in writing. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 426.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir William Sharp, after reciting the last warrant, for payment to John Ewin of London, merchant, or to his order, of whatever sum or profit he shall receive by virtue of the said gift towards the payment and satisfaction of the 5,000 merks Scots, ordered to be paid to the deceased Alexander Murray as a reward for the seizure of the deceased Archibald Johnstoun of Warriestoun, the said Ewin having now right to the said sum. [Ibid. p. 428.]
Feb. 21.
Whitehall.
Memorial of protection to Patrick Ker, one of the Life Guard of Horse, in the ordinary form for two years. [Ibid. p. 429.]
Feb. 22.
Cardiff.
William Morgan to Williamson. My last was from Paris, but my sickly young cousin suddenly in a manner dying on our road to Lyons occasioned my return about Michaelmas for England. In France I was by an old good friend of Dr. Clarke's, the President of Magdalen, Oxford, recommended to him to put in a little son of mine for a demy. It is the same, although to such a morose person, as Dr. Busby was ever known to be, you foresaw well the letter you honoured me with in the child's behalf for King's scholar at Westminster would not so readily take its desired effect. As soon as I perceived their usual too long delays, I removed him thence to Mr. Collins, an ingenious person, and master of Magdalen School, where I think as having never fancied anything else but books he improves himself, in order, I well hope, for a demy the next election in July there. The President told me he had only a single vote, the rest, I think he said, were most in the Fellows, but I should not have the least doubt, if, specially now in my old friend Sir L. Jenkins' absence from England, you would oblige me by writing half-a-dozen lines to the President, to communicate to them to set the child now on the roll, else he cannot be then elected, and I am assured he is a better scholar than one or two who are, I hear, already on the roll since Christmas, as having made their exercises for them, and that you would send it to my good friend Dr. Halton, which my cousin Morgan of Tredegar, your fellow member, who has been a little sick of late, shall thank you for. I had troubled you with this small concern before I left London, but was denied the happiness of paying you my duty at Whitehall, you being that day gone to Council at Hampton Court. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 48.]
Feb. 22.
Tredegar.
William Morgan to Williamson. Your most kind favour by the hackney man met your friend, Sir Edward Mansell, at my house, where you were not forgot, and, when we received your letter, it cost me at least half a dozen bottles in my cellar. I know not how you will repair my damage. I had sooner returned you my thanks, but have been extreme ill of a violent fever, which I hope I have overcome with the loss of 10 oz. of blood. [Ibid. No. 49.]
Feb. 22. Memorandum by Charles Gringaud. A very dangerous meeting is held constantly in Leadenhall Street on Fridays by several persons disaffected to the present government as Major-General Berry, Col. Kelsey. Col. Desborough and several others whose names I have not, that, as often as they meet, exercise their gifts both in praying and preaching to the decrying of the present power and all authority to them contrary. [Ibid. No. 50.]
Feb. 22.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to Williamson. To-day according to promise I had my friend's resolution on the business I wrote to you of lately, which being according to the enclosed letter from him, I shall pray your further commands. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 8.] Enclosed,
Feb. 22. William Sands to Robert Leigh. In pursuance of my promise I acquaint you that, having considered what you then propounded for my security of having the King's title made over to me of the discovery, I find some objections so prevailing that I doubt we cannot proceed further, unless your friends in England propound some safer way to go through with it than you told me, for in the first place, though the King's commands may be very powerful, and I know the thing itself is freely in his gift, yet I am very confident it will never pass the seal here, for the reasons I told you already, and in the next place, unless I have sufficient security at least of 2,000l. sterling that the King's grant shall be made over wholly to my use on passing the letters patent and paying down the 1,000l. promised, I am advised not to discover the title, nor do I think it safe myself as beliering neither the power of disposing of the grant when passed nor management of the affairs in the meantine, especially in England, to be wholly in your own hands. Otherwise I hare that opinion of your justice and fair dealing that I would trust you with greater matters, and therefore am still willing, if those that shall act in it in England can propound any safe way to secure those points, to proceed in it according to what is already propounded. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 8i.]
Feb. 23. Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Lord Duras, praying that, being now about concluding a marriage, his Majesty would, in order to the enabling him to make the better settlement, grant him his letter to the Lord Lieutenant directing the payment of 3,000l. per annum for 7 years granted to him out of the 20,000l. reserved by his Majesty out of the revenue of Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 88.]
Feb. 23.
Whitehall.
Grant to Edward Holmes, appointed one of the King's Falconers, of a yearly pension of 2s. per diem, and of 13l. 13s. 9½d. yearly for a livery, from Lady Day next for his life. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 132.]
Feb. 23. Pass for Manuel Cledoune, a native of Candia, who on his voyage thence to Toulon with his wife and three children was taken by a ship of Tripoli, and carried in thither, where he was deprived of all his property, and, though freed himself, left his wife and children there in slavery, and who is now going abroad to beg for alms to redeem them. [Latin. Ibid.]
Feb. 23.
Whitehall.
Grant of the offices of Secretary and Marshal of the islands of Nevis, St. Christopher's, Antego, and Montserrat to Garrett Cotter, of St. Martin's in the Fields, for the lives of Capt. James Cotter, James Cotter, his nephew, and George Burgesse of the Inner Temple and the life of the survivor of them. [Ibid. p. 133.]
[Feb. ?] Jaques De Witt, of Belle in Flanders, merchant, and Katharine De Witt, of London, widow, executors of the will of Lewis De Witt, late of London, merchant, before his death naturalized by Act of Parliament, to the King. Petition, showing that the petitioners as such executors proved the said will, and according to their oaths and the laws of England administered the said testator's estate, so far as the same has come into their hands, that the petitioner, Jaques De Witt, being an alien and inhabiting in Belle aforesaid, and the said testator owing several debts there, which the estate will not amount to pay, the creditors there sued the said petitioner before the magistrates of Belle for the same, by the laws whereof the executors are bound to pay the deceased's debts, if they undertake the executorship, whether the estate be sufficient or not, on which the petitioner is condemned and cast into prison, where he must lie all his life, unless relieved by the Council of Flanders, to whom he has appealed, that the only ground of the said sentence is, that the testator's father was a citizen of Belle, and that therefore he also is to be accounted a citizen of that city, and that by that means his estate ought to be subject to their jurisdiction and not to his Majesty's laws, though he was his Majesty's subject and died in London, and all his estate was within his Majesty's dominions, which sentence passed, as the petitioner conceives, through the magistrates' ignorance of his Majesty's laws in such cases, and he hopes that, if the Council of Flanders be informed of the said laws from his Majesty, it will much facilitate his relief on the said appeal, and therefore praying his Majesty to certify the said Council how the laws and customs of his kingdom are in the several particulars set down in the annexed paper with a recommendation of the petitioner's case to them, who suffers in vindication of his Majesty's jurisdiction over the persons and estates of aliens that inhabit and trade in his dominions. At the foot,
Feb. 24.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 51.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 88.]
Feb. 24. Sir Philip Musgrave to Sir Christopher Musgrave. 'Tis now come to that pass betwixt L[ord] C[arlisle] and you, that, if there be not a hearing betwixt you, and somewhat done to settle matters for the future, I must give up my authority, and intend to do it. How can it be expected I should still struggle alone on so great disadvantage? I know it is apparent to you, as it is to all that know anything in these parts, that it is most industriously endeavoured by L[ord] C[arlisle] and G[eorge] F[letcher] to make me insignificant in these parts, as well as themselves a terror to those that will not truckle under to them. To this end Sir John Ballantine is made a deputy lieutenant, and the quorum added to his justiceship, which much exalts him. I know the greater part of the justices in both counties dislike their arbitrary magisterial proceedings, and are more my friends than theirs, but to what purpose is this, when my age and infirmities make me unable to attend public affairs, and they see not who is able to support them against the power and malice of persons displeased with them? If a strict account be given of Justices whose zeal for the Church has made them proceed to put in execution the laws against the enemies of it, the number in this county would be small, and fewer in the Barony of Kendal. If I live, I purpose to be at the Appleby Sessions after Easter, and at Carlisle, if my health enable me, and there make it appear I dare own myself to be the same man to the Church, to the King and to my country, as I have formerly appeared, and, that done, I shall consider how I may prevent my friends in the country from drawing trouble on themselves for their regard of me, and free myself as much as I can from a burden grown too heavy for me to bear singly.
I am sorry to find it likely to be so long ere I see you. The gout continues both in my feet and hand. Pray show the enclosed to Mr. Secretary. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 52.] Enclosed,
Paper by Sir P. Musgrave, headed "The state of the business" betwixt Mr. Fleming and me. The Justices of the Peace resident in the Botham of Westmorland, John Dalston, Thomas Sandiforth, Robert Hilton, Thomas Fletcher and Edward Musgrave. The Justices of the Peace in the barony of Kendal, which is the lesser part of Westmorland, James Bellingham, Daniel Fleming, Thomas and Edward Wilson, Robert and Christopher Philipson and Sir John Otway when he is at home. Mr. Fleming's desire of new justices is only to keep up his own power in opposition to me, and to others, the most considerable justices in the county, whom he has opposed against the rules of law and practice in other places throughout the kingdom, as was made appear at Appleby before the Judges of Assize, in the presence of sereral justices besides myself and my son Christopher, which will be made good again at the next Assizes if I live, for I know Mr. Fleming cannot justify what he has done, since this dispute began. Those who oppose him only stand for the authority the King's commission gives them in the Barony of Kendal as well as other parts in Westmorland. I desire, till this dispute be ended, no more justices be appointed for Westmorland, that so no discouragement may be given to those that stand for the maintenance of the King's authority. I suppose the Custos Rotulorum, though undervalued by Mr. Fleming, merits as well to be heard concerning the state of the county as he. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 52i.]
Feb. 21. Notes by Williamson. Trade &c. At the Lord Chancellor's. 100,000 pieces of calecut sent yearly into Holland from hence. The governors of the several Plantations omit to take the oaths prescribed by law. The New England abuses in their trade up to the Southward Plantations, &c. The officers of the Customs to be set in New England, pursuant to the Act about the Plantations, &c. N.B.—To get the law of Queen Elizabeth against foreign manufactures amended. Seven years' apprenticeships. Englishmen now outdo all the world in everything with time (?), as tobacco, sugar, indigo. Fine linens 1,200,000l. sterling yearly. Were for France not 70,000l., whereas 30 years ago 400,000l. N.B.—All stuffs are made only of English wool. Spanish wool is too short. Cloths are or may be of both. N.B.—Fustians were heretofore generally worn to a great quantity in Spain and Portugal, &c. Now the manners of these countries have changed, and in their room are succeeded the Exeter stuffs, &c. Crespe (crape) coming into fashion from France was at 7s. a yard, in a little time we made it much better at 3s., &c. 1,000,000l. linen from France yearly. Of the Spanish fleet money more comes to France than to England, Flanders, Holland and Genoa, &c., and 9/10ths of this for linen. Query.—What is the vent of French woollen manufactures in England ? Yes, 8 or 9 years ago infinite quantities of French druggets vended here. So soon as ever we came to make them immediately out of fashion. To give a mode yearly in summer for stuffs, in winter for cloths. Nothing writ, only to have it done impartially. K[ing], Q[ueen], D[uke], D[uche]ss, &c. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Feb. 24.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Bertie. Accepting his kind offer of his good offices with the Lord Treasurer, enclosing a note of his arrears in the Exchequer, besides his share of the common bill of extraordinaries given in by Sir L. Jenkins and himself, and beseeching the Lord Treasurer's favour to himself, which all that know his circumstances must believe he needs much more than those that make more noise. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 78.]
Feb. 24.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor of Gloucester. I have received yours of the 19th, subscribed by several of your Aldermen, with the enclosed copy of the infamous libel you were in prosecution of. I have acquainted his Majesty with your great care and zeal in the pursuit of the author and disperser thereof, which he takes very well, and desires you will by all means hunt it up as high as may be, and, wherever it is finally fastened, order must be taken that the party be proceeded against according to the utmost severities of the law. I have not yet had the opportunity of producing the matter at Council, so as to be able to give you any other directions, only I am to answer you for the reward promised by the proclamation, if we can by your help fasten it anywhere. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, No. 78.]
Feb. 24.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Col. Sandys. I have received yours with the enclosed copy and have acquainted his Majesty with it. I shall not have an opportunity to produce it where any resolution can be taken on it till Sunday, after which I shall trouble you again on this occasion. [Ibid. p. 79.]
Feb. 24.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Mary Burford, widow, desiring a pension, her husband having died of the wounds he received from deerstealers in New Park, whereof he was keeper. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 89.]
Feb. 24.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the report of the Lord Lieutenant on Lord Duras' petition, calendared ante, p. 572, that in regard his Majesty has already by letters under the Sign Manual appropriated the said 20,000l. to the building of Windsor Castle with non-obstantes to all subsequent letters, the most proper course to render his Majesty's gracious intentions effectual will be either to order the receiver of the said 20,000l. to pay 3,000l. per annum quarterly to the petitioner, or else to grant him letters patent under the Great Seal of England for such an annual pension out of the said fund. [Ibid.]
Feb. 24.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Chancellor of the petition of Lord Herbert of Cherbury praying, in consideration of his own and his father's sufferings and services, the advowson of the church of Montgomery, being not of the value of above 80l. per annum. [Ibid. p. 91.]
Feb. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting the petition of the Mayor and Commonalty and Citizens of London as Governors of the Royal Hospitals of Christ, Bridewell and St. Thomas, and the report of the Lord Treasurer thereon, both calendared in the last volume, pp. 588, 589, for a grant and licence to them to enlarge the wharves and make the said stairs and causeways regular and convenient as is mentioned in the said report, and to that end for a grant to them of the six perches of ground taken in as therein mentioned, as also of two perches more in depth all alongst the shore adjoining the said Hospital ground, containing about 80 poles in length. [3½ pages. Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 149.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 54.]
Feb. 24. The King to Thomas Dawkes, citizen and stationer of London. After reciting that the Earl of Carbery has at the desire of divers good subjects in Wales informed the King of the scarcity of books in the British language, and that to supply such want it is proposed that Dawkes (who, as the King is informed, has been at the charge of an expert composer for the said language in which he has lately printed the Practice of Piety to the great satisfaction of all our said subjects), may be admitted King's Printer for the British language, constituting the said Dawkes such printer for 14 years, with all the privileges that the King's Printers for other languages of right enjoy, with a proviso that nevertheless he shall not print any book without the previous licence of the Bishop of London or his nominees, nor any book the privilege whereof is already granted to any other of the King's Printers or to any others who have lawful right to the same. [Precedents 1, f. 133.]
Feb. 24.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant, after reciting that the King had considered the three enclosed petitions from Henry, Lord Cardross, Sir Patrick Hume of Polwart and Lieut.-General William Drummond, requiring them to exact full payment of the fine imposed on Lord Cardross and to take good security from him that neither he nor his family shall be guilty of similar offences, after which they are to set him at liberty; as to Sir Patrick Hume the sentence formerly pronounced declaring him incapable of all public trust is to be continued in full force till the King's pleasure be declared to the contrary, but in the meantime he is to be restored to liberty, and Lieut.-General Drummond is to be set at full liberty. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 429.]
Feb. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter to Patrick Boig of Burnehouses, commissar of Peebles, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands of Utterstowne, Burnehouses, Oxendean and Ryssiebrigs in the Earldom of March, Berwickshire, on his own resignation, with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 430.]
[Before 25 Feb.] John Nicoll, servant to Lord Finch, Lord Chancellor, to the King. Petition, praying a grant of the office of writing all presentations to advowsons, &c. in the King's donation in reversion after Robert (sic) Eddowes, the present holder, for the lives of the petitioner and John Baker, his brother-in-law, and the life of the survivor. With note at foot by the Lord Chancellor that he had been made acquainted with the petition, and desired it might be presented to his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 55.]
[Feb.?] Joseph Harris, late commander of the Quaker ketch, to the King. Petition for pardon, having been condemned by a Council of War for permitting his topsail and ensign to be struck to a Spanish man-of-war, and going on board of her; after sentence, he went on board the Anne yacht to be executed, but was reprieved. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Feb. 25.
London.
Sir G. Hamilton to Williamson. Recommending the bearer, Col. Oderiskoll (? O'Driscoll), who has very well and faithfully served his Majesty. [French. Ibid. No. 57.]
Feb. 25.
Welbeck.
The Duke of Newcastle to Williamson. Requesting him to procure his Majesty's approbation for Sir John Molyneux, — Perkins, and William Cartwright to be deputy lieutenants for Nottinghamshire, several of the deputy lieutenants being dead, and others not acting by reason of their absence from the country. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 58.]
Feb. 25. Jo. Eddowes to Williamson. Being unhappily in the country, and hearing by chance that a person is now endeavouring to get the grant of a reversion of my place, the Presentation Office, I beg you to put a stop to it till my return, as I would move in it for myself, the reversion, I conceive, most properly belonging to the present possessor. I was in his late Majesty's service for the whole time of the war, underwent many losses and received some wounds. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Feb. 25. Warrant for a commission appointing Robert, Viscount Yarmouth, Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk in place of Horatio, Lord Townshend, with a clause for vacating the former commission constituting Lord Townshend Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 22.]
Feb. 25. Like warrant, mutatis mutandis, for appointing Edward Noell Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire in place of the Marquis of Winchester, with the insertion of the like clause as in the precedent warrant. Minute. [Ibid. p. 23.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Lewis, Lord Duras, of an annuity of 4,000l. for three years to commence from 25 Dec. next, and of a further annuity of 3,000l. for three years to commence from 25 Dec., 1679, to be paid out of the sum of 20,000l. yearly reserved to the King by the establishment for Ireland, which is to commence after 25 Dec. last, or out of any other part or branch of the Irish revenue, such annuities to be inserted in the present or intended or any future establishment for Ireland. With note that this warrant was afterwards altered. [2 pages. Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 133.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
Similar warrant, but commencing with a recital that the King had been pleased to grant 21,000l. to Lord Duras, in consideration of his many eminent and faithful services, and towards great losses and charges sustained and the many debts contracted by him in the King's service, and generally directing the payment of the annuities to be paid out of the Irish revenue without mentioning any special fund, and that clauses should be inserted in the grant commanding the Vice-Treasurer and the officers of the Exchequer to cause the quarterly payments of the said annuities to be duly made from time to time on the sight of the letters patents without staying for any further or other warrant, and that, if the Irish revenue should be hereafter managed by Farmers or Commissioners, commanding such Farmers or Commissioners thereof or of any branch thereof in similar terms to cause the said quarterly payments to be duly made, such Commissioners to be allowed the same in their account, and such Farmers to be allowed to defalk and deduct the same from the rent of their Farm, and that such annuities during their continuance are to be as part of the present and all future establishments of that kingdom and are to be inserted therein, and also that, notwithstanding the letters of 15 Jan. last, giving directions touching the disposition of the 20,000l. a year reserved to the King by the present establishment, no more of the said 20,000l. shall be applied or issued according to such directions than shall remain after the said several annuities shall be fully satisfied and paid, which shall have the same preference of payment as if they had been at first inserted in the establishment. [Nearly 3 pages. Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 144.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Cutts to be gamekeeper within 10 miles of Childerley, Cambridgeshire. Minute. [Ibid. p. 135.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to Capt. Joseph Harris, lately condemned by a court martial to be shot. [Ibid.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
Discharge to Benjamin Maddox, created a baronet, of 1,095l., his creation money. Minute. [Ibid. p. 136.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
Privy Seal for payment to Sir Edward Griffin, Treasurer of the Chamber, of 200l. per annum to be paid quarterly, to commence from Christmas last, the same to be paid by him to Nicholas Staggins, Master of the King's Music, for certain uses directed by the King, and to be received by him without account. Minute. [Ibid.]
Feb. 25. Duplicate of the Lord Lieutenant's report dated 26 Feb., 1674–5, on the reference to him, dated 3 June, 1674, of Lord Kingston's petition. Before the passing of the Act of Settlement he was possessed of several lands he purchased from John Blackwell, who was possessed thereof as an Adventurer on 7 May, 1659, part being set out on the Doubling Ordinance, and of several other lands which by his Majesty's declaration were to be confirmed, and on his Majesty's letters he delivered up a great part of the said lands to Lord Dungan and other former proprietors thereof, before any decrees were obtained by them in the Court of Claims.
By a clause in the Act of Settlement all forfeited lands set out to Lord Kingston or Sir Robert King, his father, or purchased by them from any adventurers or soldiers or transplanted persons, and set out to or possessed by them before 7 May, 1659, are confirmed to Lord Kingston, subject to the rules for restoring lands to the former proprietors, with a proviso for his placing deficiencies or '49 arrears on such of them as were set out on the Doubling Ordinance.
Lord Kingston, by order of the Commissioners of the Court of Claims, delivered up his own and his father's '49 arrears, and so many deficient adventures as the Commissioners adjudged the Act required for such of the lands claimed by him as had been set out on the Doubling Ordinance.
On a report dated 29 Sept., 1664, of his Lordship's damage by the loss of the rents of the lands delivered up by him as aforesaid, his Majesty, by letters of 25 Jan., 1664–5, granted him several lands therein mentioned.
By a clause in the Act of Explanation Lord Kingston was to enjoy all the lands confirmed to him by the Act of Settlement, and those granted him by the said letters, and the Commissioners for executing the Act were to set out to him so much other forfeited lands as with the lands mentioned in the said letters should amount to the clear rent of 700l. per annum, and as, over and above the said rent, should be equal in value to two-thirds of all the lands recovered against him by any decrees therein confirmed or delivered up by him in obedience to his Majesty's letters.
On return of several commissions issued in pursuance of the said clause, several lands were set out to Lord Kingston towards his satisfaction of the said two-thirds, and by an order of 18 Dec., 1668, the said Commissioners declared that, though more lands were due to him towards his reprize, yet, as the stock of reprizals and the time of the Court's sitting was then but short, they would not grant him any more towards his reprizals.
It appears by a state of the deficiencies and debt due to him by the said Acts and of the lands given him towards satisfaction thereof that two-thirds of the lands lost and delivered by him, for which he was by the said Act to have satisfaction, according to the valuation made by virtue of the said commissions amounted to 3,067l. 0s. 5d. yearly above the quit-rent, and according to the rates of purchase returned by the said Commissioners amounted to 44,484l. 0s. 5d., and that the lands set out to him by the Commissioners of the Court of Claims towards satisfaction thereof, computed by the valuation of the Lord Lieutenant and Council amounted to 2,134l. 12s. 9¾d. above the quit-rent.
His Lordship also presented a list of several of the lands granted towards his reprizals, included in the said 2,134l. 12s. 9¾d. amounting to 7,852 acres and reckoned to him at 658l. 17s. 2d., whereof the quit-rent is 119l., which lands, by reason of incumbrances and their small value, he affirms have never yielded him any benefit, though he has paid the quit-rent thereof, and therefore offered to surrender them, but I do not think reasonable for his Majesty to accept such a surrender, lest he should lose part of the quit-rent payable thereout, but, if these lands be not reckoned any part of his satisfaction, the clear yearly value of all the lands he has hitherto obtained towards his reprize amounts to but 1,475l. 15s. 7¾d., which agrees with a rent roll given by his lordship of about that yearly rent the lands are now set for, but, as he took fines amounting to two years' rent on setting them, I conceive that the said reprized lands may be reckoned at 1,650l. per annum. It also appears by the said state of his deficiencies that the lands granted towards satisfaction of the 700l. per annum allowed him by the Explanatory Act, amount, according to the valuation of the Lord Lieutenant and Council, to 505l. 10s. 0¾d. per annum above the quit-rent, and according to the value returned by valuers appointed under the Great Seal to but 428l. 15s. 9¾d., so that his deficiencies of two-thirds of the lands to be confirmed to him is 3,067l. 0s. 5d. per annum, and his reprizals being reckoned at 1,650l., he is still deficient of the yearly value of the lands lost by him 1,417l. 0s. 5d. per annum, and the lands set out for his 700l. being reckoned to him at the highest valuation, he is still deficient 194l. 17s. 2d. per annum, so that the whole yearly value of his deficiencies amounts to 1,611l. 17s. 7d.
The lands delivered up and lost by him as aforesaid lying in cos. Dublin, Kildare and Meath, and many of them very near the city of Dublin, were by the commissions issued by the Court of Claims valued some at 12, some at 15 and some at 16 years' purchase, and, the lands granted him in reprizal being valued at only 10 years' purchase, by reason thereof his deficiencies were by Lord Berkeley's report reckoned to amount to the great sum therein mentioned, but, as the said values have already been settled by the late Commissioners of Claims, I do not conceive it convenient further to inspect the same, other than by making the allowance aforesaid, and for the full completing of his satisfaction and in consideration of the various years' purchases aforesaid and the hazards and uncertainty of reprize lands, it may be reasonable that the said 1,417l. 0s. 5d. yet unsatisfied be reckoned at 13 years' purchase, which comes to 18,421l. 5s. 5d., which at 10 years' purchase, the general rate of reprizes, will be 1,842l. 2s. 6½d. per annum besides the 194l. 17s. 2d. that he is still deficient of the said 700l. per annum. Of the deficiencies of his whole claim 1,063l. 4s. 3d. per annum was in trust for Edward Roberts, out of which the yearly quit-rent is 112l. 2s. 4d., so there remains 951l. 1s. 11d. per annum, towards satisfaction of which his Lordship has assigned over 548l. 11s. 11d. per annum, so he yet remains deficient 402l. 10s. per annum, the rest is claimed by his Lordship in his own right.
I am of opinion that the manner of his satisfaction proposed by Lord Berkeley's report, viz., setting out and granting him so much lands, as should pay 1,200l. per annum quit-rents, may render the value of his reprizals very uncertain, and may much exceed his Majesty's intentions and the value of the deficiencies due to him, wherefore I conceive that 2,000l. per annum above the quit-rent and all charges and incumbrances may be a sufficient proportion for his Majesty to allow Lord Kingston in full of all his demands both on his own account and in trust for Mr. Roberts as reprizals due by the said Acts, and I have proposed the same to him and find him willing to accept it.
With note by the Lord Chancellor and the Lord Treasurer fully agreeing with the above report. Wallingford House, 28 Feb. 1675–6. [5 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 9.]
Feb. 26.
Sherborne.
Lord Digby to Williamson. Paying his acknowledgements for his great civilities to him, and wishing he knew wherein he might serve him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 60.]
Feb. 26.
Pembroke Hall [Cambridge].
Francis Grigg to Williamson. You have abundantly shown yourself to be such a lover and patron of religion and learning that you delight in nothing more than the advancement of both, which you have sufficiently testified, not only by upholding, but by adding to those schools of the prophets, which our pious ancestors had provided. Here is a Cumberland gentleman from St. Bees School, who has been pre-elected Fellow above a year, but cannot come into full profits, no vacancy having happened since, nor is there any at present in sight, so he must be forced to retire into the country, not being able to subsist any longer here. He is a very civil person, and has the repute of an excellent good scholar. I would most willingly resign my fellowship to him for any considerable preferment, having a very great desire to be fixed in the world. It is our great unhappiness here that we do not meet with those advantages and encouragements as others do, who have their friends and relations at hand to advance their interest. It is probable you may meet with a speedy opportunity of relieving us here, and of becoming a benefactor to your countrymen here, as you have been already to those of your own famous University. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Feb. 26.
Exeter.
William Reade to Williamson. Having understood by the person employed in delivering my former letter to you concerning the mandate granted me by your procurement for a canonry at Exeter on the first vacancy, that I am not only unknown to you, but that it has passed your memory that any such letter was granted, or that it was obtained or moved for by such eminent persons as I insinuated, I have therefore again assumed the confidence of representing to you that his Grace of Canterbury sent Dr. Tomkins, his chaplain, then Canon of Exeter, to you for obtaining that letter, that the Bishop of Sarum sent his letter of request to you, and lastly Dr. Lamplugh, now Dean of Rochester, was divers times with you for procuring it, and my brother by means of one of your secretaries obtained an extract of it out of your Book of Entries, and I doubt not the Bishop of Sarum will, in some short time, either in person or by letter, second my request, which yet I hope you will esteem equitable and modest, considering that, notwithstanding the precedency of my letter, I only choose to stand on equal terms with such as may have obtained letters subsequent to mine, which is dated 3 May, 1672. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 62.]
Feb. 26.
Whitehall.
Commission to Thomas. Lord Howard of Escrick, to be lieutenantcolonel of the regiment of Foot Guards under Col. John Russell, in place of Lieutenant-Colonel Grey, deceased, and also captain of a company in the said regiment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 150.]
Feb. 26.
Whitehall.
Commission to Sir Samuel Clarke to be major of the regiment of Foot Guards under Col. John Russell, and captain of a company in the said regiment. [Ibid. p. 151.]
Feb. 26. Pass for Nicholas Staggins, Master of the King's Music, having leave to go to and remain in Italy and other foreign parts for a year, with his servants &c., to embark for his transportation and to return. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 136.]
Feb. 27.
Christ's Hospital.
William Parrey, clerk of Christ's Hospital, to Williamson. Last Friday the Lord Chancellor heard the cause relating to Henry Fryer's estate, and found there was a surplus (which is 79l. per annum presently, and 200l. after the death of a woman of above 80) which should be given to the poor for ever, and he declared he would wait on his Majesty to know of him what poor should enjoy it. You are humbly prayed to move his Majesty to remind the Lord Chancellor of the petition heretofore presented to his Majesty by the Governors of Christ's Hospital, and of the reference to his Lordship concerning the settling of the surplus on the poor children in Christ's Hospital, trained in mathematics and navigation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 63.]
[Feb. ?] The Governors of Christ's Hospital to the King. Petition for directions to the Lord Chancellor, that all the present and future surplusage of the said Fryer's estate may forthwith be settled for the benefit of the new royal foundation in Christ's Hospital, the cause having been lately heard before his Lordship, who declared he would attend his Majesty for his directions for settling the said surplusage. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Feb. 27. Warrant for the committal of Robert Cobett to the Tower for treasonable practices. No person is to be allowed to speak to him nor is he to have the use of pen, ink or paper. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 149.]
Feb. 28.
Chaunston.
Sir Thomas Morgan to Williamson. Requesting him to contradict to his Majesty the report that he designs to part with his employment in Jersey, adding that he has been severely handled with the gout, and that, as soon as his health is restored, he shall attend his Majesty in order to his going for Jersey. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 65.]
Feb. 28. Grant, upon the surrender of the offices of Clerk of the Recognizances and of the making and enrolling the same by Hugh May, of the said offices to the said Hugh May and Thomas May for their lives and the life of the survivor. [Latin. On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case F, No. 74.]
Feb. 28.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Bernard Grenville and Sir Gilbert Talbot praying his Majesty to make good and confirm to them a former grant of 20,000l. out of forfeited and concealed estates of nocents with an addition of two years more to the term wherein they are to raise it, of the enlargement of the fund to concealed mortgages, and of the sum granted to so much more as will defray the costs and charges the petitioners already have and hereafter shall be at in the recovering of the same, the petitioners placing deficiencies thereon, with a non-obstante to Col. Dillon's illegal clause of preference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 91.]
Feb. 29. Caveat at the desire of Mr. Halsey that nothing pass concerning the grant of the estate of Richard Hutton, of Gray's Inn, forfeited for killing James Peachey, till notice be given to Williamson. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 21.]
Feb. 29.
Wallingford House.
Report by the Lord Treasurer on the reference to him of the petition of Northampton, calendared ante, p. 569, that he does not find that 2,000 tons or so great a quantity of timber can be conveniently spared out of the said forests, but, if his Majesty affords 300 tons to be applied to rebuilding public places or for public uses, he will do a very good and charitable work, and that it will be a fitting quantity for the present to begin with: as to the sum raised in Northamptonshire on the one month's tax, he proposes that a letter may be written to the Lord Lieutenant and gentlemen of the county recommending the disposition of it towards the rebuilding of the said town: as to the remittance of the hearth-money he conceives them under the same necessity of his Majesty's grace and favour as the City of London to which that duty was remitted for seven years: he conceives the pardoning of the Excise there would be very little advantage to the town in general, but might create a great inconvenience in respect of the contract with the present farmers of that revenue. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 94.]
Feb. 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of the Earl of Orrery, stating that he has in legal debentures from Adventurers and Soldiers 8,000 acres profitable land, plantation measure, according to the Act rates, for which he has as yet received no satisfaction, and praying a grant to place these deficiencies on such lands in Munster as he shall discover, and which are liable to satisfy the legal deficiency of Adventurers and Soldiers, and that he may out of such discoveries be satisfied his said 8,000 acres, and that letters patent be passed of them to him as Adventurers and Soldiers usually have, and that he might have liberty to place deficiencies on lands called Ballyclogh, co. Limerick, not exceeding 120 acres plantation measure, and lying near his ancient paternal estate in the said county, a reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant, and his report dated 11 Feb. last that he conceives that, in regard, as the Earl assures him, several lands he had purchased of soldiers which he was for some years legally and quietly possessed of, have been decreed from him by the late Court of Claims, and he, as he avers, has as yet had no reprizals for the same, his Majesty may grant the petitioner letters that he, making good the said allegations, may place such Soldiers' and Adventurers' deficiencies as he has or shall purchase on such forfeited lands as he shall discover not exceeding 8,000 acres profitable land, and for passing to him one or more patents thereof under the quit-rents payable thereout by the Acts of Settlement, and that he may have preference to place deficiencies on the 120 acres mentioned in the petition, and that the Lord Treasurer agrees with his report; authorizing and requiring him, on the said Earl making out the allegations mentioned in the report, to cause effectual letters patent to be passed to him and his heirs or to such other persons as he shall appoint of so many lands forfeited to or vested in the Crown by the Acts of Settlement or Explanation as shall by him or them be discovered and tendered, not exceeding 8,000 acres of profitable land, plantation measure, under such yearly rents as are payable by Adventurers or Soldiers under the Act of Settlement in the provinces wherein the said lands shall lie, and also to grant to the said Earl and his heirs the castle, tenements and lands called Ballyclogh, co. Limerick, he placing deficiencies thereon according to the Act rates and paying the usual quit-rents, and further to admit the said Earl to place deficiencies on any interest satisfiable by the said Acts on any lands forfeited to or vested in the Crown by the said Acts that shall be discovered by him, and to issue such inquisitions for finding the King's title to any lands to be passed to the said Earl and for ascertaining the quantity of them as shall be necessary. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 413.]
Feb. 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of Richard Townesend, calendared ante, p. 543, for a grant to him and his heirs creating all the lands therein mentioned into a manor to be called the manor of Bridgetowne alias Coronea, with all the clauses usual in creations of manors and with power to hold a weekly market on every Friday at Bridgetowne and two yearly fairs there on 3 May and 3 Oct. [3½ pages. Ibid. p. 426.]
[Feb. ?] William Killigrew, his Majesty's carver, to the King. Petition for a grant of the real and personal estate, amounting to about 40l. a year, of Smithfield, a felon of Shepton Mallard, Somerset, who hanged himself in prison. (See ante, p. 548.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 379, No. 66.]
[Feb. ?] Homage of Henry Compton, D.D., late Bishop of Oxford, now elected and confirmed Bishop of London. [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F, No. 75.]
[Feb. ?] Homage of John Fell, D.D., now elected and confirmed Bishop of Oxford. [On parchment. Ibid. No. 76.]
Grants of denization to the following persons during the period comprised in this volume:—
Date. Name. Document.
1675.
March 2 Giles Blott Precedents 1, f. 55
" 2 William Kroges " "
" 14 James Caron Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 51
" 18 Staes Voghelaer Precedents 1, f. 57
" 29 John Vaen Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 52
April 1 Maerten Duts Precedents 1, f. 57
" 1 Lawrence Slett " "
" 7 Martin Bruer Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 54
" 9 Peter Bart " " p. 55
" 23 Witte Lambert " " p. 57
" 24 John Cauwell Precedents 1, f. 60
" 27 Francis Krinsen " "
" 27 Marcus Mom " "
" 28 Jacob Backer " "
" 29 Matthys van Rooy " f. 63
" 30 Bastian Reyners " "
May 5 Peter Lembrack Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 58
" 5 Antonio Verrio " " p. 59
" 26 John Decasure Precedents 1, f. 73
" 27 Antonio Lonsada " "
" 27 Gomez Rodrigues " "
" 27 Domingo Francia " "
" 27 Domingo de la Cerda " "
" 27 Guillermo Vega " "
" 28 Adrian Clarke " "
" 28 Antonio Rodrigues " "
June 1 Adrian Clapmues " f. 74
" 2 Cornelis Juckes " "
" 2 Bastian Verdoes " "
" 2 Dominicus Adrianson " "
" 3 Dirick Jansen " "
" 5 Dirick Cornelisse " "
" 5 Antony Johnson " f. 76
" 5 Henry Jacobson " "
" 5 Leonard Cornelison " "
" 5 John Cente " "
" 5 William Joosson " "
" 5 Jurgen Jurgenson " "
" 6 Robert Guthery Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 66
" 11 Leonard Williamson Precedents 1, f. 79
" 11 John Krighsman " f. 80
" 15 Henry Hoaftman " f. 81
" 15 John de Fevere " "
June 16 Augustine Hanson Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 66
" 18 John Groenwald Precedents 1, f. 81
" 27 John Stonechest Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 69
July 3 Passchier Liever " " "
" 6 Michael de Raes Precedents 1, f. 81
" 6 John Joppe " "
" 6 Jacob Starman " "
" 6 Alvaro de Fonseca " "
" 6 Gaspar Francisca " "
" 6 Francisco de Pavia " "
" 6 John de Velaer " "
" 6 John Marteel " "
" 6 John Cornelis " "
" 8 Francis van Kerkehove Home Office, Warrant Book 1, f. 70
" 8 Ary Peterson Weyman " " p. 71
" 13 Alexander Matthyson Precedents 1, f. 84
" 17 Aron Baron Lonzada " f. 87
" 17 Michael Druyst " "
" 17 Conrad Legers " "
" 20 Scholte Alles " f. 88
" 25 Cryne Vandorne Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 76
" 25 Cornelis Lambracks " "
" 26 Henry van Camper " "
Aug. 3 Lawrence Arentsensis S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 140
" 6 Adrian vande Viner Precedents 1, f. 94
" 13 Mary Lewes alias Peisley, wife of William Peisley, of St. Margaret's Westminster " "
" 13 John Brewer " "
" 18 Hubert Sanse Baes " "
" 18 Frans Janson Snep " "
" 24 Thomas Simon Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 78
" 25 Harman Dryoot Precedents 1, f. 99
" 29 Peter de Kien " f. 101
Aug. (?) Gerrard Woeyt " f. 93
Sept. 3 John Florck " "
" 11 Henry Baltes Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 78
" 11 Gunter Oulson " "
" 19 John Ipping Precedents 1, f. 106
" 25 Vasmer Harlah " f. 109
" 30 John Henrickson " f. 111
Oct. 1 Matthias van den Berg " "
" 6 Jacob David " f. 112
" 6 Henry Verbarne " "
" 7 Anthony Nyssen Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 84
" 7 Cornelius and John Bart " " "
Oct. 7 Jacob Cornelisson Precedents 1, f. 112
" 7 John Roberts " "
" 7 Jacob Douwes " "
" 17 Francis Bernards " f. 116
" 18 Adam Goudt " "
" 18 George Ely " "
" 18 Matthias de Pont " "
" 18 Seger Clais " "
" 30 Abraham Thomeguer Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 88
" 31 Simon Heere " " "
" 31 Peter Andrewson Precedents 1, f. 117
" 31 Andrew Johnson " "
Nov. 2 Peter Mathysen " "
" 2 Peter Vogelaer " "
" 19 Francis Deschodt " "
" 21 Ericke Bartelson " f. 120
" 30 John Slaymer Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 97
1676
Jan. 5 Peter Rooster Precedents 1, f. 126
" 7 John Johnson Clayne " "
" 8 Guillaume Fourdrinier Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 103
" 13 Jacob Maurits Precedents 1, f. 128
" 26 Bartholomew Contales " f. 129
" 29 John Paine " f. 130
Feb. 4 Andrew Vandevell " f. 132
" 12 John Haddock " "
" 12 George Karstin " "
" 18 Gabriel Symon Browne " "
" 18 Borrey Bartelson " "
" 18 Jacob Cornelis " "
" 26 Jacob Leutea " f. 133