BHO

Underbarrow and Bradleyfield

Pages 230-231

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Westmorland. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1936.

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In this section

103 UNDERBARROW AND BRADLEYFIELD (C.f.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XXXVIII, N.W., (b)XXXVIII, N.E., (c)XXXVIII, S.W., (d)XXXVIII, S.E.)

Underbarrow and Bradleyfield is a parish adjoining that of Kendal on the W.

Ecclesiastical

a(1). Parish church of All Saints, formerly a chapel of Kendal, stands on the W. side of the parish. It was entirely re-built in 1869 but retains from the older building the following:—

Fittings—Bell: uninscribed, probably 16th or 17th century. Plate: includes cup of 1609 with a band of engraved ornament round the bowl.

Secular

b(2). Cunswick Hall, house, gatehouse and outbuilding, 1½ m. E.N.E. of the church. The House, which belonged to the Leyburne family, has been entirely re-built except for a portion of walling on the N. of the W. wing. This is of rubble and perhaps of early 16th-century date; it contains a stone window of two slightly pointed lights in a square head.

The Gatehouse, S. of the house, is a rubble building of two storeys. It is of 15th or early 16th-century date, but the two arches of the actual gateway have been re-built. Above the N. arch is a re-set stone with the Tudor royal arms, crown and garter. The upper storey has some skewed loop-lights and a semi-circular recess with a drain. The roof incorporates some old timbers. The square rubble building, E. of the gatehouse, was possibly a pigeon-house; the top has been reconstructed. It is of uncertain date.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (3–25)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys. The walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. Some of the buildings have exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

b(3). Boundary Bank, house and cottage nearly 2¼ m. E. of the church. The House has a modern W. wing. The Cottage, S. of the house, retains a timber and plaster flue (Plate 33) to the wide fireplace and a cylindrical chimney-shaft above.

Condition—Of cottage, bad.

b(4). Bradleyfield House, 700 yards S.S.W. of (3), has a later extension on the N. One chimney-stack has an oval shaft. Inside the building is some original panelling.

b(5). Fisher's Tenement, 750 yards S.E. of (4), has modern additions. One chimney-stack has an oval shaft.

a(6). Help Pot, house 1 m. E. of the church.

a(7). Tranthwaite Hall, nearly ½ m. N.E. of the church, has an original door-frame and door on the S. side. Inside the building is part of a cupboard of the local type, with the initials and date M.R. 1703.

a(8). Hag, house 380 yards S.S.E. of (7), contains a small cupboard dated 1718.

a(9). Birks, house 120 yards S.E. of the church, has been extended at both ends. There are some original windows with solid frames and inside the building are muntin and plank partitions of the local type.

a(10). Nook Farm, house 150 yards E.S.E. of (9), has a later wing at the back with two old windows with solid frames.

a(11). Underhill, house 150 yards S.S.W. of (10), contains a re-set piece of original panelling with three enriched panels and enriched rail and styles in addition. There are also some original doors and a small cupboard dated 1716.

a(12). Orphan Crag, house, two tenements, 180 yards S.E. of (11), contains some original doors and a panelled partition.

a(13). Fallen Yew, house 70 yards E. of (12), has an added cross-wing at the S.W. end. Inside the building is an original panelled door and remains of panelling. The late 17th-century staircase has turned balusters.

a(14). Punch Bowl Inn, 100 yards S.E. of (13), was built probably late in the 17th or early in the 18th century.

a(15). Broadoak, house and outbuilding, 1,100 yards S.E. of the church. The House has a modern addition on the N.E. The front doorway has an original frame and panelled door with an iron knocker; there is also one original window with a solid frame. Inside the building is a small cupboard with the initials and date T.M. 1679. The late 17th-century staircase has turned balusters. The Outbuilding, S.W. of the house, has an original roof of five bays and an original window with a solid frame.

c(16). High Grigg Hall, ¾ m. S. of the church, was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century. It contains an original staircase with turned balusters and square newels.

c(17). Low Blakebank, house ½ m. W. of (16), contains a muntin and plank partition of the local type and an early 18th-century staircase with turned balusters and square newels.

c(18). Parks, house about 1 m. S.S.E. of the church.

c(19). Little Tullythwaite, house 220 yards E. of (18), retains two original windows with solid frames.

c(20). Cottage, 270 yards S.E. of (19).

Condition—Ruined.

c(21). Broomgarth End, house 120 yards S.S.W. of (20), is apparently a mid 18th-century building, but contains a two-stage cupboard of the local type, with carved upper panels, pendants and projecting cornice with the initials and date T. and A.T. 1642.

c(22). Cooper's Tenement, in Back Lane 1¼ m. S.E. of the church, was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century.

c(23). Cottage at Garthrow 160 yards E.N.E. of (22), was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century.

c(24). Yew Tree House, 120 yards N.N.W. of (23), is probably of the same period. The panelled front door is original.

d(25). Barrowfield, house 1¾ m. S.E. of the church, has a modern addition on the W. The S. chimney-stack has two grouped cylindrical shafts; the nail-studded door in the E. wall is original.