BHO

William and Mary: March 1692

Pages 159-212

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: William and Mary, 1691-2. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1900.

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March 1692

Mar. 1.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Dr. Wickhart, to be chaplain-general of the army in Flanders during the present expedition [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 238]; for James Farrer, esq., to be lieutenant of the troop of which Sir William Russell is captain in the regiment of horse commanded by Col. John Coye; for Samuel Austen, gent., to be lieutenant of the troop in which Capt. Fletcher is captain in the same regiment; for John Henry Grueber, gent., to be cornet of the troop of which Capt. Fletcher is captain in the same regiment [Ibid. 3, p. 117]; for Rodolphe Corneille, esq., to be second engineer in Ireland [Ibid., p. 119]; for Robert Laton, esq., to be captain of Col. Henry Wither's company in Col. Selwyn's regiment [Ibid., p. 120]; and for John Taylor, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Capt. Davidson is captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Col. Robert Hodges. [Ibid., p. 122.]
Mar. 1.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Lieut.-Col. Samuel Foxton. Shows that he is, by lineal descent, in possession of the quarter of the lands of Barnaboye, &c., in the county of Galway, and that the said lands were never disposed of by letters patent, nor in the possession of any forfeiting person, and thereupon prays for a grant of the same under the Great Seal of Ireland as a farther confirmation of his title. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 309.]
Mar. 1.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The King being informed that the sum of 550l. is in the hands of the officers in Ireland, being what was collected out of the revenue of the bishopric of Derry during the vacancy of that see, desires you to give the necessary orders that the same shall be applied to the repair of the churches of that diocese, which have been very much ruined during the late war, and are in danger of falling if speedy care is not taken to prevent it. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 387.]
Mar. 1.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. On the 9th of January last I sent you, by the King's command, an extract from a letter from Consul Barker, relating, among other things, to the ransom of a carpenter who escaped on board the Duke of Grafton's squadron when before Algiers, and also relating to some cloth which the said consul desired for the King's service. I am now commanded to direct you to pay the 800 dollars, being the carpenter's ransom, with the interest mentioned in the said extract, and also to provide the desired cloth. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 387.]
Mar. 1.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. The King, understanding that there are several persons in your university who have not produced any certificate of their having taken the oaths, pursuant to the Act of Parliament in 1689, and yet continue to enjoy their respective places, commands me to acquaint you that he would have the oaths forthwith tendered to all such liable to take the same, according to the directions aforesaid; the places of such as refuse are to be declared void, and elections made to fill them. You are to signify this to the heads of all the colleges and halls, to comply herein, and to return an account of their proceedings. [Ibid., p. 388.]
Mar. 1.
Whitehall.
Passes for Pierre Gaultier to embark at Harwich for Holland or Flanders; for Mr. John Verhaset, his Majesty's Dutch Quartermaster, to go to Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 245]; for Hugh Wilson, his wife and three children, to go to Ireland [Ibid., p. 247]; for Sir William Creagh, of Newcastle-upon Tyne, and Henry Wilthew, his servant, to go to Amsterdam; and for Mr. William Couretney, his wife, sister, and three children, to go to Ireland. [Ibid., p. 248.]
Mar. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General to prepare a bill containing a patent to Anthony Forester Smith of the sole use of his invention for "boiling and heating water and all other liquors as also for melting and refining sugar." [Ibid., p. 247.]
Mar. 1.
Whitehall.
Certificate that James Johnston, esq., late his Majesty's EnvoyExtraordinary to the Elector of Brandenburg, returned on the 27th of February last past. [Ibid., p. 252.]
Mar. 1.
Kensington.
Warrant for a gift to Alexander Bucchan "of the place and office of one of the macers before the Lords of Council and Session." [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 91.]
Mar. 1.
Kensington.
Two blank warrants for commissions for the office of Commissary of Orkney and Shetland, and Caithness. [Ibid, pp. 92–93.]
Mar. 1.
Kensington.
Warrant to George Hamilton of Barnetown for payment to John, Lord Elphinstone, of 500l. out of the arrears of the retention money due to his troop. [Ibid., p. 94.]
Mar. 1. Warrant for a patent creating George Hamilton of Barnetown a "knight-baronet." [Ibid., p. 95.]
Mar. 1.
Kensington.
Commission to William. Lord Newbottle as colonel of a regiment of dragoons. [Ibid., p. 96.]
Mar. 1.
Kensington.
Order by the King to Colonel John Hill, governor of Fort William. You are to assist the Earl of Argyll or those having commission from him, with 300 men of your garrison and regiment of Fort William in Inverlochy, in order to his possessing himself of the island of Mull, according to his legal rights; and for reducing the Castle of Dowart and Fort of Cairnbulg; and you are to furnish him with what granades you see necessary for that effect, which may be spared out of our magazine of Fort William. When either or both of these castles shall be reduced you are to put a suitable garrison therein with what officers you think proper out of your said regiment. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 96.]
Mar. 1.
Kensington.
The King to the Lords of the Treasury of Scotland, ordering them to call for the account of Capt. John Mackay for raising a company of foot in the Earl of Glencairn's regiment, and to pay the same. [Ibid., p. 97.]
Mar. 1.
Kensington.
The same to the same. Captain Theodore Bury, "our first engineer" in Scotland, then "a stranger in that country," having been at great charge in attending our army, desires satisfaction of his pay: we therefore authorize you to state his account in order that what is due may be paid. [Ibid.]
Mar. 1.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. I have received your letter concerning the 550l., part of the rents of the bishopric of Derry received during the vacancy, which his Majesty is pleased to grant for the repair of churches within that diocese; and you shall have a letter, in form, for that purpose. I have laid your letter concerning a pardon before the King, and he desires you to send over a draft which is not to include any sums of money. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 296.]
Mar. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor General to prepare a commission for Viscount Sydney as Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, pp. 267–275.]
Mar. 1.
Malines.
Count de Solms to the Prince of Waldeck. It is rumoured that the French King will march on the 3rd of March towards Brussels. Encloses memoranda from different correspondents. Requests a general pardon for deserters. Details as to the army. Refers to what the bishops (sic) say as to the observance of Lent. Copy. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 48.]
Mar. 2.
Kensington.
Commission for Thomas Dalyel, esq., to be lieutenant-colonel of horse [H.O. Military Entry Book 3, p. 116]; for Robert Young, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of which Captain James Jones is captain in the regiment of foot, commanded by Col. Toby Purcell; for Francis Marriot, gent., to be ensign of the company in which Lieut.-Col. Montarjey is captain in the same regiment; and for John Strachey, gent., to be ensign of the company in which Capt. Francis Purefoy is captain in the same regiment. [Ibid., p. 118.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Richard, Earl of Burlington and Cork. Shows that his father, the late Earl of Cork, in 1616, purchased the lands of Affane, Cappoquin, and Salterbride, in the county of Waterford, from Richard Dalton; that the said lands were conveyed to the petitioner's father by fines and other good conveyances; and that he and his father have continued ever since in quiet possession thereof for above 70 years, and have laid out great sums of money in building and other improvements.
The petitioner, not having letters patent from the Crown for the said lands since the purchase thereof, prays to have such letters passed under the Great Seal of Ireland. Referred to the LordsJustices of Ireland. Memorandum.—That another petition was referred to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland on April 23rd. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 245.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Philadelphia, Lady Wentworth, widow. Shows that by an inquisition taken at Tuddington, in Bedfordshire, in pursuance of a writ of ad quod dampnum, on that behalf, lately issued out of the Court of Chancery, it is found that it will not be the damage or prejudice of their Majesties, or others, if the King should grant her, her heirs and assignes, that she and they may have and hold within the manor of Tuddington aforesaid three fairs every year, for the buying and selling cattle, goods, wares, and merchandises; one of the fairs to be held April the 14th, another upon every first Monday in the month of June, and the other upon October the 22nd in every year for ever, with all liberties, customs, tolls, etc. Prays for a grant of the said three fairs to be held and enjoyed as aforesaid according to the said inquisition. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General for report. [Ibid.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Edmund Malone of Rothleagh, esq., barrister-at-law. Shows that he made an early submission to his Majesty's authority, and in July and August 1690 obtained his Majesty's protection from Lieut.-Gen. Douglas, and the Lords Committee of the Great Seal of Ireland, and came over from Galway after the first siege of Athlone, and by license from the LordsJustices, in October following, came with his family into Wales, where he has lived ever since. He was in the late pretended Irish Parliament, and an assistant for trial of Rapparees and felons in the county Roscommon. Since his departure he has been indicted and outlawed of high treason in one or more counties on account of the late rebellion.
Inasmuch, therefore, as he has applied all his care to the preservation of the protestants in Ireland in the time of their distress, and never acted against his Majesty or held civil or military employment, he prays the King to order the said outlawries, and the judgments of high treason against him to be reversed, the said indictments to be quashed, and that he may have a pardon of all treasons, &c. Referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 246.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Thomas Lane, and others. Shows that they have purchased lands in America, and discovered divers mines, etc., there, and settled a fishery there, and that they design to set up making of salt "by the sun," etc. They pray his Majesty's charter or letters of incorporation for the better enabling them to accomplish the same. Referred to the Attorney or SolicitorGeneral. [Ibid. 2, p. 310.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sarah White, widow, on behalf of herself, and her daughters, Jane White and Lettice White. Setting forth the great services of her son, Col. Robert White, who died in Ireland in their Majesties' service, and that he contracted great debts during that time, which the petitioner discharged, with the fortune of her two daughters. They pray, in consideration of the premises, and other suggestions in the said petition, for the grant of a lease of the manors of Rosemarket, Beare, and Penalls, alias Penyllew, and of divers mills, lands, and hereditaments in the county of Pembroke; or for the grant of such yearly pension as his Majesty shall think fit. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 311.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The King having, sometime ago, acquainted you that Henry Killigrew, esq., should have his pay as Admiral of the Blue, in the same manner as if he were at sea with that command, and understanding that you have not yet given the necessary directions therein, desires that you would place him upon the establishment as well for the ordinary pay as the extra allowance payable quarterly, to commence from the time when the last payment was made to him upon that account. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 386.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Commissioners of the Great Seal. Sometime since I signified the King's pleasure to you for the putting a stop to the grant of the vicarage of Chard, in Somersetshire, then lying at the Great Seal, which signification it seems came too late to stop the said grant from passing; yet it has had this effect that the same lies still at the Hanaper Office, by your order, until his Majesty's further pleasure should be known. The reasons for which the stoppage was made being now removed, the King would have you give order for the delivery of the said letters patent to the patentee or his agent. [Ibid. 3, p. 106.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. The King having, sometime since, signed a warrant and bill to Christopher Vane, esq., of the advowson of the rectory of Middleton in Teasdale, in the county and diocese of Durham, next after the decease of the present incumbent thereof, and he being informed that the said grant is stopped by you, desires you to pass it, notwithstanding the objection made that it amounts to a grant of reversion. [Ibid., p. 108.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the bill of William Duncombe, esq., their Majesties' Envoy-Extraordinary to the King of Sweden, from October 10th, 1691, to January 10th, 1692. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 249.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Richard Poyke, messenger in ordinary, to search for Mrs. Wood and George Sheles, and to apprehend them with their papers, for uttering seditious words against their Majesties and the Government. [Ibid., p. 250.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant for Lord Cheyne, Henry Paget, esq., Philip Howard, esq., Sir John Elwes, Sir John Wolstenholme, Sir Peter Colleton Sir Henry Ashurst, Sir Jeremy Sanbrooke, Sir Charles Umfreville Sir Thomas Mompesson, Sir John Cutler, Col. Thomas Johnson, Major Wildman, Albion Chaire, Anthony Rowe, William Bridgeman, Craven Paten, Nicholas Rainton, John Pulteney, esq., Sir Charles Gerrard, bart., Sir Henry Johnson, Henry Hawley, Lancelot Lake, esqrs., Sir Walter Clarges, bart., Charles Duncomb, esq., Sir William Hedges, Sir Thomas Row, knt., Col. Cathbard, and Richard Newman, esq., to be deputy lieutenants of Middlesex; the Earl of Bedford, lord-lieutenant of that county, is to issue out their deputations accordingly. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 252.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the expenses of Sir William Dutton Colt, knt., Envoy-Extraordinary to the Duke of Brunswick and Luneburg, and to the Landgrave of Hesse-Cassel, from the 27th of August 1691, to the 28th of February 1691–2; with the exception of one article, which is referred to the Commissioners of the Treasury See entry under March 3. [Ibid., p. 254.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Passes for the Earl of Essex to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom., Warrant Book 38, p. 245]; for Estienne Cornaut, Pierre Valont, and Jacques Peytregne, French Protestants, ditto; for Mr. Van Hill, and two servants, ditto; for Pierre Bureau, a French protestant, recommended by the French Church at Hungerford Market, ditto [Ibid., p. 248]; for Mr. William Porter, ditto; for Mr. George Mordaunt, ditto [Ibid., p. 249]; for Col. Thomas Eden, with a serjeant and six men, to go to Flanders [Ibid., p. 252]; and for Mr. Verrio to go to Holland or Flanders. [Ibid., p. 255.]
Mar. 2.
Kensington.
Warrant for a ratification and new gift to Sir Alexander Erskine, of the office of Lion King-at-Arms. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 15, p. 98.]
Mar. 2.
Kensington.
Warrant for a charter to George, Viscount Tarbat, to plant "oyster scaps" in the Bay of Cromarty, between Inch Cramond and Newhaven, "and as far in breadth as from the rock of Mickrie to the shoare of Roystoun." [Ibid., p. 99.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Passes and port warrants for Peter Roux to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; for Messieurs Vamen and Van Dumus, with two able post horses to go to Harwich; for Col. Edward Lacey, and his wife, Edward Butler, John Johnson, Kennedy Brian, Margaret Walker, Mary Jones, and John Willianns (sic), his servants, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 164]; for Joseph Rouph and Robert Sale, ditto; for Mons. Beaubuisson and Mr. Lloyd, with two able post horses, etc., to go to Harwich; for Mr. John Suert to go to Harwich, with one able post-horse; and for Capt. Thomas Brent and Capt. William Harmer, and three servants, to go to Chester, with five able post horses. [Ibid., p. 165.]
Mar. 2.
Kensington.
Warrant for Letters Patent, to be passed under the great seal of Ireland, granting to Henry Guy, Robert Rochfort and Matthew Hutton, their heirs and assigns, all such castles, honors, manors, and other possessions within the kingdom of Ireland, wherein the late King James II. had any estate of inheritance before his accession to the Crown of England, in trust for the conveyance of the same in such manner as the King may direct. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office 12, p. 435.]
Mar. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant for Letters Patent, to be passed under the great seal of Ireland, granting to Henry, Viscount Sydney, the manors, lands, and other possessions of Matthias, late Baron of Trimleston, Sir Anthony Mulledy of Robertstown, Sir Richard Neagle, knts., Matthew Barnwell of Archerstown, Christopher Nugert of Dardistown, Francis Lee of Rathbride, Edmund Butler of Baleraghed, Ignatius Gould of Cork, merchant, John Grace and Robert Grace of Courtstown, upon a surrender of the letters patent granted to the said Viscount Sydney, of the manors, lands, and other possessions of John, late Baron Bellew of Duleek, Walter Bellew, eldest son of the said Baron, and Dudley Bagnall, forfeited by the attainder of the said persons for high treason, for the better enabling the King to carry out the articles of the capitulations of Limerick and Galway, in which a great part, if not all, the above-mentioned manors, lands, and possessions may possibly be comprised. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 437.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Commissions for Thomas Lloyd, esq., to be captain of the troop, of which Capt. Henry Smith was late captain, in the regiment of dragoons commanded by John, Viscount Fitzharding; for Edward Bedford, gent., to be captain-lieutenant of that troop in the same regiment of which he is himself captain; for Richard Cole, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Holgate's troop in the same regiment [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 242]; for Andrew Fox, gent., to be cornet to Capt. Thomas Lloyd in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 243]; for George Clarke, esq., to be Secretary at War, during the King's absence from England [Ibid., p. 244]; and for Henry Warner, gent., to be ensign in the company of which Major Arthur Dillon is captain in the regiment of foot, commanded by Sir George St. George. [Ibid. 3, p. 118.]
Mar. 3.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir John Trevor, executor of Arthur Trevor, esq., deceased. Shows that there is a principal debt of 900l. and interest for the same, due upon bond from Donough, late Earl of Clancarty, and Charles, Lord Muskerry, his eldest son, unto Arthur Trevor, esq., whose executor the petitioner is. Prays his Majesty will grant to him some part of the forfeited lands of the said Earl of Clancarty until he be paid. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 2, p. 310.]
Mar. 3.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Commissioners of the Great Seal. The King thinking it necessary for his service that there should be some alterations in the Commissions of the Peace for Middlesex desires that, Sir Cornwall Bradshaw, and Sir James Smith, knights, John Robins, Robert Hastings, Robert Fairbeard, Henry Higden, William Allestry, Charles Peters, Ambrose Istead, John Tully, Nehemiah Arnold, William James, Thomas Butler, Theophilus Eyton, Richard Shorditch, and Richard Woodward, esqs., be left out of the commission, and that Sir Henry Marwood, and Sir Richard Bulkeley, barts., Sir Michael Cole, knight, Hugh Squire, German Ireton, George Booth, Barten Holliday, Joseph Offley, John Herbert, Richard Fowler, Maynard Colchester, and — Yates, esqs., be added to the number of the Justices aforesaid; that Sir Edward Waldoe, knight Isaac Fansham, John Ifeild — Le Kruse, and Francis Merrick of Norcot, esqrs., be added also: and lastly that William Robinson, and — Plumtree, esqrs., and — Collins, doctor in physick, be added for Westminster, and that their several names inserted in the next Commission. [H.O. Letter Book, Secretary's 3, p. 107.]
Mar. 3.
Whitehall.
Viscount Sydney to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The King desires that there be an augmentation of 4d. a day to the present pay of each trooper, and 2d. day to that of each foot soldier who shall be appointed to do duty in Dublin, because all manner of provisions and necessaries are much dearer there, and it would be impossible for the men to subsist upon the present pay. [Ibid., p. 109.]
Mar. 3.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the expenses of Sir William Dutton Colt, knt., Envoy-Extraordinary to the Duke of Brunswick and Luneburg, and to the Landgrave of Hesse Cassel, from the 27th of May to the 28th of August 1691. See entry under March 2. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 38, p. 250.]
Mar. 3.
Whitehall.
Pass for Pierre Corbierre, " a French refugee," to go to Holland; certified by Mons. Satur, "minister of the parish church in the Savoy." [Ibid., p. 252.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the Court of King's Bench, and the Recorder and Sheriffs of London, to forbear putting into execution the sentence of death (should it be passed) upon— Wyvell, who is to be tried at the next sessions at the Old Baily, for the murder of —Wheeler. [Ibid., p. 253.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
A warrant to the Attorney-General to pass a bill containing a grant of the dignity of a baron of England to Sir Henry Capell, K.B., by the name, style, and title of Baron Capell of Tewkesbury, in Gloucestershire. [Ibid.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for a patent and commission to James Johnston, esq., to be one of the Secretaries of State for Scotland. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 100.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
The like to him for the gift of a yearly pension of 1,000l. [Ibid.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
The like for a gift to Sir John Lauder of Fountainhall of the office of their Majesties Advocate in Scotland. [Ibid., p. 102.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
A list of persons whose names are to be inserted in the commission which is to be granted for the Privy Council of Scotland, viz.:—Prince George of Denmark; John, Earl of Tweeddale, Chancellor; William Duke of Hamilton, President of the Council; George Earl of Melville, Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal; William, Duke of Queensberry; James, Marquis of Douglas; James, Earl of Drumlanrig; Archibald, Earl of Argyll; John Earl of Errol, Lord Constable; George, Earl of Sutherland; John, Earl of Cassillis; George Earl of Linlithgow; Patrick, Earl of Strathmore; Robert, Earl of Lothian, Justice General; David Earl of Leven; Archibald, Earl of Forlar; John, Earl of Kintore; John, Earl of Breadalbane; George, Viscount Tarbat; James, Viscount Stair, President of the Session; John, Lord Strathnaver; Lord Montgomery; Alexander, Lord Raith (sic); Henry, Lord Cardross; John, Lord Belhaven; John, Lord Carmichael; Patrick, Lord Polwarth; John, Master of Stair, "our Secretary"; William, Master of Forbes; James Johnston, "our other Secretary"; Sir John Lauder of Fountain Hall, Advocate; Sir John Lauder, of Haltoun; — Anstruther Sir Ludovick Grant; Sir Archibald Murray, of Blackbarony; Sir Robert Sinclair, of Stevenson; Sir Thomas Burnet of Leyes; Sir John Maxwell of Pollock; Sir George Munro, of Calvain; Lieut.Gen. Hugh Mackay; Sir Thomas Levingston; Sir William Lockhart, solicitor; and Sir Patrick Murray. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 103.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for a commission to the foregoing. [Ibid., p. 104.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
A list of persons whose names are to be inserted in the commission which is to be granted for the Treasury of Scotland: John, Earl of Tweeddale, Chancellor; James, Earl of Drumlanrig; John, Earl of Cassillis, George, Earl of Linlithgow, John, Earl of Breadalbane, and Alexander, Lord Raith. [Ibid., p. 107.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for a commission to the foregoing. [Ibid.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
List of the persons whose names are to be inserted in the Commission which is to be granted for the Exchequer of Scotland:— George, Earl of Melville; Alexander, Earl of Eglinton; Robert, Earl of Lothian; David, Earl of Leven; John, Earl of Kintore; George, Viscount Tarbet; James, Viscount Stair; Henry, Lord Cardross; John, Lord Belhaven; John, Master of Stair, our secretary; James Johnston, our other secretary; Sir John Lauder, of Fountain Hall, Advocate; — Anstruther; Sir Archibald Murray of Blackbarony; Sir Robert Sinclair, of Stevenson; and Robert Dundas, of Arniston. [Ibid., p. 111.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for a commission to the foregoing. [Ibid.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords of the Treasury to pay 300l. sterling to John, Lord Carmichael. [Ibid., p. 114.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
The like for a gift of the office of chamberlain of the earldom of Ross, to —. [Ibid.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
The like for a gift of a yearly pension of 400l. sterling out of the rents of the earldom of Ross to John, Lord Carmichael. [Ibid., p. 116.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
The like for the gift of the office of Clerk of the Registers and Rolls in Scotland, in favour of George Viscount Tarbat. [Ibid., p. 117.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for a gift of the office of Lord High Admiral, of Scotland to William, Duke of Hamilton. [Ibid., p. 118.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for a gift of a yearly pension of 400 marks, with an additional pension of 400 marks, "Scot money" to Mr. Walter Birnie, preacher of the Gospel, being blind from infancy, out of the rents, &c., of the bishoprics of Scotland. [S.P. Scotland Warrant Book 15, p. 119.]
Mar. 3.
Whitehall and Kensington.
Passes post-warrants for Emmanuel How, esq., to go to Harwich [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 164]; for Colonel Francis Hawley, and Mr. Jeremiah Chaplin, and one servant, ditto, for Dirck Vander Spelt, ditto [Ibid., p. 165]; for Lord Cutts and one servant, ditto; for Mr. John Hardham to go to Harwich and embark for Holland [Ibid. p. 166]; for Robert Morrison, gent., going to reside at Rotterdam, in the quality of agent for all matters relating to the transportation of our forces, &c., into Holland, with his servants, &c., to embark at any port of the kingdom and pass over to Rotterdam and thence to return; and for William Browne, gent., going to reside at Ostend in Flanders, in the same capacity. [Ibid., p. 168.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Lords-Justices to cause William Attwood, esq., to be admitted as one of the King's counsel, learned in the laws. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 160.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
The King to the Lord-Justices, authorising the reduction of forfeited recognizances, bonds, fines, and amercements. [Ibid., p. 298.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Governors of Sutton's Hospital or the Charterhouse, to admit Robert Johnson, on the next vacancy to the place of a poor brother or pensioner. [H.O. King's Letter Book 2, p. 46.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
The King to the Warden and Electors of New College, Oxford, and of Winchester College, recommending to them Richard Harrison for election to New College. [Ibid.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Instructions for Henry, Viscount Sydney, appointed "our Lieutenant-General, and General Governor" of Ireland.
You shall inform yourself of the present state of the kingdom, and transmit to us an account thereof. You are to settle matters in the church, for the good service of God, and see that livings in our gift are supplied with pious and orthodox persons as they become void, and endeavour to induce other patrons of livings to do the like. You are to enquire generally into the administration of Justice; and to assist, to your utmost, the Commissioners of the Revenue. You are to see that our interests be better served in the survey of extended lands. In case, at any time, the revenue should not "hold out" to pay the whole establishment, you are to take care that no pension be paid till the entire civil and military list be first paid; if the surplus is insufficient to pay all pensions, you shall make a proportionable abatement on each. You are to take a complete muster of our forces in Ireland and administer the oath to all the said forces. You are to see that the quartering of soldiers is carried out with the least inconvenience to our subjects. As there have been frequent duels and quarrels between the officers of our army, we empower you to cashier any officer who shall give or receive any challenge, or give any "real affront." You are to cause a survey to be taken of the present state of our "castles forts, and places," and also of our magazines and military stores and train of artillery, and you shall endeavour to erect and set up the art of saltpetre making in Ireland for the better supply of powder. You are to do all in your power to advance the trade of Ireland, so far as may consist with the laws in force for the welfare and commerce of our Kingdom of England, and more especially with such as relate to the Plantations, and we particularly recommend to you the improvement of the fishery trade and linen manufactory and the regulation of defects in packing and curing butter and beef. You shall give all lawful encouragement to all protestant strangers resorting to Ireland, and if a considerable number of them shall be willing to establish themselves in any cities or towns or in any other places for trade and manufacture, upon representation of the same to us, we will give order that they shall enjoy such privileges as may be consistent with the laws of Ireland. You shall strictly prohibit the transportation of wool. You shall use the best means possible to prevent "a general abuse" that has been committed in Ireland "by the unlawful coining and vending of small money for change."
It being represented to us that several rebels and fugitives come into Ireland from Scotland, we require you to correspond with our Council in Scotland, and, in order thereto, to establish a packet-boat between the two kingdoms, if you shall find it necessary. You are to seize any such rebels from Scotland and send them hither, and you are to inform yourself how far our proclamation for papists to bring in their arms has been obeyed. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 302.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Additional instructions to Viscount Sydney. You are to see that the articles granted last year to Galway, Limerick, and other places on their surrenders be construed according to their strict meaning and intention without showing any favour; and as divers persons in Ireland, are liable to prosecution for offences against us, we require you to notify to us their names, so that we may certify our further pleasure thereon. None who have submitted to us voluntarily and have since lived peaceably, are to be prosecuted, and no favour is to be shewn to those, who since their submission, have returned to the enemy. [Ibid., p. 313.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant to Thomas, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, to cause the privy seal to be affixed to all and every warrant, grant, or other instrument, now depending, which has not already passed under the privy seal, and which may have been directed to the late Commissioners for the custody of the same. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 265.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant directing Richard, Earl of Ranelagh, Sir Stephen Fox, and Sir Christopher Wren, to prepare an account, in writing, of what the charge has been for building and furnishing Chelsea Hospital, and what has been the cost of purchasing lands convenient for it, up to the 25th of this instant March, and also what has been paid to any of officers and servants belonging to the said hospital. [Ibid., p. 278.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill appointing Sydney, Lord Godolphin, Richard Hampden, esq., Sir Stephen Fox, knt., Sir Edward Seymour, bart., and Charles Montague, esq., commissioners for executing the office of Treasurer of the Exchequer. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 282.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant to Edward Russell, esq., commander-in-chief of the Royal Navy, to pay quarterly out of such money as he shall receive for the contingent uses of the navy, the sum of 120l. to Moses Jaqueau, "French sea officer and refugee," who served as volunteer in the navy during 1691. [Ibid., p. 285.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Admiralty requiring them to direct the Principal Officers and Commissioners of the Navy to make out and sign a bill for the allowance of 400l. to Admiral Edward Russell, who had paid the same to seven French refugee sea-officers who served in the fleet. [Ibid., p. 316.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant to Admiral Edward Russell, to pay quarterly, out of such money as he shall receive for the contingent uses of the Navy, the yearly sum of 80l. to Peter Fountaine, a French sea officer and refugee who served as a volunteer in the Navy in 1691. [Ibid., p. 318.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for the Marquis of Ruvigny to be sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 432.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland for appointing Henry Ecchlin, Esq., Baron of the Court of Exchequer of Ireland, to be one of the Justices of the Court of King's Bench in Ireland in the place of Sir Richard Stevens, knt. [Ibid., p. 433.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland for appointing Sir Richard Ryves, to be one of the Barons of the Court of Exchequer of Ireland in the place of Henry Ecchlin, esq. [Ibid.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for swearing Col. Richard Coote one of the Privy Council of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 434.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent under the great seal of Ireland for creating Henry de Massue de Ruvigny, Baron of Portarlington, and Viscount Galway, with the fee of 20 marks yearly. [Ibid.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for Richard Cox, Esq., one of the Justices of the Court of Common Pleas, to be sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 436.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for Murrough, Viscount Blessington to be sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [Ibid.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant to permit Thomas Uniack, outlawed for high treason in sitting as a member in the late pretended parliament in Ireland, to bring a writ of error for reversing the said outlawry. [Ibid., p. 441.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent to be passed under the great seal of Ireland for granting to Thomas Coningsby the dignity of Baron Coningsby of Clanbrassill in county Armagh and to the heirs male of his body. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 443.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for Thomas Coningsby to be sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 445.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant for Col. Robert Smyth to be sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 451.]
Mar. 3.
Kensington.
Warrant to permit James Barry to bring a writ of error for the reversal of his outlawry for sitting as a member in the late pretended parliament in Ireland. [Ibid., p. 456.]
Mar. 3.
Leghorn.
Certificate by Consul Calckberner to the States General touching an English ship, the William, of London, brought into Leghorn by a French privateer. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 52.]
Mar. 4.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Earl of Athlone, having recommended Mrs. Elizabeth Bourke, whose husband was one of the officers slain in his Majesty's service in Ireland, that she might receive his Majesty's bounty, among the rest of the widows, being reduced to great necessity, I transmit her petition to you, by his Majesty's command; it was omitted to be delivered to me with the petition of the other widows. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 390.]
Mar. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Henry Goodrick, lieut.-gen. of the Ordnance, and to the principal officers of the same, to issue 63 snaphance muskets, strapped, 3 halberds, and 2 drums, being for arming the company of grenadiers in the regiment of foot in which George, Prince of Hesse Darmstadt is colonel. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 245.]
Mar. 4.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for the engineer Minie, and his servant, to go to Harwich and Holland; for James Kitson, one of their Majesties messengers, to go to Harwich [S.P. Dom., Warrant Book 36, p. 166]; and for William Van Ingen to go to Harwich and embark for Holland. [Ibid., p. 167.]
Mar. 4.
The Hague.
Pensionary Heinsius to the King. Acknowledges the receipt of the King's letter of the 26th February. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 49.]
Mar. 4.
Culenburg.
The Prince of Waldeck to the King. Hopes that the state of his health will permit him to go to the Hague very soon. The Prince of Vaudemont embarasses us very much. The Princes of Nassau and Sarbruck are going to The Hague. In a postscript the writer asserts that he is doing his best to carry out the King's orders with regard to better quarters for the troops. [Ibid., No. 50.]
Mar. 5.
Whitehall.
Passes for Gerrit Boel to go to Harwich and Holland; for Yan Andriese, Claertje Gerts, and Dirckje Janse, ditto; for Anthony Van Son, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 166; and a post warrant for William Knight, one of their Majesty's messengers, to go to Ostend or where he shall have occasion. [Ibid., p. 167.]
Mar. 5.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. The King commands me to tell you that, notwithstanding the time prefixed in the proclamation, issued by you and the Privy Council, he would have you proceed to determine the pretensions of such as claim the benefit of the articles granted to Galway and Limerick upon their surrender last year. I sent you his Majesty's pleasure for adding 500 Irish private soldiers to the 1,400 formerly directed to be sent to the Emperor. Capt. Wilson, who brought me yours of the 27th, says there was nothing done herein when he came away, which is the reason I mention this again. His Majesty would have you give Mr. Fielding leave to come to England. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 301.]
Mar. 5.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. I enclose the proclamation, declaring the war of Ireland to be at an end. [Ibid., p. 302.] Annexing:—
The Proclamation referred to, dated at Kensington 3 March 1691–2. [Ibid., p. 299.]
Mar. 5.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Fielding. I have moved the King on your behalf, for leave to come over, which he has granted, and would have you do so with all expedition, there being present occasion for your service here. [Ibid., p. 301.]
Mar. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Thomas Beake, messenger in ordinary, to carry the Sieur Du Quesne, an alien enemy, in his custody, to Harwich, and there deliver him on board the next packet boat for Holland. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 265.]
Mar. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the commander of any of the packet boats, at Harwich, to receive the Sieur Du Quesne, on board, and carry him into Holland. [Ibid.]
Mar. 5/15. List of troops quartered in the Low Countries. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 51.]
Mar. 7.
Whitehall.
Commissions for John Miller, clerk, to be chaplain of the two companies of foot in the colony of New York [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 247]; for John Mann to be adjutant to Col. Henry Row's regiment of foot [Ibid. p. 254]; for William Tatton, esq., to take his rank as lieutenant colonel of foot [Ibid. p. 255]; for James Haliburton, gent., to be ensign to Capt., John Gordon's company in Sir David Collier's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 256.]
Mar. 7.
Whitehall.
Passes for Jacob Adriansz Mol, to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; and for the Marquis de Gregory, with two other gentlemen, and four or five Domestic servants, to go to Falmouth and embark for the Groyne. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 167.]
Mar. 7.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. The ships designed for the transport of the five battalions will sail from Bideford and Minehead on the 18th of this month to Cork, and Kinsale. The most proper place for embarking the Irish regiment, designed for the Emperor's service, is thought to be Long Island in Cork Harbour. The ships for the transport of them are ready, and ordered to sail to-night, whereof I give you notice that the Irish may be in readiness to embark upon the arrival of the ships. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 321.]
Mar. 8.
Kensington.
Commissions for William Durston, clerk, to be chaplain to Col. Ferdinando Hastings' regiment of foot; and for Nicholas Rookwood, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. James Jones, in Col. Toby Purcell's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 243.]
Mar. 8.
Whitehall.
Post-warrant for Don Gaspar de Lerruz, with two able post-horses and a guide, to go to Taunton. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 169.]
Mar. 8.
Kensington.
Warrant to the Justices of Assize, and Gaol Delivery for the Norfolk circuit, and all others whom it may concern, to admit Henry Cole, John Williamson, and Richard Busbey to bail, they, since their conviction for robbery at the assizes held at Aylesbury, having been inserted in the circuit pardon, upon condition of transportation. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 266.]
Mar. 8. Mons. Hoffman to the [Earl of Nottingham]. The Commissioners of the transport have accepted my contract to transport the Irish to Hamburg for the sum of 3,000l. there will not be much delay before they are ready to go; I have to inform Count Windisgratz of the agreement by this post. [S.P. Dom. Will. and Mary 4, No. 13.]
Mar. 9.
Whitehall.
Commissions for James Smallwood, clerk, to be chaplain to the first regiment of foot guards, commanded by Charles, Duke of Schomberg [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 243]; and for Benjamin Fletcher, esq., to take his rank and command as colonel of foot. [Ibid., p. 247.]
Mar. 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Pulteney, esq. Upon the settling of the Privy Council in Ireland, the Lords-Justices appointed him clerk of the council there. He officiated in the said place during Lord Sydney's stay there, and being obliged to come over with the said lord, he discharged the said place by his deputy. States that his salary cannot be paid otherwise than by her Majesty's letter to the Lords-Justices. Prays, therefore, for such a letter. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 247.]
Mar. 9.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Richard, Earl of Barrymore. Shows that his ancestors were proprietors of the castle and manor of Shandon, near Cork, which by its situation, commands that city, and is now made use of for his Majesty's service. That King Charles II. authorised the Duke of Ormond, then chief governor of Ireland, to agree with him for the purchase of the said castle, and land about it, which was near a conclusion, but was prevented by the death of his Majesty. That the Earl of Athlone has viewed the said castle, and knows of what consequence the same is to their Majesties. Considering "the juncture of time" he demands no money, but is willing to take a lease from the Crown for certain forfeited lands which he has in custodiam. Prays that the examination thereof may be referred "together with his sufferings, " to Lord Sydney, and in the meantime to be continued in possession of the lands granted in custodiam to John Farrel, esq., in trust for the petitioner. Referred to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 248.]
Mar. 9.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to Sir R. Reynell, Sir J. Temple, and Mr. Levinge. I send enclosed the titles of certain bills, which the Lords of the Committee think may be necessary to be passed into Acts of Parliament in Ireland, that you may consider them and prepare such heads for each of those bills as you shall judge most proper, and bring them to the Committee with all speed:—an Act of Recognition; an Act concerning the militia; an Act of toleration to Protestant dissenters; an Act for repressing rapparees; an Act for the distribution of intestates' estates; an Act for preventing frauds and perjuries; an Act for obliging beneficed ministers to residence and against pluralities; an Act for naturalizing protestant strangers who shall come into Ireland within the space of —; (fn. 1) an Act for the regulation of chimney money; and an Act for encouraging the linen manufacture. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 388.]
Mar. 9.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I send you, by the Queen's command, the enclosed papers relating to the Irish prisoners in Chester Castle, who would have you examine their pretensions and report your opinion to her Majesty what may be fit to allow them. Mr. Clarke will attend you and give you further information herein if necessary. [Ibid. p. 389.]
Mar. 9.
Whitehall.
Passes for Colonel Charles Goullon, and his three servants, to go to Harwich and Holland; for Colonel Thomas Levingston, Major Ker, Captain Hay, with five servants, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 165]; for Mons. John Francis Tillier, a Swiss officer, ditto; for Mons. Jacob Du Quesne, who has served his Majesty as volunteer in Ireland, ditto; for the Lord De Frize, (sic) with twelve servants, ditto; and for Major Du Rosoy, ditto. [Ibid. p. 169.]
Mar. 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Masters or Commanders of the Packet-Boats, or the Postmaster at Holyhead, directing them to furnish a vessel to convey William Crane, sent express to Dublin, in case the packetboat with yesterday's mails should have sailed before his arrival. [Ibid., p. 170.]
Mar. 9.
Whitehall.
Post-warrant for the above William Crane. [Ibid.]
Mar. 9.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Charles Smith to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 170]; for Hans Andrew Dilleben, ditto; for Francis and John Gaschon, ditto; for Barthel de Ness, ditto; for Mr. Christian Dietrich, with three servants, ditto; and for Jan Jacobsen, Jan Hendrick, Sen Adrian Voskuÿl, Alexander Wÿbrandse, and Lambert Meyndertsen, ditto. [Ibid., p. 171.]
Mar. 9.
Culenburg.
Memorial. The Prince of Waldeck is doing his utmost to arrange matters in the Low Countries. The Count de Cesilas has been recalled to Spain, but the Prince of Waldeck has written to Mons. de Schonenberg, Envoy of the States at Madrid, to obtain permission for him to remain. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 52.]
Mar. 10.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Abraham Maseres, esq., to be captain of the troop of which Lieut. Col. Stephen Casaubon was captain, in Major-Gen. Ruvigny's regiment of horse; for — Pinsun, gent., to be lieutenant of Capt. Abraham Maseres' troop in the same regiment; for —Maseres, gent., to be cornet of the same; for — Malerargues, gent., to be lieutenant to Lieut.-Col. Peter de la Bastide's troop in the same regiment [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 246]; for Sir John Ivory, knight, to be captain of the company, of which Capt. Soam was late captain, in Sir Henry Bellasis' regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 247]; for William, Earl of Devonshire, Steward of the Household, to be lord-lieutenant of Nottinghamshire [Ibid., p. 249]; for —Moor, gent., to be lieutenant of the company in which Capt. Franks is captain in Sir Henry Bellasis' regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 257]; for Pierre de la Bastide, esq., to be lieutenant-colonel of the regiment of horse, commanded by Major Gen. Ruvigny, and likewise to be captain of a troop in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 262]; for John de Rouviere to be a reformed captain in Viscount Galway's regiment of horse; for —Cramahé, esq., to be captain in the regiment of horse, commanded by Major Gen. Ruvigny [Ibid., p. 277]; for Peter L'Abbadie to be a reformed cornet in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 278]; and for Colin Campbell, esq., to be captain of the company of which Capt. James Campbell was late captain in Archibald, Earl of Argyll's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 283.]
Mar. 10.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Bayley, citizen of London. Shows that he has discovered and invented a new sort of "glazed printed hangings" made of cotton, worsted or woollen yarn of all sorts of curious figures, and landscapes, which can hardly be distinguished from the finest tapestry hangings. Prays for letters patent for his new invention for 14 years. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 250.]
Mar. 10.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Attorney-General. I send you enclosed the depositions of Edward Rust, and Thomas Shales against Mr. Henry Sprott, tide surveyor of Ipswich, which I desire you to return to me by the same messenger, with your opinion how and where this man ought to be prosecuted, and whether it will be best to send for him up to town, or to take his prosecution there. If you judge it best to send him hither, what crime must I charge him with in the warrant ? [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 390].
Mar. 10.
Whitehall.
Passes for William Knight to go to Harwich and embark for Holland; and for Mons. Galeany, who has been here to purchase five English horses for the Duke of Savoy, his master, to return to Piedmont, viâ Holland. [S.P. Dom., Warrant Book 36, p. 172.]
Mar. 10.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. You are to prepare, forthwith, the heads of a bill for the better settling and improving the linen manufacture in Ireland, and a bill for the better collecting of the Customs, and settling a book of rates and a bill for regulating the excise and chimney money as you shall judge most proper; as soon as the drafts are ready, you are to transmit them to me. It is resolved to ship the horses belonging to the artillery at Waterford, and the officers of the five regiments (which were to be sent from Ireland into the English Channel) and to transport them from that port to Bideford, from whence they are to march hither to avoid the inconveniences and hazards which the horses might incur by a longer voyage at sea. You are to acquaint Mons. Ruvigny with this resolution, that he may give orders for the march of these horses and officers to that port, and likewise to direct Mr. Vankomrig [Vanhomrigh ?] to provide hay and oats for these horses in their passage from Waterford to Bideford; this is to be done as soon as possible, as the transport ships will sail hence to Ireland very speedily. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 314.]
Mar. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Justices of Assize for the Home Circuit, and all others whom it may concern, to forbear, till further order, putting into execution the sentence of death upon John Lawes, gent., should be found guilty of having caused the death of Thomas Wyatt. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 276.]
Mar. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant pardoning John Dodd, John Allet, Jacob Smith, and Abraham Mudge, who were sentenced to death by a court martial for deserting the ship Vanguard, when she was on shore in Sandwich Bay, and are now prisoners in the custody of the Marshal of the Admiralty. Also for pardoning Matthew Haydon, late gunner of the fireship the Flame, sentenced likewise, for embezelling the stores belonging to the said ship. [Ibid.]
Mar. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill, containing a grant to Philadelphia, Lady Wentworth, widow, of the three fairs or markets, to be held within the manor of Tuddington in Bedfordshire, every year. One of the said fairs to be held on the 14th day of April, another upon the first Monday in June, and the other upon the 22nd day of October. [Ibid., p. 283.]
Mar. 10.
Office of the Ordnance.
The Officers of the Ordnance to Sir Henry Goodrick. Mr. Creech has now overhauled the sea propositions according to your alterations therein to be made, and computed the tonnage thereof, which comes as near as can be guessed, to 4,900 tons. We are transcribing the said proposition for the sea train, which, as soon as it is finished, according to the alterations agreed upon, shall be sent to the Duke of Leinster. We have laid the answer, received on Wednesday last from the Commissioners of Transport, before the Lords of the Treasury, wherein they complain of want of money to take up vessels for transporting the Flanders train. We had a letter yesterday to attend the Treasury, but were countermanded by another letter; so that, although we have drawn our train all out upon the parade ready to be shipped, we have yet no prospect of any shipping to be sent us. The Committee of Council should send for the Transport Commissioners, and give them some directions in this matter and recommend them to the Treasury for money. We are in great pain for the king's service being delayed; but we can do no more than we have done in this business. [S.P. Dom., William and Mary 4, No. 14.]
Mar. 10.
Office of Ordnance.
The Officers of the Ordnance to Sir Henry Goodrick. Just before the receipt of your letter, two masters of vessels came from the Transport Office, with a letter from the Commissioners to our Board, acquainting us that they would come to the wharf to be loaded at such time as we should appoint them. We have ordered one of about 90 tons burthen to lay to this evening. We are not willing to take the charge of hiring vessels upon ourselves, without an absolute necessity, having not one farthing to defray any charge whatsoever. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 15.]
Mar. 11.
Whitehall.
Commissions for John McFairland, esq., to be captain of a company in the regiment of foot, commanded by Archibald, Earl of Argyll, and for Robert Taylor, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. John McFairland, in the same regiment. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 283.]
Mar. 11.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Attorney-General. I desire your opinion whether this warrant to the Lords-Justices of Ireland is sufficient for the purpose designed, viz., the discharging those people from outlawries who are within the ratified articles of Galway and Limerick; and if it is not, what do you think further necessary ?
The enclosed paper is a letter from the Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge in answer to one I wrote him on the 1st instant, concerning the filling up of those fellowships in their respective colleges, which were possessed by such as would not take the oaths. The college of St. John's (which is most concerned, as there are several there who have not taken the oaths) have power by their statutes to elect to vacant fellowships but once in a year, which day is Monday next. I desire to know what can be done in this matter towards fulfilling the Act of Parliament, and what you think proper in this case, either for requiring certificates or displacing such as neglect to produce them, so as it may be put in execution soon enough to have the advantage by to-morrow's post; otherwise it may come too late to have effect at this approaching election at St. John's. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 391.]
Mar. 11.
Whitehall.
Passes for Gretzi Boudewÿns, Willimyntzi Hoop, and Clara Vermeulen, to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 172]; for Mons. Galleany, with a servant and horses to go to Gravesend, and to embark thence to Holland; for Philip Roset to go to Harwich and Holland; for Stephen Gythens, one of their Majesties' messengers, ditto; and a postwarrant for the same. [Ibid., p. 173.]
Mar. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant to make strict and diligent search for Henry Sprott, surveyor at Ipswich, and having found him, to apprehend him for uttering seditious words, and to bring him to be examined. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 277.]
Mar. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant to permit Edmund Malone of Rathlegh, barrister-at-law, to bring a writ of error for the reversal of his outlawry, and for letters patent granting him a free pardon, he having made an early submission, and come to England, where he has since lived peaceably. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 441.]
Mar. 12.
Whitehall.
Commissions for John Hamilton, esq., to be lieutenant-colonel of the regiment of foot, commanded by Col. John Michelbourne, and likewise to be captain of a company in the same regiment; for Anthony Shamborg (sic), esq., to be major of the same regiment, and to be captain of a company in the same [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 243]; for Francis Dorrington, gent., to be lieutenant of the grenadiers, of which Capt. Joshua Campbell is captain, in the same regiment; for Joshua Campbell, esq., to be captain of the company of grenadiers, of which Capt. Anthony Shamborg was captain in the same regiment; for John Knibloe to be surgeon to Col. Toby Purcell's regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 246]; for George Hastings, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Henry Waldron in Col. Ferdinando Hastings' regiment of foot; for Edward Booth, gent, to be quarter-master to the same regiment; for Matthew Pearson to be adjutant to Sir George St. George's regiment of foot [Ibid., p. 247]; for Henry Smith, esq., to be major of Col. Zachariah Tiffin's regiment, and likewise to be captain of a company in the same; for James Watson, esq., to be captain of the company of which Major Henry Smith was late captain in the same regiment [Ibid., p. 251]; and for Alexander Campbell, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. John Campbell in the Earl of Argyll's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 283.]
Mar. 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Constantine Vernatty, Thomas Addison, and John Nix, esqrs., John Moore, and George Moore, of London, merchants. Shows that they have, together with several others, at the expense of several thousand pounds, brought to perfection a very useful art or invention of smelting down lead ore, with pit and sea coal, and making the same into good and "merchantable sheet-lead, shot, bullets, and other lead, " which has not so effectually been put into practice by any persons before. That in regard it requires a considerable stock for the improvement and carrying on the said undertaking, which cannot easily be raised, but by a joint-stock and incorporation under the Great Seal, they pray her Majesty to incorporate them and such others as they shall nominate by the name of the Governor and Company of Lead Miners in England and Wales. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 249.]
Mar. 12.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report, dated 3 March, 1691–2, of the Attorney-General concerning — Owen, and others. I conceive that the making of salt petre in great quantities in this kingdom may be of advantage to your Majesty, and your subjects; and as the petitioners' undertaking cannot be carried on without a great sum of money, it may be proper for you to erect them into a corporation for the purposes mentioned in their petition. Granted. [Ibid., p. 254.]
Mar. 12.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge. The best answer I can give to your letter of the 10th and the best directions to the masters of the colleges will be the enclosed copy of the Attorney-General's letter, in which they will see their own duty as well as that of the fellows, and I hope they will not longer neglect it for their own sakes as the law is plain. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 392.] (fn. 2)
Mar. 12.
Whitehall.
Pass for the Chevalier de Lissac to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 173.]
Mar. 12.
Westminster.
Memorial from Mons. de la Fouleresse, respecting the ships City of Copenhagen, Charlotte Amelia, Wisdom of Solomon, Hope of Frederickshall, and Hope of Christiansand. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 277.]
Mar. 13.
Whitehall.
Commission for William Rich, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Robert Mackaylay in the Earl of Argyll's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 283.]
Mar. 13.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Queen desires you to give order for a yacht to carry President De La Tour, the Duke of Savoy's Envoy-Extraordinary, into Holland, and to be ready to sail with the Convoy which is to go with the troops about the middle of this week. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 393.]
Mar. 14. Commission for William Hamilton, gent., to be lieutenant to Lieut.-Col. Robert Jackson, in the Earl of Argyll's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 283.]
Mar. 14.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. I have received a letter this evening from Sir Ralph Delaval, dated the 11th instant, in sight of the Land's End, though I believe you may have had the same account from himself. He left Cadiz on the 21st of February with 70 odd English and Dutch [ships], who were all in his company at the writing of the letter except some English who left him in the latitude of 49° 10', and he presumes were bound for St. George's Channel, which I mention to you in regard that this sea is much infected with French privateers, and that you may give such orders as may be necessary for the security of our merchant ships. This letter came by the Crown frigate which Sir Ralph dispatched ahead to Plymouth for orders. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 393.]
Mar. 14.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lord Mayor to the same effect as the above. [Ibid., p. 394.]
Mar. 14.
Whitehall.
Passes for Capt. Villeneuve, Lieutenants Portail and Pelat, Ensign Brissac, La Verdure, a serjeant, and three servants to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. Obadiah Paul, rector of Eastrop, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 173]; for David Mendez, Eli de Medina, and Barons Isaacs and Jacob de Baiza, four Jews, ditto; for Mr. Lewis Berchere and James Lewis, his son, ditto; for Mr. Jan Jongh Cloedt and Joris Janse, ditto; for Matthew Perrin to go to Gravesend and thence to Hamburg; for Mr. John Le Platrier and Francis Le Blond to go to Harwich and Holland; for Monsieur le President de la Tour, envoy-extraordinary from the Duke of Savoy, with all his servants, to go to the Buoy of the Nore, or any other place or port, and thence to Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 174]; and for Mr. Christian Van Forster to go to Harwich and thence to Flanders. [Ibid., p. 175.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Paul Dancourt, gent., to be ensign of the company of which Capt. Lewis Mordaunt is captain, in the Earl of Monmouth's regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 248]; and for Charles Fleming, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Robert Campbell in the Earl of Argyll's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 283.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Richard Fitz-Gerald, Thomas Wise, John Porter, Edward Browne, and others, Roman Catholics of Waterford. Shows that they were inhabitants of Waterford, and as such were comprehended in the Articles for the surrender thereof. That by the said articles they were not to be molested in their properties, which included their estates and trades, &c., that they have formerly petitioned that they had not the benefit of the said Articles, being dispossessed of their real estate, which is not above 1,400l. per annum, and deprived of their respective trades, professions, and callings. They pray for a confirmation of the said Articles under the Great Seal of England. Referred to the LordLieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 250.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Lieut.-Col. John Kelly, on behalf of himself and such others as are included in the Articles of Boffin. Shows that Sir Henry Bellasis, by order and direction of General Ginckle, entered into articles with Col. Timothy Reardon, then governor of the island and fort of Boffin, bearing date August 19th last, for the surrender of the said island and fort and other adjacent islands, whereby it was agreed that the petitioner and the Lord of Athonree, and all the inhabitants of the said island, should possess and enjoy all their estates, both real and personal, as they held under the Act of Settlement, and should also have a pardon of all treasons and outlawries, &c.; and that the said Articles should be ratified within such time and in such manner as those of Galway, which have been ratified under the Great Seal of England. They pray for ratification accordingly. Referred to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 251.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I enclose [enclosure not entered] an extract of a letter from the Lord Chancellor of Ireland, by the Queen's command, who desires you consider what is represented in it, and give such directions as shall be necessary, she judging the proposal to be very reasonable. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 394.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
The same to Mr. Clarke, I desire you will let me know as soon as you can this evening to what place the artillery in Flanders is to be carried. [Ibid., p. 395.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. I send you the enclosed copy of a letter from Bristol, by the Queen's command, who would have you order the ships mentioned in it, laden with corn, etc. to be permitted to proceed to Ireland, without pressing the men, the masters giving security to return thence to Bristol or some other of the western ports, without undertaking or performing any further voyage, as soon as they shall have unladen. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 395.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lord Mayor. The Queen desires you to summon a Common Council, to meet on Friday next at eleven in the morning, at which time some lords of the Privy Council will be there. [Ibid.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Attorney-General. I send the enclosed petition of Mr. William Beckwith and Sir Edward Nevill's letter relating to his case, by her Majesty's command, who would have you report your opinion upon this matter on Thursday next in Council. [Ibid., p. 398.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Charles Hedges. I send enclosed two memorials received from the Secretaries of Sweden and Denmark, and desire an account of the ships mentioned in them by Thursday morning next. [Ibid.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen considering the good service performed by Capt. John Richards, desires you to give him a pension of 200l. per annum payable out of the Royal Oak Lottery; the first quarterly payment to be made at Lady Day next. [Ibid.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the same. I send enclosed, by the Queens command, the petition of Major Walter Delamere and Major Edmund Power, with two letters on their behalf from the Lords-Justices. She would have you consider their several pretensions and report your opinion what may be proper for their gratification. [Ibid., p. 397.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Joseph Herne. I enclose, by the Queen's command, the copy of a complaint received from the Portuguese Envoy and desire you will bring with you an account of this matter and your answer on Monday afternoon next, when you are to attend the Cabinet Council. [Ibid.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending to prepare a bill containing the presentation of James Canaries, D.D. one of the chaplains in ordinary, to the vicarage of St. Helen in Abingdon, with the Chapels of Drayton and Radley in Berkshire, and the diocese of Salisbury, the same being void by the death of Ezereel Burdon, clerk. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 121.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
Passes or post warrants for Hans Hermans to go to Harwich and Holland; for Philipp Vander Woestyne, ditto; for Capt. Anthony De la Maria, Lieutenants Simond and De la Verriere with one servant, ditto; for Mr. Ralph Young, one of their Majesties' messengers in ordinary, to go from London to Holyhead, or any other place thereabouts [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 175]; for Mr. Fortescue Tynte, Mr. Edward Stroud, Mr. Francis Lee, and Mr. Theophilus Downes, with two servants, to go to Harwich and Holland [Ibid., p. 176]; and for Charles Price and John Jenkinson, gentlemen, to embark in any port in this kingdom and pass over into France. [Ibid., p. 177.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lord Chancellor. I have received yours of the 5th instant, and have acquainted the Queen with it, and by her command I have sent the first clause in it, relating to letting lands of some persons not indicted or outlawed which have been seized by the Commissioners of the Revenue, to the Lords of the Treasury, from whom you may receive directions to-night. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 316.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
The same to the Lords-Justices. The proclamation by the Duke of Hamilton, mentioned in yours of the 6th inst. was not enclosed. I have told the Queen of the said Duke's proposal for preventing the yeomen of Scotland transporting themselves into Ireland without a pass. You are not to concur in this without first giving the Queen your reasons. [Ibid.] Enclsing
Warrant signed by the Queen to the Lords-Justices, requiring them to reverse the outlawries issued against the persons who are comprehended within the ratified articles of Galway and Limerick. Dated 15 March 1691–2. [Ibid., p. 315.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
Certificate of the death of Mr. John Andrew Eckhart, his Majesty's late resident at Brussels, who died there on the 10/20 day of January last past. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 277.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant licensing John Shorter, esq., and William Wallis, merchant, their agents and workmen, to travel and search the woods in the province of Maine, and other colonies in New England, and to fell as many good and sound trees, as may answer the number of 54 masts, 35 bowsprits, and 16 yards of several dimensions required for use of the Navy in England, and to carry the same, being squared through the woods to the water side, in order to transport and bring them into our stores. This licence is granted pursuant to the clause in the charter lately granted to the colony of Massachusetts reserving for use of the Navy all trees of the diameter of 24 inches and more at a height of 12 inches from the ground. [Ibid., p. 280.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending to prepare a warrant authorising the Commissioners of the Treasury, and Chancellor, and Under-Treasurer of the Exchequer, to pay to Thomas, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, Keeper of the Privy Seal, or his assigns, the sum of 4l. a day, in lieu of the ancient diet of sixteen dishes of meat. [Ibid., p. 281.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
Leave granted to David Parry, esq., high sheriff of the county of Carnarvon, to reside out of the said county. [H.O. King's Letter. Book 1, p. 42.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
Similar leave for William Hanmer, esq., high sheriff of Flintshire. [Ibid.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for Viscount Massereene to be sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 444.]
Mar. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the payment to John Pultney, clerk of the Privy Council of Ireland, or his assigns, of 400l. as his salary for services and attendance prior to the date of his patent, and 40l. for paper and parchment. [Ibid., p. 450.]
Mar. 16.
Whitehall.
Commission for Thomas Hoill, gent., to be ensign to Capt. John Campbell, of Airds, in the Earl of Argyll's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 283.]
Mar. 16.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The King has appointed the following persons to be Commissioners of the Revenue in Ireland:—Mr. Roberts, Mr. Kitely, Mr. Evelyn, Mr. Dickerson, Mr. Sedgwick, and Mr. Van Hummerick [Van Humery ?], and Mr. Steel to be their secretary; and he would have you give order for what is necessary in this behalf to be dispatched. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 397.]
Mar. 16.
Whitehall.
Passes for Henry Heldiring to go to Harwich and Holland; for Francis Gyles de Wispelaere, ditto; for Hans Beylenberg, ditto; for Paul De Lang and Dirck Mathÿs, ditto; for Monck Broerze Tulip, ditto; for Susanna Van Dom, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 176.]; for Gerard Vander Tin, ditto; for Mr. Johan Bout, ditto; for Mrs Dorothy Van Dÿck, with her maid, ditto [Ibid., p. 177]; and for Capt.-Lieut. Frederick Adolf Van Rhemen and one servant, to go to Harwich, ditto. [Ibid., p. 178.]
Mar. 16/26.
Berlin.
Frederick, Elector of Prussia, to the King. Thanks his Majesty for informing him of his arrival at the Hague. Will inform the King's ministers at the Hague and Field-Marshal Fleming as to his movements and of the operations of the next campaign. Holograph. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 53.]
Mar. 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report of the Lords-Justices of Ireland, dated at Dublin Castle, 26 February 1691-2, concerning Mrs. Stopford's petition. We have examined the allegations in the petition of Mary Stopford, widow of James Stopford, touching the lands of Cabragh, Tara, Brick (sic), and Trivett, and find that part of these lands were the inheritance of Matthew Penteny, and other parts thereof were the possession of Richard Cusack, and that Penteny, in July, 1641, in consideration of 400l., mortgaged the lands of Cabragh and Tara, to Ann, Lady Forth and Cusack for 340l., and mortgaged Trevitt and Britt (sic) to her likewise; the interest of both which mortgages was vested in the said James Stopford, who being in possession, by virtue thereof, in order to obtain the inheritance, pursuant to a clause in the Act of Settlement which had subjected the incumbered estates to the satisfaction of the officers for service done before 1649, bought in 240l. of those arrears and placed them upon those lands, and thereupon obtained a decree for the said lands in the Court of Claims at the quit-rent of 16l. per annum, having laid out very great sums of money in building and improving. After which, by the contrivance and ill practice of the late Earl of Tyrconnel, then Col. Talbot, and the proprietor, and one Alexander Hackett, a man of very ill fame, there was a new application to the Court of Claims, and though by the proofs of the witnesses examined before them, it appears that the said mortgages were real, and no part thereof satisfied to the time of the beginning of the late rebellion, yet, without any just ground, they judged the mortgages satisfied, and so set aside the former decree, and decreed those lands to the Duke of York towards a satisfaction of deficiencies of the lands granted to him. Whereby the petitioner's husband lost the estate and all the money laid out in building and improvement. Thereupon the said James Stopford was necessitated to take the premises for a term of years under the rent of 80l. a year, after which the said Earl of Tyrconnel obtained a grant of the inheritance of those lands, and the said Mr. Stopford was necessitated, for preserving his improvement, to make a new agreement with the said Earl and to take a new lease for 300 years at the rent of 100l. per annum.
This being the true state of the fact as far as we can collect out of the proceedings and proofs of the Court of Claims, and subsequent Acts, we are, upon the whole, of opinion that Mrs. Stopford was unjustly deprived of the said estates, and therefore that his Majesty should grant the inheritance of the premises to the petitioner, and abate part of the present reserved yearly rent. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 252.]
Mar. 17.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Corker, of Godmersham, near Canterbury, clerk. Shows that hitherto he has taught children to read, but now by reason of several infirmities, and being seventy years of age, he is incapable of supporting himself. Prays for a beadsman's place in Canterbury Cathedral. Granted, on the first vacancy. [Ibid., p. 262.]
Mar. 17.
Whitehall.
A proclamation concerning passes for ships. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations 5, p. 73.]
Mar. 17.
Whitehall.
The same for proroguing the parliament. Printed. [Ibid., p. 74.]
Mar. 17.
Whitehall.
Passes for Capt. Des Brissay, Lieutenants Dela Bene and St. Pau, with one servant, to go to Harwich and Holland; for John Walter, esq., Thomas Warland and Henry Williams, his two servants, ditto; for Wulderig Hem and Rudolf Aenlicker, ditto; for Mr. James Bridges, Capt. John Marshall, and Abraham Williams and David Lloyd, their servants, ditto. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 178]; and for Gerrit Van Schay, ditto. [Ibid., p. 179.]
Mar. 17.
Whitehall.
Certificate showing that Robert Wolseley, esq., his Majesty's envoy extraordinary to the Elector of Bavaria, Governor of Flanders, kissed his Majesty's hand, and departed on Thursday, March 3rd, for that employment. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 284.]
Mar. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Treasurer of the Chamber or his deputy, to deliver out of the treasure of the chamber, to William, Lord Bishop of St. Asaph, chief almoner, or his sub-almoner, the sum of 133l. 6s. 8d. to be distributed by him in alms upon Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and the rest of that week. [Ibid.]
Mar. 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to forbear putting into execution, until further order, the sentence of death, should it be passed upon Capt. John Blake, charged with the murder of Samuel Miller, gent. [Ibid.]
Mar. 17. Sir Charles Hedges to the Earl of Nottingham. The two first ships mentioned in the enclosed memorial called the City of Copenhagen and Charlotte Amalia went from Amsterdam to Borneuf in France, took in there a lading of salt and wines, and pretending to be bound directly for Copenhagen were seized in Cowes road by the officers belonging to the Isle of Wight; they are claimed by the inhabitants of Copenhagen, and have the King of Denmark's pass bearing date in August last. The masters of the ships being examined, respectively depose that the property of the said ships is in the claimers, because they have accounted for former voyages. I find the goods were laden by Mr. Leers, the Danish Consul in France, and the bills of lading set forth that they are for account of the claimers, which each master declares to be true. On the other side it appears that the masters of these ships were put in by Mr. Blesin (?), of Amsterdam, about 15 months since, and that they were then subjects of the States General, and about that time made free of Copenhagen, and that their families are not yet removed. The ship called the Wisdom of Soloman seems to be a Danish ship, and has that King's pass for France, and having gone from Amsterdam to France, to take in her lading there, was likewise seized in Cowes road. The Hope of Frederickshall is a ship which came from Norway, and unloaded her cargo at Plymouth, and going from thence to St. Malo, was taken by an English privateer, but we have not any evidence yet to whom she belongs. We have not any news of the ship called the Hope of Christiansand. As to the two Swedish ships called the Arms of Sweden and the Hercules, they appeared upon a full hearing to belong to the subjects of the King of Sweden, the first bound from Dunkirk to Plymouth, and the other from Westerwick to Bordeaux. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 273.]
Mar. 18.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Thomas Le Halle, gent., to be ensign to Capt. Stephen Piper's company in Col. Henry Trelawny's regiment of foot; and for Norris Downes, gent., to be quarter-master to Col. William Selwyn's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 247.]
Mar. 18.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners for Victualling. I have acquainted the Queen with the proportions mentioned in yours of the 16th, which her Majesty approves, and would have you act accordingly. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 398.]
Mar. 18.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrant for Mr. Elias Gerant to go to Harwich and Holland, recommended by Mons. Dubourdieux, minister of the Savoy; for Benjamin Isaac Cramer and Samuel de Graffenriedt, ditto; for Virgilius Moller, ditto; for Abraham van der Druyff [Druyft ?], ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 179]; for Andrew Pietersen, ditto; for Cornelius van der Hill, Hendrick Schutting, Adrian van Aertse, Cornelis van Ossenbergh, and Andrew Beckers, ditto; for Nathaniel Lucas, Peter Colebowne, Esq., and Mr. Joseph Flight, ditto; for Baron de Frize and his gentleman, to go to Harwich, and for Colonel La Motte, Mons. Darcourt and three servants to go to Harwich and Holland. [Ibid., p. 180.]
Mar. 18.
Ghent.
Colonel Thomas Talmash to [Lord Nottingham]. I have received your orders. If you were on the other side of the water, I would write to you fully what is happening here, but the Marquis of Bedmar has so largely informed the King of the motions of the French, that I dare not trouble you on that account. We have no news of the Irish and Scotch forces. The want of them may be of great consequence at this time. I expect to be drawn out with his Majesty's subjects, who have all the inclination imaginable to show their zeal for the common interest. I fear the Marquis of Bedmar has not instructions to inform the King that the Count de Montbrun is preparing a body of 8,000 men to have an eye upon our movements in Flanders. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 53a.]
Mar. 19.
Whitehall.
Commission for Charles Armstrong, esq., to be captain of the company of which Capt. Thomas Armstrong was late captain in Col. Zachariah Tiffin's regiment of foot. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 248.]
Mar. 19.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Treasury. The Queen desires you to give directions for liberty to carry cattle out of England into Ireland, duty free, for one year. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 398.]
Mar. 19.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for Mrs. Manning, a maid and man servant to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 180]; for Mr. Richard Hill, Mr. Suite, Mr. Bruce with two servants, ditto; and for Col. Matthews, Mr. Owseley and one servant to go with three horses and a guide to Leicester, upon their Majesties' service. [Ibid., p. 181.]
Mar. 19.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. The Queen would have you send over an account of which of the castles lately ordered to be demolished, belong to protestants. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 317.]
Mar. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pension of 25l. to be paid yearly to Thomas Hughs who lost his sight in the service of Charles II. as a tide-waiter in the port of Londonderry. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 444.]
Mar. 20.
Whitehall.
Commission for Francis Forrester, gent., to be ensign to Col. John Michelburne's own company. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 248.]
Mar. 20.
Whitehall.
Passes for Richard Winssenburg and one servant to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. Jacob Vander Esch and Pieter Hackee, ditto; for Mr. Peter Hubrecht to go to Harwich and embark for Holland or Denmark; for Julian Chanteloup, with his goods, etc., to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 181]; and for Capt. Reinholdt Van Langenfeldt and one servant, ditto. [Ibid., p. 182.]
Mar 20.
Edinburgh, 3 in the morning.
Lord Melville to the King. In obedience to your commands I called a council yesterday, when your letter for the adjournment of Parliament was read and a proclamation ordered for adjournment until April 15; there were but few contrary votes. Yesterday were not in council, the Earls of Annandale and Dundonald, Lord Ross, Sir James Montgomery, and one or two more. The council was very full. This adjournment has occasioned a great consternation, and such who are not desirous of a settlement endeavour to make a very bad improvement of it, and to abuse the people. At first they represented me as the author of the adjournment and that it was concerted before I came from London; when they saw that would not take with rational men, they now would lay it at my Lord Stair's door, at whom the great spite runs, not so much from reason as out pique and humour, but I wish he were so wise as willingly to lay himself aside, though this would not satisfy some, but there seems an infatuation upon people, for we are neither thankful for our mercies nor sensible of our danger as we ought.
I question not but you have had very weighty and good reasons that moved you to this adjournment, and I partly see them; but I was very hopeful, and on very probable grounds had carried affairs in Parliament, "if it had sit to your satisfaction, notwithstanding all the endeavours and big talk to the contrary." What effects this prorogation may have I cannot yet give you any account, but shall lay myself out to the utmost to prevent the inconveniencies likely to follow upon this emergency; for some ill minded men have been at great pains to inflame the country, and those most affectionate to your service, and to misrepresent your Majesty to them under the worst characters, pretending that all the favours offered to them were but a sham, that there was never a design the Parliament should sit, and now they make use of this adjournment as a confirmation of what they formerly asserted or suggested.
This poor country is at present in a most confused and distracted condition that a nation can be, not actually in war. The "jacobins," (sic) as they call them, are very numerous and barefaced, the presbyterians, as they are termed (at least, the common people of that sort who are not fit judges to distinguish between realities and fair and specious pretences), are alarmed and abused by false reports and cunning insinuations by men who love to fish in troubled waters and are but making tools of them to serve their own designs. There is an army without pay. The country poor and grumbling, and yet in the opinion of all who wish you well, there is an inevitable danger of disbanding it at this time and without pay, even though they be not so well appointed as they ought to be. LieutenantGeneral Douglas professes to be fully of this opinion, and not to be satisfied with his brother the Duke Q[ueensberry]; and so does his son, and often said they can say nothing for him, so I shall say nothing concerning him. He is desirous now to confer with my eldest son; what passes or shall be the result, I will acquaint you with. I see well enough the designs of both the Dukes and some of the ringleaders of the club who are in some concert, as also of their being so likewise with some of the jacobins who have heretofore shown themselves disaffected to your Majesty's government and several of them who stood out formerly were come to attend the Parliament and resolved to swallow the oath, as I am informed, out of no good design. It is in your power, not so much in mine, to frustrate their design, but in my opinion it were fit you should make both the Dukes know you are not satisfied with their carriage as to your service, and that you will not be forced to make use of men against your will. I shall forbear to insist on this head lest I should be thought partial.
I have sent some additional instructions to be superscribed and subsigned by you, as also a letter for the Parliament at its opening, and if you think fit two letters to the two Dukes, but this I leave entirely to yourself. If you think it convenient you may cause my son to transcribe them; the others would be hastened against the sitting of the Parliament. Though I dare not propose it, yet I think it would be very useful to your service to let this regiment of Danish horse stay in this country and take more of ours in lieu of them to Ireland, for it is scarcely to be imagined the bad condition this poor kingdom is in at present. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 54.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Paul Du Buisson, esq., to be captain of the company of which Capt. William Leech was late captain, in Col. Henry Trelawny's regiment of foot; for Richard Hill, esq., to be captain of the company of which Capt. Vincent Googene was late captain, in Col. Thomas Erle's regiment of foot; for Vincent Googene, esq., to be captain of the company in which Capt. Richard Hill was late captain in Col. Richard Coote's regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 248]; for Villiers Carleton, esq., to be captain of the company of which Capt. David Rindes was late captain in the regiment of foot commanded by Col. Zachariah Tiffin; for Gilbert Primrose, esq., to be captain of the company of which Lieut.-Col. Charles Progers, was late captain, in the first regiment of foot guards, commanded by Charles, Duke of Schomberg, and to take his rank as youngest lieutenant-colonel; and for Evert de Meausse de Saurency, esq., to be ensign of the company of which Lieut.-Col. Clud is captain in the same first regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 250.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir John Morris, bart. Shows that he has always lived in the county of Tipperary, where he behaved himself peaceably and inoffensively, and that after the passage of the Boyne he was received into his Majesty's protection and lived peaceably ever since, and took the oath of allegiance, etc.; yet he is now indicted for treason and will be outlawed next term to his utter ruin. Prays an order to stop the said outlawry. Referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 254.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Elizabeth, Countess of Clancarty. Shows that her husband, dying in 1676, she was entitled to a dowry out of his estate, and in 1682, prosecuted her writ of dowry and recovered the third part of his estate, and had also a judgment for 6,280l. damages. She hoped to have been permitted not only to receive her said debt, but also raise portions for her four daughters who are protestants, two of them unmarried, but has of late been grieviously threatened by Col. Hastings and others to be disturbed in the possession of the premises on the pretence of the outlawry of her son the Earl of Clancarty. Prays for a custodiam thereof under a small rent, considering her son is but 22 years of age, and that the possession may not be taken from her. Referred to Sir John Temple, Attorney-General of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 255.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Philip Savage, Clerk of the Crown, in the Court of King's Bench in Ireland. Shows that, by order of the Lord-Justices there, he prosecuted above 4,000 of the Irish in arms against their Majesties; that he never received any recompense for himself or servants who have been for more than a year employed in that service, and that his office is, at present, of no other use. Prays that, in consideration of his said service, he may have the grant of the rent and reversion of the lands of Dollarstown in the county of Meath and Powerstown in the county of Dublin, both leased by King James, when Duke of York, at 120l. per annum for several years, of which seven are yet unexpired. Also prays for the remission to him of the quit rent of 40l. per annum payable out of his estate, and the custodiam of the estate of Sir Valentine Brown, bart., till the same be otherwise disposed. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 255.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of William Fanshaw, esq., and Mary his wife, relict of William Sarsfield late of Lucan in the county of Dublin, esq., and Charlotte Sarsfield, daughter and heir of the said William Sarsfield and the said Mary, by her guardian, Sir Stephen Fox. They show that the said William Sarsfield, in consideration of a great portion in money and lands, etc., given him by King Charles II., settled a jointure of 800l. per annum on the petitioner Mary, during her life, out of the manor of Lucan, and all other his manors, and lands, etc. redeemed by King Charles out of Sir Theophilus Jones's hands. That soon after, William Sarsfield died leaving two sons, and a daughter; which two sons are since dead. That afterwards one Patrick Sarsfield, called the Earl of Lucan by the creation of King James, brother to the said William, did, by his servants, wrongfully take possession of a great part of that estate, and unjustly detained the same till the kingdom of Ireland was reduced. That the said Patrick having been, and being still in arms against their Majesties, the Commissioners of the Revenue of Ireland, seized and entered upon the said estate for their Majesties use. The Petitioners, having no remedy but by his Majesty putting them in possession of the said estate, pray to be put in quiet possession accordingly. Referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 256.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Galway. Shows that he has never borne arms against their Majesties; that during the late rebellion in Ireland he behaved himself honestly, and contributed as much as he could to the security of the prostestants, as may appear by the testimonials under the hands of several people of that kingdom; that in March last he came over to England, by license from his Majesty and General Ginckle; that in his absence he had been outlawed, becaused he had been "a parliament man" in the pretended parliament in Ireland; that he was elected for the city of Cork by the votes of the prostestants, and that he never voted anything against them or their interest. Prays that the said outlawry may be reversed, and his right restored. Referred to the LordJustices of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 257.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Dame Ellen Aylmer, widow of Sir Fitz-Gerald Aylmer, deceased. Shows that her husband died about seven years since, and that her children were then sent into France for their education; that she being in Ireland after the victory at the Boyne took a protection, and came over into England, that soon after she sent for her children out of France, but cannot yet obtain them. She hopes to do so, and return immediately. She is informed that she is indicted with Col. Thomas Bourk, and Lady Clanricard of high treason, and is likely to be outlawed. Prays to have an order, as Col. Bourk had to stop proceedings against her, and to have a Nolle Prosequi entered upon the said indictment. Referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 257.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Ann Bagnall. Shows that her husband has been for some time in a sick and languishing condition; that immediately after the passage of the Boyne he went into France, where he has not intermeddled in anything against their Majesties' service; that upon her inter-marriage, her father gave her a considerable portion, in consideration whereof a suitable jointure was settled upon her, and the whole estate limited to her children after their father's death, so by that settlement she is but a tenant for life. The said estate is liable to seizure during her husband's life, his outlawry not being reversed, and by that means she is with eight children, exposed to the utmost want. Prays that order may be given that, for her support, she may have a custodiam or other grant of that part of the estate which was so settled upon her in jointure, and that for the present maintenance of her children, so much more of the estate may be assigned to her. Referred to the Attorney-General of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 258.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Charles White, esq. Shows that, in King James's time, he did all the good service he could to the protestants of Ireland, but more particularly for those of the county of Kildare where he had his dwelling, and was the first who submitted and obtained his Majesty's protection the day after the battle of the Boyne, by reason whereof he had his house burnt and his improvements destroyed. That he never had any command in the Irish army; and although by his Majesty's declaration he was to incur no forfeiture of life, land or goods; yet he was by Serjeant Osborne indicted in two counties and outlawed for treason in 1690. Considering his estate is small, and that he is but tenant for life (his said estate being settled upon his children in consideration of a marriage portion) he prays to have a custodiam of his estate. Referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 259.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Anne Baker, widow of Col. Henry Baker, late governor of Londonderry. Shows that, by letters under the Great Seal of England, in consideration of her husband's service, she had an annuity of 300l. She is informed that some lands containing about 2,593 acres in Ireland [formerly] demised to several persons at 354l. per annum, but at present for 200l., are in their Majesties' gift, and as her habitation is in Ireland she prays to have the said lands in lieu of her pension. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 260.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John, Lord Bellew, Baron of Duleek. Shows that upon King James's coming into Ireland he had order to raise a regiment and served till he was wounded and made prisoner of war at Aughrim and brought " here " where he continues under cure; and although he was not comprehended in the Articles of Limerick, yet the Lords-Justices and General Ginckle promised they would obtain from their Majesties his restoration to his estate, which he has but for life, being settled, upon the petitioner's son's marriage to Sir William Wentworth's daughter. Prays to have the outlawries reversed, and to be restored to his estate. Referred to the Attorney-General for Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 260.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the report, dated 29 February 1691–2, of the Solicitor-General, concerning Sir Francis Compton's petition.
The parcel of waste ground mentioned in the petition is the forest or chase of Ashdown, and other lands in Sussex, parcel of your Majesty's Duchy of Lancaster; and it appears to me that the late King Charles II. by lease under the Duchy Seal, bearing date the 1st of April, in the 13th year of his reign, granted the said forest and lands, with appurtenances to George, late Earl of Bristol, in consideration of service done, to hold for 99 years from Lady Day before the date of the lease under a rent of 200l. per annum; in which lease there is a proviso that if the rent should be in arrear for 40 days after any of the feasts when it ought to be paid, the said lease should be void.
On the 30th June 1664, the said forest of Ashdown, and the premises which had been demised to the Earl of Bristol (were amongst other things) granted to trustees for her Majesty the Queen-Dowager for 99 years, if she should live so long, and in 1665 the premises were put out of charge to the King, and put in charge to the Queen-Dowager; afterwards she, finding that the rent was not paid, had a reprize from the King. But it is affirmed to me that there was no surrender made nor any other act done, whereby the estate granted to the Queen's trustees was brought back to the Crown. On the 22nd of November, 1673, his said late Majesty (reciting the lease to the Earl of Bristol, and that the same was void or voidable for non-payment of the rent of 200l. per annum), granted the premises to Sir John Packington, Reginald Grahame, and George Legge, for 31 years under the rent of 1s., in trust for the four daughters of Col. Washington, in default of payment of the 200l. per annum, and to hold and enjoy as fully, and to all intents and purposes as his said Majesty might do in case of non-payment. On the 22nd of November, 1676, by letters patent under the Duchy Seal,—reciting the Earl of Bristol's lease and the proviso therein mentioned, that the same should be void in case of non payment of the rent, and reciting the demise made thereupon to the said Sir John Packington and others upon the said trusts, and that the same was become ineffectual by reason of the non-payment of the rent occasioned by the barrenness of the premises, and reciting that Sir Thomas Williams had paid to Col. Washington's daughters 1,700l. for their interest in the premises, and the further sum of 1,000l. in satisfaction of other claims out of the premises, and in consideration of 100l. per annum rent to be paid to the Crown, over and above the said rent of 1s.—the King granted to Sir Thomas Williams and Joseph Fells, and their heirs the reversion of the premises, and all the said forest and premises, and all rents reserved thereupon, etc., to hold to them and their heirs rendering the yearly rent of 100l. 1s.
By letters patent under the Duchy Seal, bearing date the 14th of May, 30 Charles II., the said fee farm rent of 100l. 1s., reserved on Sir Thomas Williams' grant, was granted to Charles, Earl of Dorset and Middlesex, and his heirs.
Upon the case thus stated the estate in law being in the trustees of the Queen Dowager at the time of the grant to Sir John Packington and no notice taken of it in that grant, it seems that the King was deceived and that the grant was void. The same objection seems to lie against the grant to Sir Thomas Williams; but if that were not so, yet the estate in law, during the 99 years determinable on the death of the Queen Dowager, not being in the King at the time of Sir Thomas Williams' grant, that estate in law still remains in the trustees to be disposed of as his Majesty pleases.
I do not know how far the case may be varied, from what it appears at present, when Sir Thomas Williams, and the Earl of Dorset are heard, but the petitioner declares himself willing to consent to anything that shall be proposed in order to secure the fee farm rent to the Earl of Dorset, in case his Majesty shall be pleased to make a grant of the premises to him according to his petition.
Referred, with the annexed petition, to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 264.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Williams, of Exeter merchant, and Sir Henry Marwood, bart. Shows that they have attained the art of taking fish by a light, which they can cause to burn, some fathoms under water; this, with a light above water, will "draw" the fish, which are in the compass of a league in the sea, to one place and thereby a greater quantity can be caught than by hooks, or nets. They pray for letters patent for the sole use of their invention during 14 years. Referred to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. [Ibid., p. 268.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the form of prayer, prepared by special direction for the fast day on the 20th day of April next, to be forthwith printed, published, and used on the said day, and on the respective fasts appointed to be solemnly kept every second Wednesday of the month, successively, during the present war. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 122.]
Mar. 21.
Whitehall.
Passes for James Carter to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 182]; for Sir Lawrence Esmond and his tutor to return out of France and land in any port of this kingdom, granted on the request of "my Lady Devonshire" [Ibid., p. 186]; and for John Gallwaye, his wife and family, to go to the Caribee Islands on board any ship bound thither, in order to take possession of the plantation and other estate left him by his father, John Gallwaye, an inhabitant of Montserrat, who died there. [Ibid., p. 187.]
Mar 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for Thomas Keightley to be sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 445.]
Mar. 22.
Whitehall.
Commissions for John Adams, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. Richard Hill's company of grenadiers, in Col. Thomas Earle's regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 248]; and for John Pitt, clerk, to be chaplain of the Irish battalion belonging to Col. Thomas Earle's regiment of foot. [Ibid., p. 252.]
Mar. 22.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Hearn, praying that John Hill, Thomas Gray, John Jones, and Richard Haines, belonging to the ferries of Westminster and Fulham, may be free from being impressed this summer as they were last. Referred to the Admiralty. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 259.]
Mar. 22.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Great Seal. The Queen desires you to give order for an exemplification to be forthwith made of the ratification of the Articles of Limerick and Galway, and that you will send the same to me as soon as done. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 398.]
Mar. 22.
Whitehall.
The same to the Attorney-General. The Queen desires you to prosecute William Fuller forthwith, pursuant to the address of the House of Commons of the 24th of February last. [Ibid., p. 399.]
Mar. 22.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of Prizes. The Queen directs you to forthwith send me an account of your proceedings in relation to a Danish ship belonging to Henry Silvester Moller, and other merchants, called the Margareta; and in the meantime to forbear the sale of that ship or her goods. [Ibid.]
Mar. 22.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrant for Capt. Henry Gilman to go to Harwich and Holland; for Barthol. Havish, Martin Creutzman and Matthew Hins, ditto; for Mons. de Cene, a French minister, ditto; for Mrs. Elizabeth Burton and Elizabeth Barnes, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 182]; for Jan van Someren, Rogier van Brecht, and Hendrich Kien, ditto; for Edward le Brun, ditto; for Mons. Brindell, belonging to the Baron de Frize, ditto; for Charles Kenge, messenger ditto [Ibid., p. 183]; for Mons. John de Man, ditto; for Hendrich van Dueren, ditto; for Philip Couturier and Charles Panhuysen, ditto [Ibid., p. 184]; and for Sir John Kirwan's wife, Anne Blake otherwise Kirwan, Simon Kirwan, James Rutledge, John Kirwan, James Hayne, Austras Kirwan, and a maid servant, with the said Sir John's ship and such goods "as are not prohibited" to return out of France unto Galway, which town he left when his goods were seized and carried into France; this pass is desired for him by the Earl of Athlone. [Ibid., p. 185.]
Mar. 22.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. I formerly wrote to you about 500 Irish, desired by the Emperor, over and above the 1,400. I now desire you will take all the care you can to complete this number as soon as possible. Both numbers, with the officers, are in the whole, to make up 2,000 men, and are to be ready to embark upon the arrival of the ships appointed to transport them, so that those ships may not be delayed in port longer than is necessary for receiving the men on board. [S.P. Ireland, King's Letter Book 1, p. 317.]
Mar. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant to James Kitson, messenger-in-ordinary, requiring him to go to Woolwich, or any other place where he shall be informed that Mr. John Webb, lieutenant of one of the marine companies, now is, and to summon him to come, forthwith, to the Earl of Nottingham's office at Whitehall, to answer a complaint made against him by Samuel Fletcher, housekeeper at Woolwich. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 285.]
Mar. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General to prepare a bill containing a grant to William Bayley of his invention of making a new sort of "glazed printed hangings, made of cotton, worsted of woollen yarn of all sorts of curious figures and landscapes, which for beauty of colours, exactness of figures, strength and gloss, is hard to be distinguished from the finest silk tapestry hangings brought from foreign parts. [Ibid., p. 286.]
Mar. 22.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson, at Cobham Hall. This afternoon the Dutch letters of Friday last came in, which tell us that the King was to go the next day to Loo, and would return to the Hague before he began the campaign. The Elector of Bavaria arrived at Brussels last Wednesday in the evening, and the Marquis De Gastanaga had desired and obtained a pass to return home by the way of France. In Flanders things continued very quiet; but the French were going to encamp their horses, and the French King would himself take a review of them about the 25th of April. The Count D'Estree had orders to pass the Straits with the Toulon squadron, which would consist of 16 great men-of-war and several light frigates. These letters give an account likewise of the death of the Earl of Dumbarton at St. Germains. This is the substance of what we have from abroad, to which I can only add, that Mr. Sayer is made Vice-Chamberlain to the Queen. Seal of Arms. [S.P. Dom. Will. & Mary 4, No. 16.]
Mar. 22./Apr. 1. Frederic, Elector of Prussia, to the King at the Hague. FieldMarshal Fleming will inform you how pleased I am to hear of your safe arrival in Holland, and also what are my views as to the operations for the next campaign. When I learn what are yours I will try and conform mine to them. Seal of Arms. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 55.]
Mar. 23.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Richard, Earl of Barrymore, showing that he long enjoyed the house and lands, of Lisle and Agha, as his ancient inheritance, till expelled by the late King James, when Duke of York. Prays to have the examination of his title referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. Referred to them accordingly. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 261.]
Mar. 23.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the orphan-children of Nicholas, late Viscount Netterville, showing that they are six in number; that their father and mother died in 1689, leaving them in a deplorable condition, having only some lands to subsist upon, which, for the most part, were all waste, and that after the passage of the Boyne they were turned out of the same lands; and upon application made to the Lords-Justices, they ordered the Solicitor General to make a full examination of their case. He reported that their father, upon consideration of a marriage, and marriage portion, was a tenant only for life. Nevertheless, the lands are seized as their father's lands, although his interest was determined by his death. They pray to be restored to the possession of the said lands, and to have, in the meantime, the profit of the same, or so much as may support them. Referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 261.]
Mar. 23.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Capt. William Netterville. Shows that he was always a protestant, as can be testified by divers officers and by the Bishop of Meath, in whose diocese he was born. His Majesty ordered, after the defeat at the Boyne, that no protestant should be outlawed if he lived peaceably under the Government. Petitioner judged himself secure under the protection of that order, nevertheless he has been outlawed; and he now prays for an order for vacating his outlawry, as was granted in the case of Mr. Barry. Referred to the Lords-Justices of Ireland. Memorandum, that another petition (from the same petitioner) was referred to the Lord-Lieutenant on the 8th of June following. [Ibid., p. 262.]
Mar. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Principal Officers of the Ordnance to cause certain arms and tents to be issued for the supply of the several regiments mentioned in a paper stated to be annexed; and to issue arms and tents to the Earl of Argyll's regiment from the stores at Berwick. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 251.]
Mar. 23.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Chaigneau to go to Harwich and Holland, recommended by Grave Roll, minister, Rapilliard, elder, and Cassenave, elder; for Gubbert Terhart, Jacob Burgartt, and Philip Hagdoren to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 183]; for Peter Jacobsen, ditto; for Lieut.-Col. de Sunderbourg, Major Detlof Reusch, Capt. John Frederich Sohrn, and Mr. Paul Nicholas de Koln, with their servants, ditto; for Margaret Leeuwen, ditto [Ibid., p. 184]; and for Benedict Torner and Anetje, his wife, and one child, Huybertje vander Velden, and Jannetje van Menlen, ditto. [Ibid., p. 185.]
Mar. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the payment of 110l. per annum to Philip Savage, trustee for William, Stephen, Katherine, and Barbara Crow, dren of John Crow, Esq., deceased, because the said John Crow, by direction of the then Privy Council, made a lease, for 41 years, of a parcel of ground, and several buildings erected thereon, for stables and a guard-house for the Horse Guards in Dublin. The said rent was paid until December 1688, and the premises have been used by the Guards since the victory at the Boyne. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 446.]
Mar. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for Francis Roberts to be sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [Ibid., p. 447.]
Mar. 23.
Mounts Bay.
Extract from a letter of Captain Condon, commander of the ship Hart. I met a ship at Falmouth, called the Henry, Robert Savage, master, which is one that transported the Irish soldiers from Limerick, and is now laden with French wines and linen, which the bill of lading shows is bound for Cork, which the master says was the contract which was made upon the surrendering thereof. I have his and seven more vessels under my convoy, they being bound for Swansea, and one for Bristol. [H.O. Admiralty 4, p. 247.]
Mar. 23.
The Court at Kensington.
The King to the Commander of the Dutch ships at Portsmouth. You are hereby required to sail to the rendezvous of the fleet, with the Dutch ships under your command, at the same time that the English men-of-war shall sail thither from Portsmouth, and you are to observe such orders as you shall receive from the Queen. Dutch, with translation. [H.O. Admiralty 5, pp. 56–61.]
Mar. 24.
Whitehall.
Commissions for John Butler, gent., to be cornet of that troop in the regiment of horse commanded by Col. Francis Langston, of which he is captain; for George Hamilton, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. George Whitehead in Col. Gustavus Hamilton's regiment of foot [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 249]; for Hambden Coy, gent., to be lieutenant to Capt. George Fletcher's troop in Col. John Coy's regiment of horse; and for Samuel Austine, gent., to be cornet to the troop in the same regiment of which he himself is captain. [Ibid., p. 250.]
Mar. 24.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Col. Wilson. Shows that he has, for several years, served his Majesty in Holland, and was always desirous to serve him, till he met the opportunity at Limerick, representing to the inhabitants the difference between the benignity of the English government and the slavery of France, which he did to a good effect, though to his great losses, besides the danger of his life, being for seven weeks prisoner with Col. Luttrell, who was equally concerned.
After the capitulation, he "bought," besides his own regiment, several thousand men from going to France, giving them some of his own money, to above the sum of 100 pistols, which was never repaid to him again; nor was he compensated for his arms put in the stores of Dublin, as appears by acquittance. Since their march from Limerick, he has been with the said Irish, in quarters, by order of the Lords-Justices, and only received 14 days subsistence, and persuaded those he knew to be men of interest, who upon the least occasion, might be troublesome to the government, to go over to Germany.
In order to serve his Majesty he has not spared the ruin of his family, wife, and children, living happily in France till they were, upon this account, imprisoned there during four months, barbarously treated, and turned away hither some days ago. He has lost considerable employments, being Inspector-General, Colonel, and Governor of Galway.
Prays that care may be taken for him as well as has been for others who were equally concerned with him. Referred, with a letter from the Lords-Justices of Ireland, to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 263.]
Mar. 24.
Whitehall.
A proclamation for a general fast. Printed. [S.P. Dom. Proclamations 5, p. 75.]
Mar. 24.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Spingeler, Hendrick Bastion, and Peter van Tringden to go to Harwich and Holland; for Mr. John Barkas, Mr. Thomas Waldegrave, and Henry Ward, their servant, ditto; for Anthony la Garde, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 186]; for Albert Ploos van Amstel, ditto [Ibid., p. 187]; for John and Maurice Belson to return from Dornay in Flanders and to land at any port in this kingdom; and for Claud Fourmont, Jane Fallowfield, and Sarah Prescote to embark from any port in this kingdom for France, on request of Mr. Lamb, master cook to the King. [Ibid., p. 189.]
Mar. 24.
Whitehall.
Allowance of the account of Maria Spierinck, widow and administratrix of John Andrew Eckart, esq., late resident at Brussels, of his expenses from 26th September 1691 to the 10/20th of January following. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 287.]
Mar. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners for Sick and Wounded Seamen and Prisoners of War to cause Lieut.-Gen. Richard Hamilton, a prisoner of war in their custody, to be carried on board some vessel going to Boulogne, with direction to the master of the same, that, having received on board his ship, Lord Mountjoy, now a prisoner in France, he immediately thereupon land the said Lieut.-Gen. Hamilton at Boulogne aforesaid, and after that, return to England and set Lord Mountjoy on shore. [Ibid., p. 288.]
Mar. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor-General, to prepare a bill, containing a pardon to George Howard, commonly called Lord George Howard, of all treasons and other misdemeanors committed before the 21st day of May 1691, and of all indictments, convictions, pains, penalties, and forfeitures incurred by reason thereof. [Ibid., p. 289.]
Mar. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same, to prepare a bill appointing all the Privy Councillors Commissioners for receiving, hearing, and determining appeals in causes of prizes during the present war. [Ibid.]
Mar. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a writ of error for the reversal of the outlawry for high treason against Matthew Bellew, it having been represented that in October 1688 he came from Ireland to England, where, with his family, he has lived ever since. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 447.]
Mar. 24.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. We have little news here at present. Col. Wyndham's regiment of horse, with some other troops, are to embark this week for Flanders. The last letters from abroad said that the French began to be very much alarmed at the news of our intended descent, and had, thereupon, sent several troops towards their sea coast. It is taken for granted that the late ill weather has spoilt their designs, which they meant to put in execution the last month, or in this; and it is now believed that they will only act defensively the rest of the year. The Queen-Dowager has again declared that she will embark next Wednesday for France, in order to her return to Portugal. This day Mr. Dines (?) was sworn clerk of the Council in the place of Mr. Montague, and a fast is appointed on the second Wednesday in every month. Seal of Arms, broken. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 17.]
Mar. 25.
Whitehall.
Commission for Israel Fielding, esq., to be commissary general of provisions for the land forces of England. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 266.]
Mar. 25.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of John Green. Shows that he was a seaman on board the Defiance, his Majesty's ship, commanded by Captain Gurney, and on 3rd September last, he received a blow over his eyes, whereby he has utterly lost his sight. Having a wife and child in great want, prays for an almsman's place at Westminster. Granted on a vacancy occurring. [S.P. Dom Petition Entry Book 1, p. 251.]
Mar. 25.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Mayor of Harwich. The Queen desires you to stop all persons coming from Holland or Flanders, unless they have a pass from Lord Dursley, his Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary at the Hague, or a pass from William Blathwayt, Secretary of War, attending his Majesty in Holland and Flanders [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 399]. A like letter was sent to the Mayor of Dover. [Ibid.]
Mar. 25.
Whitehall.
The same to the Postmaster-General. The Queen desires you to give strict orders to all the postmasters upon the road between this place and Harwich, and between here and Dover, and other places upon the coast of Kent, that they do not furnish any person coming from Holland or Flanders with a horse, unless they have a pass from Lord Dursley or William Blathwayt. [Ibid., p. 400.]
Mar. 25.
Whitehall.
Passes and post-warrants for Andrew Coenraedue van Beeke to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 187]; for John Perez d'Arce to go to Harwich and embark for Holland or Flanders; for Charles Grey, esq., and his two servants, David Davies and William Hawkins, to go to Harwich and Holland; and for Martin Petersen, ditto. [Ibid., p. 188.]
Mar. 25. [Lord Godolphin] to the King. The commands in your two letters shall be complied with as far as it is possible; and therefore my Lord Ranelagh shall, for the future, be able to remit 18,000l. a week, on account of the subsistence and the contingencies, but in that case, would you not give us leave to deduct out of that, by moderate weekly payments, the sum which you command us to remit at once, for the 200l. a battalion to the troops in Flanders; for otherwise, I am afraid, it will be thought very extravagant to allow 2,000l. a week for the contingencies, and so great a sum, in one lump, as the 200l. a battalion will amount to. We have already paid 4,000l. on account of the bread to Mackado's correspondent, and shall take care the remaining 6,000l. is paid to him here.
Since the commands in your letter of the 25th, we have given all the necessary orders for the preparation for the descent, though still I cannot help looking upon it as a thing subject to a great deal of hazard and uncertainty. The expense of the transportation, by the estimates brought us, will be about 20,000l., and that part of it will require ready money. The expense of the provisions will be nearly 30,000l., but the greatest part of that we hope to provide for by assignments. The expense of the ordnance is not yet laid before us by that office, so we do not know what the charge of that will be; but in their discourse of it, they speak of sums that I am afraid to repeat to you, and that provision, be it more or less, must come out of the land tax, which does not bring in the money so fast as the weekly occasions of Navy or the Army do require it, and especially at this time the loans on the land tax are less, because we have received of the City, loans upon the Customs, in the last week 60,000l., which enables us to pay the arrears to the regiments of Lanier, Wyndham, Langston, Lord Portland, and Eppinger, and likewise several other payments on account of the arrears and remits of the troops that came out of Ireland.
We have also settled a fund for the clothing of those designed to serve in Ireland, but we cannot pay anything towards their arrears till all that is to go into Flanders be sent from hence. Mr. Neale has been so near dying, that I do not doubt you have received many importunities for his place, but he will serve them all as my Lord Lovelace did; at present, the only hopes of the pretenders to employments are, that Sir Rowland Gwynne's impertinence to my Lord Sydney may make a vacancy. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 56.]
Mar. 25.
Rotterdam.
The Dutch Admiralty to Captain Barend Vander Pot. Giving him orders to repair with his ship to Rotterdam, with the consent of the King of Great Britain. [H.O. Admiralty 5, p. 114.]
Mar. 26.
Whitehall.
Passes for Peter la Porte to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 188]; and for Mrs. Elizabeth Payne and Elizabeth, her daughter, ditto. [Ibid.]
Mar. 26.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. The letters from Plymouth, of the 22nd, give an account of the arrival of the homeward bound Canary fleet, being about 30 sail, under the convoy of the Oxford and the Greenwich. The York, in which Sir Ralph Delaval came home from the Straits, ran aground on the Gunfleet in coming in; but having lightened the ship by throwing most of her guns overboard, she got off again. The Dutch letters came in to-day of last Tuesday. They tell us that the King came to Loo last Saturday night, and that Mr. Blathwayt had had the misfortune to lose all his horses and equipage; the ships they were on board of, lagging behind the convoy, were taken by a French privateer, and carried to Dunkirk. The Elector of Bavaria, since his arrival at Brussels, has been preparing things with great application for the campaign. He was going to visit the Spanish garrisons in Flanders, and after that to meet the King at Loo or Breda. The advices from the frontiers say that the French recruits are in a very ill condition, and that they had broken 38 regiments of horse, foot, and dragoons to complete other regiments; and upon the whole matter they look upon the French to be in no condition to attempt anything, but only to act defensively. They say further that the Marquis De Gastanaga is in disgrace, and that perhaps the next news we hear of him may be that he is under arrest. Col. Wyndham's regiment of horse marched from hence to-day, to embark for Flanders, and several other troops, and a train of artillery, go over with the same convoy. Seal of Arms. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 18.]
Mar. 26.
Edinburgh.
Lord Melville to the King. I sent the Solicitor to wait on your Majesty, who will give an account of your affairs here. There is little occurred since the day we met in Council. Most of what was before us was private business, but in the end there fell in some difference in relation to the Countess-Dowager of Erroll's imprisonment. She is a person of a great deal of wit and intrigue, and one in whom the late King James much confides. By the informations we have, she is the chief manager of his affairs in this kingdom, upon one, Strachan's discovery, which you had before I parted from you. She was brought prisoner from the north to this city; the Council at once ordered that she should be sent to the Castle of Dumbarton as a place at some distance from this; that she who is the source of intelligence to King James's party might be in the less capacity of doing prejudice to the government. She will not in the least acknowledge your government, nor would so much as make application to the Council, but she does not want for friends. The Duke of Hamilton concerns himself particularly for her, after the former order of Council for going to Dumbarton Castle, though she herself would not so much as supplicate the Council for a thing, and said she would be pulled out of bed before she went. Her friends brought this affair again before the Council, and it was resolved (though other places more convenient were proposed) she should be imprisoned in Edinburgh Castle, which is certainly the most unfit place in the kingdom, unless she was a close prisoner, for there she has opportunity of driving on her intrigue a great deal better than if she were at full liberty at her own house in the country. I shall not trouble you with all the reasonings on this affair, but at this rate of management, there is but little security for the government.
The former act of Council in relation to my lady's imprisonment was, whether the castle of Glasgow or Edinburgh, should be selected. Leven and others proposed: in what conditions, as close prisoner or free ? The Duke said that no one should be allowed to come to her but whom the governor allowed, and unsuspected persons, which is but a make business. Something of this was put in the Act, as worded by the clerk, though it was no part of the vote, and required an explanation. When this was spoken to and desired, he was in some passion, and said that this was a sufficient reason why all members of Council should sign what passed, which is none at all, for if Acts of Council were worded, written over, and signed in the presence of the Council, which this was not, there would be no occasion for any such debate, and, likewise, though the whole Council should sign an Act, it does not in the least hinder that any who are to put that Act in execution, may not, and ought to desire an explication of any dubious clause. However, the Duke of Hamilton, in presence of Council, tore his name from this Act, and said he would not sign any more at present, until he informed you. Whether he will fall from this humour, or what his behaviour will be next Council day, I do not know; but, however, I am resolved not to let your service suffer. I shall say nothing as to what relates to myself in it, but whatever I am, it became none to carry so before any who represented you. I know he may make a great deal of clamour, as he is apt to do at most things, but it is without ground. I hope you will allow me to be concerned with what relates to your interest, and the security of your government.
There is great clubbing and caballing to prevent the sitting of this parliament here, so as to render it ineffectual as to the ends designed, and for that end several parties are joined. I know there are several designs and projects, and the reasons which move them. I know not yet if I shall be able to prevent them. Many are coming to this parliament who would not own the former, nor your government, for this very end; however, not only in my opinion but in the judgment of most who have your and their country's weel before them, there seems a necessity for the sitting of it at once. Lieut. -Gen. Douglas is absolutely of this opinion, and not satisfied as yet with his brother. What he will yet do I know not. I would have had him write to you, but could not yet persuade him. Whether many take such methods as they do to affright me, I cannot tell. I am using all my endeavours. The success is in God's hands.
I heard there was an order for carrying back guns sent from England, but if so, I hope you will recall it, at least for the time, there being no cannon here worth anything, and it is absolutely necessary the castles should be kept, whatever becomes of the rest of the country. I wish you could hasten down the money for paying the four regiments of foot you wrote of to the Council formerly. It is very difficult to keep the army from mutinying, and there is nothing at all in the Exchequer here. We do not know what shift to make to provide those 600 or 700 men Mackay designs aboard the frigates you promised to send thither.
But as I have always done since you allowed me the honour first to wait upon you, so in this I give you my opinion faithfully, and without any "self end," and as what I judge most conducing to your service. The country may be in general divided into such who are, or profess to be, for your interest and government, and such who are for or favourers of the late King James; the last, as to the gentry and persons of interest, are the far greater number. These may be subdivided into such who are actually in arms, and such who are only waiting their opportunity to appear. The places of the country where their interests and estates lie being a bar and check on them, and the season of the year likewise, until occasion offer for their public appearing to join the others; but they may be and are well enough known, and give abundance of proofs daily to evidence their disaffection Yet they do not want advo cates to plead for them when challenged for gross misdemeanours in expressing themselves contemptuously in public against the government, not only drinking King James's health, &c., but forcing others by bent pistols and drawn swords to do the like. Yet it has been often asserted by persons whom I shall not name, that we ought not to secure persons upon suspicion, or where the guilt is not clearly proved, and where it is, that we ought to set them at liberty upon very slender assurance of their good behaviour for the time to come, though there be abundance of evidence that such who have been so set at liberty are just what they were, and do not look on themselves as under any obligation, further than their present interest and conveniences tie them to; but I do not desire to reflect on any. You know my sentiments, they are still the same, and meet with enough to confirm me in them and nothing to alter them.
I have met the Earl of Breadalbane several times, but can make nothing of him. Lieut.-Gen. Douglas, who spoke of him to you, and the Lord [Laird ?] Arbruchell, who did the same, who is ensign, and comes from his family, both say "he walks in the clouds, and is but trimming." Douglas desired me to look to him that he slip not away, as last year, and would have me secure him; but I am unwilling to do anything of this nature rashly, and without your particular command, though it were possibly necessary for the interest of state that both he and some others were secured.
You can hardly imagine at what height of insolency many are, nor what a multitude of disaffected people are in this place, but let me know your pleasure, and it shall be observed as far as is in my power.
I shall hope and expect that you will own me in what you command me, and also that you will put me in a capacity of serving you as far as you are pleased to employ me, otherwise it is impossible for me to serve you so far as I would and might. I am trying what I can do to break off some of the Highlanders, and shall yet try further what can be done with Breadalbane, but want of some ready money to follow business is a great want, and that which encourages both enemies and those who would make themselves necessary, and so make their own bargains "is the lock they see your Majesty on," and the little force you have to trust to, and the unsettled condition of the country, which some of them industriously help to keep so.
I have difficulty to get the members of parliament kept in town till they but consider what is fit for them to do, for pains are taken to make them believe they need not expect the parliament is to sit, and that they are to expect a dissolution, which I hope none will be able to persuade you to. I am endeavouring to bring about, that some application should be made to you in better terms than the former address. How it will succeed I do not know yet, for it is difficult to get the terms so adjusted as to please different tempers and suit different interests. Those who are not for a settlement have been put often to change their measures since I came here. Few would imagine that such would have been for raising this government to a higher pitch than I, but I know their design in it; but I doubt not this would have been over-ruled had the parliament sat at this time, and that none should have had just reason to have reclaimed. The ministers have been very sober for most part hitherto, and have been laying themeselves out to persuade others.
The great difficulty at present is what shall be done for subsistence to the army, the Exchequer being empty. I know you are straitened, but if you could get sent, at least cause payment at London upon bills, the pay for the four regiments you promised, from the 1st of January, it would be some ease for the time, and I would cause it to be divided amongst more of them; for if a mutiny should arise, and consequently a desertion, and the Highlanders fall down, which is expected by many next month, and an insurrection in the low country break forth, the kingdom would be in a most miserable condition, considering how many disaffected people we have in our bosom.
I wish that your parliament in England may go on speedily in giving you supply, and settling your revenue.
I crave leave likewise to remind you of the money due by the English forces when here, which you once ordered to be detained off their pay. I gave Mr. Harbord an exact account, as instructed, of above 1,500l. before I came from London, and shall send up the rest as soon as instructed. There is likewise an account of meal and wheat, sent to England upon your officer's desire, of which there is no payment made; the meal was sent to the relief of the people of Londonderry, and 600 bolls of wheat since, on Marshal Schomberg's desire.
Since I wrote this length I have been making an exact scrutiny of the members of parliament and find clearly that if the parliament had sat we had carried things for your service, and the good of the country without all doubt, and notwithstanding of all opposition; but that now is over, so we must look forward. I am just now informed of a "tumultuary kind of business" which has fallen out here, which may make a noise at a distance, which was this Col. Cunningham's regiment was brought from the county of Fife within these few days to the town of Leith, within a mile of this, because there were but few forces about this city, which was not safe to be in time of parliament, whatever should fall out. There being no pay to give the soldiers, and the parliament being adjourned, so no expectation of money soon, had, it seems, instigated a multitude of women to come here and infest and threaten MajorGen. Mackay; more of this kind is threatened and feared. The poor people are not able to give the soldiers subsistence, for many have difficulty to subsist themselves. The great poverty of the country cannot be imagined by those who are not witnesses to it. Dissatisfied and disaffected men make a bad use of this, and endeavour to poison the people, and would lay all at your door, because of the frequent and long adjournments, and in the Council House yesterday said, it seems the King needs no money, he must have enough to pay his forces that he puts off the parliament; but if this was all they said, it was the less matter. But some endeavour "to possess the people with the blackest things of your Majesty hell can invent"; and diffidence and distrust once begotten it is ill to remove.
The unsettled condition of the country forces people to overlook many things for the time, so if I am at a great strait what to do, if I had credit I would employ it to the uttermost to stop present clamours and tumults, but I know not how to have it for my own expense which is necessarily very great, for besides that of my family and equipage I must be giving out money daily to persons on private negotiations. I leave all to your consideration, and beg not to be mistaken; but what makes me the more concerned as to the preventing tumults and insurrections is that I have ground to believe that there is some correspondence between both the discontented and the disaffected people in both nations, though on different accounts, which may draw deeper than many may be aware of; but I hope God shall disappoint them, and doubt not but you will get many wrong representations of things and persons here, but I think I am able sufficiently to vindicate all my carriage.
The Duke of Hamilton makes a business at my commission; then that it should continue till you recall it; then that a lord should be commissioner; all which are frivolous objections; for it was ordinary when commissions were given to persons when at London, to bear its commencement from their parting, and likewise many had it for continuance till they see the King again; and this may be recalled at your pleasure. For the other objection it is ridiculous, for besides that gentlemen have had it, you, had it pleased you, might have made me a Duke as well as King Charles made him; but it shows I was not ambitious, and that I desired no greater titles. Another of their objections against it is that the letter for the adjournment was not countersigned as a thing against an Act of Parliament; but this will be found as frivolous. It is likely I shall hear his objections next Council day, and I hope I shall be able to answer them. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 57.]
Mar. 27.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. Edward Gheast to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book, 36, p 188.]
Mar. 27.
Brussels.
Maximilian Emmanuel, Elector of Bavaria to the King. Thanks the King for writing through Baron de Reppel, to congratulate him on his safe arrival at that place. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest, 12, No. 58.]
Mar. 28.
Whitehall.
Pass for Capt. William Jordan and Thomas Miller, his servant, to go to Harwich and Holland. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book, 36, p. 189.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners for exchange of prisoners. The enclosed is a list of Mr. Blathwayt's servants who have been taken by a privateer and carried prisoners to Dunkirk. I desire you will get them released as speedily as you can. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 400.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Admiralty. The Queen desires you to appoint some men-of-war to attend the Queen Dowager in her passage from Dover to Calais, and to see her safe within sight of Calais. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 400.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners for exchange of prisoners. The Queen desires you to write by the next ship which you shall send to Calais, to the Intendant or other officer with whom you correspond there, about the exchange of prisoners, and acquaint him with the violence lately offered to the commanders of some of the ships employed by you in forcing them to take passengers on board contrary to their orders; that express directions be strictly renewed to all those commanders, upon no terms whatever, for the future, to receive any persons on board, otherwise than pursuant to the orders they shall receive from you. You are to add that you therefore hope the Intendant will take care to prevent any such force for the future. If the like has been done by any other Intendant or officer of France anywhere else, you are to write in the same manner to him. You are also to give strict orders to all the commanders employed in the exchange of prisoners not to receive any person on board except such are to be exchanged, without a pass from the King or Queen, "and to suffer any extremity sooner than do it." [Ibid., p. 401.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Dover. I received yours of the 25th and acquainted the Queen with it who desires you to discharge and set at liberty the persons mentioned in it, viz., Lord Netterville, Robert Byerly, Bartly Skelly, and Mary Lovell; you must still be very careful and strict in stopping all persons coming from beyond sea, especially from France. [Ibid., p. 402.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to the Mayor of Dartmouth. The Queen being informed of a Dutch ship called the St. Peter lately come from Charente into Dartmouth with several French protestants on board her, would have you acquaint one or two of the most intelligent of them that they are to come to town, that I may speak to them upon matters relating to their Majesties' service. [Ibid.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. I enclosed papers received from Col. Beaumont and Col. Fletcher, by the Queen's command who would have you give order that the account between them, in relation to the regiment mentioned in these papers, be forthwith stated and adjusted, which her Majesty would have done with all speed, because Col. Fletcher is ordered to repair to his government of New York. [Ibid., p. 403.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to Sir Charles Hedges. I send the enclosed paper by the Queen's command that you may give me an account of the two ships mentioned in it, which there seems be no just ground to condemn, the rather because they both belong to Mons. Guldenlieu as appears by letters under his hand, wherein he claims them; so that, if they cannot be released otherwise than by a process in regard of their being taken by a privateer, you may in, that case, take the most easy and expeditous method to do it. [Ibid.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to the Commissioners of the Treasury. Mr. Robert Cole, merchant, residing at Algiers, having been obliged, after the death of Consul Erlisman, and before the arrival of Consul Baker (sic), to discharge the officer's duties usually paid by the Consul at two of the Turk's feasts, amounting at each of them to 35l. 17s. 6d. sterling, as may appear by the two enclosed accounts, signed by Mr. Cole, and attested by Consul Baker. Her Majesty, having allowed these two sums as expended on their Majesties' service has commanded me to transmit these two papers to you, that you may give order for paying both the sums to the said Mr. Cole. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 403.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet attending to prepare a bill containing the presentation of John Jolland, M.A., to the vicarage of Sherborn in Dorsetshire, and the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean of Sarum, void by the death of John Henchman, clerk. [H.O. Church Book 1, p. 122.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
The like to the provost, and rest of the Electors of Eton College, to elect and admit William Worthington, at the next election, as scholar of the foundation of that College. [Ibid., p. 123.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
The like to the same to prepare a bill containing the presentation of Roger Royston, B.A. to the vicarage of Netherbury and Beaminster, with the chapel of Mangarton in Dorsetshire, void by the deprivation of Arthur Squibb. See under date 25th January [Ibid.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
The like to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, to be communicated to the Senate, to bestow the degree of Master of Arts upon Joseph Raphson, F.R.S. [Ibid., p. 124.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
Passes for Peter Aerderick, Benedict Cassier and Joseph Bastraens ? to go to Harwich and Flanders; for Luther Wessen to go to Harwich and Holland; for David Lexpert ditto; for John Holland to go to the Lizard in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, upon their Majesties' service, "to work on the wreck in the sea thereabouts" and from thence to return to London; for William Combs to go, upon the same account; both recommended by Philip Ford, a quaker [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 190]; and for the Countess of Fingall, the Earl of Fingall, her son, and Lady Emily Plunket, with four servants, viz., William Warren, Patrick Lynham, Mary Blackborne and Dorothea Stephens, to return out of France into this kingdom, and in case the said Countess of Fingall shall attend the Queen's aunt, the Queen-Dowager of England, into Portugal, they shall be permitted to return out of Portugal into this kingdom of England, provided they do not return by way of France. [Ibid., p. 191.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Lords-Justices. The Queen considering that Lord Iveagh, and other officers appointed to command the Irish who are to go into the Emperor's service, may want some money before they can leave, would have you distribute among them according to their necessities, any sum of money not exceeding 200l. or 300l., and to hasten them to the place where they are to embark in regard their ships will be there speedily to receive them. Lord Galway having acquainted me that the artillery horses will not be ready to embark before the 15th of May, you are to let me know whether it is not possible to dispatch that service sooner, and what price those horses will yield in Ireland, in case her Majesty should direct to have them sold. [S.P. Ireland King's Letter Book 1, p. 317.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners for the sick and wounded seamen and prisoners of war, to give order for Vioteau, Strowde, Spicer and Gibbons, servants of Lieut.-General Richard Hamilton, to be received on board the same ship which is appointed to carry their master to Boulogne. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 288.]
Mar. 29.
Whitehall.
R. Yard to Sir Joseph Williamson at Cobham Hall. The Queen Dowager holds her resolution of setting out to-morrow; she goes by land to Dover, and there embarks on a vessel of her own providing, which is to carry her over to Calais. In the meantime all the persons of quality about town have been to take their leave of her. It is at last agreed that Lieut.-General Hamilton, who was taken prisoner at the battle of the Boyne, shall be exchanged for Lord Mountjoy, who has been a prisoner in France ever since the beginning of this Revolution, and orders are given to the Commissioners of prisoners to see the exchange made accordingly. Directions are given to the Attorney-General to prosecute Fuller, according to the address of the House of Commons. The Dutch letters came in to-day, of Friday last, but bring no manner of news, telling us only that the King continued at Loo, where General Steinan(?) was arrived to compliment his Majesty on the part of the Elector of Bavaria, who himself would follow in four or five days. In the meantime things continue very quiet on the frontiers of Flanders, and the French do not now pretend to encamp before the end of April. They have sent 18 battalions of foot, and several squadrons to guard the coast of Normandy, being alarmed (whatever countenance they endeavour to show to the world) at the news they had received of our designing to make a descent upon them. The Count D'Estre has sailed from Toulon, and has orders to join their main fleet; but whether he will attempt anything, on his way, is not yet certainly known. Seal of arms. [S.P. Dom. William and Mary 4, No. 19.]
Mar. 29.
Brussels.
Maximilian Emmanuel, Elector of Bavaria to the King, is sending Baron de Steinan, his general of artillery, to express his feelings of gratitude to the King. [S.P. Dom. King William Chest 12, No. 59.]
Mar. 29.
Kensington.
Warrant for letters patent, to pass the Great Seal of Ireland, for a grant to John Pultney, esq., of the office of Clerk of the Privy Council of Ireland, upon the surrender of a like grant made to Matthew Barry, esq., by King Charles II. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 430.]
Mar. 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Lieut. Martin Laycock. Shows he has spent above 160l. for the cure of his wounds; and being ordered now to go to his post in Ireland, he "has not six pence to pay the charge of his journey." Prays to have the fine of 100 marks imposed on John Davids, vicar of Fenn, (sic) in Buckinghamshire, bestowed upon him. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 266.]
Mar. 30.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Asenzio Deyrun, a Spaniard, master of the ship St. Mary Magdalen of St. Sebastian. Shows that, with his ship and lading, consisting of wines taken from the French and condemned at St. Sebastian as lawful prize, he was bound for Dublin, and did not design to touch at any port of England; but by stress of weather, he and his ship were forced into Plymouth, and before she could sail from thence again, she was seized by the officers of the Custom-house there. Prays for a discharge of his said ship and lading. Referred to the Treasury. [Ibid., p. 268.]
Mar. 30.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Nottingham to the Commissioners of the Customs. I desire you will cause an enquiry to be made concerning the William of London, John Nall, master and discoverer, if you can, the owners, or who were the freighters of her. She sailed about the beginning of January last from Holland to Leghorn, and I am informed is of English property. As soon as you hear anything of her please let me know. [H.O. Letter Book (Secretary's) 2, p. 404.]
Mar. 30.
Whitehall.
Passes for Peter Dietsy to go to Harwich and Holland [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 190]; for John Ditten, with his son 10 years old, Egidius Ellern, and Hendrick Winthout to go to Harwich and Holland or Flanders; for Ross Mariaens to go to Harwich and Holland [Ibid., p. 191]; for Jannetje Jagers and Judith van Dresburgh, ditto; for Michael Erichen, Borre Larsen, Andrew Larsen, Andrew Helgesen, Lars Nelson, Jurgen Larisen and Errich Maarssen to go to Harwich and Denmark. For Peter Wyngaart to go to Harwich and Holland. [Ibid., p. 192.]
Passes for Sir William Booth and his servant, Francis Charlton, James Saxes, Richard Davis, Philip Babring, Rely George, Joel George, Sackfield Ride, Thomas Charlton, Edward Heatfill, Thomas Biggs, Thomas Joy and Robert Cock (who are attending the Queen-Dowager of England in her passage from Dover to Calais and on her landing) to embark at Dover and to pass over to Calais or any other port in France and to return in like manner into England; for the ships The Friend's Adventure, Richard Cheter, commander, The Vyne, Elazar Thourtun, commmander, The Charles Samuel Lackas, commander, The Friends' Adventure, of London, Richard Andrews, commander, and Sir Henry Johnson's yacht and 7 men, which are provided to carry over the Queen-Dowager of England and her servants to France, to sail from Dover to Calais or any other port in France and to return to England. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 194.]
Passes for the Queen-Dowager to embark in any port of this kingdom and pass over into France, with these persons attending her:— The Countess of Fingall, Lady Emily Plunket, and four servants, viz.: Wm. Warren, Patrick Lynham, Mary Blackbourne and Dorothea Stephens; Lady Tuke and Penelopea Bennet and Anne Harrington, her servants; Mary Crane, Jane Widdrington, Mary Crane her daughter, and Ann Allwell and Elizabeth Allwell, her servants; Maria de Quintana, Luiza de Vasconcellos, Francisca de Vasconcellos, and Mary Brian, Anne Kennedy and Francisca Chages, their servants; Lady Weich, and Mary Melyson, her servant; Anne Carey, Anthony Carey, and Martha Harris, and Elizabeth Pand, their servants; John Carey and Norbert Carey his servant; Thomas Sandys, senr., Thomas Sandys, junr., Joseph Sandys, Mary Sandys, and two servants, viz.: James Glass and Elizabeth Whitager, Edward Widdrington, and William Jarrett, his servant; David Mead and Francis le Grange, his servant; George Tonstall and Nicholas Shipping, his servant; Robert Lightfoot, and Richard Canning and George Grey, his servants; Richard Stephens, Thadey Kennedy, John Martin, John Pereira, John Baptista del Ciamsi and Edward Fallen and Daniel Cursy, his servants; Edward Cane and Nicholas Richemond, his servant; Joseph Beaumont, Bernard Ruelle and Baptista Farry, his servants; Peter Ollivon and Thomas Tudeman and Peter Guillottin, his servants; Anne Shinner, Mary Taylour, Mary Phisick, Anne Love, Mary Brimisham, Margarett Brimisham, Paul Almeida and Feliciano Pinto, his servant; Emanuel Dias and Richard Greyson, his servant, two Chaplains and a Brother, Giles Daniel John Michael Blackemore, Bennet Blackemore, and John Esteivis, Emanuel Dias, junr., and John Rougee, his servant; James Martin, Nicholas Kennedy, Antonio Francisco, Michael Lawrenco (sic), Daniel Wicks, Francis Gill, Thomas Godwin, Thomas Row, Lewis Lagrill, Richard Holland, William Boreman, Patrick Quinlane, George Hillyard, William Freeman, Richard Ellery, George Lathume, James Bunts, Henry Clasford, John Mackus, Thomas Eaden, Thomas Newman, John Taylour, Robert Thompson, Anthony Harvey, Richard Jones, Thomas Mason, John Porter, Peter Chatlet, Thomas Dark and Robert Collyson [Ibid., p. 195]; and for 24 coach horses and 20 saddle horses, belonging to the said Queen-Dowager, to pass over into France. [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 196.]
Mar. 30.
Stockholm.
W[illiam] Duncombe to the King. I am almost convinced that this Court with its adherents, in conjunction with France will endeavour to do its utmost for an immediate peace. I cannot think they believe you will yet treat for a future one, because they represent to themselves the present condition too powerful and the designs too great and expensive to be stopped by either a cessation or mediation. They have therefore given Monsieur Lillierode credentials to your Majesty, and Count Oxenstiern orders to attend the Camp, that wherever you are, a Swedish minister may be there. Besides the two Fieldmarshals, Birth and Hastfer with the Count de la Gardie are to be soon at Aix-la-Chapelle, where I suppose they are to be ready to pursue the orders, which doubtless are suitable to the difficulties France lies under. One part of this winter's negotiations, I heard some time since, is, that if your Majesty should make a descent into France, this Crown must declare against you, because France must not be lost, and a descent would be its ruin. Another part is, that France would offer such a project of a peace as should content all Europe. Which of the two it will be, or in what method these gentlemen are to proceed, your Majesty will see by their working. But if they threaten I hope it is all they can do. [S.P. Dom. King William's Chest 12, No. 60.]
Mar. 30.
Tournay.
Memorandum on military affairs, with a list of officers who will serve in the campaign. [Ibid., No. 62.]
Mar. 31.
Whitehall.
Commission for Thomas Newcommen, esq., to be captain of the troop, of which Captain William Pulteney was late captain in Col. Edward Villiers' regiment of horse. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 250.]
Mar. 31.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Sir Henry Furness. Shows that, lately, he had 360 pieces of muslin seized at the Custom-house, being imported from Holland, the importation of which is no prejudice to the subjects of this country but the seizure is a great loss to him. Prays, in consideration of his good service and his great affection to the government, to have the moiety forfeited to the King. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book 1, p. 267.]
Mar. 31.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of the agent of the Hanse Towns. Shows that the said Hanse Towns, have time out of mind, enjoyed divers immunities in this kingdom, particularly the Steelyard, and the merchants of the said town therein residing have always been exempted from public taxes, the exemption being confirmed by Henry III., and several Acts of Parliament. That the English merchants at Hamburg enjoy greater privileges there. That in 1682 the Steelyard was rated; but upon application to King Charles II., who referred it to the Lord Mayor of London—who reported that the agent of the Hanse Towns was freed from all duties and taxes—it was then ordered, that for the future no molestation should be given upon pretence of public taxes. So matters rested till 1689, when they pretended to charge him again, but were forborne by his Majesty's letter. Nevertheless, the present assessors have rated the said Steelyard, and have distrained some goods from thence, and though his Majesty, in January last, was pleased to order, that the said Agent should be discharged, yet they have caused the said goods to be sold. Prays that some course may be taken for the restoring of his goods, and that no disturbance be hereafter made on pretence of the said public taxes. Referred to the Attorney-General. [Ibid.]
Mar. 31.
Whitehall.
Proceedings upon the petition of Gideon Le Turte, serjeant in Belcastle's regiment in the colonel's company, James Coudrieres, soldier in the late General Kirke's regiment, and Isaac Legeret, in the Brandeburg regiment, all three being French protestants. They show that, at the first siege of Limerick, Le Turte had his right arm shot off; Coudrieres had the same mischance, and Legeret was wounded by a musket shot, and has lost the use of his arm. Having come from Ireland, in that sad condition, with passes, they presented themselves to Lord Ranelagh, hoping to be received in Chelsea College, but were denied that admission and all sorts of assistance, besides even to the payment of their arrears; they were relieved by one Belcher, a cook, for nine months together, and now are threatened to be clapped into prison. They pray to have their arrears paid, and to be continued in pay. Referred to the Treasury. [S.P. Dom. Petition Entry Book1, p. 273.]
Mar. 31.
Whitehall.
Passes and post warrants for John Grass to go to Harwich and Holland; for Christopher Meyer and one child, ditto [S.P. Dom. Warrant Book 36, p. 192]; for Isaac Rouhuyse, ditto; for Mr. Oliver Westland, ditto; for Mr. John Fredericks, quarter-master, ditto; for John Palmer, ditto; for Mr. John Fowke, captain in Sir James Leslie's regiment, to go to Edinburgh [Ibid., p. 193]; and for Magdalen Barré and her servant maid, to return from France to any port of this Kingdom. [Ibid., p. 197.]
Mar. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Francis Clarke, messenger in ordinary, to go to the house or lodging of —Rudehouse, in Warwick Lane near Golden Square, and there to search for and seize her for certain crimes and misdemeanors, also to search for a trunk marked " J.R." with a crown upon it, in the said house or lodging. [H.O. Warrant Book 6, p. 290.]
Mar. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Admiralty, to order a pension of 40s. by the day, together with the usual allowance of half-pay upon the ordinary establishment of the Navy, to Sir Henry Killegrew, Admiral of the Blue [Ibid. p. 291]; this pension is increased to 3l. a day by a similar warrant of the same date. [Ibid., p. 295.]
Mar. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant to permit a writ of error to be brought for a reversal of the outlawry for high treason of Nicholas, late Viscount Netterville, it being stated by his children that the indictment was being brought and judgment given some months after the death of the said Viscount. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office12, p. 458.]
Mar. 31. Sir Charles Hedges to the Earl of Nottingham. I have perused the papers belonging to the ship Guldenlew, and have likewise seen a letter in the hands of Mons. de la Foularisse, whereby I am induced to believe that the ship belongs to Mons. Guldenlew; but there are great suspicions of the goods being upon a French account, for the master of the ship has declared as much, and Mons. Guldenlew, in his letter does not say they are his own, but only that they were of the growth of his lands, and the pass does not make any mention of the property of them as it ought to do; and it may be also considered that Mons. Guldenlew does not appear to be a trader. The papers and examinations of the other ship, Mary, of Larwick, are not yet transmitted to me, but as soon as they come in, the ship shall either be discharged, or the case speedily be before you upon an appeal. [H.O. Admiralty 2, p. 281.]
Mar.
Whitehall.
Commission for David Games, gent., to be lieutenant of the company of which Lieut.-Col. How is captain, in the first regiment of foot guards, commanded by Charles, Duke of Schomberg. [H.O. Military Entry Book 2, p. 250.]
Mar.
Whitehall.
Warrant for Thomas Coningsby to be sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [S.P. Dom. Signet Office 12, p. 451.]
[March ?] Reasons given by the House of Commons for amendments on the Treasons Bill, with the Lords' observations on those amendments.
First reason: The course of impeachment in Parliament, being a necessary institution for preserving the government, the Commons cannot consent to admit anything relating thereto in words, as they may be liable to divers constructions.
Second reason: The Clause (A), added by the Lords, is of a different nature from the purport of the Bill, which is designed only to allow the subject a more equal way of making defence in trials of treason and misprison of treason, but not to alter the court or the method of constituting it.
The Lords look upon the clause marked (A) to be quite otherwise, and cannot conceive how anything should be thought foreign to the Bill, which so naturally agrees with the scope of it, which is the protection of all innocent men who shall at any time hereafter, happen to be accused of any of the crimes therein mentioned. The ground of this Bill is, that every man who shall be prosecuted for treason or misprison of treason, shall have a fair and equal trial; that in what respect soever as the law now is, an innocent man's life, estate, or liberty, may be rudely exposed by his being prosecuted for the crimes above expressed, and it is fit there should be a remedy. Therefore, if the present method of trying Peers, gives just cause of objection to it, in relation to the true meaning of this Bill, it is either to be shown that the objection is of no force, and that in the present method there is no such defect and inconvenience, or it must be acknowledged that there ought to be a remedy; and then it cannot be denied, but that such a remedy comes properly in this Bill, since it agrees both with the title and intent of it.
The Lords think it is unjust that the Peers when they are tried for treason should lie under greater hardships and disadvantages than others; and it seems to be less reasonable that they should, in the method of their trials, be so distinguished as to be more exposed than the meanest subject in the kingdom. The Lords conceive that nothing conduces more to preserve the whole constitution than a mutual care; and especially a good correspodence between the two Houses, which is necessary for maintaining the safety of the nation. [S.P. Dom. William & Mary 4, No. 20.]

Footnotes

  • 1. Blank in original.
  • 2. A portion ol a letter to the same, embodying the Attorney-General's report, is entered and crossed out.