Marston-Maisey - Martin-Hussingtree

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

266-269

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'Marston-Maisey - Martin-Hussingtree', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 266-269. URL: https://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51137 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Marston-Maisey (St. James)

MARSTON-MAISEY (St. James), a parish, in the union of Cirencester, hundred of Highworth, Cricklade, and Staple, Cricklade and N. divisions of Wilts, 3½ miles (N. E.) from Cricklade; containing 245 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patron, the Rector of Maisey-Hampton: the tithes have been commuted for £250. A school is partly supported by endowment: and several small legacies have been bequeathed at various times for the benefit of the poor.

Marston-Montgomery (St. Giles)

MARSTON-MONTGOMERY (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Uttoxeter, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 6¾ miles (S. W. by S.) from Ashbourn; containing 477 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2439 acres of land, and has a village pleasantly seated on a gentle acclivity, and several farms, of which Marston Lodge is now one. There are 88 acres of common. The living is a rectory, annexed to that of Cubley: the tithes have been commuted for £140. The church consists of a nave, chancel, gallery at the west end, and a tower, and appears to have been a larger structure: it was repaired in 1824, at a cost of £400. A meeting-house was built in 1845.

Marston-Moretaine (St. Mary)

MARSTON-MORETAINE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Ampthill, hundred of Redbornestoke, county of Bedford, 4 miles (N. W.) from Ampthill; containing 1147 inhabitants, and comprising 4171a. 2r. 21p. The females are employed in lace-making by hand, and in platting straw. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £33. 17. 3½., and in the gift of St. John's College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £1120, and the glebe comprises 68 acres. The church is a very elegant structure, mostly in the later English style, and contains some curious brasses; the tower, which is of earlier date, and the walls of which are six feet in thickness, is detached. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Marston, North (St. Mary)

MARSTON, NORTH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Winslow, hundred of Ashendon, county of Buckingham, 3 miles (S. by E.) from Winslow; containing 619 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1904a. 1r. 16p.; the soil is a dark loam, resting on a strong clay, and the surface is pleasingly undulated. The living is a discharged perpetual curacy; net income, £94; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln. The church is a neat structure, containing three stone stalls and a piscina; the chancel was built by the offerings of those who frequented a chalybeate spring here, once in high repute.

Marston, Potter's

MARSTON, POTTER'S, a hamlet, in the parish of Barwell, union of Blaby, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 3 miles (E. N. E.) from Hinckley; containing 11 inhabitants. It comprises 1200 acres, in general very good land, and about equally divided between arable and pasture.

Marston, Priors' (St. Leonard)

MARSTON, PRIORS' (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Southam, Burton-Dassett division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 5½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Southam; containing 701 inhabitants. The monks of Coventry had a charter of free warren here in the reign of Henry III.; and in that of Edward I. they had 28 tenants, who, besides service, did suit to the prior's court twice a year: after the Dissolution, the manor was granted to Sir Edward Knightley, and passed from him to Lord Spencer. The parish is bounded on the east by a portion of Northamptonshire, and comprises by measurement 3386 acres, mostly rich pasture: there are some quarries of stone, but of inferior quality, and used only for repairing the roads. The Oxford canal passes through a small part of the parish, and on its bank is a wharf. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed, with that of Lower Shuckburgh, to the vicarage of Priors'-Hardwick; the glebe comprises 103 acres. The church was entirely repewed in 1841, at a cost of £359. James West, in 1705, and Josiah Kay, in 1711, bequeathed property now producing £40 a year, for teaching children.

Marston-Sicca (St. James)

MARSTON-SICCA (St. James), a parish, in the union of Stratford-upon-Avon, Upper division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 6½ miles (N.) from Chipping-Campden; containing 337 inhabitants. The parish, which derives its affix from the scarcity of water in the immediate neighbourhood, comprises 1300 acres. The village is a long line of houses irregularly built. Charles II. is said to have taken refuge in a house here after the battle of Worcester, and for the purpose of concealment to have turned a jack at the kitchen-fire, disguising himself as a domestic. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 10.; and in the gift of the Rev. R. G. Jeston: certain tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, under an act of inclosure, in 1773, and a rent-charge of £420 has been recently assigned; the glebe comprises 29 acres. The church is an ancient structure. A school was endowed in 1643, by John Cooper, Esq., with an estate now producing upwards of £100 per annum.

Marston, South

MARSTON, SOUTH, a chapelry, in the parish of Highworth, union of Highworth and Swindon, hundred of Highworth, Cricklade, and Staple, Swindon and N. divisions of Wilts, 4 miles (S. by W.) from Highworth; containing 442 inhabitants. Here is a neat chapel, and a school is supported. The Great Western railway passes through the chapelry.

Marston-Stannett

MARSTON-STANNETT, a chapelry, in the parish of Pencombe, union of Bromyard, hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 6½ miles (W. by N.) from Bromyard; containing 27 inhabitants. The chapel was erected by the incumbents of this and the adjoining parishes. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £75; patron, the Rector of Pencombe.

Marston-Trussel (St. Nicholas)

MARSTON-TRUSSEL (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Market-Harborough, hundred of Rothwell, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Market-Harborough; containing, with Thorpe-Lubbenham, extra-parochial, 247 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1300 acres, and is situated on the borders of Leicestershire, which bounds it on the north-west. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 2. 11.; net income, £429, arising from 314 acres of land; patron, the Rev. William Law. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style of architecture, with a square embattled tower.

Marston-Upon-Dove (St. Mary)

MARSTON-UPON-DOVE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 2 miles (E. N. E.) from Tutbury; containing, with the townships of Hatton, Hilton, and Hoon, 1177 inhabitants, of whom 85 are in the township of Marston. The manor was given to the priory of Tutbury by the founder, Henry de Ferrers; and was granted after the Reformation to the Cavendish family. The parish comprises 4227 acres, chiefly rich pasture and dairy-farms, and of level surface: in Marston township are 976 acres. The river Dove passes on the south of the parish. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 15. 2½.; net income, £225; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Devonshire: the tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1780 and 1789. The vicarage-house is a neat mansion with gardens and shrubberies attached. The church is partly in the early and partly in the decorated English style, and is a handsome edifice, consisting of a nave, chancel, aisles, and a tower with a lofty spire; it was repaired and repewed, and a singing-gallery with an organ erected, in 1816, at a cost of £1600, and a gallery was built on the north side in 1830: the font is curious and ancient. There are several bequests, among them those of the Woolley family, for the benefit of the poor.

Marstow (St. Martin)

MARSTOW (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Ross, Lower division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford, 5 miles (S. W.) from Ross; containing 139 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on its south-eastern extremity by the river Wye, and intersected by the small river Garran, and the road from Ross to Monmouth, comprises according to admeasurement 810 acres. Red sandstone is quarried for building, and for the roads. The living is a perpetual curacy, with that of Pencoyd united; patron, the Vicar of Sellack; impropriator of Marstow, the Rev. W. Coke. The tithes have been commuted for £202. 10., and the glebe comprises about half an acre. The church is an ancient structure: the churchyard is frequently inundated. There is a place of worship for dissenters.

Marsworth (All Saints)

MARSWORTH (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Berkhampstead, hundred of Cottesloe, county of Buckingham, 2 miles (N.) from Tring; containing 472 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 1200 acres, of which about 1050 are arable, and 150 pasture. The Grand Junction canal passes through it, and the London and Birmingham railway within a mile of the church. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 9. 7.; net income, £136; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1809. The church has an appearance of considerable antiquity; in the windows are some fragments of stained glass, and parts of the floor are of Roman brick. The Roman Ikeneld-street bounds the parish on the south-east, and in forming the Junction canal numerous swords, urns, coins, and other relics of Roman antiquity were discovered.

Martha, St., On-The-Hill, or Martyr-Hill

MARTHA, ST., ON-THE-HILL, or Martyr-Hill, a parish, in the union of Hambledon, First division of the hundred of Blackheath, W. division of Surrey, 2¾ miles (S. E.) from Guildford; containing 193 inhabitants. This parish is called Martyr-Hill from a tradition that in the early ages some Christians were burnt by the Pagan Britons on the site where the church now stands. It contains 1070 acres, and in point of picturesque beauty is almost unrivalled. The living is a donative; net income, £25; patron and impropriator, W. Tinkler, Esq. The church occupies a bleak situation on a high hill about a mile from Chilworth, the small village of the parish: it was formerly an extensive cruciform structure, in the early English style; but the nave is now in ruins. The ecclesiastical property, prior to the Dissolution in 1538, belonged to the abbey of Newark in Send, near Guildford; and at Tyling are the remains of a religious house.

Marthall, with Little Warford

MARTHALL, with Little Warford, a township, in the parish of Rosthern, union of Altrincham, hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 3¼ miles (E. S. E.) from Knutsford; containing 254 inhabitants. The township comprises 1636 acres, of clay land; the surface is level, and the cultivation is solely with a view to the dairy. The hamlet of Little Warford is east-south-east of Marthall. A separate incumbency has been founded, which is in the gift of W. Egerton, Esq.

Martham (St. Mary)

MARTHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the East and West Flegg incorporation, hundred of West Flegg, E. division of Norfolk, 9 miles (N. W.) from Yarmouth; containing 1032 inhabitants. It comprises 2526a. 2r. 20p., of which 1675 acres are arable, and 851 pasture; the surface is varied, and of pleasing character, enlivened by an extensive lake interspersed with islets. The river North bounds the parish on the north. A pleasure-fair is held on the last Tuesday and Wednesday in July. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Norwich (the appropriators), valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4.; net income, £247: the glebe comprises 10 acres, with a house. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a lofty embattled tower surmounted by a small spire; the windows contain some remains of ancient stained glass, and the font is richly sculptured. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. Thirty-six acres of land, allotted at the inclosure, are let for £45 per annum, for the benefit of the poor, who also have some small bequests.

Martin (St. Michael)

MARTIN (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, S. division of the wapentake of Gartree, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2¼ miles (S. W. by S.) from Horncastle; containing 58 inhabitants. The parish is intersected by the Horncastle canal, and comprises by measurement 764 acres, of which 100 are moorland. On the moor are the remains of an octagonal turret sixty feet high, supposed to have been built by the Lord Treasurer Cromwell as an appendage to the castle of Tattershall; from the summit, to which is an ascent by a winding staircase, is an extensive view of the surrounding country. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 4. 2., and in the gift, alternately, of John E. Oldham and W. Gilliat, Esqrs.: the tithes have been commuted for £143. In the neighbourhood is Woodhall Spa.

Martin

MARTIN, a township, in the parish of Timberland, union of Sleaford, First division of the wapentake of Langoe, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 10¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Sleaford; containing 926 inhabitants. A small school is supported by endowment.

Martin

MARTIN, a hamlet, in the parish of Harworth, union of Worksop, Hatfield division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham; containing 81 inhabitants.

Martin (All Saints)

MARTIN (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Fordingbridge, S. division of the hundred of Damerham, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 4½ miles (N. N. E.) from Cranborne; containing, with the tything of Tidpit, and the extra-parochial place of Allenford Farm, 582 inhabitants, of whom 69 are in East, and 460 in West, Martin. The parish comprises by computation nearly 5000 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Vicar of South Damerham. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists; and a national school is supported by subscription. William Talk, Esq., in 1796 bequeathed £3000, which are appropriated to the support of six poor persons.

Martin

MARTIN, a tything, in the parish of Great Bedwin, union of Hungerford, hundred of Kinwardstone, Marlborough and Ramsbury, and S. divisions of the county of Wilts; containing 153 inhabitants.

Martin, St.

MARTIN, ST., a parish, in the union of Liskeard, hundred of West, E. division of Cornwall; containing, with the town of East Looe, 1402 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the west by Looe harbour, and on the south by the English Channel; and comprises by computation 2719 acres, of which 2324 are arable, 257 woodland, and 66 pasture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £36. 2. 3½., and in the patronage of the Dowager Countess of Sandwich and the family of Vane: the tithes have been commuted for £415, and there are 108 acres of glebe. The church is an ancient structure. At East Looe is a district church. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. Here was formerly a nunnery.

Martin, St.

MARTIN, ST., a parish, in the hundred of Oswestry, N. division of Salop, ½ a mile (E. by S.) from Chirk; containing 2200 inhabitants. It comprises 5314a. 2r. 25p., and is intersected by the road from London to Holyhead. The Ellesmere canal also passes through the parish, and crosses the valley of the Ceiriog by an aqueduct, in the vicinity of Chirk, where it enters Wales: on its banks near the Welsh boundary are some coal-works. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 2. 3½., and in the gift of the Bishop of St. Asaph: the tithes have been commuted for £862 payable to the impropriators, and £260 to the vicar, who has a glebe of 23½ acres. There is some ancient wood carving in the roof of the church, in allusion to the patron saint.

Martin, St.

MARTIN, ST., an extra-parochial liberty, locally in the chapelry of Hipswell, parish of Catterick, union of Richmond, wapentake of Hang-East, N. riding of York, ¾ of a mile (S. E.) from Richmond; containing 8 inhabitants. About the year 1100, Wymar, chief steward to the Earl of Richmond, gave the chapel of St. Martin, with some land adjoining, to the abbey of St. Mary at York, upon which a cell of Benedictine monks was established here. This cell continued till the Dissolution, when its revenue was estimated at £43. 16. 8.

Martin, St., in Meneage

MARTIN, ST., in Meneage, a parish, in the union of Helston, W. division of the hundred of Kerrier and of the county of Cornwall, 6¾ miles (E. S. E.) from Helston; containing 565 inhabitants. It comprises 2294 acres, of which 380 are common or waste: the river Hel flows on the north side of the parish. The living is a rectory not in charge, united to that of Mawgan: the tithes have been commuted for £300. The church, with the exception of the tower, was rebuilt in 1830. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans. At Gear is a circular encampment, comprising an area of fourteen acres, defended by a very deep fosse; there is also an encampment on the estate of Carvallack. Captain Wallis, the circumnavigator, resided for some time at Tremayne, in the parish.

Martin's, St., Stamford-Baron

MARTIN'S, ST., Stamford-Baron, a parish, in the borough and union of Stamford, soke of Peterborough, N. division of the county of Northampton, ½ a mile (S. E.) from Stamford; containing, with the hamlet of Wothorpe, 1443 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the navigable river Welland: the surface is varied, and enriched with wood; the substratum contains freestone of excellent quality. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 13. 9., and lately endowed by the Marquess of Exeter, who is patron and impropriator, with £1800; total net income, £215. The tithes were commuted for land in 1795. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, erected by a bishop of Lincoln in the fifteenth century, and contains monuments to several members of the Cecil family, including one to Lord Treasurer Burghley, whose ancient mansion in the immediate neighbourhood, Burghley House, is now the magnificent residence of the Marquess of Exeter. Her Majesty the Queen, accompanied by Prince Albert, visited the noble marquess at Burghley House in Nov. 1844: during her stay she planted an oak in the grounds, near the great lime planted by Queen Elizabeth on her visit to Lord Burghley. In the parish is an hospital founded by Lord Burghley about 1597, and endowed by him with a rent-charge of £100, for a warden and twelve poor men; the endowment was subsequently augmented by various gifts. Dorothy, afterwards Countess of Exeter, in 1596, and Elizabeth, Countess Dowager, in 1722, gave property now producing together £123 per annum, which sum is appropriated to the support of schools, and in assisting the poor. Here was a Benedictine nunnery in honour of our Lady St. Mary and St. Michael, founded in the time of Henry II., by William de Waterville, abbot of Peterborough, to which abbey it was subordinate; it had at one period forty nuns, but at the Dissolution possessed a revenue of only £72. 18. 10. In March, 1847, some labourers, when excavating, near the late rectory-house, discovered a wooden box containing seven gold coins, consisting of nobles of the reign of Edward III., and angels and half-angels of the reign of Henry VIII.: they were nearly as bright as gold just issued from the mint.

Martin-Hussingtree (St. Nicholas)

MARTIN-HUSSINGTREE (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Droitwich, Upper division of the hundred of Pershore, Worcester and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 3 miles (S. W.) from Droitwich; containing 237 inhabitants. This parish comprises 908a. 3r. 33p. of rich land, of which two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture, with 12 acres of common. It is intersected by the road from Birmingham to Bristol, and the Droitwich canal passes through the lower part. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 14. 4½., and in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Worcester: the tithes have been commuted for £248. 10., and there is a glebe-house, with about 3 acres of garden and orchard. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style, with a spire of wood at the west end; it is overgrown with ivy in many places, which renders it rather picturesque.