BHO

Swanbourne

Pages 288-293

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Buckinghamshire, Volume 2, North. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1913.

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Citation:

In this section

204. SWANBOURNE.

(O.S. 6 in. xix. S.E.)

Ecclesiastical

(1). Parish Church of St. Swithin, stands in the village, and is built of ashlar limestone, that in the walls of the chancel and tower being rough; the dressings are of limestone and clunch; the roofs are covered with slate. A church consisting of the present Nave with a chancel and W. tower was built on the site c. 1230. In the second half of the 15th century the North Aisle was added, and late in the 15th or early in the 16th century the West Tower was re-built from the foundations, only the original tower arch being retained; at the same time the W. bay of the N. aisle was pulled down and a large 15th-century window, probably brought from elsewhere, was inserted in the N. wall of the nave. The S. wall of the nave is dated 1632 and contains 17th-century windows; it is possible that a S. aisle was removed in 1632. The church generally was restored in 1863, when the Chancel was completely re-built, many of the old stones being re-used; the S. doorway was moved towards the E., the 13th-century chancel arch was heightened, and new windows were inserted in the clearstorey. The South Porch is modern.

The S. doorway of the nave is an interesting example of 13th-century work; the late 15th or early 16th-century paintings in the N. aisle are curious, and the stone clock face, probably of the same date, on the tower is unusual.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (32 ft. by 21 ft.) has an E. window of three lancet lights, with modern external stonework; internally the window is of the 13th century and forms the three middle bays of an arcading of five bays, with stilted and chamfered arches carried on round shafts having moulded bases and capitals; two of the shafts are detached, the others attached to the jambs and mullions. The N. and S. walls have each three lancets; the stonework internally is original and externally modern; the S. doorway is modern, except a few of the stones inside. The two-centred chancel arch is of the 13th century, heightened and restored in the 19th century; it is of two orders, the outer order moulded and continued from the jambs, the inner chamfered and carried on moulded capitals, which are supported on carved tapering corbels. The Nave (48 ft. by 25 ft.): The N. wall has, at the W. end, an embattled parapet, and a moulded plinth similar to that of the W. tower; the parapet above the clearstorey is plain. The S. wall has an embattled parapet and two buttresses, the eastern buttress has a random date (1630) on it; over the S. porch is carved the date 1632. The late 15th-century N. arcade is of three bays; the two-centred arches are of two chamfered orders carried on octagonal pillars of rough limestone, with plainly moulded capitals of clunch, and chamfered bases; the E. respond is square with chamfered edges; the W. respond is formed by a pillar partly buried in the W. wall of the aisle where it joins the N. wall of the nave: E. of the arcade is the doorway of the former staircase to the rood-loft; in the nave the stonework is modern; in the aisle it is of the 15th century, and the doorway has a four-centred arch in a square head with carved spandrels and a moulded label with one head-stop: W. of the arcade is a large window of late 15th-century date, and of four cinque-foiled lights with transoms and tracery in a pointed head; the jambs and mullions are moulded, and the external label has shield-stops, one bearing a cross and the other a molet; the window has been repaired externally with cement. In the S. wall are two windows, both probably of 1632, the eastern of four trefoiled lights and tracery and the other of three similar lights; both windows have obtuse pointed heads: the S. doorway, between the windows, is of the 13th century, but has been much restored; the outer order forms a two-centred moulded arch and has a modern label; the inner order forms a low septfoiled drop arch, the foils having roll cusp-points; the tympanum over it is of rubble; the jambs are moulded and have attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases; the moulded abaci are carried across both orders. The clearstorey has, on the N. side, three modern windows. The North Aisle (34 ft. by 8½ ft.) has, in the E. wall, a late 15th-century window of three trefoiled lights in a flat four-centred head with a moulded label. In the N. wall is a window of three trefoiled lights under a square head with a moulded label; W. of the window is a doorway of two chamfered orders with a two-centred arch in a square head having trefoiled spandrels and a modern label; the window and doorway are both of late 15th-century date, partly restored. In the W. wall is a window similar to that in the N. wall; below the sill, visible outside, is a smaller blocked window or niche, probably brought from elsewhere; the trefoiled head is much decayed. The West Tower (10 ft. by 9½ ft.) is of three stages with a moulded plinth, an embattled parapet, low clasping buttresses at the W. angles, and shallow buttresses against the W. wall of the nave. The two-centred tower arch is of the 13th century and of three orders, moulded on the E. side and chamfered on the W. side; the outer orders are continuous, the innermost is carried on moulded corbels with capitals; the N. capital is modern. The late 15th-century W. doorway has moulded jambs and pointed head with a restored label; the W. window is of the same date as the doorway and of three trefoiled lights under a four-centred head. The second stage has, in the N. wall, a loop light. In the W. wall is a small stone circular panel set in a square frame; in the centre is a hole and on the splayed face of the circular panel are twelve small discs, showing that it was originally the dial of a clock; it is apparently of the same date as the tower. The third stage has, in each wall, a 15th-century window of two cinque-foiled lights with a transom under a pointed head and moulded label.

Fittings—Bells: six and sanctus; 2nd and 6th, by Anthony Chandler, 1654. Brasses and Indents: In chancel—on N. side, (1) of Thomas Adams, slain 'by bloudy theves in Liscombe Ground', 1626, and Elizabeth his wife, figures of a man and woman, two sons and two daughters, with shield of the arms of the Butchers' Company, and inscription; on S. side, (2) to 'Robart Addames', 1616, and his wife, inscription with the names of his three 'survivors', and two small indents. Communion Table: of oak, with fluted top rails and turned legs, early 17th-century. Door: In nave—in S. doorway, of oak, with strap-hinges, probably 15th-century. Font: plain, circular, with tapering bowl, probably 13th-century, re-tooled. Lectern: of oak, with turned stem, and four feet with scrolled braces, 17th-century. Niche: N. aisle —over N. doorway, outside, apparently with four-centred arch in a square head, late 15th-century, now blocked and obscured. Paintings: In N. aisle— on N. wall, at E. end, remains, in three tiers, apparently a representation of different conditions of the soul before and after death, inscribed scrolls, almost illegible, late 15th or early 16th-century. Piscinae: In chancel—double, with moulded jambs and pointed trefoiled heads, two basins, 13th-century, restored, middle mullion modern. In N. aisle—E. of arcade, shallow recess with trefoiled segmental head, no basin, probably late 15th-century, re-tooled. Plate: includes pewter paten, probably late 17th-century.

Condition—Good.

Secular

Monuments (2–40)

These buildings are almost all of two storeys and most of them are of the 17th century. They are nearly all timber-framed, generally with brick filling, and all have been considerably restored or altered. About two-thirds of the roofs are thatched; the rest are all tiled, except one. Most of the buildings have wide fireplaces, some of them being blocked, and original ceiling-beams.

The Mursley road, S. side

(2). The Old House, 200 yards E.S.E. of the church, is of two storeys and an attic; it was built probably late in the 16th century, and has considerable modern additions. The walls are covered with modern plaster. In the middle of the N. front is a modern porch, and at the E. end is a gable; the original wall has been heightened and a modern parapet added. The central chimney stack is square, with clasping pilasters at the angles, and is built of thin bricks. Interior:— Some of the original timber-framing of the walls is visible, with brick filling set in herring-bone pattern. On the ground floor the hall and another room have each an original open fireplace with moulded stone jambs and four-centred arch in a square head; on the first floor are three fireplaces similar to the others, and one room has a stop-chamfered ceiling-beam; some of the ceiling-beams on both floors have been encased.

Condition—Good, much altered.

(3). Cottage, now two tenements, 100 yards W. of (2). The plan is L-shaped. The E. wall retains the original plaster filling; at the back are modern additions. In the longer wing is a central chimney stack of thin bricks, with three square shafts set diagonally.

Condition—Good, but much ivy in front.

(4). Cottage, now two tenements, 100 yards E. of (2). In front the filling in the wall is partly of plaster. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Poor; rotten and broken floor, etc.; the E. tenement is unoccupied.

N. side

(5). Deverell's Farm, 70 yards E. of the church, is a house of two storeys and an attic; the walls are of stone, and one stone is dated 1632. The plan consists of a rectangular block, facing S., with a small porch-wing in front, and a larger wing at the back, extending towards the N. S. Elevation:— The porch-wing has a modern outer doorway of stone; the inner doorway is of old oak with a moulded frame and a door of battens, now painted; on the first floor is an original stone mullioned window of three lights, and in the gable is the stone inscribed with the date 1632; W. of the porch the windows on both floors are original, and of stone; at the level of the first floor is a moulded string-course, carried the whole length of the wall. W. Elevation:—The main block is gabled and has in the attic an original window of three lights. N. Elevation:—The N. wing has, on the ground floor, in the N. and W. walls, original mullioned windows of three and four lights; on the first floor in the W. wall is a single light with brick reveals; the N. wall is gabled and has a modern window on the first floor. The central chimney stack in the main block is of brick, apparently a modern copy of the original stack.

Swanbourne, Plan Shewing Positions of the Monuments Described

Interior:—On the ground floor in the main block, a chamfered ceiling-beam in the hall has moulded stops of unusual form, and the large open fireplace has an oak lintel. Some of the ceiling-beams in the other rooms on the ground and first floors have been encased. The attic is undivided, and the roof has rough queen-post trusses and wind-braced purlins.

Condition—Good.

(6). Cottage, 110 yards E. of the church. The front has been re-faced with 18th-century red and black bricks and heightened with modern brick. At the back and W. end the filling in the walls is partly of plaster. The central chimney stack is of 17th-century brick, restored above the roof.

Condition—Good.

(7). House, adjoining the Infant School, 150 yards E. of the church, is of two storeys and an attic. The plan is L-shaped. The S. and W. walls are entirely covered with plaster; the E. wall has a half-hipped gable. At the back are modern additions.

Condition—Good.

The Little Horwood road, with Smithfield End, E. side

(8). Church Farm, about 100 yards N. of the church, is a house of two storeys, with a small cellar. The plan is L-shaped. The walls of the longer wing have been re-faced with modern brick. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks. Interior:—The wide fireplace in the longer wing has chimney corners now enclosed in cupboards.

Condition—Fairly good; except the floor of the shorter wing over the cellar, which is rotten and dangerous.

(9). Cottage, now two tenements, at Smithfield End, 220 yards N. of the church. The S. front has been re-faced with modern brick, and the central chimney stack has been re-built. Interior:—The staircase is of old oak.

Condition—Fairly good.

(10). Cottage, 250 yards N. of the church. In front the E. half of the wall has been re-faced with modern brick. The chimney stack at the W. end has been re-built.

Condition—Good.

W. side

(11). The Manor House, opposite to the church, is of two storeys and an attic, with a small cellar, built of ashlar, probably in the second half of the 16th century. The plan was originally rectangular, facing E., with a central porch-wing in front; part of the building N. of the porch has been pulled down, and a modern S.W. wing has been added, making the plan L-shaped.

The house is an interesting example of 16th-century domestic architecture, of stone.

E. Elevation:—The plinth is chamfered, and the moulded string-course, at the level of the first floor, is carried round the porch-wing, dropping to a lower level above the doorway. The porch is gabled, and has a stone coping; the doorway is apparently modern, but is now disused, being blocked by the staircase. On each floor is a range of stone mullioned windows; those on the ground floor are of two chamfered orders, and two of them have transoms; in the S. half of the block is a gabled dormer of stone with a window of three lights. At the N. end of the elevation is a length of wall, the height of the lower storey; it projects beyond the N. wall and was probably part of the former N. extension. S. Elevation:—The E. half is gabled, and a straight joint marks the junction with the modern wing, which is also gabled. The windows on each floor have stone mullions, jambs, etc., much restored and with labels of cement. The N. Elevation is gabled; the windows are modern. W. Elevation:—The N. half is original, and has on the first floor a window similar to those in the E. wall; in the attic is a dormer window; the lower part of the wall is covered with ivy.

Interior:—On the ground floor the southernmost room has a 16th-century stone fireplace with moulded jambs and four-centred arch in a square head. The northernmost room has a large open fireplace, partly blocked. There is one original oak panelled door, and the central newel staircase in the porch-wing is of old oak, brought from elsewhere. The stairs leading to the cellar are original. In the attic the rough timbers of the roof are visible.

Condition—Structurally good; the N. half of the first floor and the attic disused, and the attic floor in bad condition. Some ivy on the W. wall.

(12). Cottage, now the post office and a tenement, 40 yards N.N.W. of the church, was built probably late in the 16th century. In front the brick filling in the wall is set in herring-bone pattern and partly covered with plaster; on each floor are three old mullioned windows; one window on the first floor is blocked. At the N. and S. ends the brick filling of the half-hipped gables is set in herring-bone pattern. At the back and N. end there are low modern additions. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks. Interior:—The two wide fireplaces on the ground floor have chimney corners enclosed in cupboards.

Condition—Good.

(13). Cottages, a range of four, N. of (12). The E. front and N. end are entirely of modern brick. At the back are some low modern additions. One rectangular chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Good.

The Winslow road, or Hollow Lane, N. side

(14). Charlton Hill Farm, 180 yards N.W. of the church. The plan of the 17th-century house is T-shaped, but the N.W. angle between the wings is filled by a modern addition. The S. front has been heightened and re-faced with modern brick; the E. and W. ends of the longer wing are covered with plaster. The central chimney stack in the longer wing is of thin bricks, with four square shafts forming a cross-shaped plan. Interior:—One of the ceiling-beams is moulded and one room is lined with early 17th-century panelling, of oak, now painted.

Condition—Good.

(15). Cottage, now a shop, 20 yards W. of (14). The front has been re-faced with modern brick, and at the back are modern additions. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks. Interior:—On the ground floor the large open fireplaces are now used as recesses.

Condition—Good.

(16). Cottage, 70 yards W. of (14). The front has been re-faced with modern brick. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Good.

(17). Cottages, now four tenements, W. of (16), are of two storeys and an attic; the W. half of the building has been re-faced with modern brick, and the roof is partly covered with slate; the central chimney stack in the E. half is of old thin bricks. At the back and E. end there are modern additions. Interior:—On the ground floor the large open fireplace in the old stack has an oven and chimney-corner seat; the oak staircase is of the 17th century.

Condition—Fairly good.

S. side

(18). Grange Hill Farm, 220 yards N.W. of the church. The house is of two storeys with an attic and cellar. The plan is T-shaped; the main block, running N. and S., and the short central wing, extending towards the W., were built at the end of the 16th century; the wing was extended further towards the W., probably c. 1660. The external walls have been much re-built with modern brick. The central chimney stack in the main block is square with a V-shaped or square pilaster on each face, and is built of thin bricks; the late 17th-century extension has, at the E. end, a stack with four attached square shafts, probably contemporary with the extension. Interior:—On the first floor an original stone fireplace has moulded jambs and flat four-centred arch in a square head; the jambs have moulded stops; three doors are of late 16th or early 17th-century panelling.

Condition—Good.

(19). Cottage, 60 yards W. of (18). The plan is T-shaped; the central wing, at the back, is partly original, the rest of the building is modern. The chimney stack at the N. end of the wing has three square shafts, built of thin bricks.

Condition—Good.

Lane, running N. from Hollow Lane, ¼ mile W. of the Little Horwood road, with Duck End.

E. side

(20). The Boot Inn, 300 yards N.W. of the church. The walls have been much re-built. The projecting chimney stack at the E. end is of old thin bricks. Interior:—On the ground floor the large open fireplace in the old stack has cornerseats.

Condition—Good.

(21). Cottage, at the corner of a lane running E., 50 yards N. of (20). The S. front has been re-faced with modern brick. At the back is a low modern addition. The central chimney stack has been re-built.

Condition—Good.

(22). Ivy Farm (formerly Maunder's Farm), 345 yards N.W. of the church. The plan of the house is L-shaped, the main block projecting towards the E., and the short wing towards the S. The main block was built probably at the beginning of the 17th century; at the E. end is an extension, formerly two cottages, now outhouses, added in 1626, the date incised on a piece of wood, taken from a former window-sill; a straight joint marks the junction with the original building; the short wing was added in 1718, the date painted on a brick in the W. wall, under the eaves, and the stables at the E. end of the extension of 1626 are modern. The main block has been re-faced with modern brick in the lower storey on the S. front, and has an original central chimney stack; the extension of 1626 has a contemporary stack at the W. end, on which is incised an 18th-century sundial. Interior:— Two of the doors are of old oak battens and a third is of early 17th-century panelling.

Condition—Good.

W. side

(23). Cottages, two adjoining, 50 yards N. of Hollow Lane. In front the lower storey is of modern brick; at the back is a low modern addition. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Not very good.

(24). Cottages, a range of three, N. of (23), at the S. corner of a blind alley running W. At the back are low modern additions. The central chimney stack is of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Poor; in one cottage the first floor is propped up with temporary posts.

(25). Cottage, on the N. side of the alley, W. of (24). The plan was originally rectangular, but a modern wing at the back makes it T-shaped. The E. front, and the upper storey at the S. end are covered with plaster; the S. wall of the lower storey is modern. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Good.

(26). Cottage, formerly two tenements, at the end of the alley, on the N. side. The walls are of brick; the front is modern. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Poor.

(27). Cottage, on the S. side of the lane, 100 yards W. of the Little Horwood road, about 330 yards N.W. of the church. The S. front is of modern brick. At the back, facing the lane, are low modern additions. At the E. end is a chimney stack with the lower part of squared stones, the upper part of brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

Lane, running E. from the Hoggeston road, with Nearton End.

S. side

(28). Brise's Farm, about ¼ mile S. of the church. The house is of two storeys and an attic built probably late in the 16th century. The walls are on stone foundations. The N. front has closely spaced timber-framing in four bays, the principal posts having struts; the brick filling is set in herringbone pattern, and has been slightly restored; there are three very small original oak-mullioned windows, each of two lights and all blocked. The E. end is covered with plaster and has a low modern addition; the W. end is of modern brick. The greater part of the wall at the back is original, with brick filling set in herring-bone pattern; on the ground floor is a small original window, of three lights. The central chimney stack has four shafts forming a cross-shaped plan. Interior:— On the ground floor the chimney corners of the remaining large fireplace have been enclosed in cupboards. On the first floor an original fireplace is of stone, with moulded jambs and flat four-centred arch in a square head.

Condition—Good.

(29). Cottage, at the end of an alley, 50 yards E. of (28). All the walls have been partly restored with modern brick. The central chimney stack is original. Interior:—The staircase is of old oak.

Condition—Fairly good.

(30). Cottage, now two tenements, 70 yards E. of (28). At the N. end is a heavy projecting chimney stack, partly of stone and partly of brick. At the S. end is a weather-boarded addition. The central chimney stack is original.

Condition—Poor.

(31). Cottage, and shop, 90 yards E. of (28). The dormer windows have original frames, and the central chimney stack is also original. Interior:— On the ground floor the large open fireplace retains the original oven and chimney-corner seats.

Condition—Poor.

(32). Brooks' Farm, 180 yards E. of (28). The W. wall of the house has plaster filling, and is covered with ivy; the chimney stack has been restored. At the back is a modern addition.

Condition—Good.

(33). Cottage, 220 yards E. of (28). The projecting chimney stack at the E. end is of old bricks, restored at the top; the central chimney stack has been restored. Interior:—On the ground floor an original fireplace has corner-seats of oak enclosed in cupboards.

Condition—Fairly good.

(34). Athawes' Farm, 300 yards E. of (28), is a house of two storeys with a cellar. The N. front was re-faced in the 18th or 19th century with red and black bricks. The E. and W. ends are of brick covered with plaster. At the back is a modern wing, making the plan L-shaped. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Good.

(35). Cottage, 340 yards E. of (28). The walls are of brick, and the upper storey is covered with plaster; at the E. end is a modern addition. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Fairly good.

N. side

(36). Cottage, formerly the White Hart Inn, 320 yards E. of (28). The plan is L-shaped. The S. front is covered with plaster, and the E. end with rough-cast. The whole building has been much restored. The projecting chimney stack at the E. end is of thin bricks.

Condition—Good.

(37). Cottage, at the E. corner of a lane running N., 300 yards E. of (28). The S. end is of modern brick. The central chimney stack is original. Interior:—On the ground floor the remaining wide fireplace has been partly blocked, but retains the original oven. The staircase is of old oak.

Condition—Fairly good.

(38). Cottage, opposite (32), 170 yards E. of (28). The walls are almost entirely of modern brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

(39). Cottage, 80 yards W. of (28). The S. half of the building is of modern brick, the N. half has plaster filling in the timber-framed walls.

Condition—Good.

(40). Cottage, on the E. side of a lane running N., 100 yards N. of (37). On the S. front and at the W. end the lower storey is of brick. At the back is a modern wing, making the plan L-shaped. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks.

Condition—Good.

Unclassified

(41). Mound (probably a boundary mound), 5/8 mile N. of Hoggeston Church; see Hoggeston, p. 153.

(42). Mound, in Millpossels, a field now allotments, 600 yards W. of the church; it is about 30 ft. in diameter and 4½ ft. high.

Condition—Half the mound has been destroyed in making the road.