BHO

Charles II: June 1676

Pages 140-199

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1676-7. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1909.

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June 1676

June 1. The Earl of Exeter to Williamson. Requesting him to recommend to the king Mr. Tryan to be a deputy lieutenant for that division of Northamptonshire. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 234.]
June 1.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Ships light and laden pass daily. We have had much rain of late. Wind a hard gale at S.W. [Ibid. No. 235.]
June 1.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived last Tuesday evening. They brought no news. The wind continues S.W. and blows fresh, which has kept these three days in and near the Sledway a considerable laden fleet from Norway, the Baltic, Newcastle, &c. [Ibid. No. 236.]
June 1.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. To-day arrived the Abraham of Dover and Jonas of London, both from Setubal. Both in one day, but not at one time, met about 40 leagues at sea three Argereens, who were very civil, and, as soon as they saw the king's pass, gave great obedience. They took not from them the value of one farthing. A fresh gale commonly at S.W., but variable. [Ibid. No. 237.]
June 1.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 238.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire. Signifying the king's approval of 4 baronets and 2 esquires recommended by him as deputy lieutenants. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 158.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to [Col. Scott]. Capt. Parker will give you this, to whom I have granted a company in the regiment on condition that he carried it over, wherein I am satisfied he has done all in his power, and, if his complement be not made, I impute it rather to the difficulties he has met with than any fault or neglect of his. Therefore I have given him 9 men carried over by Young and Hatton, besides which I would have him have 10 out of those recruits which Capt. Trant shall bring up to the regiment, who, I hear, carries over double his number, and I would have you take care that Captain Parker's company be one of those that shall stand. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 48.]
June 1. Recommendation for Arthur Walton of his Grace's regiment in France to the Earl of Oxford to ride in his regiment. [Ibid. p. 49.]
June 1. Caveat that no grant pass of the estate of William Hunt in Rutland, forfeited to the king by his becoming felo de se, from his wife and children, who are left in a most deplorable condition, without notice to Mr. Holder. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 23.]
June 2.
Ludgate.
William Middelton to Williamson. Thanking him for his late kindness, and stating what he has done with the 7l. His clothes and linen are all worn out and he has not stirred out of doors two years and a half. Begs his Honour to make his condition known to the Earl of Devonshire, whose father and he were cousins german. Has been a great loser in his Majesty's cause. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 239.]
June 2.
The College, Windsor.
Dr. Brune Ryves, Dean, and six Canons to Williamson. Thanking him for his readiness on all occasions to do them all good offices, and particularly for obtaining an order from his Majesty for repairing the house of Dr. Scott, one of their brethren, standing on the north wall of their cloisters. [Ibid. No. 240.]
June 2.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The wind high at S.W. with showers. [Ibid. No. 241.]
June 2.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Since my last I met one of the masters mentioned in it, who told me these Argereens met a Dutch East India ship, outward-bound, which they fought with and took, and they were then looking out for some loorendrogers, as the Turks also call them. Wind W. and S.W. variable, all last night calm, and in the day it blows very fresh. [Ibid. No. 242.]
June 2.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing particulars of one ship arrived. The Reserve and Pearl are still here, as also her Majesty's frigate. Wind W.S.W. [Ibid. No. 243.] Enclosed,
The said particulars. [Ibid. No. 243 i]
June 2. Consent for Mr. John Chamberlaine and Mr. Seaman to be Doctors of Physic, they paying fees and cautioning. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 49.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Walter Tichbourne praying the place of a poor knight of Windsor, signification of his Majesty's pleasure to the Bishop of Sarum, Chancellor of the Order of the Garter, that he order the installing of the petitioner on the first vacancy after the admission of those already granted the said places or the determination of their interests. [Precedents 1, f. 149.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Col. John Strode, Governor of Dover Castle, or to his deputy in his absence. Information has been given that Capt. Metefay, commander of a French privateer, took in the open sea the Prosperous of Hamburg, but a Holland man-of-war of greater force soon afterwards took the prize from the privateer, who thereupon retired into the Downs, where on command he showed his French commission to Capt. Clements, riding admiral, who, for what reason is not known, kept it. In the meantime the French privateer was arrested by order of the Admiralty of Dover on pretence of damages suffered by the master of the Hamburg vessel, though he disowns any such thing. I therefore require you forthwith to give me a clear and exact account of the whole matter of fact and of all you know or can know thereof, that I may acquaint his Majesty therewith that such order may be given therein as shall be agreeable to justice. [Ibid. p. 150.]
June 2.
Southampton.
Certificates by Thomas Cole, collector of the customs and deputy surveyor of the navigation, that the Katherine of Southampton is a foreign built ship and appears to be made free, and that the Rachel of Southampton is an English built ship, and that both are bound for Newfoundland and the Straits, with consent at the foot of each by Cole to a pass being granted. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, Nos. 152–153.]
June 3.
Council Chamber.
[Sir Robert Southwell] to James Hoare. By command of the Committee for Trade, directing him to deliver a pound of the counterfeits he has made of the metal proposed by Mr. Palmer to Mr. Palmer, that he may by 10 next Wednesday morning, when the Committee have again appointed to meet, be able to speak thereunto, and he is also then to attend there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 244.]
June 3. Henry Slingesby to Sir Robert Southwell. I cannot yet leave my room and so cannot make any counterfeits of Mr. Palmer's farthings, but hope the Comptroller, Mr. Hoare, will be able to comply with the commands of the Committee for Trade in this matter and show them counterfeit tin farthings, which Mr. Palmer himself cannot discover. [Ibid. No. 245.]
June 3. Objections offered to the Committee of Trade against making farthings, halfpence and pence of tin, being the same with a few verbal differences as those calendared 24 May ante, p. 123. Noted, as read that day. [Ibid. No. 246.]
June 3. Statement of Mr. Palmer's propositions made in 1665, that he would supply the kingdom with small coins of tin so hardened and beautified that they should bear their intrinsic value, could not be counterfeited and would raise a considerable revenue to the King, with statement of proceedings thereon in 1665 and 1669; of the proofs of his metal made by him before competent persons, of the objections of the officers of the Mint and his answer thereto, &c. Noted, as read that day. [Ibid. No. 247.]
[June 3?] Arguments on the advantage of having a stamped intrinsic value set upon tin, so as to pass it current according to its worth, as is done with copper in Sweden; especially in trade with the American plantations, which can only be carried on advantageously with ready money, and where tin moneys, not exceeding 5s., would be valuable as less easily stolen by slaves, as 5l. would be load for a person. [Ibid. No. 248.]
June 3.
London.
Certificate by Hawly Bishopp and Samuel Moore, that the defect of the flint glasses, which were formerly observed to decay, has been redressed several months ago, and that the glasses since made have all proved as durable and lasting as any glasses whatever, and that the usual trials have been made on these new flint glasses with entire success. [Ibid. No. 249.]
June 3.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind continues where it has been for some time, only to-day it has got a little more westerly. We have no sight of the packet-boat, which last Wednesday should have come from the Brill, by reason the wind is so contrary and fresh. Weather fair and clear. A second dogger is to be launched here to-day on account of the Royal fishery. [Ibid. No. 250.]
June 3.
Bristol.
Roger Bathorn to—To-day some made oath before our Mayor that three Frenchmen were apprehended at Chippenham for a design they were about to act (which two of them confess), which was to burn most of the principal towns in the land, and that a hundred of them were dispersed for carrying it on, which has much amazed our town and put our magistrates on a narrow search for all strangers. Our Mayor has sent an express to Chippenham to know the certainty thereof. Chippenham is 12 miles from Bristol. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 381, No. 251.]
June 3. —to Williamson. Mr. L'Estrange illegally assumes in his employment of supervising the press a power vested by law as to works of history and intelligence, heraldry, law, and divinity, and miscellaneous severally in the Secretaries of State, the heralds, the judges, and the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishop of London. He oppresses poor printers, but suffers the rich to escape by bribing him; exacts 5s. a ream on everything printed for the king's service, and also exacts from the Stationers' Company, from the playhouses, for quack bills and books, and for ballads, and for winking at Nonconformists' books; he arbitrarily seizes without conviction the goods of those who infringe his pretended power, &c. He has declared his place to be equal in value to that of the Secretaries of State. [Ibid. No. 252.]
June 3. Pass and licence to Sir Philip Percival to travel for 3 years. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 170.]
June 3.
Dublin.
Susanna Durhame to Williamson. Praying him again to do something effectually for her husband, though she knows he has great concerns, which make him forget them, otherwise she doubts not he might have procured a foot company for him, so many having fallen vacant while the Lord Lieutenant was in England. Sir James Cuffe and also Lord O'Brien can give an account and character of her husband. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 35.]
June 4.
Noward (Naworth).
The Earl of Carlisle to Williamson. Enclosing a copy of Wickham's information calendared post, p. 147. It is possible that by the time this comes to you the complaints from the ships taken may come to London. If they prove so foul that his Majesty would right himself by seizing these privateers, please send immediate orders to Sir Ralph Delaval, my deputy ViceAdmiral, who lives near the place. I have sent to him to command the Englishman and Scotchman ashore to examine them, and to give you or Secretary Coventry an account of what he finds further in this matter. The seaman said they intended to stay a week yet at Tynemouth, so perhaps orders concerning them may come time enough.
I was last week at Carlisle doing justice on our Border thieves at a gaol delivery. Six are hanged and two burnt in the hand. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 1.] Enclosed,
The said information. [Ibid. 1 i.]
June 4.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. blowing hard. The Norwich is fitted out and is at Spithead, attending for a wind to carry them for Ireland to their former station. [Ibid. No. 2.]
June 4. Warrant to the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex to discharge Richard Smart, prisoner in Wood Street Compter, as to the king's moiety of 666l. 13s. 4d. debt and 10l. damages recovered against him by his Majesty and the Stationers' Company. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 28, f. 160.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Thomas Newcomb and Henry Hills, assigns of John Bill and Christopher Barker, the King's printers, praying that such King's Counsel as have appeared for them at the Council Board may be of their counsel at the trial of an action brought against them in the Court of Common Pleas by Mearne and Pawlett, stationers, concerning the right of printing a book called Constitutions and Canons Ecclesiastical, allowance that the Attorney and Solicitor General with such other King's Counsel as have been of counsel for the petitioners may continue to be of their counsel. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 46, p. 116.]
June 4. Warrant, after reciting a grant to John Fannis of the office of enrolling indentures and other writings among the records of the Chancery during his life, and another grant to James and Stephen Smith for their lives successively of the office of writing and engrossing to the Great Seal all grants, licences and protections to collect alms towards the relief of any that shall suffer loss by fire, sea, tempest or any other casualty, and that all the said parties are still living; for a grant of the said several offices to William Fall, his heirs and assigns, for the lives of himself and John Nowell, junior, and the life of the survivor immediately after the determination of the interests of the said John Fannis and James and Stephen Smith or of any or either of them in the said offices or either of them. [Precedents 1, f. 151.]
June 5.
Tynemouth Castle.
Col. Edward Villiers to Williamson. This day sennight I gave the Duke of Monmouth an account of some French men-of-war come into this harbour. Men-of-war indeed they were, but cheats which might have passed on any body, so handsomely they carried it, for, anchoring some four miles from the bar, three of their captains came in their longboat into our little harbour, and coming to me they pretended they were bound for the Sound, and that more ships were following, desiring leave to come into the harbour to clean and mend one of their great masts, which I suppose could not be denied, though I had known them for what since I understand they were. Lord Carlisle having last night sent Sir R. Delaval an examination of an Englishman that had run away from them, which he sending me late last night and the ships being gone to sea, I could do nothing more than examine some six of their crew this morning, who were left behind, who confessed them to be privateers, but, I think, the best party of privateers that ever sailed together, being very well officered and all their seamen and soldiers in great subjection, for, though they were forced to be much ashore in time of cleaning, where the seamen were enough provoked, as you may easily believe, when the very captains could hear themselves, as they walked in the street, called French dogs (so barbarous this town of Shields was to them), yet neither seaman nor officer would ever take notice of any abuse, and this carriage so took me as I confess I was of their party while on shore, and indeed reproved the constables and some of the better sort of inhabitants for not governing those under them better. Now that they were rude to a ship or two, as I suppose you or Secretary Coventry may have advertisement of from other hands, perhaps my being civil may be thought a crime, as I confess it was an omission that I did not ask to see their commission, but, if I had known them to be privateers, I could do no less than I did, as I hope you will answer for me, in case I should be misrepresented, till I come up to answer for myself. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 3.]
June 5.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Yesterday anchored in this bay 24 light colliers, the wind being so violent at W.S.W. that they could not carry sail, but at night it ceased, and they are sailed for their loading ports. [Ibid. No. 4.]
June 5.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. To-day arrived a vessel of this town from Rochelle. The master reports that entering the Channel he fell in with three Algerine men-of-war, the least of 30 guns. He was on board the Admiral. They had taken a London droger laden with salt, and were taking out of her what they thought fit and intended to sink her. They seemed troubled at the many sorts of passes they meet with, and the master believes that, had not all his company been English, it would have gone hard with them. [Ibid. No. 5.]
June 5.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The wind being W. and S.W. all the past week there is little to inform you of, only those ships I gave an account of in my last are still in this port. [Ibid. No. 6.]
June 5.
Whitehall.
Commission to Henry Norreys to be quartermaster to Sir Francis Compton's troop in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 31.]
June 5.
Whitehall.
Patent for 14 years to Goodwin Wharton and Bernard Strode at the nomination of Theodore Lattenhower for certain new invented engines with leather pipes for raising water for quenching fires, draining mines and drowned lands, &c., with much more force and facility than hitherto. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 171.]
June 5. Notes by Williamson of proceedings at the Council. Sir Philip Monckton, Sir J. Newton, Sir W. Yorke, Brockelsby called in.— The Lord Keeper opened that Sir P. Monckton should say that Sir R. Carr should have encouraged (?) the matter in Council. Sir Philip: No, he did not say so. The minutes of last day read. That Sir R. Carr would stop the information. That he would countenance the business in the Common Council. Brockelsby: He has nothing to accuse Sir R. Carr of, but too much vigour in prosecuting this whole matter. Never said any such thing as to Sir R. Carr. That Sir Philip has done a thing highly disingenuous in repeating what passed at his table, &c. That he had said merely (?) at his table, that some said that way of the petitioners (?) in London was a better way than that of Sir Philip, which was of 20 gentlemen. Sir Philip insists that, to the best of his memory, Br[ockelsby] did say that Sir R. Carr would advance (?) the business at the Common Council. Br[ockelsby] offers to swear the contrary. Sir Philip: He did say a petition would be presented, &c. Br[ockelsby] owns it. Sir Philip: To the best of his memory he named Sir R. Carr. Br[ockelsby] denies it and swears to it.
2. As to not receiving the information brought, &c.
Sir J. Newton. As soon as he and Sir W. Yorke told Sir R. Carr of this, he thanked them, and said they had done like dutiful subjects, and that next day he was to go for London, and would acquaint his Majesty and they should know his pleasure.
Mr. Brockelsby, enraged at this denial of Sir Philip, produces Sir Philip's letter to him of 10 June, to show what kind of man this is.
Sir Philip called in to say what information he can give of the priest Widdrington.
The two secretaries sent out to take his information. The sum of it was that he had been informed Mr. Widdrington was in England, but absolutely refused to say where he received the information. He knew nobody that had been to speak with him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 187.]
June 5 and 10.
Bristol.
Certificates that a pass has been granted for the Concord of Bristol in pursuance of the treaties with Spain and Holland, and that security had been given for the delivery up thereof within one year of the date thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, Nos. 154, 155.]
June 6. Sir Ralph Delaval to Williamson. I judged it my duty to send you the enclosed orders and information from Lord Carlisle, and to acquaint you that the ships were generally taken for a small squadron of the French King's fleet, and so reported by the commanders themselves to be, and really I believe Col. Villiers knew no other till I sent him what I received from Lord Carlisle, whose commands I should fully have obeyed, but the ships were sailed the night before his letters reached me. The Governor has the examinations of several of these men left behind, which agrees in most particulars with the enclosed, and truly, as they gave out ere they went hence, that they would be severer to the English in plundering and abusing them than formerly, they have been so just to their words that off our bar they beat Adam Breckett of Lynn and John Coverdale, plundering them both, so that, if some speedy care be not taken, these villains will hinder all trading. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 7.] Enclosed,
The Earl of Carlisle to Sir Ralph Delaval for Col. Edward Villiers. I have taken the enclosed information of a man that escaped last Wednesday afternoon from the four French prirateers that lie in the Shields. I desire you will immediately go to Tynemouth and get the Governor to assist you with men and make a search for the three Flemings in the St. Francis and the Englishman and Scotchman on board the Brave and bring them ashore and take their examinations, and though, as this information is somewhat lame, I cannot give a positive order for seizing the vessels, yet, if you find on the examinations there be just cause to seize them, I desire you will do it and give notice of the same to one of the Secretaries. There were several complaints of the French privateers, before I came from London, and 'tis very likely these very ships have given some cause for them, therefore, though you find it not convenient to proceed further, write to one of the Secretaries, for possibly some of them may stay in the river till you receive orders what to do.
When you search for the men you must only name the Englishman and Scotchman which the King's proclamation will justify you in, and examine the Dutchmen as by accident, for taking them from the French cannot be justified. 3 June, Noward (Naworth). [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 7 i.] Enclosed,
The information of Christopher Wickham of Kinsale, ship carpenter, taken before the Earl of Carlisle, Vice-Admiral of the four Northern Counties.
About two months ago he was taken off St. Malo in the Arms of Waterford by a French privateer, commanded by Jackson, an Englishman, who turned the informant with four more into a small boat, in which with difficulty they got into St. Malo, where he was entertained by Lieutenant Legard of the St. Francis. This ship has been these six weeks in company with three more, the St. Nicholas, the Admiral, the Victoria and the Brave, all of St. Malo, which have taken two ships with Englishmen in them that had English passes. The men they turned ashore at Dunkirk and put the ships into that harbour. Besides they robbed several other English ships. The aforesaid ships are now at anchor in the Shields, where he escaped from them. There are three Flemings on board the St. Francis and an Englishman and a Scotchman on board the Brave, who can testify more than he can, by reason he was not suffered to go on board any of the prizes they took. Since their coming to Tynemouth harbour he has heard some of the lieutenants say they would use the English worse than they had done by reason of some affronts they had received at the Shields. When they are at sea, they do not own that they belong to St. Malo, but either to Flushing or to Brest, and put out either English or Dutch colours. 3 June. [Copy. Ibid. No. 7 ii.]
June 6.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived about midnight last Saturday but brought no news. Weather fair, wind uncertain. A fleet of laden colliers for the River is passing before us. Last Saturday's account from your office miscarried somewhere. [Ibid. No. 8.]
June 6.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Your two packets for Mr. Samuel Martin, consul at Algiers, and two to Mr. Bland I received Sunday night late. The latter I delivered yesterday to Captain Thomas Alderman of London, who is bound for Tangier and has goods on board for Mr. Bland. The others I have by me, no ship going that way. I desire to know if I shall send them to Cadiz to be sent by the Commander, or if I shall send them to his Majesty's agent there and who that is. There are about 30 English ships outward-bound, and as many loondragers bound for the Eastland, Sound, &c., which stay for convoy.
The winds have been and are very variable, but at present S. and by W. and very little. [Ibid. No. 9.]
June 6.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. The wind is come up N.E. and we expect every hour the outward-bound fleet to sail. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 10.]
June 6.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W., fair weather. The Norwich continues at Spithead waiting for a fair wind. [Ibid. No. 11.]
June 6.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. No ships are arrived here since my last. To-day, though the wind is contrary at S.W., the Queen's frigate and the Reserve and Pearl sailed to the southward. [Ibid. No. 12.]
June 6. Acknowledgement by Capt. Joshua Paine that he had received from Philip Messervy a freedom for a ship, which he promises to return next Saturday, or else to pay him 40l. [Ibid. No. 13.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Approbation of Mr. Tryan to be a deputy lieutenant for the Eastern Division of Northamptonshire. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 31.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Viscount Ranelagh for a grant of certain houses and lands in Meath, late in the tenure of Richard Philpott and granted for 31 years in 1670 to Sir John Cole, who has conveyed the same to the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 117.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Edward Progers, Groom of the Bedchamber, showing he had been granted by letters of 27 Aug., 1663, 5,000l. out of the half year's rent given by Adventurers and Soldiers in Ireland, whereof only 1,000l. was paid, and therefore desiring the reversion of an annuity of 480l. paid to Col. Lane's daughters till the remaining 4,000l. due to him be satisfied. [Ibid.]
June 6. Pass for the Unity going with goods of Sir Leoline Jenkins to Holland. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 171.]
June 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting a grant dated 4 Oct., 1675, to Henry Killegrew of the real and personal estate of Hugh Willoughby, alias Revell, late of the City of London, a bastard, who died intestate, which had escheated to the Crown, and a grant of letters of administration of the said personal estate to the said Killegrew which he had subsequently renounced for valuable consideration, and the appointment of Henry Bulkeley in the place of the said Killegrew, to Dr. Thomas Exton, the King's Advocate General, and Samuel Franklin, the King's proctor, to procure letters of administration of all the said personal estate to be granted to the said Bulkeley. [Ibid.]
[June ?] Robert Fitzgerald and Adam Loftus to the King. Petition showing that Viscount Ranelagh has agreed with them for his right and title to a pension for his life of 300l. per annum, payable in Ireland, to commence after the death of the Countess of Tyrconnell, who is still living, and desiring a grant of the same on the said Viscount's surrender to them for their joint lives and the life of the survivor. At the foot,
June 6.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. On the back,
His report, that Lord Ranelagh has but his own life in the reversion of the said pension and that the petitioners desire a grant for both their lives, and that letters patent have been granted to Mr. Carre and Sir James Cuffe, and also a letter in pursuance of a patent to Col. Cary Dillon for pensions in Ireland, as soon as any of the pensions on the establishment there become void, and that changing the petitioners' two lives for Lord Ranelagh's one may lessen the favour intended by the said letters patent. 29 June, Dublin.
Further reference of the above report to the Lord Treasurer. 6 Aug., Whitehall.
Second reference thereof to the Lord Treasurer. 10 Nov., Whitehall.
His report, that finding his Majesty, notwithstanding the said report, is inclined to gratify the petitioners, he has nothing to object against it. 8 Dec., Wallingford House. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 36.]
Other copies of the above three references and of the Lord Lieutenant's report. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, pp. 118, 128, 145.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that the Lord Treasurer direct the Commissioners of the Customs to cause blank passes to be printed and dispersed among the officers of the outports appointed to issue passes, and the said Commissioners are to report why Portsmouth is not named, or may not fitly be named, among the ports authorized to grant passes. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 14.]
June 7. Objections by the Mint officers against Mr. Palmer's present and former proposals about his undertaking of tin farthings, &c.; that his metal is only found as hard as pewter, which can easily be defaced, and further hardening would make it brittle and debase it; that the expenses of the coinage of tin being 20 per cent., he cannot meet those, yield a revenue of 50,000l. or 60,000l. a year to the King, and yet keep the coins of intrinsic value; that they can be counterfeited and not easily detected, they having made some counterfeit farthings, and that according to his proposed rate of making there would [be] 50 per cent. profit on them, so that the Hollanders might bring in quantities of counterfeits. Noted, as read on that day. [Ibid. No. 15.]
June 7. Report of Elias Palmer on the counterfeit farthings delivered to him by the Mint officers, that they are alloyed with regulus of antimony, which is 10 times dearer than tin, so that his farthings cannot be counterfeited to the advantage of the maker; and that, even if they were debased with half lead, they would be as valuable as the copper farthings. Noted, as read on that day. [Ibid. No. 16.]
June 7. Order by the Committee for Trade that on the 14th they are to meet at the Mint, where Mr. Palmer is to show the value of the several mixtures in the Mint counterfeits, and how much per annum will be gained or lost on each way of making farthings different from the intrinsic value of tin, and the Comptroller is to answer his statement that the tin farthings, if half debased with lead, would not be a greater loss to the subject than the present copper ones, and if so, the consideration of a foreign and a home metal makes a great difference, so that the whole scope of the meeting is for the Comptroller to make out that there is most advantage to his Majesty and less loss to the subject by use of copper, and Mr. Palmer is to prove the same in the use of tin. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 17.]
June 7. Sir Philip Lloyd to [Williamson]. Excusing himself for not having attended his duty at the Council Chamber on the ground of want of health, but hoping that a few days will put him in a condition to wait on his Honour. [Ibid. No. 18.]
June 7.
Whitehaven.
Sir J. Lowther to Williamson. At my coming into the county I made it my business to inform myself of the condition of St. Bees' School, of which, as also of Cockermouth, I shall at my return give you a particular account. I have since on receipt of yours been with the old master at St. Bees', whose willingness to resign I much doubted, yet he says on reasonable consideration he will do it. I pressed him to know his expectations, but could have no resolution till he had advised with friends, who, I suppose, will induce him to moderation, and the rather since he owns an intention to have resigned 14 years ago, and has ever since continued only at the request of Queen's College. So soon as I have his answer, you may expect an account thereof. [Ibid. No. 19.]
June 7.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning arrived the Bombay from East India. He reports that the Rainbow and Fleece came out 10 days before them and are not yet arrived, and that Capt. Goodlar, commander of the Rainbow, Capt. Peerce, commander of the Fleece, and Capt. Limbray, are dead, and that there has been great mortality in that country. The wind is very variable, but commonly as at present very fresh at S.W. [Ibid. No. 20.]
June 7.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. The Bombay met two Argier menof-war off the Land's End. The wind W., the fleet sailed out of the Downs last night.
Postscript.—The wind since blows very hard at S.W. and we expect the fleet back again. [Ibid. No. 21.]
June 7. Warrant for a discharge to Dame Philadelphia, widow of the late Sir John Clerk, Baronet, and her heirs and assigns from payment of the 1,095l. due in respect of that dignity; the said discharge was granted by the King about July, 1660, but, Sir John's solicitor neglecting to prosecute it, the debt remains charged on the estate. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 209.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Major Kirke. Order for payment to Thomas Cole, lieutenant to Capt. Trelawny's company, of his proportion of what has or shall be received on account of the halfpay for the last campaign. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 49.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir Roger Cave and to his guardian and trustees. After reciting letters of 3 March last to the Lieutenants of Northamptonshire directing payment to Viscount Cullen of 490l. out of the militia tax (calendared ante, p. 5) and that the Earl of Exeter, as Lieutenant of the Eastern Division of the said county, directed payment of 245l., being one moiety of the said sum, and that there was remaining in the hands of Sir Thomas Cave, lately deceased, as one of the deputy lieutenants of the said county, part of the said militia money, ordering them as guardian and trustees of Sir Roger Cave, son of the said Sir Thomas, to pay out of the said moneys so remaining in the hands of the said Sir Thomas to the said Viscount 245l. in full discharge of the said sum of 490l. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 31.]
June 7. Licence to Major Percy Kirke, captain-lieutenant to the Earl of Oxford, with his two men to be absent for 6 months. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 31.]
June 7. Caveat that no pardon pass to Richard Moore, late sheriff of Tipperary, for a misdemeanour committed by him while sheriff, without notice to the Duke of Ormonde. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 23.]
Request for entering the above caveat. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 37.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a brief empowering such persons as shall be appointed to receive the alms of all persons in Ireland for the relief of the sufferers by the extraordinary and dreadful fire at Northampton 20 Sept. last, by which the habitations of above 700 families were burnt to the ground, the losses proved on oath amounting to 102,008l. 4s. 6d., besides many other losses not included therein, and also the great and principal parish church of All Saints and other public buildings, amounting to the value of about 50,000l. more, being all burnt. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 32.]
June 8.
Hart Hall.
Dr. John Lamphire to Williamson. I have received your noble favour. Your Moselle, I believe, will make me like a Dutch divine, and the Florentine, Machiavelli's liquor, a politician, for old Hippocrates informs the world that, as a man's meat and drink is, so will be his complexion and thoughts. The soul looks through a dismal cloud after ale, but after red Florentine gay as Aurora, when she blushes on the limit of the horizon with her rosy cheeks and fingers. I am unwilling to cite Homer with this fancy, but I shall do you reason in drinking it, and I believe I shall do myself right. You shall have the effects of it to yourself, the wishes of your health and prosperity by many of your friends. You have too seriously minded the French proverb: Fish without wine is poison. I shall be for the future an admirer of the Gregorian account, and hope to see a grig in the arms of the year and old time instead of the snake—Cognata anguilla colubro.
I have a glass bottle of fountain water that has crossed the equinoctial line four times. There is in it secretum nostri. It is pure, uncorrupt, and the ingredient makes it anti-scorbutical. If it could be tried in a runlet of three gallons, well iron-hooped, and sent to the East Indies, and it returns good and potable, the invention is good for all mankind, but especially for the good of an English seaman, the most noble creature that goes on the seas, far beyond the Leviathan. The latter takes his pastime in the deep, this undergoes the danger of the water and the fire for the honour and safety of his prince and country. My office calls me to be an enemy to sturdy beggars, but I am charitable to a seaman, provided he can say this set form of prayers, I mean his compass. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 22.]
June 8.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About three last Tuesday afternoon one of our packet-boats arrived, but brought no news. The wind continues westerly with a little thunder and some rain yesterday and last night. [Ibid. No. 23.]
June 8.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This morning arrived two East Indiamen, the Rainbow and the Fleece. They also met with the two Argier men-of-war off the Land's End, and also a small dogger from Barbados; which off Portland met with two capers, and they clapped him aboard and drubbed the master and men and took two great guns from him and also his linen, and took from the master the letters he was to bring to England and broke almost a hundred of them open. They clapped a rapier to his breast and a pistol to his face, and told him they would kill him if he would not do what they would. [Ibid. No. 24.]
June 8.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Informing him of the arrival of the Rainbow and Fleece. A topsail gale at S.W. [Ibid. No. 25.]
June 8.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.W., fair weather. The Norwich has now order to take the first opportunity of wind to sail for Ireland. [Ibid. No. 26.]
June 8.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The country is in a quiet posture. The only complaint is want of trade. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 27.]
June 9.
London.
Sir Patience Warde to Williamson. Requesting a letter from him to Sir W. Godolphin, the ambassador at Madrid, to procure him right concerning a ship carried by a privateer into St. Sebastian according to the enclosed memoir. [Ibid. No. 28.]
June 9. Arthur Brett to Williamson. Being disappointed by those I employed to present my humble thanks for the money you allotted me just this time 12 months, I could neither in good manners nor conscience let this day pass without making such returns as I am able. With 16 lines subjoined beginning:—
"So to the public treasury that good dame
Gave what she had and got eternal fame."
[Ibid. No. 29.]
June 9.
Newcastle.
Sir Francis Anderson, mayor, and five others to Williamson. Informing him of the outrage by the four French men-of-war on a collier according to the depositions enclosed. [Ibid. No. 30.] Enclosed,
Information of Adam Brethett, master of the Pelican of Lynn. The 4th he was at anchor in Sunderland Bay, purposing for Newcastle, but by reason of the great storm his anchor broke, and he was forced off to sea, and endeavoured towards Tynemouth haven, but within two or three miles of Tynemouth Castle he saw two men-of-war with Dutch colours, one of which fired a gun, which he thought had been to salute the other ship, for there was no shot in it, and presently he fired another with a shot, but it did not reach the deponent's vessel, nor did he think of any harm, nor that these guns were fired at his vessel, wherefore he made still forward for the port. Presently a third shot came directly across the forefoot of his vessel, whereupon he laid her under the man-of-war's stern, who forthwith sent his boat and commanded the deponent on board. As soon as he came there, he discovered them to be Frenchmen notwithstanding their colours, and though the lieutenants said they belonged to Flushing. The vessel he was commanded on board is called the Saint Francis of St. Malo. The captain with a strong cane immediately began to beat the deponent and gave him three heavy blows on his body and arm, and two punches on the body with the end of the cane, which were great damage to him, he being nigh 60, and the said captain likewise demanded 5l. of the deponent, who being frightened and trembling by reason of such strokes forthwith delivered what money he had about him, being about 32s., of which the captain took 25s., and restored the remainder and then sent him on board his own vessel, but the Frenchmen which came with him took away by violence out of his ship pork and beef which he had for his company's necessary food. Newcastle, 6 June. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 30 i.]
The information of William Swan, master mariner. Four French men-of-war came into the port of Newcastle 29 May, and continued there a week where they were very civilly treated, and on the 4th they set sail and contracted with the deponent and others to pilot them out. The deponent was pilot to the St. Francis, M. de la Begasier, captain. In their sailing out he had out French colours and within a league or two of Tynemouth Castle he put out Dutch colours. The captain inquired of the deponent what vessel the Pelican of Lynn was, who gave a true account of her and that she was a collier for Newcastle and an ancient trader. Notwithstanding, the said captain commanded three guns to be fired at her, and caused the master to be brought on board, and gave him many heavy blows and compelled him to deliver up what moneys he had, and then sent him aboard his own vessel, and the Frenchmen that set him aboard did what damage they could and carried away what beef and pork they found. Newcastle, 8 June. [Ibid. No. 30 ii.]
June 9.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Much rain has fallen this week. Wind now westerly. [Ibid. No. 31.]
June 9.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 32.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid No. 32 i.]
June 9.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 33.]
June 9. Commission to Ingoldsby Daniell to be captain of Capt. Saunders' late company in the Earl of Craven's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 31.]
June 9. Commissions to Henry Cope to be capt.-lieutenant and to William Huet to be ensign to the Earl of Craven. Minutes. [Ibid.]
June 9. Commission to Walter Pentland to be ensign to Capt. Motlow in the same regiment. [Ibid.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Clerk of the Signet. Desiring at the request of the Earl of Pembroke that no grant or discharge pass for any part of the month's tax raised in Wiltshire till notice be given him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 24.]
June 10.
Portsmouth.
The information of Henry Rainstead, one of the sergeants at mace of the said borough. Yesterday about noon, being at the Whitehouse, the prison of the said borough, with Samuel Moone, he heard Moone say that the Duke of York had declared himself a Papist, and that he, Moone, would be one of the first that should fight against him according to the oaths of allegiance and supremacy he had taken.
Similar information by Edward Brookes, the other sergeant of the said borough. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 34.]
June 10.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The packet-boat that was to have come from the Brill last Wednesday is not yet arrived. The wind continues westerly. Weather this morning black and rainy. [Ibid. No. 35.]
June 11.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This morning is arrived the Sarah from New England. The master reports that the New England men have overcome the Indians and have taken two of the greatest of them. One they have hanged, drawn and quartered, the other they keep in prison, and they have killed above 1,000 of the Indians. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 36.]
June 11.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W., fair weather. The Norwich continues at Spithead, wanting an opportunity of wind to sail for the coast of Ireland. [Ibid. No. 37.]
June 12. Note of the reading at the Council for Trade of a copy of a report from the Farmers of Customs to the Privy Council, dated 2 Dec., 1619, stating that after due hearing of the Mineral and Battery Company, the Dutch importers of wire, and sundry English artificers, they find that Flemish wire is valued rather for its cheapness than its goodness, and that the English is better for most purposes, and on the whole as good for making great ordnance. [Ibid. No. 38.]
June 12.
Custom House.
Report of the Commissioners of the Customs on the draft of a patent for erecting a royal fishery that it should be limited to such fisheries as are not in use, and not allowed to extend to those already well carried on, thereby prejudicing all who are not of the company; that the terms of admission and rules for byelaws are not sufficiently fixed; that their freedom from customs is contrary to all laws of trade and navigation, and attended with many difficulties and liable to frauds; that their request for their foreign-built ships to be made free is also open to objection, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 39.] Perhaps annexed,
Warrant for a charter of incorporation of the Company of the Royal Fishery of England. May, 1676, Whitehall. [Draft. Ibid. No. 39 i.]
June 12.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. A great many loaden ships have passed by to the southward these three or four days. Blowing a stiff gale, wind W. and N.W. [Ibid. No. 40.]
June 12.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Yesterday arrived the Henry and John of this town, who came from Königsberg about three weeks since. The 26th in the Cattegat a French privateer came up with him, who offered him some abuse, commanded him on board his own ship and sent his boat on board his ship, and took from him in money and goods to the value of 80l. About six hours after he parted with him, he came up with another French privateer, who took from him to the value of 3l., and told him that the former, though he gave himself out for a Frenchman, was an Ostender. About ten days ago a collier of this town was plundered and abused by a French privateer about ten leagues short of Tynemouth haven. [Ibid. No. 41.]
June 12.
Yarmouth.
[Richard Bower] to [Williamson]. The Nonconformists here continue their meetings, both forenoon and afternoon, every Sabbath day at their public place, and not the least notice taken of them by our magistrates. Their numbers through their connivance daily increase, and are become so great, that, notwithstanding the house they have built is by the relation of him that sets their psalms so large as to hold 2,000, it was yesterday so filled that a considerable number were forced to stand in the streets about the doors. They now begin to sing psalms, which they had left off from the time their licences were recalled till yesterday sen night. It is here thought their confidence arises from the settlement of the militia in the hands of those who were joined with them in the government in the late unhappy times, who now have both the civil and military power in their hands, the new made colonel being Sir George England, one of our justices, the major, Edmund Thaxter, one of our bailiffs, who take no notice of the laws, nor the King's commands for suppressing these unlawful meetings, whereby they disarm the Church of all those laws which should defend her, leaving her to the mercy of her merciless enemies. Where are these men's piety and allegiance? Certainly in time of danger their zeal and courage for the defence of the Church will not be found, who are known to be no other but changelings, having changed with all times, so decently behaving, that they have had a share more or less in all the governments, and, now the desperate enemies of the king have failed in all their plots. we shall be decently brought in danger of destruction and betrayed into our late unhappy condition with these men. Sir George's son is made a captain and Mr. Huntington another captain, who cunningly to keep Sir Thomas Meadowes out of command, as I am informed, made friends to the Lord Marshal to recommend him for a captain's place to the Lord Lieutenant, which I am apt to believe, because, when I waited on the Lord Lieutenant to acquaint him what manner of person he was, he was much troubled at his promise, and, when he was at Norwich the day after to settle the militia of the county, Sir Knevet Catline told me his lordship could not go off of his promise, the person to whom that promise was made was one of greater honour than any there. All the time I was at my lord's, he seemed not the least discontented with me, and on the road called to me kindly out of his coach, but, when he came to Norwich and Sir William Doyly came into his company, and Major Doughty and he had consulted together, both great friends of Capt. Huntington, the scene was altered, these two having great influence on my lord, so at my return home I wrote to his lordship whereof I enclose a copy, and I dare aver that, where Sir William has any influence, the Church's constant friends shall come in no favour or command. [Copy. Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 42.] Enclosed,
Richard Bower to [Lord Yarmouth.] Taking notice of the discontents of the loyal party here, your friends, on their hearing Mr. Huntington was ordered a commission, I waited on you to acquaint you with the cause of these discontents, which were that he being a person to whom the Dissenters apply on all occasions for support and advice, and one that can transform himself into any shape to serve his own interest, having been in office under most of the late governments, a grand supporter of our grand conventicle, who makes it his business to find out occasions to make void the law, putting tricks on those who would endeavour the suppressing of such unlawful meetings, these his principles and practices being unknown to Lord Townshend, he was prevailed with to put him here as captain, on which Sir Thomas Meadowes, then major of this town, rather than join in command with him laid down his commission, though it was then alleged that the honour done him would work a reformation in him. Yet, when he got into command, he continues his old principles and practices, and when his Majesty was by him and such of his principles necessitated, as they term it, to grant an Indulgence, he resorts to the conventicle, and declares that he could with as good a conscience hear a tradesman preach and receive the Sacrament from his hands as from a minister in orders, and now publicly and frequently he justifies the Nonconformists to be as good subjects as those of the Church of England, and that it was no offence to be a Dissenter, if they paid the penalty when they were taken. Both the Church's and your lordship's friends are not a little troubled to see the ill example he gives by his most unworthy deportment at church in sitting at the Lord's Prayer, the Creed and the Commandments, and taking no notice of the responses. This was all, if not more than I acquainted you with, only I added that I was obliged to acquaint some persons with what passes here that relates to the public, but that out of the tender respects I ever had for you, I first waited on you to give you this account, wherein if I mistook myself and went beyond the bounds I ought to have kept, I humbly beg your pardon, and protest that, if so, it was my zeal for the public good and your honour that wrought this forgetfulness in me. Were I sensible of any danger to the person or estate of my neighbour, certainly I was bound to discover it, and shall I be sensible of a danger that attends the Church and consequently his Majesty's person and therein be silent, when his Majesty in his gracious declarations has repeated on all occasions his perpetual good affection for it? Were I not therein justified, certainly I should not be condemned, till I failed in the proof of my information. It would be some proof of his innocency, if our minister would but give him a certificate that he is a friend to the Church and not to the Conventicle. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 42 I.]
June 12.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind N.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 43.]
June 12.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Tuesday sailed the ships for France and Newfoundland of which you had account formerly, the wind being N.W. The French man-of-war with the three merchantmen for the West Indies are still here with three or four small vessels bound about land for Wales. The fisher-boats report that three Dutch capers lie off this harbour waiting for these Frenchmen to come out. [Ibid. No. 44.]
June 12.
9 a.m. Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. About 30 or 40 colliers and other vessels for the West of England and Brittany and elsewhere have put three times to sea and put back again, and wait in this road for a wind, most of them having been loaden above a month ago. The weather has been very uncertain of late with high winds. Wind now W.S.W. and gentle. [Ibid. No. 45.]
June 12. Consent for John Rawlett to be B.D., he paying fees and cautioning. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 49.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Thomas Allen, desiring to be discharged of a certain account as a Commissioner of Excise in 1657–1659, the tallies of the same being burnt in the fire of London. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 119.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir John Shaw for a privy seal to authorize the Queen's trustees to demise him all their estate in the manor and park of Eltham, Kent, whereof he is tenant for about 53 years to come, except one month, reserving the rent now payable during her Majesty's life, and afterwards 5l. per annum. [Ibid.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Oliver Boteler praying for satisfaction for two fields near Chatham church and a saltmarsh and other grounds between those fields and the Medway. [Ibid.]
June 13. Certificate by Sir Joseph Sheldon, Lord Mayor, that Samuel von Breda, late of Stockholm, had taken the oaths of supremacy and allegiance before him that day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 46.]
[June ?] Robert Ryves, goldsmith, to the King. Petition stating that the petitioner, having advanced great sums to his Majesty, was at the time of the stop of the Exchequer indebted to Mrs. Stawell, late wife of Henry Seymour, Groom of the Bedchamber, 700l., and to Bartholomew Canter, her servant, 750l., that he afterwards paid Mrs. Stawell 518l. 4s. and Canter 274l., that the balance of Canter's debt was transferred to Mrs. Stawell's account 12 months after the stop, so that the petitioner has paid 792l., above one moiety of the whole, notwithstanding which and his willingness to pay interest on the remainder, the said Henry Seymour has made him for his debt a prisoner in the King's Bench, and the petitioner is unable to give Seymour any security for the remaining moiety but by such orders as he has registered in the Exchequer, which the rest of his creditors are willing to accept, and praying his Majesty to interpose with Seymour that he be not more hardly used by him than by the rest of his creditors, as otherwise he will be forced to lie in prison to his utter ruin. [Two copies with some verbal differences. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, Nos. 47, 48.]
June 13 Robert Ryves to Williamson. I forgot to insert in my petition a request for a Habeas Corpus during the next vacation in order to the settling of my accounts with his Majesty's auditors, so I beg you to move the King or the Lord Chancellor in it, in case they shall not think fit to grant me any other present relief. [Ibid. No. 49.]
June 13.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 50.]
June 13.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By the packet-boat for Holland on Saturday evening went hence the Swedish plenipotentiary for Nimeguen, as 'tis said, getting from London hither by post, just as the passengers were getting on board, the wind being W., very fair for them.
On Sunday towards evening arrived one of our packet-boats from Holland, from whence this general news there is brought: That the Imperialists in Alsatia have overthrown the French forces with a great destruction, and among others of 3 or 4,000 English and Scots, whom the French had so placed for a defence to themselves, that they received the whole shock of the Imperial army, which has so highly pleased them, that to confirm it to those that doubt they offer to lay two to one.
Yesterday the wind varied much. To-day it holds southerly, weather clear. [Ibid. No. 51.]
June 13.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Yesterday went hence several vessels which have lain here wind-bound. [Ibid. No. 52.]
June 13.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W., foggy weather. Yesterday the Norwich sailed from Spithead, to proceed on her voyage for Ireland. [Ibid. No. 53.]
June 13.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 54.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 54 I.]
June 13. The King to [the University of Cambridge]. Having been requested to grant a letter mandatory for the degree of B.D. to John Rawlett, who was several years since admitted of Pembroke Hall, but was prevented from continuing so long there as to take his degrees in the regular time, though he has studied privately, and was curate to the late bishop of Chester, and is now preferred to the rectory of Kirkby Stephen, requiring his admission to the said degree, for which he is well qualified, on his performing the usual exercises and paying the fees. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 196.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to Andrew Forrester, secretary of the Duke of Lauderdale, of the office of treasurer clerkship, and of keeping the register of all infeftments, &c., vacant by the decease of William Burnett of Barnes with the yearly fee of 130l. sterling, to be paid in equal portions at Whitsunday and Martinmas, the first term's payment to be for the term of Whitsunday, 1675. [Two pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 497.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift of non-entry of Katherine, Countess of Leven, deceased, to George, Lord Melvill, with a proviso that the receipts after deducting the said Lord's charges be applied in payment of the annual rents of the debts and burdens of the family of Leven and for defraying so much of the principal thereof as the surplus will amount to. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 499.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a tack to Sir Charles Arskin of Cambo, Lyon King at Arms, his heirs and assigns, of the assize herring of the East seas betwixt Berwick and Kinnaird's Head and that of 1675 and for —years thereafter, he paying—Scots as tack duty, with a promise that he at the expeding thereof shall grant a full discharge of all fees, &c., due to him as Lyon King at Arms by his Majesty. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 500.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to Sir George McKenzie of Rosehaugh, his heirs male and assigns, of the lands therein mentioned. (A ratification of the charter of which this is a docquet is printed in full in The Acts of the Parliament of Scotland, Vol. 8, p. 377.) [Docquet. Ibid. p. 501.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a presentation in favour of Thomas Wilkie, student in divinity, to the kirk of Abbotrule in the diocese of Glasgow, vacant by the decease of Mr. Martin. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 502.]
[June.] Walter Lyttleton, cornet to Major Henry Slingsby's troop, to the King. Petition stating that, the petitioner being in his quarters at the Spread Eagle at Chichester, 9 May last, near 12 at night, and being the chief commission officer then in the quarter, John Gipps, soldier in the said troop, came in and, without any other provocation from the petitioner than his excusing himself from drinking with him, it being so late, Gipps gave the petitioner very abusive and provoking language, whereupon he commanded him to repair to his quarters, which he peremptorily refused to obey, on which the petitioner sent for a corporal with a guard, but, before he could come, Gipps drew his sword half out, daring the petitioner to draw, whereon the petitioner seized his sword, and kept it till the corporal was near the door of the room, and, as the petitioner was going towards the door to meet him and give him the sword (?word) and orders to dispose of Gipps, Gipps violently assaulted the petitioner by tearing the clothes off his arm, and seized his sword, and made a thrust at the petitioner's face and passed the point through his hair, whereon the petitioner in defence of his life was forced to draw his sword (which he had not done till then), and, as Gipps was making passes at the petitioner, he received a wound in his belly, of which the night following he died, the truth of all which the petitioner does not doubt to prove, and that he has lain under a close confinement ever since, and is likely to do so till the assizes, and praying for a pardon. At the side,
June 14. Opinion of Sir William Jones and Sir Francis Winnington that it is fit the prisoner be tried according to law. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 55.]
June 14. Statement by Mr. Palmer that the copper used for farthings is worth but 11d. the pound but is coined at 22d. and is probably further debased by use of coarse copper; that the copper farthing can be counterfeited by mixing lead or iron with the copper, that a tin farthing could not be debased by half lead without detection, and would even so be as valuable as a copper farthing; and that tin farthings would restore the tin farm and preserve the stannaries, and help the balance of trade by bringing down the price of copper and raising that of tin, and would prevent the importation of unnecessary copper and bring down the price of what is necessary. [Ibid. No. 56.]
June 14. Computation of the value of tin money, on the proposal to coin a pound of tin worth 12d. into 14d., and shewing that little or no gain is to be made by counterfeiting it; but that copper coin, especially that of Barbary, which is worth 6d. a pound but coined at 22d. is a great loss to the subject. Given in by Mr. Mason, assented to by Mr. Palmer, and approved by the Lords. [Ibid. No. 57.]
June 14.
The Mint in the Tower.
Account of experiments made in presence of the Committee of Trade by Mr. Palmer and the Comptroller of the Mint, relative to the detection by weighing in air and water of the presence of lead in the counterfeit tin farthings produced by the Comptroller, which proved that it would be so detected if present, but Mr. Palmer affirmed that some of the Comptroller's farthings were pure tin, and so no counterfeits at all. [Ibid. No. 58.]
[June.] Samuel Missenden, Secretary to the Hamburg Company, to the King. Petition, stating that having heard that on some dispute between Sir John Shorter and some of the Commissioners for distributing the Hamburg moneys an order has been made concerning the petitioner, and praying that, as the petitioner is newly come to England and is wholly a stranger to the said dispute, he may have a copy of the draft of the said order, and may be heard as to what concerns himself.
[June.] Thomas Tyte to the King. Petition stating that the petitioner was out of town on the hearing on the 7th instant of the matter in question between Sir John Shorter and some of the Commissioners, and praying a copy of the draft of the said order and some reasonable time to be heard therein.
Order in Council that, it appearing that the freight amounting to 1,340l. 9s. 4d. due on the four ships lost in the Elbe not only was due, but was ordered by his Majesty to be paid, that the Commissioners show cause on the 31st instant, why they have not paid the said freight. 24 May.
Order in Council postponing the hearing to 7 June. 31 May.
Order in Council that Sir John Shorter should be paid the said freight, and that Mr. Tyte forthwith pay to Sir Thomas Player 500l. and Samuel Missenden 250l. which they had received as gratuities before the principal losses were paid, and that, as soon as such sums are paid the Commissioners sign warrants for payment of the said 750l. to Sir John towards the said freight. 7 June. Noted, as not yet signed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 59.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
Orders in Council on the above petitions of Thomas Tyte and Samuel Missenden suspending what was ordered concerning Sir John Shorter and the Commissioners till the 23rd instant, when his Majesty will hear the petitioners, and all parties concerned are to attend. [Ibid. Nos. 59, 60.]
June 14. Indenture made between John Sizer of St. Martin's in the Fields of the one part and William Grymward of Aldham, Suffolk, of the other part, demising to the latter for the considerations therein mentioned certain tithes payable out of certain lands in Aldham aforesaid for three years next ensuing the date thereof. [Ibid. No. 61.]
June 14. Bond by the said Grymwood for securing the payments to be made and the covenants, &c. to be observed by him comprised in the said indenture. [Ibid. No. 62.]
June 14.
Hull.
Col. Anthony Gylby to Williamson. A disturbance has been occasioned here by a report that the Mayor of Bristol had written to the Lord Mayor of York that three Frenchmen had been taken, who confessed to a design of themselves and others to fire some great towns in England. Three reputed Frenchmen coming into the port of Hull were examined, but two turned out to be English, and the third though a Frenchman was tutor to a gentleman's children in Yorkshire. For my part I think it an idle report. [Ibid. No. 63.]
June 14.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday the major part of the outward-bound fleet sailed with variable winds. This morning that wind veered to S.E. very little, but all the remaining outwardbound ships sailed and have now doubled the South Foreland. These two days past the guns have gone off very much towards or near Flanders. [Ibid. No. 64.]
June 14. Leave to Gregory Babbidge, one of the pensioners, to go into the country for a month. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 49.]
June 14. The King to the President, Treasurer and Governors of St. Bartholomew's Hospital. Recommending to them Capt. Thomas Rawson for the vacant place of porter of the Hospital. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 32.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Charles Bertie. The Bishop of Strasburg, having caused two or three bales of his best goods left at Cologne to be brought hither as the goods of Mons. Courtin to avoid seizure in their passage down the Rhine, and being desirous to have them shipped off immediately for France where he is, his Majesty recommends it to the Lord Treasurer to give what warrant is necessary for unlading and reshipping them. You will move the Lord Treasurer in it and give them what dispatch you can, there offering the conveniency of a yacht in a day or two for France. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 103.]
June 14. Warrant, after reciting that Capt. Alexander Makenye, serving in the garrison of Tangier, having been unhappily taken last September in an engagement against the Moors, agreed with Muley Ismael, Emperor of Morocco, to provide as part of his ransom 400 guns to be delivered 15 Aug. next, for providing forthwith and having in readiness the said guns to be sent and delivered by the day appointed without any indenture being entered into by the said Makenye. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 32.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the High Sheriff of Sussex, in case Walter Littleton, cornet to Major Slingsby's troop, be convicted and condemned at the next assizes for Sussex for killing John Gipps, a soldier in the said troop, to defer putting the sentence in execution, till the King's further pleasure be signified. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 172.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
Pass for Ch. Mootey to go into Flanders. [Ibid. p. 173.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
Grant of a baronetcy of England to William Pennington of Muncaster, Cumberland, and the heirs male of his body. Minute. [Ibid.]
June 14. Royal approbation of the election of John Browne of Stamford, one of the attorneys of the Court of Common Pleas, to be town clerk of Stamford in place of William Panke, resigned. [Precedents1, f. 152.]
June 15. The arguments in law against the importation of foreign wire given in by the Battery men. By 3 Edw. IV. c. 4, and 1 Rich. III, c. 12, all iron thread commonly called white wire and all wire of latten and iron is prohibited to be imported under penalty of forfeiture. By 39 Eliz. c. 14 the importation of cards for wool is prohibited under the same penalty. On pretence that foreign wool cards and card wire only should be forfeited within this last act, much wire is imported, and the said imported wire has got into the book of rates and custom is taken for it as if the importation were lawful. 14 Car. II. c. 19, prohibits only foreign cards and card wire, whereby all foreign wire except card wire has gained a kind of allowance at the Custom House, which by the above more ancient acts is clearly contrary. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, Nos. 65, 66.]
June 15.
The Council Chamber.
Sir R. Southwell to Capt. William Kiffen. The Committee of Trade heard to-day the difference between the Battery men and the importers of foreign wire, who alleged that there was formerly a trial in the Exchequer on this very point and that the verdict went for the merchants as you can more particularly declare, so the Committee command me to write to you for a full account thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 67.]
June 15.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning Capt. Lashen (Lassells) commander of the Garland brought a St. Malo privateer into the Downs. The outward-bound fleet that sailed two days ago have continued fair wind and weather. No Algier ship nor one bound nigh thither has been in the Downs since your two packets came. Little wind, not a topsail gale, at N. or N. and by E. [Ibid. No. 68.]
June 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By one of our packet-boats arrived here yesterday from Holland we received that it is there reported that the French in the country of Alost are decamped and marched, but whither is not said. What wind there is is S.E., weather fair and clear. [Ibid. No. 69.]
June 15.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 70.]
June 15.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The Trompeur, a French manof-war, with two great merchantmen under her convoy has put to sea, bound for the West Indies. Wind very scant at E.S.E. A small French man-of-war is cruising before this harbour, and inquired of the fishing-boats if there were any Dutchmen in the harbour. [Ibid. No. 71.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Sarum. Recommending to them Seth Ward, a prebendary of that church, and requiring them immediately to pre-elect him into the first place of a canon residentiary that shall become void, in order to his being actually admitted into the same on the first vacancy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 28.]
[June ?] Capt. Alexander Makennyie to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioner, in the unfortunate engagement against the Moors, 19 Sept. last, was taken prisoner, having received several wounds, his horse being killed under him, and all under his command slain, that being carried 20 days' journey into the country before the Emperor Muley Ismael he contracted with him for his ransom to pay 400 guns, each 7 spans long, to be delivered 15 Aug. next, for which the English merchants there are his security, and the rest of the ransom was referred to Alcade Marino, Governor of Sallee, and that notwithstanding his agreement with the Alcade for 1,000 pieces of Eight, before he could obtain his liberty, he was forced to pay and secure the sums specified in the annexed account besides the loss of his horses and equipage and his great charge in his voyage to London, &c., and praying an order for the said guns and for payment of the said sums laid out, and for compensation for the petitioner's equipage and charges. At the foot,
June 16.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord High Treasurer. At the side, His report that he is ready to order payment to the petitioner of 515l. 0s. 6d. as soon as he receives his Majesty's direction. Wallingford House, 4 July. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 72.] Annexed,
The said account showing that he paid for his ransom 1,600 pieces of Eight, the Tetuaners informing the Viceroy that he was able to give more than 1,000 and that he paid various sums for presents which all with the loss on exchange amount to 515l. 0s. 6d. [Ibid. No. 72i.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 120.]
[June ?] Henry Bond, senior, to Secretary Williamson. Petition for payment of 60l. promised him in advance, and of his pension of 50l. a year, granted for showing the King a secret mode of finding the longitude, the result of 39 years' study. [Ibid. No. 73.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
Reference of the part of a similar petition to the King concerning the pension to the Lord Treasurer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 120.]
June 16.
London.
William Kiffen to Sir R. Southwell. In 1652 some iron wire was seized by the officers of the Customs, and I then understood that the merchant had a verdict for him, that all iron wire from superfine to all other coarser sorts might be brought in, and the statute against iron wire alias white thread was understood to mean wire drawn smaller than any of the above-mentioned sorts, and I believe there was such a verdict because after that the Commissioners of the Customs ordered their officers not to molest the merchants by any seizure of any of the aforesaid sorts of iron wire, and since then no merchant has been troubled for bringing in the said goods. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 74.]
June 16.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. About 7 last Wednesday evening began such a violent rain with lightning, thunder and hail, which continued for two hours, that the like has not been known here by any man living. Most houses had their low rooms overflowed, and several had water above a foot high, and people were thereby constrained to break holes in their walls to run out the water. The wind hurried from south to north. It is now S.W. [Ibid. No. 75.]
June 16.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 76.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 76 I.]
June 8–16. Notes of the musters taken on those and intervening days of the six trained band regiments of the City, the total number amounting to 8,351 men besides officers. [Ibid. No. 77.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
On the petition of the Dean and Canons of Windsor, calendared ante, p. 132, and Mr. May's report that he finds the wall on which the house stands much decayed, so as to be dangerous, and that the cause of the decay appears to be the building the house on the wall, and it ought to be speedily repaired, which will cost about 120l., but that he cannot determine whether it ought to done at the charge of his Majesty or the Canons, reference of the above petition and report to the Lord Treasurer to inform himself what has been formerly done in like cases, and whether the petitioners are not by their statutes obliged to keep the prebendal houses in repair. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 120.]
June 17.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By a packet-boat which arrived very early yesterday morning we received no news but of the great preparations in Holland for the siege of Maestricht, as it is given out, many great guns and mortars being on their march that way. Wind easterly, weather hot. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 78.]
June 17.
Dartmouth.
Thomas Newman to Williamson. Requesting him to give such orders that a pass may be granted for the Thomas and Mary of that place which solely belongs to himself and his friends. The bearer will produce two certificates relating to the obtaining of a pass for her. [Ibid. No. 79.]
June 17. The examination of James Gardiner, apprentice of Robert Gale of Southwark. Last Tuesday night he set fire to some old wood and laths in the cellar of his master's house, with intention to set the house on fire, that so he might be freed from his service. [Ibid. No. 80.]
June 18. The King to the [Justices of the Peace] of Oxfordshire. Recommending them at the next quarter sessions to admit into the list of maimed soldiers to be pensioned, Thomas Hemming, who served under Sir Edward Spragg in the expedition to the Mediterranean Sea, was in the action at Bugia, where the Algerine ships were burnt, and served in all the engagements against the Dutch, in the last whereof he lost his left leg, he being born in Oxfordshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 159.]
June 18. Notes by Williamson. England. Letter from Col. Gylby. What I writ last night. The extravagant reports of Bristol, Dover, &c.—The Southwark fire. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 198.]
June 19.
Council Chamber.
Sir R. Southwell to the Officers of the Mint. By command of the Committee for Trade requiring them to furnish an exact account of all the copper farthings and halfpence coined since 24 June last, mentioning the time at which they have been coined. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 81.]
June 19.
Council Chamber.
Sir Robert Southwell to Charles Bertie. The Committee of Trade on examining the petition of the Company of the Mineral and Battery Works against the importation of foreign wire are told by the merchants complained against that wire is entered in the book of rates, and duties are regularly paid for it. Their Lordships therefore wish the petition and a view of the case to be sent by the Lord Treasurer to the Commissioners of the Customs to ascertain how this wire comes to be in the book of rates. [Original and draft. Ibid. Nos. 82, 83.] Annexed,
Charles Bertie to the Commissioners of the Customs. The Lord Treasurer refers to them the petition against the importation of foreign wire, and wishes to know why it is now permitted to be imported. 23 June. Wallingford House. [Ibid. No. 82I.]
June 19.
Des beins (Bath).
The Duchess of Portsmouth to Williamson. "Je ne say commant vous remersyer de toute vau bontée, monsieur, et des soins quil vous aplus de prandre pour ma satisfactyon et aussy que vous ayes bien voullus minformer que le roy et ancaure amer, car san vautre bontee je me seres inquiettée de ne pas resevoyr de sée lettre. Jespere de partir jendis de se ville pour merandre samedis dusoyr a Londre ou je vous randres mille grasse, et ou je vous asureree avec baucoup de veritee que personne aumonde net plus vautre tres umble servante que moy." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 84.]
June 19. James Hickes to Williamson. To-day's post brings no letters to me from Bath as formerly, which I thought proper to acquaint you with. [Ibid. No. 85.]
June 19.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. The masters of some ships from Holland tell us that the Hollanders generally much bemoan the loss of De Ruyter. We have had very hot weather this week and little wind, only Friday and Saturday it blew N. and N.E., which brought two ships from Norway. They had a sore gale Wednesday sennight which forced them to throw overboard most of the wood on their decks. They met two French or Flemish capers, which did them little injury, only causing them to come aboard them. Wind now N.E. [Ibid. No. 86.]
June 19.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Our Nonconformists now meet at their public place on Thursdays as well as Sundays, there being a meeting there last Thursday, where Mr. Ottey of Beccles, formerly a bodice maker, held forth, who lodged at Capt. Huntington's. At this meeting were several strangers, among whom was one they called Major-General Desborow, and one Capt. Nichols, formerly a captain of a troop of horse; who were also there yesterday both forenoon and afternoon, the work of the day being carried on by his chaplain, whom they formerly called the Lord Fleetwood.
Here seems now to be a general discontent at the settling of the militia, the honour being chiefly conferred on one family, when there are many more able and fit, Sir George England being colonel, Bailiff Thaxter, that is married to his daughter, major, and Thomas England, his son, a captain, which three, being all justices, want zeal or courage to suppress a conventicle, though I am apt to believe the last would attempt it, were it not for his father. My lord has lost his interest in this town, as well as weakened that of the Church by the choice he has made, and, I fear, it will prove he was wrought upon by the person mentioned in my former, whose friends here being divided and a great animosity having arisen between Sir George England's family and Capt. Huntington, he thought it a proper expedient to reconcile them and so strengthen his own interest, for no man that ever knew Sir George can judge him any way fit for a colonel in a port town of so great concern and so factious. First he is very ancient and infirm, for, besides the gout which sometimes holds him a considerable time, he is frequently taken with apoplectic fits and lies for the present dead. Neither he nor the other two is the least of a soldier capable of their commands. Besides he has borne office here under all the late governments, and is one, I daresay, if the government should change, may as fairly excuse himself in this, as he has done in those past, and be as fit for command in the next as this. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 87.]
June 19.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind S.S.W., very hot weather. [Ibid. No. 88.]
June 19.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The French man-of-war with those under his convoy for the West Indies, which I gave you an account of, went out of this harbour the 14th. Wind N.E. Other shipping news as in the next letter. [Ibid. No. 89.]
June 19.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 16th came in here the Katherine of London and five more from Bordeaux loaden with wines and brandy bound home. They report that there came over the Poll head a fleet of 55 sail about 20 days past. Most of them they suppose to be cruising at sea, many of them being seen off this harbour. These put to sea again, the wind W. [Ibid. No. 90.]
June 19.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. All things here are in quiet, but trading very dead. Wind N.N.E., gentle. I was last week at Sir William Russell's house in Carmarthenshire, where he drank your health. [Ibid. No. 91.]
June 19.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir G. Downing. Sir W. Temple having at last obtained a final resolution of the mind of the States on the point of revisions, which has given us so much trouble, I am commanded to transmit it to you and your colleagues, the late commissioners that treated those marine articles on his Majesty's part, that his Majesty may know your opinion how far this resolution is according to the true sense of the treaty, and how far it may be fit to close with this mind of the States in the matter or not, and on the whole what you can finally advise him should be insisted on in it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 101.]
June 19. Commissions to Richard Bolton to be lieutenant and to Ferdinando Forster to be ensign to the Earl of Middleton in the Holland regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 31.]
June 19.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir Gilbert Talbot, Master of the Jewel House. After reciting that the Kings and Heralds of Arms have always been invested with coats of arms and collars of S.S. which have been delivered to them by the Masters of the Jewels on warrants of the Earls Marshal, as appears by credible memorials thereof in the time of the late king, but the books and registers thereof and the original warrants and orders themselves have been embezzled in the times of the late troubles, and that since the restoration no Earl Marshal has been constituted till of late, and that during the vacancy of the office such warrants have been issued either immediately from the King or from the Chamberlain of the Household, and that Sir Gilbert consequently makes difficulty in obeying the Earl Marshal's warrants for delivering such collars for want of precedents, declaring that from henceforth he and the Master of the Jewels for the time being shall on the warrant of the Earl Marshal or his deputy for the time being provide and deliver to the said Kings and Heralds of Arms such collars as have been used since the restoration. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 173.]
June 20.
Rochdale in Lancashire.
Henry Pigott to Williamson. You were out of town when my occasions drew me home. The account therefore I was to have given you of my negotiating with — I left to Sir Thomas Doleman, who, I hope, has done it. I could much have wished the result had been more to our general satisfaction than as yet it is, and I am of opinion it may at last be so, if the gentleman be gently dealt with and encouraged. In order to it, lest you want him when need is, I endeavour to keep up the good opinion he had of me, by writing a kind letter and submitting it to Sir T. Doleman. He told me at parting that two more should have been in his capacity, had they not recovered their suits in Westminster Hall. One was a peer, who had a second verdict for some business. This communication makes me think that, if ever any one of the clan becomes heartily yours, the rest will all lie open, and so be more pliable to reason.
I must mind you of our sheriff's business, indeed the King's also, that it is not only consistent with his Majesty's prudence, honour and justice, but indeed his interest beside, to buoy up so useful a subject in a country that so much stands in need of such, and that makes me so earnest, for I hope I have made it manifest that I am not of those who think every duty done merits a reward to themselves. My duty is my duty; the King shall not buy it of me, yet never shall want the tender and payment of it, when seasonable. I could wish my service and thanks given to Sir Gilbert Talbot. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 92.] Probably enclosed,
The case of Al[exander] Butt [erworth], high sheriff of Lancashire. He joined with Batts and others to farm the excise from Sir R. Vyner and others, but they lost by it and had defalcations, yet Batts dying the arrears were not paid, and the lands are thereupon extended. The Sheriff is willing his proportion should be raised, but craves that no more should be laid on him while the others are solvent. To piece up his damage, he became partner with Batts and one Lloyd in farming the excise from the under-farmers to Mr. Banks and his partners and gave security with them, on condition that either the others should seal or his security be redelivered, but they did not. Batts died and Lloyd, who had all that was collected but 2 or 300l., pretends himself insolvent, and the under-farmers extended the sheriff's land. The King has been paid and the original farmers, and the underfarmers are no losers. The sheriff prays that he, refunding what he has received, may be discharged or else that he may come in again with the farmers who are now to bargain anew. In Pigott's handwriting and endorsed "Mr. Pigott's friend." [Ibid. No. 92i.]
[June ?] Similar statement about Butterworth also in Pigott's handwriting. [Ibid. No. 93.]
June 20.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arriving this morning brought few passengers and little or no news. Wind uncertain, mostly easterly, weather hot. [Ibid. No. 94.]
June 20.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Foresight sailed hence this morning for the Downs. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 95.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 95 i.]
June 20. Warrant to Sir Thomas Twysden and Serjeant Pemberton, justices of assize, to insert Richard Hall, condemned to death for stealing a mare but reprieved, in the next pardon for poor convicts of Surrey, without the clause of transportation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 158.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to [Col. Scott]. This will be brought you by Mr. Manwaring, Mr. Radcliff and Mr. Paris, whom I have ordered to return to the regiment, they having done as much towards the carrying over their men as could be expected from them in this conjuncture. What men they carried over, if they are now in the regiment and divided into other companies, I would have taken out and delivered to their own officers, and, because their numbers fall short of what was propounded, for their further assistance I would have Capt. Pye's company broke, and the men distributed amongst these three, which, I suppose, will enable them to stand, for I hope they will not be over severe with those who have done their endeavours. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 50.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster of Mr. Blood's petition for a lease in reversion for 51 years of a lease of all goods and chattels forfeited in Lancashire to Christopher Anderton of Lostocke, deceased, at the rent of 5l. per annum. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 121.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of Paul Demascelay, a Venetian, praying liberty to practise his art for making glasses. [Ibid. p. 122.]
June 20.
Dublin.
Christopher Hurt to Lord O'Brien. I have yours of the 10th. It will be a great mercy if you have no occasion to use such means as are provided for your safety and defence. A bad peace is to be preferred to an unkind war.
Dan Gorman last week delivered me Mr. Jephson's bond and the copy of the will but no letters with them. In order to prove it here, I have procured the enclosed commission authorizing the giving an oath to the Duke of Richmond's executors to be sworn before the Judge of the Prerogative Court, and, on the return thereof hither with a certificate that the executors were duly sworn, probate will be allowed here. Till this be completed and the will proved true, no suit can be commenced against Mr. Jephson. I-have fully informed Mr. Alexander about finding a proper person for your use, which he promises to endeavour, and have spoken with one or two that are willing to purchase the manor for 6,000l. but will not be brought to give more. Your answer is entreated by them.
Your father made himself so hoarse and deaf the last horse match, that it brought him into great disorder and indisposition, but he is now very well recovered, and, I hear, will be in the country for the assizes which begin at Ennis, 7 July. Such a bill was showed by Mr. Blackwood as you mention, but for want of advice I know not what to think of it, or by what means the money would be advanced, but shall now take care to comply with it when due by redrawing on you, for I know not what way any money is like to come into my hands on your account. I gave you all the answer I could draw out of Sir Hercules, and he has since told me he has writ his mind to Mr. Tilson. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 38.]
[June ?] Jasper Kaus of London, merchant, on behalf of Jacob Kaus, an infant of about 16 years of age, to the King. Petition, stating that the said infant, son of the petitioner's brother John, who died in London in 1666, was sent by the petitioner to Germany to learn that language, and being at Elberfeld was last Easter Monday decoyed by Peter Kaus of Schwelm in the Dukedom of Brandenburg to his house, where he seized on him, and ever since keeps him close prisoner in the garret, scarce allowing him the necessaries of life, under pretence of a debt owing to him by the youth's father, and uses great severity towards him, threatening to take away his life, though it has been justified by oath confirmed by the seal of the City of London that the said Peter is indebted to the estate of the infant's father above 100l., and though the infant is not an executor of his father's estate, and praying a letter from his Majesty to the Duke of Brandenburg for the infant's enlargement and instructions to the Brandenburg agent here that he may cause the requisite applications to be made for obtaining his discharge. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 96.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the above petition that Secretary Williamson prepare a letter for his Majesty's signature to the Elector of Brandenburg in order to the enlargement of the infant, who is his Majesty's subject, and also signify to the Brandenburg minister here his Majesty's pleasure therein. [Ibid. No. 97.]
[June ?] Joseph Hicks to the King. Petition stating that the petitioner was convicted and condemned 17 July last at the Huntingdonshire assizes, before Lord Chief Baron Sir Edward Turner, but was reprieved, but the Lord Chief Baron dying before any general pardon for convicts on that circuit was sued forth, praying that he may be inserted in the next general pardon for poor convicts in that circuit. [Ibid. No. 98.] Annexed,
Certificate by Sir Nicholas Pedley, Lionel Walden and John Harvey, clerk of assize, echoing the statements in the petition. [Ibid. No. 98 I.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Williamson. Requesting him to get a pass for Sir Thomas Ogle, major to the Holland regiment, to go into the country for three months, and also for Walter Pentland, ensign to Captain Miller's company in the Earl of Craven's regiment, to be absent abroad for 6 months. [Ibid. No. 99.]
June 21. John Griffes of Birmingham, glover, to the King or in his absence to the Queen. A most incoherent letter, stating that the writer was looked on as a frantic man (which he apparently was) and as a rebel, though no such thing, and entreating that his townsmen and townswomen therein named might be brought before his Majesty to make it appear what a rebel he is and against whom. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 100.]
June 21.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. The master of a vessel arrived from Westmoney (? the Westmann Islands) with fish informed me that coming home he fell in with a Turks man-of-war who cried himself of Argier, off the Orkney Islands. His boat was on board him with 14 or 15 hands, most Moors. They took from him about 500 fish, and told him they left two of their consorts in the Channel. Off Buffam (? Buchan) Ness he fell in with four French men-of war, and with about 300 busses and 12 convoys about 25 leagues this side of the Ness. The master of a vessel from Hamburg says that last Sunday he saw a Dutch man-of-war of about 12 guns engaged with three French men-of-war or capers of the like force, some of them bigger. He heard the guns, after he lost sight of them. The Dutchman made a running fight of it. [Ibid. No. 101.]
June 21.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This morning two Dutch menof-war are come into the Downs to convoy home the loonedrogers there. Wind S.W., a fresh gale. Here are several small vessels from Bordeaux, also Capt. Conaway, commander of the Prince from Virginia. [Ibid. No. 102.]
June 21.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Similar news to that in the last. [Ibid. No. 103.]
June 21. Warrant to the Earl of Northampton, Constable of the Tower, to receive into custody Charles, Lord Cornwallis, indicted for the murder of Robert Clarke. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 159.]
June 21. Warrant to Roger Harsnett, Serjeant at Arms, to carry Lord Cornwallis to the Tower. Minute. [Ibid.]
June 21. Recommendation of Henry Sandys for a vacancy in the regiment of foot. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 50.]
June 21. Licence to Sir Thomas Ogle, major to the Holland regiment, to be absent for 3 months. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 32.]
June 21. Warrant to the Justices of Assize for the Norfolk Circuit for inserting in the next general pardon for that circuit Joseph Hicks, convicted 17 July last at the Huntingdonshire assizes for robbery but reprieved. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1,p. 175.]
June 22.
St. Albans.
Anthony Farrington, Mayor, to Williamson. My absence when I had occasion to insert something in the Gazette gave you the trouble of a young man's solicitation in my behalf. Had I known that a personal notice at that time was requisite, I would have made it my business to have attended myself. An accident of another but far higher concern has since happened in these parts, as you will perceive by the enclosed advertisement. It was the opinion of us country justices that the best way of discovering this secret was to publish it in the same manner. To that end I presume to give you this further trouble not for your friend but for justice's sake, this being a probable way to find out the offender, if any. Also signed by Thomas Arris and Robert Robotham. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 104.]
June 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. After sending away my letter last Tuesday, I heard that the King of Spain had for the relief of his Netherlands remitted to them by Amsterdam as much bullion as was accounted at 25 ton of gold, which was very confidently affirmed.
The wind at present most westerly, but very uncertain, weather dark, threatening rain. [Ibid. No. 105.]
June 22.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This morning the two Dutch men-of-war are out with their fleet, wind S.E. Several small vessels are come in from the westward. [Ibid. No. 106.]
June 22.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind S.S.E., very hot weather. [Ibid. No. 107.]
June 22. The King to Henry and Sir Cecil Howard, Commissaries General of the Musters. Ordering them to pass on the musters, as though present, Albion Thompson, trumpeter of the King's own troop of Horse Guards, and John Christmas, trumpeter of the Queen's troop of Horse Guards, commanded by Sir Philip Howard, who are allowed to go abroad and be absent till further order. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 160.]
June 22.
Dover.
Certificates by Robert Breton, collector, that a pass had been granted for the William of Dover in pursuance of the treaties with Spain and the United Provinces, and that security had been given for the delivery up thereof within one year of the date thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 389, Nos. 156, 157.]
June 23.
Council Chamber.
Report of the Committee to whom the consideration of the tolls on goods brought into or passing out of the channel from the Thames to Holborn Bridge was referred, that there is a power by Act of Parliament in the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen to set this toll, and in the Barons of the Exchequer to ratify the same, and that the Chief Baron has testified his respect to his Majesty in acquainting him that such a matter was in doing, but that the jurisdiction thereof is wholly left with himself and the other Barons, and that they had also referred the consideration of the tolls to the Lord Treasurer, and giving the substance of his report calendared ante, p. 123. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 108.]
June 23. Brief at the hearing of the difference between Sir John Shorter and others. Recapitulating the proceedings from 11 May to 14 June, all of which appear by papers already calendared, and arguing that Mr. Tyte is one of the defendants, and has been several times summoned to attend, and particularly had notice of the hearing of 7 June, and that he knew from the defendants' replication that they set forth that he had 500l. as a gratuity gained only by his casting vote, and that it is certain that Mr. Missenden knew of all the proceedings from Mr. Deering, who is present, and managed the business for them all, and desiring that he should explain wherein he conceives the king had been misinformed, as their lordships reported nothing but what was confessed and found to be justified, viz., Missenden's having 250l. as a gratuity.
Brief for the plaintiff, Sir John Shorter, against Thomas Tyte and others. After recapitulating the plaintiff's petition, the defendants' answer and the plaintiffs' replication, alleging that the plaintiffs prove:—
1. That 35,000l. was paid by the Hamburgers to be paid pursuant to a particular of each man's loss. 2. That the same came by the Judge of the Admiralty's report to 33,639l. 10s. 8d. 3. That his Majesty directed that the persons concerned in the freight should have divided among them pro rata 1,340l. 9s. 4d. to make up the 35,000l. 4. Of the 7 commissioners three are no ways concerned but as commissioners to take care that justice be done. Before the commissioners issued warrants, it was well-known that the sums cast up to 33,639l. 10s. 8d. were cast up short 573l. 15s. 4d., and it was discoursed among them that it might be equally borne by all the interessents. To defray all charges and gratifications in gaining the 35,000l. 26½ per cent. was by consent abated by each man concerned in the 34,233l. 6s. Mr. Tyte being one of the interessents received his dividend, and also prevailed with three of the Commissioners to vote him a gratuity of 500l. which the other three refused, but Mr. Tyte gave the casting vote in his own favour. He also prevailed with the said three Commissioners to vote Samuel Missenden 250l., though alleged to be a person so obnoxious to the interessents as to deserve nothing from them. The whole loss was stated by the Judge of the Admiralty to amount to 33,639l. 10l. 8d. and the King ordered in Council that for the freight the Hamburgers should pay 1,340l. 9s. 4d. to complete the 35,000l., which was done. Now, if the particulars given in by the Judge had not come to 30,000l., the petitioners concerned in the freight could never expect any benefit, and so they hope they shall receive no loss but that Tyte and Missenden may refund the 500l. and 250l. and the plaintiffs have his Majesty's order for warrants for the 1,340l. 9s. 4d. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382,No. 109.]
June 23. Minutes of the proceedings at the Committee of Trade about the fires in London. Several justices and some constables attended. Mr. Lenthall said 3 or 4 fires happened since the great one in Southwark. Some people were brought to him whom he examined but could find no ground to detain them. Mr. Reading spoke of two idle vagrant boys now in Bridewell, one seemed a fool, the other attempted to set his master's house on fire but did not. Mr. Hart, who lived next door where the great fire began, cannot say how it began, and believes no malice in it but mere accident by the young servant's taking tobacco, as he was seen at 12 at night taking a pipe. Welsh, the young man who smoked, knew nothing of how the fire began. Justice Reading answered to the boy who says one came before this fire trying to know if a fire were not on St. Margaret's Hill. Note of Richard Taylor's information. Justice Strood spoke of three Lübeckers brought before him, which appeared touching the East Smithfield fire. Justice Wood is to take the full information of all he can and bring it in writing on Monday. [Ibid. No. 110.]
June 23. Notes by Williamson of the evidence given by Justices Reading, Lenthall and Wood before the Committee. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 111.]
June 23. The examination of Thomas Ellot, cutler, of Three Crowns Alley, Minories. In January Laurence Saunders, a gunsmith, brought to him 4 persons, one said to be Capt. Hurst, formerly page to the Duke of York, who ordered 60 knives of a size given by the next day, but did not come to fetch them; that the Lord Mayor being informed examined him thereon and ordered him to apprehend the parties who ordered the knives and who had also ordered 12 pairs of pocket pistols from the gunsmith, but that he had failed to discover Hurst, and that Brown, a cutler, bought some of the knives, to help him to sell them off and that the Lord Mayor told him that the knives were such as Prince Rupert shot out of his guns. Noted, as read in Council, 26 June. [Ibid. No. 112.]
June 23. The examination of Edward Brown, cutler in Cornhill. Ellot said that the Lord Mayor's officers refused to tell him who had accused him, and that he thought the men who ordered the knives were Frenchmen. On the report about the fires, he wished to see some of the knives, and got some from Ellot. Noted, as read in Council, 26 June. [Ibid. No. 113.]
June 23 The examination of James Peirce. He was late a servant to Capt. Morgan, dwelling in Somerset House, who kept a troop of horse there. About a month ago his master and the examinant came to Southwark at night, where his master set fire to a house and told the examinant to run away. His master is a tall blackhaired young man, and has a wife. Dowse, a coal heaver in New Market, near Vere Street, set the examinant on to burn houses in Southwark afterwards, and he came over the water again at night, when the waterman carried him to the watch at the Bankside. Dowse gave him a white stick, hollow with gunpowder in it, and bade him use it to burn more houses in Southwark, which the examinant threw out of the boat, and it made a noise like a cannon. [Ibid. No. 114.]
June 23.
The Lion Inn, Holborn.
Sir Philip Monckton to Williamson. I confine myself, till I know your commands. I am ready to give an account to you or the Council of any thing I have done or would do, and, as I have been instrumental in restoring his Majesty and preserving him and his Royal Highness from being assassinated in '62, so I hope I shall never dishonour God nor disserve his Majesty, to whom, the last time I was in town, I gave an account of one act of my integrity as great as any man has done. [Ibid. No. 115.] Perhaps enclosed,
Account of Sir P. Monckton's services at York. When General Moncke declared in Scotland and sent letters to Mr. Bowles, the minister, and Lord Fairfax and desired them to get York for him, Lord Fairfax commanded Mr. Bowles to communicate the business to me and desire my concurrence, and that I should engage Sir Hugh Bethell on the King's account. (Account of how Monckton procured Bethell's adherence.) I told Mr. Bowles, Sir Henry Cholmely and several others I consulted with, that all Protestants ought now to lay aside their animosities and unite to preserve ourselves, for Lambert would draw the Quakers into his army and others under that notion, and would then secure all eminent Protestants that were for the King and the Parliament, and declare himself both King and Papist and so cut off at one blow his Majesty's friends both at home and abroad. This had a great influence to animate those I spoke to, to stir. The Quakers gave out their orders, several of which were intercepted, to rendezvous at Col. Lilburne's house in the New Park near York on the 5th of the 1st month, where Lambert, as he said at York on his passage to Newcastle, would be 10,000, with which he would keep his army in obedience, being told it might desert him. This rendezvous was luckily prevented by Lord Fairfax's rising 30 Dec. sooner than was designed. I earnestly pressed that the General might be advised of Lord Fairfax's intentions, lest his little army shall fall from him in the face of so great a force as Lambert had. (Account of sending Bryan Fairfax and Capt. Bacon to Moncke with this news, of whom the latter was arrested at Newcastle but the former got to Moncke at Coldstream.) The news he brought was communicated to the army, by which Lambert got knowledge of it and immediately commanded away Col. Lilburne to York with 500 commanded horse, all picked men, and told him that, if these with 500 foot and 120 horse that were in garrison there were not sufficient, he should have the whole army, for York he must not lose. With Lilburne was a great confidant of Lambert's, Capt. Turner, a Jesuit under the notion of a Quaker. They had orders to seize Lord Fairfax and the Duke of Buckingham, which forced him to rise sooner than he intended, but on his rising he drew off Major Smithson of Lilburne's regiment who brought his and some other troops to my lord, which, with the news of my lord's rising with the gentlemen of the country and the horse Lambert had sent with Lilburne, not only made him incapable of staying at Newcastle, but obliged him to get to York, if possible, before Lord Fairfax should seize it. My lord foresaw it was more fit for me to stay with Mr. Bowles at York not only to advise with him, but to avoid what had like to have lost the whole design, for some of the army that joined him highly cavilled at some old Cavaliers, though they willingly admitted their sons. He desired me to send what assistance I could; which was 20 men well armed and mounted whom I sent to Sir Hugh Bethell under the conduct of my cousin, Capt. Edmund Monckton.
On Lord Fairfax's sending Mr. Bowles word that he intended to appear before the city at 12 on New Year's Day, we advised him to attack a postern gate on the south side of the river, and we would have musketeers lodged in Sir Thomas Widdrington's house, that would scour the line, so that his men might safely come to the gate and force it.
On my lord's appearance at the time prefixed, Lilburne caused the gates to be shut and disposed every man to his post and sent patrols of horse through the streets perpetually. After my lord had been before the town two hours, and did not attempt it, which was because of the late disorder amongst them about some old Caraliers, Mr. Bowles said he wondered he did not attempt it and asked me what I thought. I told him I feared that, if the enemy had not some diversion made by the citizens, my lord would not be able to enter before Lambert's arrival. Bowles desired me to send to the citizens to rise, which I did. They sent me word they were ready, but would not rise unless I would head them. I told those they sent that my appearing might be a disadvantage, as the enemy might say it was a Cavaliers' plot, which was not to be owned till the city was in my lord's possession or Lambert's army totally broken. They being positive they would not rise without me, I told them they should find me at the Minster, for it was necessary they must rise, and bade them repair to the Minster on the tolling of the great bell, and I would disguise my being with them as well as I could. I made my servants fill their pockets with powder and bullets and went with them to the Minster, and caused the bell to toll and locked up all the doors but those I told the citizens should be opened for them. By the time 60 were come in, some friends of the enemy advised the main guard that the citizens were assembling in the Minster on which 120 foot came down with their matches cocked and lighted and 100 horse. The citizens who were thereby prevented from coming to us assembled in two other churches.
Among those in the Minster was an honest fellow who had a blunderbuss. Him I placed as a sentinel outside the south door of the Minster, and bade him stand, and I would keep him company, and, when the enemy came and began to draw up in the little plain within 20 yards of the door, he should present his blunderbuss, but by no means fire, and should cry, "A Fairfax, a free Parliament," and they in the Minster should answer him with the greatest noise they could.
I stood within the door and saw the captain come up sword in hand and his men following him. As the sentinel presented his blunderbuss, I leaped from within and clapped hold of the dog of his blunderbuss and stood with my hand on it, by which it seemed to the captain and his soldiers I had hindered his firing on them, on which the captain asked me the reason of the citizens being in arms. I told him I was there by accident, and he had seen I had prevented great effusion of blood, for, had it not been for me, the blunderbuss would have fired on his men. I said the citizens were there to facilitate Lord Fairfax's entrance, who was at the gates with many gentlemen of the country and Major Smithson with some troops of the army, to whom his lordship had given an assurance of their arrears and of a reward for joining him, and that he had sent to the citizens to assure the officers and soldiers in the city that they should have the same conditions, if they would join him. The captain said, if they might be assured of this by my lord, they would join him, and, if I would go with him to my lord, that he might receive this assurance from himself, he would engage that I should go and return with safety, and that nothing should be attempted by his men against those in the Minster during my absence, if I would likewise engage that nothing should be attempted by them against his men.
I went to the citizens and told them what was proposed, and that, if there were any treachery, I had rather expose myself than any of them, and that, if in my absence they attempted them, they should retire into the steeple. The many doors in the Minster were not to be made good, and, till they were attempted, they should keep the guards on the several doors as they were, and that door that was open full of their best men, and they should suffer no one to see what they were, there being very good men and some that had been officers. I then went and told the captain that they agreed to what he proposed, and that I would go with him, but that I was so lame I could not without my horse, and therefore desired him to let me send a servant to my house for one, who with my horse brought me word that my wife, who was very great with child, on hearing we were going to fight, broke from some ladies who were with her, and ran into the street, and had come to the Minster, but that she was carried back by force.
As soon as I was mounted, the captain on foot made a passage for us through his foot, but on our approach to the horse, who had not seen what I had done, their captain cried, Away with him, away with him. I said "Hold, I am no prisoner, and I am your best friend in town, for had it not been for me, who prevented the blunderbuss from firing, as this captain saw, there might have been a great slaughter of your soldiers, and had I not prevented that considerable body of citizens in the Minster from falling on you, they would have beaten you up to the gates, and have let in Lord Fairfax, but now by my means you may have the same terms as the Irish Brigade have." On this the captain was so much calmed, that I asked him if I might go out of my way to see my wife, which he assented to and went with me, endeavouring to in form himself what number were in the Minster. I told him they seemed to be considerable, as they did to the foot captain on their crying, "A Fairfax, a free Parliament." When I went into my house with the foot captain, the other galloped away as fast as he could to the port, where my lord was on the outside and Lilburne was within.
When I had stayed a little with my wife, I went on horseback to the port, where I found the captain of horse and Martin Lyster, Lambert's brother-in-law, going with a paper of terms to my lord, on which his party was admitted in a few hours. Lyster went immediately to Lambert, who was that night at Ripon with his army, whence he sent 400 horse to reinforce the garrison, who came to the gates by 2 in the morning, and alarmed those of my lord's party within but could not enter, on which they dispersed, and, as soon as Lyster told Lambert what had happened at York, he disguised himself immediately and left his army.
When Lambert escaped from the Tower, he sent Col. Salmon to surprise York for him, and by that to gain a reputation to his insurrection. I happened to come out of Derbyshire to York the night it was to have surprised, in order to which one Peveril's troop of horse was secretly drawn into the town, who came in as cavaliers to several inns. The governor, Major Waterhouse, was tempted with 1,500l. and was promised a regiment and to be governor for his life. Mr. Bowles called me up by 2 in the morning to go to him, and I prevailed with him to keep the town for the King, which he did, and by his advice I went to Welbeck to Lord Ogle that day, and spoke with Lord Castleton and several gentlemen by the way and told them what had like to have happened at York, and bade them prepare to oppose Lambert, who would rise about Edgehill. Lord Ogle wrote several letters to Nottingham, Derby, Leicester and Stafford and sent to Lord Clare and Col. Rossiter to meet him in Sherwood Forest, where we met them about 10 at night. After I related to my Lord and Col. Rossiter how York had like to have been surprised, I advised the colonel to draw his men, who were quartered at Stamford, further from Lambert's intended rendezvous to Lincoln, and to invite thither all his own friends and the King's friends who would keep them in obedience. Though it was his marriage night, he went to his men and marched them to Lincoln, otherwise they had gone to Lambert, which if they had done, and Lambert had had the reputation of having York, the General's army would have left him, for, as he was, some were marching and others attempting to march from all the quarters in England.
The first place Lambert appeared in was Welling with 80 horse only. This place was equally distant, 14 miles, from Northampton and Leicester, where both the counties were assembled for electing knights. From the first place all the electors fled, so dreadful was the appearance of Lambert with that inconsiderable force. At Leicester all the electors left the the high sheriff, Col. Font (Faunt), save 16, all he could get to stay with him.
With a list of the engagements in which Sir P. Monckton had taken part, and note that he had prevented the assassination of the King and the Duke in '62. [12 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 115i.]
[June 23.] Elizabeth Sandys to Williamson. After apologies for troubling him, requesting that, if it is in his power, when a prebend falls vacant at Worcester, Gloucester or Hereford, to get it for Edward Casson, the vicar of Ombersley, who is a very deserving man, but that living being very small, and he having a family, they fear they may lose him which would be a very great loss to them. [Undated but with post mark of 23 June. Ibid. No. 116.]
June 23. Henry Slingesby to [Sir Robert Southwell]. The Comptroller of the Mint, to whom the department of copper farthings belongs, will send the Committee for Trade a proper account of the quantities coined during the year. [Ibid. No. 117.]
June 23.
Broxbourne.
Sir John and Henry Monson to Sir Joseph Sheldon, Lord Mayor of London. We have sent to-day Norris Finch to Hertford Gaol. We send the enclosed that the two persons named by him and the man of the Golden Ball may be apprehended. [Ibid. No. 118.] Enclosed,
Examination of Norris Finch. Was hired the 15th instant by Richard Hilliard and Robert Norris, who lodge at the Golden Ball in Cheswell Street, for 30s. to set the town of Hoddesdon on fire, that they might be able to plunder what they could. He tried to accomplish it by putting a firebrand into a rack of hay in a stable, but was discovered, and no harm was done. Hilliard and Norris confessed to him that they fired the Talbot Inn at Southwark in hopes of plunder, and received 51. for doing it, but from whom he knows not. 22June. [S.P. Dom., Car. II 382, No. 118 i.]
June 23.
Everton.
Col. Anthony Gylby to Williamson. Having, the post after I wrote to you, received news of my eldest son's death, I was compelled to go to Nottinghamshire, where my family is, and therefore received not yours till yesterday, so that I could not give you a more speedy return, nor can I now give you any account of what answer came from York, but I hope to be at Hull to-morrow, when you shall receive a fuller account. The person that brought the news from York affirmed on oath that he heard it asserted by divers there that such a letter came to the Mayor, but he saw it not. Security is given that he stir not. Since I came here, there is the same alarm all over the country and here also on the same report of a letter from the Mayor of Bristol to the Lord Mayor of York, and in all the great towns as Nottingham, Derby and Mansfield, the people are in a great fright, the very magistrates watching night by night. It is even to admiration that such a silly report can give so great a disturbance. [Ibid. No. 119.]
June 23.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Tuesday night was the most violent night of thunder and lightning I ever heard or saw in my life, though not the least harm happened by either. The wind was easterly with no more than a moderate shower, the like having been this morning. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 120.]
June 23.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last Wednesday Major Doughty came here and was at Capt. Huntington's. He came in the morning and went again in the afternoon. That evening Capt. Huntington came to my house, and said he had seen the letter I sent the Lord Lieutenant and taken a copy of it, and yesterday Mr. Richard Ferrier received a letter by the post giving an account of every particular in my letter of the 12th to you with the names of several persons of honour present when it was read, so that my letters are here published up and down before I can hear that either the Lord Lieutenant or you had received them, so nimble are their agents, but these practices put a great damp on the spirits of the truly loyal, finding the friends of the others so diligent and faithful to them, so there can be little hopes of a reformation. Besides the magistrates will take no care in it, the rich will not give themselves the trouble or lie under the scandal of an informer, and the poorer sort dare not undertake it for fear of being ruined, meeting with nothing but discouragements, and the Nonconformists buzzing in their ears, that, if their meetings were displeasing to the King, the magistrates would be checked for neglecting their duty, and therefore it was vain for any to concern himself with them for he would get but his neighbours' ill will and trouble and expense to himself. Whatever they preach or prate, whenever his Majesty shall declare his pleasure, I am bound to believe him as he has declared himself and not as others shall interpret him. If you give me orders to suppress this great meeting, if I do it not without any bustle, I will lose my life, for they are a tamer people here than they are reported to be. It is only cowardice and folly in others that makes them appear what they are not. No man knew of the letters I sent you, so they have secret friends above that send them here what passes with you. Mr. Ferrier further said that the copy of my letter of the 12th was sent down here the last post, or would be sent next post. If what I have done may but be serviceable to his Majesty or the Church, I shall with great satisfaction undergo all the clamour and mischief of the enemies of either. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 121.]
June 23.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This morning two Virginia men are come home, who report that the Indians are so troublesome there, that they think they shall plant no tobacco against next year, because they must plant corn for provision to maintain the war against the Indians. The Foresight is also just arrived, bound up the river. [Ibid. No. 122.]
June 23.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 123.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 123 i.]
June 23.
London.
T[homas] B[arnes] to —. As to that old concern of yours you know of, since I saw you, I have been as careful as was in my power, and was several times to have seen you, but could not have an opportunity. Indeed I had little but words about it to offer, and those perhaps such as you had heard of before from other friends, but, if I knew wherein I might do you any considerable service, you shall ever find me your faithful friend.
As to news in these parts there is not much that is certain, only very much murmuring about the many fires, which some say are not mere casualties. I am told a man is taken at Hertford in the very act of firing a hayloft, that talks much. Some considerable friends here say that on the 24th there will be a Common Hall of all the Companies to elect new sheriffs, and that endeavours will be used to cause a vote of the people for a new parl[iament], as a second to a petition lately about it which did not succeed, and, if this vote succeed, as some think it may, then some others intend to send the news ont speedily into the countries. [Ibid. No. 124.]
June 23. Opinion of Sir Richard Stote on the case of Charles Otway's election to a Fellowship at Peterhouse, that for the reasons therein given he is well elected, and ought to be admitted accordingly. (For the facts relating to the election see ante, p. 90.) [Ibid. No. 125.]
[June 23?] Information sent to his Majesty about the former lodgings and haunts of Macquaire alias Jackson, in some which he may probably be now lit on, viz., a house on the left hand, as one enters the great gate of the Spital, a corner house in the paved court in the Spital, a cheesemonger's house between Lowman's prison and St. Margaret's Hill, Dr. Vermooden's house on Snowhill without Newgate, though the doctor is dead. He keeps very close and is exceeding wary. With request that the Secretary may lay down a suitable sum for the employment of instruments to find out this and other things. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 126.]
[June 23 ?] Further information about Macquaire alias Jackson. The messenger should inquire very slyly at the next alehouses to the above-mentioned houses to know if they observe such a person going in or out. He must pretend it is somebody that owes him money and that he will reward them, if they can but set him for him. (Description of Jackson's person and dress.) Though he be a minister, he goes like a very á la mode Frenchman. He is about 48 years of age. The cheesemonger in Southwark may be known from any other there by being one of Muggleton's Company. Let him be very wary of starting his game, for the writer hopes to get a more punctual account of him shortly. [Ibid. No. 127.]
[June 23 ?] Request to Williamson to let his Majesty know that Mr. Macquaire goes by the name of Jackson. [Ibid. No. 128.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant from Sir J. Williamson to John Bradley, messenger, to search for, apprehend and bring before himself — Macquaire alias Jackson, to answer to such treasonable practices as shall be charged against him. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1,p. 176.]
June 23.
Dublin.
C. S— to Lord [O'Brien]. I yesterday received your commands, which I sent forward by to-night's post. I am at present not able to give you more satisfaction than that Major James Lesley and Capt. Caughland went for Scotland about the end of last month and with them Lady Donegall's old chaplain, Powell. I shall watch their return and make myself master of what passes in those quarters. We are at present in a great calm everywhere, the soldiery only excepted, whose condition is now worse than ever, and in many places, through absolute necessity and want of pay, grown troublesome to the neighbourhood. Complaints are made, but without the Perus be stopped on this side and justly applied to their proper uses, little can be expected, high arrears being grown due since you went from us. I make Jack my scribe, judging it more proper than to write myself. Direct your letters under cover to Lieut. George Lawson to be left at the Post Office, Dublin. God preserve your Lordship. I am told some hard words passed betwixt the Lord Lieutenant and the Lord Chancellor. Addressed to "Thomas Jackson to be left at Mr. George Cole's, London." Endorsed in Lord O'Brien's hand, "C. S. from Dublin." [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 39.]
June 23. Notes by Williamson of the arguments in the appeal of Josuah Marrett v. George la Cloche from Jersey. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 36.]
June 24. Examinations of Andrew Anderson, joiner, and Thomas Seward, chandler and headborough, both of Nightingale Lane, near East Smithfield, relative to a fire in the house of the former, 21 June, the cause of which could not be discovered, and also of 5 servants of William Campion, pot-maker in the said lane, and of two other informants, relative to a fire threatened in Campion's house, 22 June, which they believed to be occasioned by balls of greasy stuff thrown into some straw in a loft. Noted as read in Council 26 June. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 129.]
June 24.
Gloucester.
Alderman Henry Fowler to Williamson. As the quarter sessions for this city will come soon, I earnestly entreat you to signify in a post or two his Majesty's commands concerning the persons bound over here as dispersers of that abominable libel, for I conceive we ought not to determine an offence so directly against him and the government without first knowing his pleasure.
We hear that at London you have hunted the hell-bred paper to the original. God grant all his Majesty's enemies may be detected and receive due punishment. I hope that Mr. Rogers, my apothecary, who first made this thing known to me, and whom I employed further to discover and procure the copies of that detestable paper, shall receive the boon of 20l. his Majesty has promised to such as shall make known such offenders. If you will do that favour for him, I will order a friend of mine in London to wait on you to receive it. His father hazarded his life and fortune for his Majesty in the late unnatural war to the utter ruin of a considerable estate. [Ibid. No. 130.]
June 24.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About 3 yesterday afternoon arrived one of our packet-boats. The passengers report there has been a fight in the Sound betwixt the Danish and Swedish fleets, in which the Swedes, as they say, having lost 4 or 6 men-of-war the Danes are said to have the victory, though with the loss of Admiral Van Tromp, one of whose arms is said to have been shot off. Mr. Oudaert, who also came over by this boat, heard nothing of it in Holland till he came on board. Your private letter I expeeted last night miscarried. What wind there is is S.W., weather fair. [Ibid. No. 131.]
June 24.
Plymouth.
George Dyer to Williamson. In his master's absence enclosing list of ships arrived. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 132.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 132i.]
June 24.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Yesterday morning the Countess of Essex arrived at Neston in the Monmouth yacht from Dublin, and to-day is gone towards London, accompanied by Lady Powerscourt, and intends to be there next Wednesday. [Ibid. No. 133.]
June 25.
[Received.]
Certificate from James Hoare, Comptroller of the Mint, that since 24 June, 1675, 114,445lbs. 8oz. of copper have been coined into farthings and halfpence worth 9,677l. 4s. 5¼d., and that 97lbs. remain in copper halfpence and farthing blanks. [Ibid. No. 134.]
June 25.
Council Chamber.
W. Blathwayt to S. Pepys. By order of the Committee for Trade transmitting two reports from the Commissioners of the Customs concerning the True Love and the Olive Branch of Bideford gone on a fishing voyage to Newfoundland, with their desires that the Lords of the Admiralty grant such passes to the said ships as is usual in the like cases. [Ibid. No. 135.]
June 25.
Hull.
Col. Anthony Gylby to Williamson. Yesterday came in here two ships from Norway, which affirm that the Danish has beaten the Swedish fleet. One says the Swedes have lost three of their best ships, and that 12 more are brought into Copenhagen. These ships left Norway, one this day and one yesterday sennnight, and the fight was 10 days before.
As to burning the towns, the Mayor has not sent on purpose to York, as he intended, to make inquiry, but contented himself with such intelligence as came from some York men who came hither, who all affirm that no letter came from the Mayor of Bristol to the Lord Mayor, but only from a merchant to a merchant in York, but the fear is now pretty well over, though there is scarce a day that does not come news of the burning of one great town or other, all lies. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 136.]
June 25.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. A ship arrived yesterday met two Argereenes in the Channel, which a little before found on an English ship two or three Spaniards, passengers, whom they carried away. The fleet of merchant ships for the Straits is in the Downs, only two or three more expected. Your packets for Mr. Martin, consul at Algiers, are yet in my hands. I can send them to Tangier or Cales, but dare not without order. Not a topsail gale at N.E. [Ibid. No. 137.]
June 25.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Spragg frigate is now at Spithead. [Ibid. No. 138.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Rothes, Lord Chancellor, for knighting with the Sword of State David Balfour of Forret, Thomas Murray of Glendoike, and Mr. Fowlles of Redfoord, Senators of the College of Justice. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 503.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Treasury Commissioners in Scotland. Warrant for payment to William Murray, advocate, of 200l. sterling, the arrears of his fee or pension when he was one of the Justice Deputs. [Ibid. p. 504.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Treasury Commissioners in Scotland. Warrant for payment to Sir William Murray, of Dreghorn, of 110l. sterling on account of his fees and wages while Master of the Works in Scotland, and for their examining and reporting what they find due to him on account thereof. [Ibid.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Commission to Alexander, son of Sir Alexander Livingstoune, to be ensign of Capt. John Winram's company in the Regiment of Guard in Scotland in place of James Alexander, deceased. [Ibid. p. 505.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Pass for James Forbes, son of Lord Forbes, who is going beyond beyond the seas. [Latin. Ibid. p. 506.]
June 26 and 27. Minutes of the proceedings before the Committee for inquiring about the fires. Ordered that Lenthall, Freeman and Reading, justices in Southwark, send in writing what they declared to the Board, or what else they can touching the rumours and occasions of the fire, by 10 to-morrow and that they continue their care. The note given in by Mr. Taylor to be sent them to take examinations thereon. Directions to the Lord Mayor to examine the other parties mentioned by Taylor. Examinations taken touching the late fire in East Smithfield read. A letter of 23 June from Col. Gylby read and thereon a letter to be prepared to the Mayor of Hull, taxing his want of information that the apprehensions are groundless.
27 June. The letter to Hull read and signed. Sir J. Monson's letter to the Lord Mayor and the enclosed examinations read. This matter lies before the Lord Mayor to be prosecuted. Letters to be sent to the Lord Mayor of York and the Mayor of Bristol to advertise them touching the fire and rumours spread. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 139.]
[June 26.] The above Committee to the Justices in Southwark and to the Lord Mayor of London. (The purport of these sufficiently appears from the above minutes.) [Draft. Ibid. No. 140.]
June 26. The information of Richard Taylor. Since Friday, when I was before the Board, Jeremy Johnson, a watchmaker, said to me that he and Thomas Woodlow, a periwig-maker, both living in Exchange Alley, the night before the fire in Southwark, were told in Hog Lane, Shoreditch, that there was a fire in Southwark. Also William Hester, a soapmaker in Southwark, near London Bridge, told me he had heard the same night there was a fire about St. Margaret's Hill in Southwark. [Ibid. No. 141.]
June 26. The information of Sir Thomas Gould and Sir John Shorter, sheriffs of London, John Wells, common cryer, and John Green, one of the attorneys of the Mayor's Court. Being in the Guildhall the 24th instant at a Common Hall for choosing sheriffs, &c., Francis Jenkes, a linen draper in Cornhill, being a member of the Common Hall, after declaring divers grievances as he called them, requested the present sheriffs and the Common Serjeant that they would, before they proceeded to the election of sheriffs, go up to the Lord Mayor and desire him to call a Common Council, that might make an address to his Majesty in the name of the City to call a new Parliament. [Copy. Ibid. No. 142.]
June 26.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. The master of a ketch of this town for Hull from Stockholm tells us he came from thence about 14 days since and gives an account of the great victory of the Dane and Hollander against the Swede. The Swedes were above 60 sail and the Danes not above 35. The Swedes had much the better and chased the Danes to their own harbour, where they met with Van Tromp with 12 Hollanders, and on saluting each other they stood off to sea again to fight the Swedes, they having the weather gage. The Swedish Vice-Admiral, called the Sword, being in the van and in danger of falling into the throng of the enemies, the Swedish Admiral, being a ship of 120 guns, tacked to bring his ship to his assistance, it blowing hard, and on his tack overset and blew up by some accident of fire in the powder-room, not above 15 being saved out of 1,500. The master says the Swedes confess the loss of 12 of their best ships burnt and taken. In his passage he came through the Danes' fleet and was on board their Admiral who told him they had destroyed 12 of the Swedes. There were in the Admiral five deputy admirals, who were all lost. The Admiral who was out in their fleet last year, when they were forced in by storm, was laid aside on some misunderstanding, so was not in this engagement, but was sent down to command their fleet that was returned after the engagement. There was an embargo on the English ships, but the then Admiral sent an express to the Court to know the reason of it and immediately ordered them to sail. Here are also three ships of this town from Norway but they bring no news. Wind S.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 143.]
June 26.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last Wednesday happened a fire at Blythburgh about 16 miles from here on the London road, which burnt between 20 and 30 houses. There was a collection at our church and at the meeting house towards their relief. At our church was collected 13l. odd, at the conventicle 24l. odd. The Lord Lieutenant sent down the copy of my letter. Several copies are dispersed up and down the town. They make a great noise that the Lord Marshal and the Lord Lieutenant will take me to task and that my letter was delivered by his Majesty to the Lord Treasurer and that they are all offended at it. Here are still Major-General Desborow and Capt. Nichols. [Ibid. No. 144.]
June 26.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind S.W., dark close weather inclining to rain. [Ibid. No. 145.]
June 26.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Identical with the last. [Ibid. No. 146.]
June 26.
Pendennis Castle.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 147.]
June 26.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 23rd came in here the Arthur of London for Guinea and some others outward-bound.
Here has been a report these 6 or 7 days past that Dover, Bristol, Portsmouth, Deal and several other towns were burnt and that the French King had sent over 50 or 60 persons to burn all the seaport towns, so that it has put all these parts in a belief of it, and several towns keep watch and ward, and there is much ado to keep this town from doing the same, but, the last post having nothing of it, they begin to lessen their belief. By this you may see the people of this nation are very unstable. [Ibid. No. 148.]
June 26.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. Wind W.S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 149.]
June 26. Order to Ralph Rutter, messenger of the Chamber, to repair to the house of Francis Jenks, linen draper, of Cornhill, and bring him before the Council. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f 159.]
June 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting that by letters of 28 March last preference as to reprizals in Ireland was granted to the Duke of York, it being required that no lands be set out to any persons whatever till he were reprized and satisfied, and that by his letter to Secretary Coventry it appears that, in regard of some directions given concerning the passing of reprizals to Sir Theophilus Jones with an exemption from the order in Council of 1 Oct., 1675, he lies under some difficulty how to proceed and therefore requests further directions, declaring that no lands be set out to any persons whatsoever for reprizals till the said Duke be reprized and satisfied according to the said letters of 28 March, any direction concerning the passing of reprizals to Sir T. Jones or any other direction or order to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 34.]
June 26. Notes by Williamson of the appeal of Norman v. Bisson from Jersey, touching a lease by parole. He queries whether matter not before the Court below can be brought forward on an appeal. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 37.]
June 27. The further examination of James Peirce. Though his mother denied she knew Capt. Morgan and Dowse, he has seen them both with her at her lodging and they have eaten and drunk there together several times, when his father has been also present. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 150.]
June 27. Examinations of John Moth, beadle of St. Saviour's parish, and William Dagger, keeper of the House of Correction, Southwark. Having attended James Peirce to apprehend Capt. Morgan at Somerset House and Dowse in the New Market, no such persons can be found nor heard of, and Peirce's mother denies knowing anything about them and says her son has never been in service, and that he had been lately whipped and passed out of the country. [Ibid. Nos. 151, 152.]
June 27. Examinations of George Whitehead and Edward and Mary Smith of Southwark. 27 May last Whitehead heard a report in Smith's house, and found a broken pistol on the floor, which Edward Smith said he found at the time of the fire and carried home, and laid under the clothes at the bed's foot, and this, his wife leaning on the bed's foot, went off and wounded her. [Ibid. No. 153.]
June 27.
Council Chamber, Whitehall.
The Committee for Trade to the Mayor of Hull. Understanding by Col. Gylby's letters of the 14th and 23rd that the people are in great fears of fire on a report that the Lord Mayor of York has been informed by the Mayor of Bristol of a design for firing towns, they wonder at his not having written before and sent up depositions about those who spread such reports, the Council having found on enquiry that the late fires were caused by carelessness, not malice, which they intimate to him in order to remove all groundless fears, ordering him to seize the promoters of such and to use due vigilance. [Two drafts. Ibid. Nos. 154, 155.]
June 27. The same to the Mayor of Bristol. Finding that great fears of fire have arisen in the North, through his letter to the Lord Mayor of York, about a design for burning Bristol and other cities, they wonder he should not have informed a Secretary of State or the Council of the report and request to know what he has written or done therein, and whether he has prosecuted any spreaders of such dangerous rumours. [Draft. Ibid. No. 156.]
June 27. The same to the Lord Mayor of York. Thinking it strange he has not sent advice of such a report and desiring a particular account thereof with a copy of the letter of the Mayor of Bristol, and commanding him to be vigilant when necessary. The fires in London appear to have been caused through negligence, not malice. [Draft. Ibid. No. 157.]
June 27. The examinations of Thomas Woodlaw of Exchange Alley, and Jeremy Johnson. That the Thursday before the fire in Southwark, several boys playing in Hog lane asked had they heard of the fire in Southwark. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, Nos. 158, 159.]
June 27. The information of William Hester, of Southwark, and of Elizabeth Browne, servant of Alice Hester. That the latter going to an alehouse near the Bridge Foot, 25 May, heard a report of a great fire at St. Margaret's Hill. [Ibid. No. 160.]
June 27. The information of Thomas Ellis. A chimney in his house, the White Lion, in Southwark, smoking on 14 June last, a report of fire arose. [Ibid. No. 161.]
June 27. The information of Thomas Demyske, goldsmith. The day of the fire in Southwark, he was at Henstridge in Somersetshire, and a blacksmith told him about 2 in the afternoon that London had been on fire two days. [Ibid. No. 162.]
June 27. Capt. John Shales to Sir Robert Southwell. Mr. Mason says that copper blanks for farthings are sold for 12d. per lb. and the charge of coining is only ½d. per lb., so that the computation of 83l. 6s. 8d. per cent. advanced above the real worth is a better computation than he thought, as the expense of coinage should be added to that as well as to the tin; in the worse copper this makes an insufferable disparity. [Ibid. No. 163.]
June 27.
Laycock.
Sir John Talbot to Williamson. I have been long expecting your Mercury Cyri, having directed your servant, Mr. Benson, how to send them, either by the Bath or Bristol waggons, which pass our gate weekly.
For want of them I want employment, having set myself apart for your service, and, if you think not fit to busy me this way, pray let me know, when you intend to visit Oxford, what will be your stay there and whether the artillery marches with you, for I much covet to wait on you.
Before I left London you told me that the King of Persia had made a fair invitation to our Master to claim the arrears of his customs of Ormuz. If he intends to pursue that affair, pray remind him that I was the first to acquaint him with his title to those customs and that I was designed once to be sent thither to claim them, and, if he will employ any, I know not where he will find a younger man for the voyage there. I have a copy of the articles of agreement betwixt King James and the Persian King and all the instructions necessary concerning the manner and charges of the journey. I have written to the Earl of Bath about it, who was formerly engaged with his Royal Highness, Lord Fitz-Hardinge and myself in a project of pursuing it on our own charge, having obtained from his Majesty a grant of his title, but the then Chancellor obstructed us. If you should discourse this affair with his Majesty, you might intimate thus much and recommend me to the employment. [Ibid. No. 164.]
June 27.
Okeley.
Thomas Brathwaite to Williamson. These return my most humble and hearty thanks for your kindness in removing me to Okeley, which may be greatly improved, if you would afford me some further assistance. Mr. Wither, a clergyman, my good friend and next neighbour, has two livings now at his disposal each worth almost 100l. One he intends to take himself and to bestow the other on me, if I can get us both qualified for them, i.e. to be chaplain to some nobleman or bishop, which he supposes my friends may effect for me. To this purpose I wrote to my friend, Dr. Lamplugh, the beginning of last week, but have had no return yet, so fear he is not at home. Delays we fear may be dangerous, because harvest is so near, and, unless we can get possession of them before, the churchwardens will have the disposal, which, we fear, may redound to our no small damage. I beseech you let me have your helping hand, and I promise never to trouble you for myself any more. Let Mr. Benson return me your thoughts of it the next post.
Mr. Wither was formerly Fellow of New College and is well known to the Deans of Carlisle and Rochester. The latter dined at his house last year in his journey from Dorsetshire to London. He has one living already in the Bishop of Winton's gift, and tells me, that, if his design towards me should not take effect, he could find in heart to leave that to the Bishop, and take both those now fallen to himself. That he intends for me is but two miles from Okeley. With note on the back from the Earl of Anglesey to Williamson that he is content that Mr. Brathwaite be one of his chaplains, if he will get a draft prepared for his signature. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 165.]
June 27.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Yesterday arrived from Stockholm the Hannah, a ketch of this place. The master says he saw the Swedish fleet, before they put to sea, which consisted of 58 or 60 sail, and that he was also there, when they came in from fighting the Danes and Dutch fleet, but not above 36 sail returned. As the Swedes were going to engage the enemy and tacking for the wind, their Admiral ship, the Crown of 136 brass guns, having a stiff gale, her guns all running to the leeside, overset, and, before she was half sunk, fire got to her powder, and blew her up, and next her the Sword on the very first engaging was set on fire by Admiral Tromp's fireship, which he took for Tromp's own ship, whereupon their whole fleet was so discouraged, that immediately after they ran for it, and, had it not been for Capt. William Lee, a Whitby man and one of their captains, fewer of them had got home, for which good service the King of Sweden has given him a gold chain and made him one of his admirals. Capt. Lee was several times on board the ketch after the engagement. Twenty captains and five gunners were carried up, which the master supposed would be hanged for not fighting. On coming home he met another vessel homeward-bound. The master told him, he had been amongst the Danes and Dutch fleet after the engagement and had seen six great Swedish men-of-war amongst them. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 166.]
June 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By a pink arrived here yesterday from Gottenburg we hear that it was reported there that the Danes had the better of the Swedish fleet. The first were well manned, the other very ill, though much in number exceeding the first. The master could not give us the particulars, but says a great Swedish ship, the Three Crowns, was said to be blown up. An English gentleman, a passenger by one of our packet-boats which arrived this morning, told me there was such a variety of reports in Holland concerning this action in the Sound, that it was difficult to find out anything amongst them fit to be credited.
The wind is inconstant, at present northerly, the weather fair and hot after some refreshing showers yesterday and last night. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 167.]
June 27.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. About post time yesterday arrived the East India Merchant and Ann, both from East India. They speak of a more than ordinary mortality. Yesterday came into the Downs the Unity of Dover from Cales. In the Channel southward of Plymouth she was met by two French capers, which commanded the master on board, who showed his pass and was then cleared, but before that in his own vessel they put a sentinel over him, and, when he was freed from the French, the boat that brought him on board plundered him of his linen and what other clothes were good and necessary in the ship. He was their prisoner 4 hours. The Dover packet-boat to-day came with several Frenchmen into the Downs. The wind blew at S.W. and they could not fetch Dover. Not a topsail gale at S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 168.]
June 27.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.W. The Spragg frigate continues at Spithead. [Ibid. No. 169.]
June 27.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Henrietta and Diamond frigates are still here. [Ibid. No. 170.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 170i.]
June 27. Passes for Sir Thomas Ogle, major to the Holland regiment, for 3 months and for Walter Pentland, ensign to Capt. Miller's company, for 6 months. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book41, p. 50.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Henry Fowler. I communicated yours of the 24th to his Majesty, and am commanded to answer that by all means you should proceed against the dispersers of that abominable libel at the sessions or assizes, as they stand bound over, according to law.
As to the reward of Mr. Rogers, who first discovered this wicked paper, his Majesty has declared he shall certainly receive the full reward due to him by the proclamation, and therefore I must pray you to send me, as soon as you can, a short paper stating how he made the discovery, and praying, according to the proclamation, the reward promised. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 101.]
June 27. Sir J. Williamson to the Clerk of the Signet. Desiring at the request of Sir Stephen Fox that no grant pass for security of any tallies on the Excise to Sir John James and Major Huntington till he be made acquainted with it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 24.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Rothes, Chancellor, Sir James Dalrymple of Stair, President, and the remanent senators of the College of Justice. As by the advancing of Sir Archibald Primerose, late Clerk Register, to the office of Justice General, the above office is now vacant, empowering them to appoint some of their number to inspect the public records that were in his custody, and to receive the same from him, and to require him to produce all the said records to them or those appointed by them immediately on receipt thereof. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 507.]
June 27.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. Last Friday came in here the Mary frigate bound for Dublin, and last week the George of this town from Antigo, with leaf tobacco. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 337, No. 40.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting the petition of Theobald, Earl of Carlingford, which stated a grant to him some years since of a pension of 500l. a year which was placed on the former establishment of Ireland but was omitted in the late new establishment, and besought that, in case the Irish revenue be for the first year of the present farm thereof already disposed of, he might be resettled in his former pension to begin from Lady Day next, when the second year of the said farm begins, and a reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant and his report in favour of granting the desire of the petitioner, with which the Lord Treasurer agrees, if it be thought fit to make any addition to the present establishment; requiring and authorizing him to cause effectual letters patent to be forthwith passed containing a grant of a pension to the Earl as prayed in his petition. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 34.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of the Earl of Anglesey for relief, he being deficient of his reprizals in Ireland above 600l. a year, and most of the rest of his reprizals being very barren lands and so clogged with an unreasonable quit-rent as to be of no considerable advantage to him, some of them in the barony of Beare and Bantry, co. Cork, and in the most barren baronies of Wexford, Carlow, and Kerry not yielding so much clear profit as the quit-rent, and for some of them near three quarters of the yearly value being paid for quit-rent, the reference thereof of 8 Oct. last to the Lord Lieutenant and his report of 14 Feb. last, certifying that, when a survey shall be made as directed by an order in Council of 28 July, 1675, of the quantities and value of all lands in Ireland undisposed of, and disposable to the uses of the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, the King may then grant orders for placing the petitioner's deficiencies on part thereof, and concerning the unreasonable quit-rent offering that, when the commission to be issued for abating quit-rents payable out of coarse and barren lands not exceeding 4,000l. per annum shall be executed, the petitioner's case may be considered and such abatement made as shall be just and reasonable, and the report dated 26 May of the Lord Treasurer certifying his agreement with the said report: authorizing and requiring him, as soon as it can be done consistently with the design of the survey, to cause effectual letters patent to be passed to the said Earl and his heirs or to his nominees of so many lands and hereditaments in Ireland discovered by the said survey to be undisposed of and disposable to the uses of the said Acts as shall be sufficient to satisfy the reprizals yet deficient to him, and further authorizing and requiring him out of the said 4,000l. to make such abatement to the said earl of the said quit-rents as shall be just and reasonable and to take effectual order for discharging him from so much thereof as shall be abated. [2¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 10, p. 37.]
June 28.
[Received.]
William Stanley, of Southampton, merchant, and other the owners of the Diligence, Desire and Providence of Southampton to the King and the Privy Council. Petition for passes for the above ships which about the end of February last sailed for Newfoundland, bound thence for the Straits, before the late regulation touching passes, the Lords of the Admiralty having refused to grant passes, because the late rules require ships to be first surveyed. On the back,
Reference of the above petition to the Committee for Trade. 5 July, Whitehall. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 171.]
June 28.
[Received.]
John Hammond to the King and the Privy Council. Petition stating that he and his brother Thomas have been for above 20 years the only constant traders to Drontheim in Norway, that English ships being now so scarce and dear the petitioner has not only lost 20l. by the lading of every English ship he freighted last year and this, but was much damnified last autumn, because he could not hire one ship in the port of London that would go the voyage, so to prevent the like disappointment he has bought a new ship in Holland, which belongs wholly to himself and his said brother, and praying a pass to bring the said ship by Newcastle to London and from thence to employ her in the said trade. At the foot,
Reference of the above petition to the Committee for Trade. 5July, Whitehall. On the back,
Noted as not allowed. [Ibid. No. 172.] Annexed,
Affidavit by John Hammond of the parish of St. Katherine Coleman, London, merchant, that he and his brother, Thomas, for 20 years past have been the only constant traders from London to Drontheim in Norway, and that of late years by reason of the high freights of English shipping they have lost thereby, and have therefore been necessitated for carrying on the said trade to buy a new ship at Saardam, called the John of London, for 9,050 guilders, and that he and his said brother are the sole owners of the said ship. 3 June. [Ibid. No. 172i.]
June 28. Order in Council approving of the report of the Committee of Trade, relative to the coinage of tin farthings, and ordering them to receive a contract from the proposer, touching the value, fineness and hardening of the metal, to fit it for use; and also to report on any address that may be made by the Earl Marshal, touching his right to the coinage of farthings. Prefixed,
The said Report. The papers produced on both sides leaving the matter doubtful, they had experiments made before them, which proved that the counterfeits of the Comptroller of the Mint, which he challenged Mr. Palmer to detect, were of pure tin, and therefore no counterfeits, but that the presence of lead in a bullet cast in their presence was soon detected by weight: that his farthings would yield no profit to the counterfeiter, unless so mixed with lead as to be discoverable at sight, that, if these statements and others about copper farthings be correct, it would be better to employ tin being a home metal, than copper, and to accept the proposer's offer to exchange the copper money for tin, under proper regulations. Council Chamber, 22 June. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 173.]
Another copy of the above report. [Ibid. No. 174.]
[June ?] Dame Mary, relict of Sir William Davenant, to the King. Petition showing that the petitioner's husband expended all his fortune to the value of 13,000l. or more in the late King's service, and sustained many great losses and imprisonments for his loyalty, and was thereby so much impoverished that he could not make competent provision for the maintenance of the petitioner and the eight sons he left, that the petitioner has made hard shift to maintain her charge, and has her second son, William, three years at the University of Oxford, where he has employed himself so well that he is a youth of very pregnant hopes in learning, but that the petitioner's poverty is so great that she is not able to provide for him there longer without his Majesty's assistance, and, there being at present two fellowships at All Souls' vacant, praying his Majesty to recommend her said son to be admitted to one of them, or that he will otherwise assist the petitioner. [Ibid. No. 175.] Annexed,
Draft reference of the above petition to the Duke of Ormonde, Chancellor of the University of Oxford. [Ibid. No. 175i.]
June 28. Sir Thomas Clarges to Williamson. I have been once or twice to wait on you to acquaint you, that Mr. Pullen, Vice-Principal of Magdalen Hall, is Mr. Davenant's tutor, and, if you inquire after him, I hope you will not be discouraged in your kindness towards him. I perceive by the enclosed letter Lady Davenant sent me this morning that she had written to Lord St. Albans to mediate with the Duke of Ormonde in her behalf, and had sent him a copy of the petition you have. Her servant tells me he waited on his Grace this morning who told him he would do anything in his power for any of Sir William Davenant's children, so, if you speak with his Grace, I presume he will be favourable. I hope God will reward your charity to this poor family. [Ibid. No. 176.]
June 28. Sir Robert Hanson to Williamson. Requesting him to send him the King's letter to save his man Vevers, who is found guilty of manslaughter, from being burnt in the hand. [Ibid. No. 177.]
June 28. The information of Joseph Wight of St. Saviour's, Southwark. About a fortnight after the late dreadful fire in Southwark, 10 June, the headway of a back door in his house was found to be burning, which he thinks must have been fired maliciously.
The information of Ann Symmes. Her chimney took fire on the evening of 25 May, about 7 hours before the great fire, and she thinks that caused a report of a fire having broken out about St. Margaret's Hall. [Ibid. No. 178.]
June 28.
Council Chamber, Whitehall.
Warrant to Ralph Rutter, messenger, to take Francis Jenks into custody and to deliver him to the keeper of the Gatehouse prison. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 179.]
June 28.
Council Chamber, Whitehall.
Warrant to the Keeper of the Gatehouse to take and keep in his custody Francis Jenks, who, when called before the Council, was so far from denying or extenuating his offence, that he endeavoured in a presumptuous and arrogant manner to justify the same. [Copy. Ibid. No. 180.]
June 28.
Bristol.
Certificate by Sir Robert Cann, mayor, that Thomas Scroope and John Dudelstone deposed that the Planter of Bristol is an English-built ship and solely belongs to them and other subjects, and that only one of her crew of 18 is a foreigner, and that she sailed from Bristol for Stockholm about 18 May last, and had a pass according to the articles with Sweden, and that the deponents believe she is now in Elsinore for want of a pass according to the articles with Denmark. [Ibid. No. 181.]
June 28. Warrant to Sir Thomas Twysden and Sir Thomas Jones, Justices of Assize for Essex, to suspend the execution of the sentence on Richard Josselyne of Littlebury, Essex, if found guilty of the manslaughter of Roger Marshall; a quarrel arising between Marshall and the prisoner's son, Richard, Marshall wounded the latter very sorely, and the prisoner coming in and finding his son wounded and bleeding struck Marshall a blow on the head with a cudgel, of which he died three weeks after, Josselyne being certified to be a loyal subject and a peaceable person. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 159.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
Licence to print and exclusive right of copyright for 15 years to Henry Bond of a book composed by him entitled "A Treatise, wherein is showed and demonstrated an easy and speedy way as well by night as by day to find the longitude, having the latitude of the place, by the use of the magnetick inclinatory needle," he having for several years applied himself to find out the longitude thereby. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 176.]
June 28. The King to Sir Harbottle Grimston, Master of the Rolls. Warrant revoking former letters to him to admit such fit person as Thomas, Lord Culpeper, should nominate into the six clerks' place first vacant, and directing him to admit on the next voidance of any of the said places such fit person as shall be nominated by the Duke of Ormonde and Sir Thomas Culpeper, persons nominated by the King in favour of John and Philippa Culpeper, younger children of John, Lord Culpeper, deceased; any former letters in favour of Silius Titus or any other persons notwithstanding. Marked, as cancelled. [Precedents 1, f. 152.]
June 28. Notes by Williamson of proceedings in the Privy Council. Lord Chancellor acquaints the King with what Jenks had said in the Common Hall, the 24th inst. The depositions read of the two sheriffs and of John Wells and John Green, taken before the Lord Chief Justice the 26th. Jenks on these examinations being taken was warned by Secretary Coventry to attend the Board. He did so, and was this day called in, and the depositions read to him.
The Lord Chancellor asked, By whose advice he made this speech? He desired no question might be asked him against himself. Lord Chancellor: Who was acquainted with what you spoke before he spoke it? Jenks magnifies his own loyalty and the City's. The King: I know the City well enough without you, they need not your fostering. The King knows their loyalty. Jenks: He conceives that every member had liberty to debate whatever he thinks for the service of the King and the good of the City. He thought this so, and this was so accepted that it passed the Court nem. con. It was declared by the Common Serjeant and the two sheriffs as the common and just desire and resolution of the Common Hall. The King: It is said otherwise by the Sheriffs, and the Lord Mayor never heard of it. Jenks: It is true. It was the Act of the Court and carried up to the Lord Mayor as such. It was said by the sheriffs that the matter was so, and it was the judgment of the Court and there was an answer to it by the Lord Mayor, that he would concur in this and whatever else the City would, &c. He thinks he might propose it. He did so to the Court of Aldermen. He had the Common Hall, and, if he mistakes not, he has made the major part of the City to his opinion. He should not go from anything he said there. The King: Who made you a Councillor to dissolve Parliament? Lord Chancellor: Who advised you to it? Jenks: He does not understand he is obliged to say, it being the sense of the whole Court, he being thus charged, &c. Secretary Coventry: How could you know it was the sense before you spoke? Jenks: He had it from the multitude. He knows the practice of that Court and does not know what that of this is and whether he be bound to answer. He thinks that anybody may address for any thing that is a grievance, &c. He has done nothing but what the law allows. The law allows to address for anything to the King that is not against law. Lord Chancellor: The law will tell you, whether this be according to law. In the meantime, if you will be refusing to say who advised it, who was privy to it? Jenks: Desires to be excused from answering. Sir P. Monckton called in. The letter of Brocklesby, the minister, to Sir W. Yorke, read, giving an account of what passed between him and Sir Philip. That the King was the great support of the Protestant religion. That it was the thoughts of many, that the King could be snatched out of our hands, so soon as the King of France was at leisure, &c. That there were 20 gentlemen of quality who could live in London in more than ordinary splendour to take care of putting laws in execution against Papists, to prosecute priests, and all this in another Parliament. That they would need a sum of money to maintain themselves, &c. That I should try where to take it up. He answered, this design was dangerous. Sir Philip answered, that it was very innocent, &c., that the thing designed was only a parliament, that the King would not dislike a petition for a parliament, &c. Sir Philip confessed, 1, the King's snatching away, &c., 2, the 20 men that met, 3, the 6 to present the petition, 4, the King's liking of a petition; cannot say if he said so. That Sir R. Carr had declared in Lincolnshire he would assist in it, to bring the Common Council in London, &c., to address. Against Sir R. Carr. That he would not meddle in the information brought him by the two Justices; that he would promote the thing in the Common Council, i.e. to present a petition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 203.]
June 29. Sir Philip Lloyd to the Commissioners of the Customs. By the enclosed you will find two cases where passes are wanting, which seem to deserve relief. His Majesty in Council has referred them to the Committee for Trade, who are sensible that relief should be given where the cases are as they are represented, but are afraid abuses may creep in. They therefore desire you to consider the best means for supplying those just cases so as to prevent abuses, and also to send to all the ports for an account of what ships are gone to the Newfoundland fishing this year, and of the time of their departure by knowing which attempted frauds in passes may be discovered. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 182.]
June 29. Note that at the Committee for Trade Mr. Lenthall was called in and signed a petition for the re-imbursement of 16 barrels of powder spent in the fire. [Ibid. No. 183.]
June 29. Edmond Lenthall and other Justices of Southwark to the King. Petition for an order for the delivery to Josias Deweye of the Mint in Southwark of 16 barrels of powder to replace the like quantity taken from him for blowing up houses to stop the late fire. [Ibid. No. 184.]
June 29.
Pembroke Hall.
Francis Grigg to Williamson. I formerly acquainted you with the sad condition of our affairs here, but now begin to assure myself we are in a far better way, having gained so certain a patron of arts to favour us. We can now desire nothing more than you would afford us your countenance by advancing us a little higher in the esteem of the world. Here are three of us from St. Bees' School. Mr. Gascarth has but the half profits of a fellowship, he has a strong inclination to an University life, and is esteemed by all very well qualified for it. His request is that he might but enjoy the full profits of a fellowship, which might be effected, if you would favour me with any preferment more advantageous to me. Sir Bancks, who has already experienced your bounty, has thoughts of returning into the country. We look on him as a very creditable and intelligent person, and one that might prove very serviceable, if you think fit to employ him. He is able to write a piece of Latin or English very readily and well. [Ibid. No. 185.]
June 29.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. Weather dark and cloudy and wind westerly. [Ibid. No. 186.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to suspend executing the sentence of burning in the hand and all other legal penalties to be inflicted on John Veavers by reason of his conviction at the Old Bailey of manslaughter for killing John Bigmore. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 177.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Justices of Assize for the Home Circuit. Warrant for proceeding to the trial of Walter Littleton (as to whom see ante, p. 159), but for forbearing to pass sentence on him, if convicted, till the King's further pleasure be signified. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 178.]
June 29. Bill signed by Williamson for Bevil Skelton's extraordinaries from 25 March to 24 June, 1676, amounting to 100l. [Ibid.]
June 30. Affidavit by Capt. Joshua Paine that the 6th instant he received a freedom for a ship from Philip Messervy on condition of paying him 40l. if it would pass the Custom House, London, and gave him an obligement to secure payment of the said money, and an hour afterwards delivered the said freedom to Mr. Townson, clerk to Sir John Shaw, Collector of the Customs. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 187.]
June 30. Sir Patience Ward to Williamson. I desired your letter to Sir W. Godolphin concerning a ship carried into St. Sebastian, and the Spanish ambassador this morning assured me of his particular concern to it as recommended by you, and told me he designed to attend you to-day to take leave. I entreat you to intimate one word to him in my behalf, for he stopped my complaint to the Council by his assurance I should have justice without. [Ibid. No. 188.]
June 30.
Hull.
William Shires, Mayor, to Williamson. I received the letter of the 27th from the Council. On the report of a letter from the Mayor of Bristol, I sent for the person, but not finding him one of any ill design for spreading false rumours, but only relating what he heard at York, I did not think fit to trouble you, nor were the inhabitants in any disorder touching it that I heard of. It is true that report with other rumours of so frequent fires occasioned our fears and put us to a more than ordinary vigilance by keeping watch, but the satisfaction of your letters that these frequent accidents have been occasioned rather by improvidence than out of malice or design has so allayed our fears that we shall not easily hereafter entertain any belief on groundless rumours. [Ibid. No. 189.]
June 30.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 190.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 190i.]
June 30. Warrant, after reciting the warrant of 1 March, calendared ante, p. 1, for the respite of Henry Hutchins, if found guilty, and that the person robbed was a collector of Excise, from whom he took upwards of 700l., and that he refuses to discover his two accomplices, and that several farmers of the Excise have been since robbed in other counties by persons in the same confederacy, revoking the order for forbearance of proceedings against Hutchins, unless he shall make restitution and discover his accomplices. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 160.]
June 30. Licence to John Pentland, ensign to Capt. Miller in the Earl of Craven's regiment, to be absent for 6 months. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 32.]
June 30. Caveat entered at the Signet Office at the desire of James Herbert on behalf of Lady Worsley, relict of Sir Robert Worsley, that no grant pass of any lands drained from the sea in the Isle of Wight wherein Sir Robert Worsley, deceased, had any title. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 24.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
Grant and confirmation to Henry Brouncker in fee simple of the advowson of the rectory of Titchburne, Sussex. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 30.]
[June ?] Letter from a country gentleman to a barrister in London, making enquiries as to the security and credit of the East India Company, which, he hears, is much shaken by their factions; with a reply, asserting that the Company trade upon credit, and having borrowed large sums, for which individual members are not responsible, can secure themselves and laugh at their creditors. Also that their patent is a monopoly and illegal. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F.]
June 30.
Bristol.
Letter in answer to the above two letters, arguing that the East India Company, though not severally responsible, have a million and a half in stock, liable to their creditors, that none have ever yet failed to receive back their money when demanded from them, that they never take up more money than they have goods to satisfy, &c., and arguing against the patent being called a monopoly. [Printed. Ibid.]
June. The Button Makers of London to Williamson. Requesting him to take their case into his remembrance, as by reason of interlopers they are undone. Button-making being a manufacture, they conceive that by the law and custom of the City, no one is to use that trade within the city and its liberties, who has not served seven years' apprenticeship. They therefore beseech him to intercede with the King that, when such offenders are convicted, the King's moiety may not be begged off by them but may be bestowed on the poor of the parish where they live. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 191.]
[June ?] Fuller statement of the case of the button makers presented to [Williamson?] complaining of Noah Delaunay, an alien and interloper, who boasts that when convicted by them he got off the King's half of the fine and can soon make up the rest; that before a late trial in the King's bench, he sent away the principal witness, his apprentice, Mary Middleton, though subpoenaed, and she cannot yet be found; that he has kept apprentices, and taught persons who were not apprentices, that he spends in litigious suits moneys entrusted him by the French church for charity; and entreating that the fines on him and similar offenders may not be remitted, but be given to the poor of the parish where such offenders live. [Ibid. No. 192.]
[June ?] Names and address of 4 button sellers who prosecute Launay, a free denizen and button seller. Endorsed by Williamson: M. l'Aisne's friend; speak with Sir Thomas Player. [Ibid. No. 193.]
June. Monsr. Herault to Williamson. The Consistory of London having ill-treated me, as you may remember, about the choice of the late Sieur Michaeli, and having redoubled their ill-treatment of me because I protested against their disregard of a king's letter in favour of Sieur Bonhome to the extent of treating me as a cheat, an incendiary and a traitor, and having finally put me out of their Consistory and taken away my pension, declaring that I deserve to be inhibited from the duties of my ministry, I have been obliged to consent to retire by an honourable discharge from the ordinary duties of a minister among them. But seeing myself since treated by them not as a discharged but as an expelled pastor, I felt myself obliged to beg his Majesty to refer the business to the Bishop of London to report thereon, and, he having done so, it now remains for the King to declare his pleasure therein. I therefore beg you to prevail with him to declare by an express order to be published on a Sunday in church and afterwards to be registered among their acts, that, recognizing that I am innocent of the calumnies against me, he cannot but disapprove of their proceedings towards me, and enjoin them to have more respect in future to everything that may come to them from him, declaring that I have done nothing but what I was obliged to do as a true and faithful minister of the Gospel and a good subject of his Majesty, and ordering them to execute precisely the conditions of the agreement between them and myself for my separation from them under pain of his displeasure. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 382, No. 194.] Enclosed,
Draft of the order desired, being substantially the same as that in English of May 22, calendared ante, p. 120. [French. Ibid. No. 194 i.]
[June ?] [M. Herault to Williamson?]. Is referred to him by the Earl of Arlington for help in his affair, and sends him a memoir approved by the King, who has ordered Secretary Coventry to prepare his declaration thereon. Enclosed,
The said memoir. Wishes the King would add to his testimony some reprimand for the persons who have ill-treated him for his deference to orders, lest they should shut their pastors' mouths on such occasions. M. Primrose advising them in the Consistory to appease him (Herault), lest the thing should come to the King's knowledge, they asked insolently if he was one of those who run after or adore the beast. They could not deny this when accused of it before the Bishop of London. [French. Ibid. No. 195.]
June. Notes by Williamson of the proceedings relating to the proposed treaty of Commerce with France, between 1664 and Oct., 1672. [Ibid. No. 196.]
[June ?] Henry Bond to Williamson. Petition thanking him for being a means whereby he has received the 50l. given him by the King and requesting him to present his petition to the King, praying him to settle to the petitioner the annuity of 50l. a year that he has promised him. [See ante, p. 164. Ibid. No. 197.]
[June ?] Upon the report dated 15 May of Hugh May on Mr. Rose's petition, calendared ante, p. 106, that he considers his proposal for keeping the garden in St. James' Park reasonable, his Majesty allows that the agreement proceed on the petitioner's proposals and commands that it be recommended to the Lord Treasurer to settle a certain and easy payment of 320l. yearly to him according to the said agreement and that he direct a privy seal for payment of that sum to the Paymaster of the Works for the use aforesaid, all which is yet referred to his Lordship to report his opinion thereon, if he see cause. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 122.]
June.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 382./No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Board. Inward Bond. Wind. Remarks.
198 June 1 5 18 6 S.W.
199 " 2 5 20 0 S.W.
200 " 3 2 25 0 W.
201 " 4 2 24 1 S.W.
202 " 5 2 33 0 S.W.
203 " 6 2 0 0 E. The merchant ships are at sail.
204 " 7 2 3 4 S.W.
205 " 8 2 18 3 N.W. All that are crossed are not returned.
206 " 10 2 18 1 S.W.
207 " 11 2 19 3 S.W.
208 " 14 1 3 0 E.
209 " 15 2 2 0
210 " 16 2 3 3 E.
211 " 17 1 1 0 E.
212 " 18 1 3 0 S.
213 " 19 1 2 0 W.
214 " 20 2 0 0 S.
215 " 21 1 2 0 N.W.
216 " 22 1 2 0 N.E.
217 " 23 3 3 3 S.W.
218 " 29 2 8 1 S.W.