Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1685

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1892

Supporting documents

Pages

283-300

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1685', Middlesex county records: Volume 4: 1667-88 (1892), pp. 283-300. URL: https://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66095 Date accessed: 16 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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INDICTMENTS, RECOGNIZANCES, CORONERS' INQUISITIONS-POST-MORTEM, CERTIFICATES OF CONVICTIONS OF CONVENTICLERS, ORDERS AND MEMORANDA temp. JAMES II.

1685

15 February, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Mascall late of the said parish yeoman and divers other malefactors to the number of five persons riotously and tumultuously assembled, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration otherwise than according to the laws of this kingdom of England, to the terror of the people of the said Lord the King, the disturbance of the said King's peace, and the evil example of all other delinquents in this respect. Thomas Mascall confessed the indictment and was fined twelve pence, which he paid to the Sheriff in court. S. P. R., 23 Feb., 1 James II.

15 February, 1 James II.—Recognizances of Edward Freind 'brocher' and George Reede gentleman, both of St. demon's Deanes at May Poule Alley, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Edward Freind and George Reede at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer the complaint of William Mayes and others, being suspected to have severall cloaths stole from the Granideeres belonging to the Queenes Troope." S. P. R., 23 Feb., 1 James II.

15 February, 1 James II.—Recognizances of Thomas Maskett of St. Tules (sic) Southwarke waterman and Humphrey Burroughs of Whitechappell weaver, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Thomas Maskett at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex to be holden at Hicks Hall, to answer &c. "for preaching." S. P. R., 23 Feb., 1 James II.

16 February, 1 James II.—True Bill that, on the said day and on divers other occasions before and afterwards at St. Andrew's Holborn co. Midd. and divers other places of the said county, Richard Hookam late of St. James's Clarkenwell laborer wandered abroad, carrying about with him a wooden cart and a rotatory wheel, and crying and vociferating in a loud voice in and through the places and lanes in the said county these words, to wit, 'Have you any knives to grind?' with the intencion of colouring his said vagrancy, and escaping punishment for the same. Richard Hookam confessed the indictment, and was fined twelve pence. S. P. R., 23 Feb., 1 James II.

21 February, 1 James II.—Recognizances of Gascoyne Sedgewick . . . . and William White . . . ., both of St. Giles's Cripplegate, in the sum of twenty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Gascoyne Sedgewick and William White at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex, to give evidence "against Peter Henshaw constable of the Liberty of Norton Folgate, for suffering an unlawfull Preacher or teacher to escape, being in his custody." S. P. R., 23 Feb., 1 James II.

23 February, 1 James II.—Recognizances of Miles Musgrave and John Sherborn, both of the Tower of London laborers, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Miles Musgrave and John Sherborn at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to "give evidence against John Jones for speaking treasonable words against our Soveraigne Lord the King." S. P. R., 23 Feb., 1 James II.

24 February, 1 James II.—Recognizance of Andrew Snape of Hampton Court serjeant-farrier, in the sum of forty pounds: For the appearance of the said Andrew Snape at the present S. P. for Middlesex, "to give evidence against Richard Deeley for speaking words of the next Parliament, supposed to be seditious words." S. P. R., 23 Feb., 1 James II.

2 March, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, in the course of conversation which he had with a certain person to the jurors unknown about and concerning the Lord now King and James Duke of Monmouth, John Hathaway late of the said parish yeoman maliciously and seditiously spoke in a loud voice, and in the presence and hearing of divers of the said King's lieges and subjects, these seditious words, to wit, "I would fight for the Duke of Monmouth, and if that Monmouth had the better and the King was to bee killed, rather then the King should not bee killed I would doe it." This indictment was taken upon Commission of Oyer and Terminer. Declared 'Guilty' by a jury, it was adjudged that John Hathaway should pay a fine of £6 13s. 4d. and that in the forenoon of the next Wednesday, he should be stript from the middle upwards, and be publicly whipt upon his back at the hinder part of a cart, until his body should be bloody, from a certain place called The Maypole in East Smithfeild to a certain other place called Ratcliffe Crosse, and that he should be committed to Newgate Gaol, there to remain until he should have paid the said fine and undergone the said punishment. S. P. R., 7 Dec, 1 James II.

4 March, 1 James II.—Recognizances of Frances Smith of Westminster spinster, John Young dancing-master and Anthony Turner drawer, in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Frances Smith, John Young and Anthony Turner at the next S. P. for Middlesex, then and there to "give evidence against Thomas Child for speaking treasonable words." That the matter came to nothing appears from the attached letter of Richard Graham, announcing that "Mr. Attorney consents that Thomas Child and the prosecutors be discharged of their recognizances." S. P. R., 27 April, 1 James II.

10 March, 1 James II.—True Bill that Thomas Johnson, late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., being on the said day a soldier (not a captain immediately retained by the king), and as a soldier at the garrison of Sheerness co. Kent being engaged to serve the Lord the King without having leave to do so withdrew himself from the said garrison and service, and was taken and arrested for the said felony on 24 July, 1 James II. at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields aforesaid. No clerical notes touching subsequent proceedings in the case. G. D. R., 26 August, 1 James II.

17 March, 1 James II.—True Bill that, on the said 17 March, 1 James II., and on divers other days and occasions before and after the said day, at St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. and at divers other places in the same county, Anthony Sanders late of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate laborer, an idle and vagrant person, wandered abroad, carrying about certain kettles and skelletts and other articles of merchandise, and crying in a loud voice these words, to wit, "Have you any worke for a tinker?"—Also, a similar True Bill against John George late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields laborer, for wandering abroad and crying aloud in the said parish, in the same unseemly and unlawful manner. Both tinkers confessed the indictment and were each fined three shillings and four pence. S. P. R., 27 April, 1 James II.

18 March, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, Deborah Hawkins wife of Richard Hawkins late of the said parish yeoman alias Deborah Hawkins spinster, designing and maliciously intending to procure and rouse ill feeling against the said Lord the King &c. audaciously and seditiously uttered, in the course of conversation with Mary Bennett spinster of and concerning the death of the late King Charles the Second, these wicked and seditious words, to wit, "Before the King (to wit, King James II.) shall be crowned, this head of mine shall goe off, and before that day comes there will be a greate deal of bloodshed," and also spoke in presence and divers of the said now King's lieges and subjects these words in contempt of the said king, to wit, "Hee is noe King but an Elective King, and if there were warrs as I believe there will be, I will put on breeches myself to fight for the Duke of Monmouth." On 26th Feb. 2 James II. she put herself 'Not Guilty,' and on the . . . . . th Feb. she was found 'Guilty by a jury and was fined 13s. 4d., it being further adjudged that on the 4th of March she should be put on the pillory for an hour near the Turnstile in Holborn, having on her head a paper setting forth her offence. S. P. R., 22 Feb., 2 James II.

20 March, 1 James II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against Mary Baines widow, Stephen Stanes carpenter, Elizabeth Hanson wife of John Hanson sailor, Richard Taylor ropemaker, Mary Willis the wife of William Willis sailor, Thomas Walker yeoman, all six late of Stepney co. Midd., and Thomas Hollis late of St. Trinity's Minorites yeoman. Stephen Stanes and Thomas Walker were convicted on failing to appear and surrender themselves &c. All the others appeared, when process was stayed against each of them, until the King should be pleased to order otherwise. Of Mary Willis alone is proof of conformity recorded. S. P. R., 27 April, 1 James II.

22 March, 1 James II.—Recognizances of Abraham Wardner of Red Bull Yard in Clerkenwell framework-knitter and John Camden of Aldersgate Street joyner, in the sum of twenty pounds each: For the appearance of Absolom Chamberlaine at the present S. P., to answer to what shall "bee objected against him by Michaell Tod gentleman, for publishing a libellous paper intituled Strange and Wonderfull News concerning his Grace James Duke of Monmouth and Ford Lord Gray." S. P. R., 27 April, 1 James II.

13 April, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at Stepney, co. Midd. on the said day, John Maynard late of the said parish yeoman, intending to bring Sir William Smyth bart. and J.P. for Middlesex into infamy and odium &c. maliciously and scandalously in the presence and hearing of divers of the said King's lieges and subjects spoke these words in a loud voice, to wit, "I wish they was hangd that was the occasion of Paveing" i.e. paving a certain highway within the said parish. John Maynard confessed the indictment: but the bill bears no clerical minute touching his punishment. S. P. R., 2 June, 1 James II.

17 April, 1 James II.—True Bill against Jonas Parnell, one of the churchwardens of Endfield co. Midd., for official negligence in respect to the execution of four several warrants, for levying four several sums of twenty pounds by distress and sale of the goods and chattels of William Parnell of Endfeild aforesaid, in accordance with the Act of Parliament for hindering and suppressing seditious conventicles, the said William Parnell having been convicted of allowing an unlawful conventicle to be held on four several occasions in his house in the said parish. On 8 Oct., 1685, Jonas Parnell confessed the indictment and was fined in the sum of twelve pence, which he paid to the Sheriff in court. S. P. R., 13 July, 1 James II.

23 April, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at Chelsey co. Midd. on the said day, Susan Bowcher wife of . . . . Bowcher late of the said parish yeoman alias Susan Bowcher of the said parish spinster, with the intention of defrauding Elizabeth Berry wife of Thomas Berry, fraudulently uttered in payment to the said Elizabeth two milled shillings that were fraudulently gilt so as to resemble two pieces of the King's current gold money called guinneys.—Similar True Bill against Joseph Rosse of Chelsey yeoman for uttering on 5 May, 1 James II., to the same Elizabeth Berry a milled shilling so gilt as to resemble a guinney, and imposing the said counterfeit piece of money upon her as a guinney. Found 'Guilty' by jurors on 13 July, 1685, Susan Bowcher and Joseph Rosse were each fined in the sum of twenty pounds, and committed to the New Prison at Clarkenwell, there to remain until the fine should have been paid. S. P. R., 2 June, 1 James II.

1 May, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, John Noades late of the said parish yeoman, and then one of the headboroughs of the same parish, designing to disturb the King's peace, and to render Sir William Smyth bart. and J.P. for Middlesex hateful and infamous not only to the said King's lieges and subjects inhabiting the said parish, but to all the lieges and subjects of the Lord the King, and also to all persons who then knew and in future time should come to know him, in a loud voice and in the presence and hearing of divers of the said king's lieges and subjects maliciously, scandalously, contemptuously and advisedly spoke these words, to wit, "I care not a turd for Sir William Smyth." On 13 June, 1685, John Noades confessed the indictment, and was fined 13s. 4d., which he paid to the Sheriff in Court. S. P. R., 2 June, 1 James II.

10 May, 1 James II.—Recognizances for the appearance of Benjamin Browne of Hounsditch London calender, Ann Jackson the wife of John Jackson . . . ., and John Barrow of George Street weaver, at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to be holden at Hicks Hall, in order that Benjamin Browne and Ann Jackson may "answer for being at a riotous and tumultuous Assembly," and that John Barrow "may answear for suffering a riotous and tumultuous Assembly to be held in his house on the said 10th day of May." S. P. R., 2 June, 1 James II.

2 June, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's-le-Savoy co. Midd. on the said day, John Gorden late of the said parish laborer assaulted William Dyson, and then and there slew and murdered the same William Dyson, by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound in the left part of his belly near the navel, of which wound he then and there instantly died. Found 'Guilty,' John Gorden was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 4 June, 1 James II.

8 June, 1 James II.—True Bill that, whereas a certain Robert Parrott late of St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. . . . ., was arrested and taken into custody at Taunton co. Somerset on 27 May, 1 James II., on suspicion of traitorously inciting and promoting the rebellion in the West of England against the Lord now King, nevertheless on 8th June in the said year at St. Leonard's Shoreditch, a certain John Wicks late of last-named parish clerk and then vicar of the same parish, and George Ricketts late of St. Leonard's Shoreditch yeoman and John Tue late of the same last named parish yeoman in behalf and in favour of the same Robert Parrott falsely certified and caused it to be certified that the same Robert Parrott was of peaceable disposition and had then lately and afore lived well and quietly in the said parish of St. Leonard's Shoreditch, with intention that the said Robert Parrott should by colour of the said false certificate be discharged from custody, and allowed to go whither he should be pleased to go. John Wicks, George Ricketts and John Tue all three confessed the indictment; whereupon John Wicks was fined £3 6s. 8d., George Ricketts was fined £26 13s. 4d., and John Tue was fined £1 3s. 8d., which fines they respectively paid to the Sheriff in court. S. P. R., 13 July, 1 James II.

10 June, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's Cripplegate co. Midd., Samuel Warner late of the said parish, a perverse and seditious man, in the presence and hearing of one John Newman and of divers others of the King's lieges and subjects, spoke with a malicious and seditious purpose these scandalous words, to wit, "Argile did well, and it is well any body stand up for our liberties, for all the laws of the land are against him that hath it;" and that further, in reply to the said John Newman's remark "You will speak ill of the king," the said Samuel Warner answered "He hath taken upon him more than his right." Found 'Guilty,' Samuel Warner was sentenced to be whipt and to find good sureties for his good behaviour, during the next seven years. G. D. R., 16 July, 1 James II.

14 June, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Samuel Langdale salter, Evan Davies glazier, Samuel Balls salter, Joseph Coleman tin-plate-worker, Henry Marten frame-workeknitter, John Collier cordwainer, John Langley merchant, Francis Roberts instrument-maker, John Reading weaver and Josiah Dilley brasier, all late of Stepney aforesaid, unlawfully and tumultuously assembled together, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration, otherwise than according to the laws of this kingdom of England. Samuel Balls pleaded 'Not Guilty,' but died before trial. No clerical minute touching subsequent proceedings in the case against Francis Roberts and Josiah Dilley. John Collier, John Langley and John Reading all confessed the indictment, and were fined in various sums, which they severally paid to the said Sheriff in court; John Langley being fined 13s. 4d., John Collier and John Reading being each fined 10s. Abandoning previous pleas of 'Not Guilty,' all the others on 24 Aug. 1685 confessed the indictment, and were fined in various sums; Samuel Langley being fined in 5s. and committed to the New Prison, until he should have paid the fine; Evan Davies being fined 5s., which he paid to the Sheriff in Court; Joseph Coleman being fined 6s. 8d. and committed to the New Prison, until he should have paid the fine; and Henry Marten being fined 5s. and committed to the New Prison, until he should have paid the fine.—S. P. R., 13 July, 1 James II.

17 June, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Dunstan's-in-the-West co. Midd. on the said day, William Gard and William Cole, both late of the same parish laborers, with certain keys called picklock keyes opened the lock on the door of the shop of Elizabeth Brook widow, with the intention of stealing and carrying off the goods and chattels, then being within the said shop. Found 'Guilty' each of the culprits was sentenced to pay a fine of three shillings and fourpence, and to be whipt from Algate to Temple Barr, and to be committed to prison, there to remain until &c.—G. D. R., 16 July, 1 James II.

22 June, 1 James II.—Recognizances, taken before Lord Jeffreys, of William Tibballs laborer and Phillipp Higgins taylor, both of Old Bedlam co. Midd., in the sum of fifty pounds each: For the appearance of the said William Tibballs and Phillipp Higgins, at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate, "to give evidence against William Eales for treason and other misdemeanours," Signed, Jeffreys. G. D. R., 16 July, 1 James II.

22 June, 1 James II.—Recognizances of Gregory Page of Tower Hill co. Midd. merchant, in the sum of five hundred pounds and . . . . Goodin of St. Paul's Shadwell gentleman in the sum of two hundred and fifty pounds: For the appearance of the said Gregory Page at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex, to be holden at Hicks's Hall. He appeared, and was then delivered in bail to Frank Johnson of Wappin gentleman, bound in the sum of five hundred pounds, and John Kentee of Wapping fishmonger, bound in the sum of two hundred and fifty pounds. S. P. R., 13 July, 1 James II.

28 June, 1 James II.—Recognizances of Robert Jones and Richard Waring, both of Preston co. Radnor laborers, in the sum of fifty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Robert Jones and Richard Waring at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex to be holden at Hickes Hall, "to give in evidence against John Foster for drinking the late Duke of Munmouth's health and speaking other seditious words." S. P. R., 13 July, 1 James II.

29 June, 1 James II.—Recognizances, taken on the said day before Lord Jeffreys, of Cornelius Clanchy and George Caworth, both of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., in the sum of one hundred pounds each: For the appearance of the said Cornelius Clanchy and George Caworth at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate, "to give evidence against Denis Daley for seditious words." Signed Jeffreys. G. D. R., 16 July, 1 James II.

29 June, 1 James II.—An ignored indictment against John Foster late of Isleworth co. Midd., a seditious and ill-disposed person, for drinking the health of James late Duke of Monmouth, at that time a traitor towards The Lord now King, in the presence and hearing of divers of the said king's lieges and subjects, for the purpose of exciting sedition against the Lord the King. G. D. R., 16 July, 1 James II.

1 July, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Samuel Alderton late of the said parish laborer, being retained as a soldier (not a captain &c.) to serve the Lord the King in his wars, withdrew from the said service without licence to do so. Found 'Guilty,' the said Samuel Alderton was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 16 July, 1 James II.

4 July, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Botolph's-without-Aldgate on the said day, Rebecca Jadd widow, Thomazine the wife of Christopher Lamb cordwainer, Mary Challis widow, Marcia Tooley widow, and Sara Fox wife of William Fox taylor, all late of the said parish, unlawfully and tumultuously assembled themselves, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration, otherwise than according to the laws of this kingdom of England. All five confessed the indictment, and were each fined six shillings and eight pence, which sum each paid to the Sheriff in court. S. P. R., 13 July, 1 James II.

4 July, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Botolph's-without-Aldgate on the said day, William Cooper weaver, Mark Hawkins weaver, Thomas Hawkins weaver, Thomas Hill weaver, Robert Good husbandman, Valentine Lindsey cook, Abraham Stacey cook, Symon Brunt taylor, William Russell taylor, John Walter yeoman, Alice Prior widow and Ellen Bankes the wife of Thomas Bankes taylor, unlawfully and riotously assembled, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration otherwise than according to the laws of this kingdom of England. William Cooper confessed the indictment and was fined £1 6s. 8d., and was committed to the New Gaol, there to remain until he should have paid the fine. Abandoning a previous plea of 'Not Guilty' Mark Hawkins confessed the indictment and was fined 13s. 4d. which he paid to the Sheriff in court. Thomas Hill confessed the indictment, and was fined £1 6s. 8d., and was committed to the New Prison, there to remain until he should have paid the fine. Robert Good confessed the indictment and was fined . . . ., which he paid to the Sheriff in court. Abandoning a previous plea of 'Not Guilty,' Valentine Lindsey confessed the indictment, and was fined 13s. 4d., which he paid to the Sheriff in court. Abandoning a previous plea of 'Not Guilty,' Abraham Stacey on 24 Aug., 1685, confessed the indictment, and was fined 6s. 8d., which he paid to the Sheriff in court. In like manner abandoning previous pleas of 'Not Guilty,' Symon Brunt and John Walter confessed the indictment and were each fined 13s. 4d., which fines were paid to the Sheriff in court. Alice Prior confessed and was fined five shillings. Abandoning previous pleas of 'Not Guilty,' William Russell and Ellen Bankes both confessed and were fined 6s. 8d., which fine each of them paid to the Sheriff in court. S. P. R., 13 July, 1 James II.

6 July, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields within the Liberties &c. of Westminster on the said day, William Hoyington late of the said parish laborer, a pernicious and seditious person, in the course of conversation with a certain John Panckhurst concerning the rebellion and open war then being levied against the said Lord the King by James late Duke of Monmouth and other persons to the jurors unknown, spoke in a loud voice these seditious words, to wit, "I will not take up arms for the King, but if I could but get downe into the West, I would assist the Duke of Monmouth, for I doe not question (?) a collonell's place." No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. West. R., 5 Oct., 1 James II.

7 July, 1 James II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, on view of the body of Anne Hoult wife of James Hoult, there lying dead: With Verdict of jurors, saying that on the 5th instant, Henry Morgan late of the said parish gentleman and William White late of the same parish laborer assaulted the said Anne Hoult, and that the said Henry Morgan slew and murdered her, by giving her with a rapier a mortal wound in the left part of her belly near the naval, of which wound she languished at the said parish from the said 5th of August until the 7th day of the same month, on which last-named day she died of the same wound: And That William White was present at the said felony and murder, and aided and encouraged the said Henry Morgan to do and perpetrate it: And That immediately after the said felony and murder by him done and perpetrated in the manner aforesaid, the aforesaid Henry Morgan "made flight" (quod predictus Henricus Morgan immediate post feloniam et murdrum predictum per ipsum modo ac forma predictis factum ac perpetratum apud parochiam Sancte Margarete Westmonasterii infra libertates predictas in comitatu predicto fugam fecit.) It is worthy of observation that the jurors, after recording Henry Morgan's "flight," forbear to say that he withdrew himself to places to the jurors unknown.—Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the same Henry Morgan gentleman and William White gentleman for the same murder; from a clerical note on which indictment it appears that William White gentleman (styled laborer in the Inquisition) put himself on trial and was acquitted. No clerical note over Henry Morgan's name. G. D. R., 16 July, 1 James II.

10 July, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas How late of the said parish yeoman, in the presence and hearing of divers of the said King's lieges and subjects, falsely and wickedly and seditiously spoke these words, to wit, "You must all bee papists, for there is a ship loaden with beads come, and you must learne to tell your beads." This bill was taken at Session of Oyer and Terminer. Found 'Guilty' by a jury on 12 Dec., 1685, Thomas How was fined £13 6s. 8d., and was committed to the. New Prison at Clarkenwell, there to remain until he should have paid the said fine. S. P. R., 7 Dec. 1 James II.

10 July, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. on the said day, when a certain Francis Hulcupp in the society of divers other persons began to drink the health of our most serene Lord James the Second by God's grace King of England &c., a certain Thomas King late of the said parish clerk, a perverse and disaffected person, refused to drink the health, and in the presence and hearing of divers of the king's lieges and subjects, uttered these seditious words in a loud voice, to wit, "I care not a fart for the King, neither do I love him." This bill was taken upon Commission of Oyer and Terminer. Thomas King confessed the indictment and was fined £1 6s. 8d. S. P. R., 13 July, 1 James II.

15 July, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. James's within the Liberties of Westminster on the said day, William Pratt late of the said parish within the said Liberties yeoman, a seditious and disaffected person, in the presence and hearing of divers of the said King's lieges and subjects spoke these false, seditious and scandalous words, to wit, "The Queene is the Pope's bastard. It is no treason to speake against the Queene, because she never was crowned with the Crowne of England; and I will be the death of them, that was the death of the Duke of Monmouth, if I'm to be pared to death with a razor." Found 'Guilty,' William Pratt was sentenced to pay a fine of three shillings and four pence, and to be whipt from Temple Barr to Charing Crosse. G. D. R., 26 August, 1 James II.

16 July, 1 James II.—The Newgate Calendar of the said date contains the following entries touching prisoners within the gaol, to wit, (1) Samuell Warner and Thomas Glover, committed by William Cleeve esq.; Samuell Warner being charged upon oath for speaking treasonable words against his Majestie, and Thomas Glover, charged upon oath for countenancing and abetting the said Warner in uttering the said treasonable words: Dat. 10 July, 1685.—(2) Oliver Sheires, committed by Sir Wm. Smith, baronet, charged upon the oathes of Captain Joseph Monck and Mrs. Anne Chester, for publishing false and scandalous news.—(3) William Eales, committed by the Rt. Hon. George Jeffreys Lord Cheife Justice of England, accused upon oath of High Treason, for endeavouring to subvert the government of this Kingdome and to levy warr against his Majestie: Dat. 22 June, 1685.— (4) John Reeve, committed by William Cleeve esq., accused of being a nonconformist minister: Dat. 22 June, 1685.—(5) Thomas Harford and Elizabeth Soreby, committed by Thomas Cheeke esq., suspected to be confederate with the rebells now in armes, divers arms being privately hid and found in their houses.—(6) Thomas Pletso, Robert Ashe, Nathaniel Stronge, John Halfe, committed by Henry Reynell esq. upon suspicion that they intended to assist the rebells now in armes, they being travellinge westward: Dat. 16 June, 1685.—(7) Dennis Dayley, committed by the Rt. Honble. George Lord Jeffreys, Lord Chief Justice of England, charged upon oath for High Treason in sayeing the late Duke of Monmouth had as good a title to the Crowne as the Kinge: Dat. 29 June, 1685.—(8) John Foster, committed by Richard Downton esq., for sayeing he had a mind to drincke a good health, which health was the Duke of Monmouth's, and told a soldjer who stood by him, that he hoped he was of his mind: Dat. 30 June, 1685.—(9) Tracy Panceford, committed by the Rt. Honble. George Lord Jeffreys, Lord Chief Justice of England, accused upon oath for High Treason, for endeavouring to subvert the government of this kingdome: Dat. 19 June, 1685.—(10) William Disney, committed by the same Lord Jeffreys, accused by the oathes of severall witnesses for High Treason, for conspiringe the death of our Sovereigne Lord the Kinge, and for excitinge persons to levy warr against his Majestie and his government: Dat. 16 June, 1685.—(11) Robert Francis esq., committed by Thomas Smith esq., charged upon oath for thrusting a stick at Thomas Dangerfeild into the coach comeing from Tyburn and running it into his eye, whereby he is in danger of losing his life: Dat. 4 July, 1685.—(12) William Cooper, Marke Hawkin, Thomas Hill, Robert Good, Valentine Endsey, Simon Brant, John Walters, William Russell, Abraham Stacey, committed by Sir William Smith knt. and bart. and others, upon suspicion that they are dangerous persons, they being mett with many others at the house of John Walters, and refused to give any accompt of themselves, therefore looked upon to bee likely to assist the traitors, now in rebellion: Dat. 4 July, 1685. G. D. R., 16 July, 1 James II.

20 July, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. on the said day and other days before and afterwards, William Ring late of the said parish tailor conspired to kill the Lord now King and to change, alter and subvert the ancient government of the country: And that, knowing a certain Joseph Holloway and Henry Lawrence traitorously had conspired the said King's final death and destruction, and together with other traitors to the jurors unknown had raised war and rebellion against the same Lord the King, the aforesaid William Ring traitorously and as a false traitor did on the said day and at the said parish traitorously harbour, comfort and maintain the same Joseph Holloway and Henry Lawrence and give them food and drink. Found 'Guilty,' the said William Ring was sentenced to be executed, in the manner prescribed for culprits convicted of high treason. G. D. R., 14 Oct., 1 James II.

26 July, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's-le-Savoy on the said day, Thomas Gardner late of the said parish laborer assaulted Roland Lytton esq. in the high-way, and then and there robbed him of a silver-hilted sword .worth forty-eight shillings. Found 'Guilty,' Thomas Gardner was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 26 August, 1 James II.

27 July, 1 James II.—Recognizance of William Shatter of Drury Lane in St. Martin's-in-the-Fields . . . ., in the sum of one hundred pounds: For the appearance of the said William Shatter at the next G. S. P., to be held at Hixes Hall, then and there to "give evidence against Richard Walker for speakeinge treasonable words against the Queen's Majesty." S. P. R., 24 Aug., 1 James II.

16 August, 1 James II.—True Bill, for unlawfully and riotously assembling on the said day at St. Andrew's Holborn, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration otherwise than according to the laws of this kingdom of England, against seven individuals, to wit, 2 yeomen and 5 spinsters. Clerical minutes touching Grace Andrew spinster and Mary Mackmillion spinster show that on 22 Feb., 1685, both confessed the indictment, and were each fined twelve pence. No other clerical minutes on the bill. S. P. R., 8 Oct., 1 James II.

16 August, 1 James II.—True Bill for unlawfully and tumultuously assembling at St. Andrew's Holborn on the said day, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration otherwise than according to the laws of this kingdom of England, against fifteen humble and obscure individuals, to wit, 8 yeomen, 1 taylor, 1 yeoman's wife, 4 spinsters, and 1 widow. A clerical minute certifies that on 7th Dec. George Hudson yeoman confessed the indictment and was fined five shillings, which he paid to the Sheriff in court. No other clerical minute touching subsequent proceedings on the bill. S. P. R., 8 Oct., 1 James II.

16 August, 1 James II.—True Bill, for unlawfully and riotously assembling at St. Andrew's Holborn on the said day, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration otherwise than in accordance with the laws of this kingdom of England, against thirteen obscure and humble individuals, to wit, 5 yeomen, 1 yeoman's wife, 6 spinsters, 1 widow. A clerical minute over the name of Mary Upton spinster certifies that she confessed the indictment, and was fined 3s. 4d., which she paid to the Sheriff in court. No clerical minute touching subsequent proceedings in the case against the other twelve persons. S. P. R., 8 Oct., 1 James II.

19 August, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Ellen Steele late of the said parish spinster broke into the dwelling-house of the Most Honourable the Lady Elizabeth Carteret, and there stole and carried off a silver sugar caster worth three pounds and fifteen shillings, a silver chafingdish worth fifty shillings and two silver salts worth thirty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Lady Elizabeth Carteret. Acquitted of burglary, but found 'Guilty' of the larceny, Ellen Steele was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 26 August, 1 James II.

20 August, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's Whitechapple co. Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, John Fernely late of the said parish . . . . conspired and designed to bring the said Lord now King to death and final destruction, and to raise war and rebellion against the said Lord the King: And that, knowing a certain James Burton had traitorously conspired and imagined the death and destruction of the said Lord the King, and together with other traitors to the jurors unknown had traitorously raised war and rebellion within this kingdom of England against the said Lord the King, the said John Fernely at the aforesaid parish and on the aforesaid day did wickedly and traitorously harbour, comfort and maintain the said James Burton, and give him food and drink. Found 'Guilty,' John Fernely was sentenced to be executed in the manner prescribed for the execution of culprits convicted of high treason. G. D. R., 14 Oct., 1 James II.

26 August, 1 James II.—The Newgate Calendar of the said date contains the following entries touching prisoners within the gaol, to wit, (1) Richard Walker, committed by Francis Knollis esquire, for speaking treasonable words: Dat. 27 July, 1685.—(2) Richard Goodeanough, committed by the Rt. Honble. Earle of Sunderland and one of His Majesties most honourable Privy Councell and Principle (sic) Secretary of State, being attd. of High Treason: Dat. 20 July, 1685.—(3) Abraham Holmes, committed by the same Earle of Sunderland for High Treason in levying of warr against the King: Dat. 20 July, 1685.—(4) Colonel John Rumsey, committed by the same Earle of Sunderland, for High Treason in conspireing to levy warr against the King: Dat. 21 July, 1685.—(5) John Austin, committed by Thomas Cheeke esq., charged upon oath for saying to Wm. Hamilton, a soldier, 'You are all Roman Catholicks, and I could find in my heart to sacrifice all soldiers, for that you have a Popish Kinge:' Dat. 9 August, 1685.—(6) Roger Hoare, marchant, committed by the same Earle of Sunderland, for High Treason . . . . Dat. . . . .—(7) Edward Whytehead, Benjamin Hewlinge, Christopher Battiscombe, William Jenckins and Henry Lisle, committed by the same Earle of Sunderland for High Treason, in levying warr against the Kinge: Dat. 3 August, 1685.—(8) Richard Nelthrope, committed by the same Earl of Sunderland; Being outlawed for High Treason: Dat. 9 August, 1685.—(9) John Jones, James Heyes, John Kidd, committed by the Earle of Sunderland &c. for High Treason in levying warr against the Kinge: Dat. 16 August, 1685.— (10) Charles Bateman, committed by the same Earle of Sunderland, charged with High Treason: Dat. 20 August, 1685.—(11) James Burton and John Fernly, committed by the same Earle of Sunderland: Burton being outlawed for High Treason, and Fernly concealing him.— (12) Dionisius Dally, committed for seditious words.—(13) Abram Angely, Leonard Jackson, Samuel Glisson, John Smith, Arthur Mathewes and Walter Coodris, for having bin in the late rebellion in the West of England: To remain &c. G. D. R., 26 Aug., 1685.

30 August, 1 James II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of Samuel Read of Carter's Rents near Brick Lane in Stepney weaver at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being a setter to Conventicles." S. P. R., 8 Oct., 1 James II.

6 September, 1 James II.—Recognizances of Rebecka Thomson of Spittlefeilds widow, in the sum of forty pounds, and of Jos: Tuftone turner and John Sunders weaver, both of Spittlefeilds, in the sum of twenty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Rebecka Thomson at the next G. Q. S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. for "suspicion of harboring persons supposed to be concerned in the late rebellion against his present Majesty." S. P. R., 8 Oct., 1 James II.

15 September, 1 James II.—Recognizances, taken on or between 15 and 20 September, for the appearance of Richard Townsend junr. of Hackney glazier, Sarah Hilton of . . . ., Jonathan Joyner of . . . ., Nathaniel Denham of . . . ., and Mary Williamson of . . . ., at the next G. Q. S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being taken in an unlawfull Assembly." S. P. R., 8 Oct., 1 James II.

25 September, 1 James II.—Recognizances of Edward Fryer of Clapham co. Surrey gentleman, in the sum of three hundred pounds, and James Bennett of Highholborn co. Midd. coffeeman, in the sum of forty pounds: For the appearance of the said Edward Fryer and James Bennett at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex to be held at Hicks Hall, "to give in evidence against Henry Ireton esq. for treasonable practices against the King and Government, and against . . . . Bendish for holding correspondence with the said Henry Ireton." S. P. R., 8 Oct., 1 James II.

27 September, 1 James II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of John Booth, William Boyler, John Tucker and Elizabeth Mabbot (whose respective vocations and places of abode are not stated) at the next G. Q. S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being taken at a riotous and unlawfull Assembly." S. P. R., 8 Oct., 1 James II.

1 October, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, and on divers other days and occasions before and afterwards, Sara Tisdall, the wife of a certain . . . . Tisdall late of the said parish yeoman, committed that horrible sin of adultery with divers men unknown to the aforesaid jurors (horribile illud peccatum adulterii cum diversis hominibus, juratoribus predictis ignotis). No clerical minute touching any subsequent proceeding in the case. S. P. R., 8 Oct., 1 James II.

4 October, 1 James II.—Recognizances, for the appearance of Robert Steeds of St. Alban's Wood Street farrier at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being taken at an unlawful assembly or Conventicle."—Also, Recognizances, taken on 6th or 7th Oct. 1 James II. for the appearance of John Chalkley of St. James's Duke's Place in London cordweyner and the appearance of Mary Palmer at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being taken at a Field Conventicle." S. P. R., 8 Oct., 1 James II.

4 October, 1 James II.—True Bill for unlawfully and tumultuously assembling at St. James's Clerkenwell on the said day, under colour of performing acts of religious adoration otherwise than according to the laws of this kingdom of England, against twenty-three individuals, to wit, 1 carpenter, 1 hot-presser, 1 laborer, 2 tailors, 1 tallow-chandler, 1 weaver, 1 cutler's wife, 1 dyer's wife, 1 meal-man's wife, 1 perfumer's wife, 1 pin-maker's wife, 1 tallow-chandler's wife, 1 weaver's wife, 1 yeoman's wife, 4 widows and 4 spinsters. Clerical minutes on the bill's face show that all these persons confessed the indictment, and were fined in the sum of 3s. 4d. each, which fine was paid by each to the Sheriff in court. S. P. R., 8 Oct. 1 James II.

4 October, 1 James II.—Recognizances, on twenty-four several parchments, for the appearance of twenty-seven humble and obscure individuals, of both sexes, at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being taken at an unlawfull and riotous Assembly in Swan Alley." S. P. R., 8 Oct., 1 James II.

21 October, 1 James II.—Recognizances of Isaac Botchcraft of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate frame-worke-knitter, in the sum of forty pounds, and John Davis flax-dresser and Joseph Cam pipe-maker, both of the said parish, in the sum of twenty pounds each: For the appearance of the said Isaac Botchcraft at the next S. P. to be held at Hicks Hall, "then and there to answer for saying that hee was as good a man as the King." S. P. R., 7 Dec, 1 James II.

30 October, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Tristram Greene gentleman alias Tristram Thornhill gentleman alias Tristram Thornton gentleman, Roger Parsons yeoman, Garrett Greene yeoman and James Alen yeoman, all four late of the said parish, assaulted a certain Rowland Williams gentleman, and unlawfully imprisoned the same Rowland Williams, until he in order to regain his liberty delivered to the same Tristram Greene alias &c. gentleman, a silver watch belonging to the same Rowland Williams and worth five pounds, and until the same Rowland Williams then and there as his own proper deed delivered to the same Tristram Greene alias &c. an obligatory writing sealed with the seal of the said Rowland and bearing date 29 Oct. 1 James II., by which writing the said Rowland Williams was bound to the said Tristram Greene &c. in the sum of forty-three pounds for the payment of the sum of twenty-one pounds and ten shillings to the said Tristram Greene upon demand, and also until the said Rowland Williams had paid to the said Tristram Greene alias &c. the sum of ten pounds, The indictment was taken upon Commission of Oyer and Terminer at S. O. T. held on 7 Dec, 1 James II., and following days. Found 'Guilty' by jurors on 11 Dec, 1 James II., Tristram Greene &c. gentleman and Garrett Greene yeoman received judgment. It was adjudged that Tristram Greene should pay a fine of £3 6s. 8d., and on the next . . . . day be stript from his middle upwards, and be publicly flogged on his back until his body should be bloody at the hinder part of a cart from a certain place called St. Giles's Pounde to the Almshouses in St. Giles's parish and thence to and through a streete called Monmouth Streete and round a place called Sohoe Square even to the sign of the Blackamoore's Head Taverne near Greeke Streete, and should be committed to the New Prison, there to remain until he should have paid the said fine and undergone the said punishment. It was adjudged that Garrett Greene should pay a fine of £3 6s. 8d., and that on . . . . day should be placed for an hour in and upon the pillory, near the sign of the Blackamoore's Head Tavern, with a paper showing his offence upon his head, and should be committed to the New Prison at Clerkenwell, there to remain until he should have paid the fine and undergone the said punishment. S. P. R., 7 Dec., 1 James II.

1 December, 1 James II.—Recognizances on four several parchments, for the appearance of Robert Fenn of St. Alban's Wood Street London tailor, John Brown of . . . ., Christopher Bartlett of Stepney tailor, and Joseph Davies of St. Leonard's Shoreditch gentleman, at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being at an unlawful Assembly and Conventicle." 7 Dec, 1 James II.

16 December, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at about 8 p.m. in the night of the said day, James Dore late of St. Dunstan's-in-the-West co. Midd. gentleman, in the king's highway of Chancery Lane, with a sword wickedly and inhumanly assaulted a certain Jane Weddall, wife of John Weddall esq., and then and there beat, wounded, kicked, bruised and maltreated her, so that her life was despaired of. James Dore gentleman confessed the indictment, whereupon it was adjudged that he should pay a fine of one hundred marks, and on the next Thursday and in the forenoon of the same day be put for an hour in and upon the pillory near the Globe Tavern in Chancery Lane, with a paper showing his offence upon his head, and that he should be committed to Newgate Gaol, there to remain until he should have paid the said fine and undergone the said punishment. One of the clerical minutes on the bill shows that the indictment was taken upon Commission of Oyer and Terminer, 19 Dec, of the aforesaid year. S. P. R., 7 Dec, 1 James II.

18 December, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, in the course of conversation about and concerning George Lord Jeffreys, Baron of Wemm and Lord Chancellor of England, a certain John Bennett late of the said parish yeoman, with the intention of causing discord between the magnates and commonalty of this kingdom of England and bringing the said Right Honourable George Lord Jeffreys &c. into odium and contempt &c., wickedly and scandalously spoke, in the presence and hearing of very many of the King's lieges and subjects, these words about the same Lord Jeffreys, to a certain Brent Flint, to wit, "your wife" (viz. the wife of the Brent Flint) "may goe with her sister" (a certain Elizabeth Davis the wife of one John Davis being thereby indicated) "to her Lord" (the speaker meaning thereby the said Lord Jeffreys) "who is a rogue lately crep'd to honour." This bill was taken upon Commission of Oyer and Terminer, at Session held on 15 Jan., 1685, and adjourned to the following day, on which last-named day the said John Bennett pleaded 'Not Guilty,' but the jury found him 'Guilty,' whereupon he was fined in the sum of two hundred marks, and was further sentenced to be put on the next Wednesday in and upon the pillory for an hour near a place called Little Tower Hill, with a paper showing his offence upon his head, and to be committed to the New Prison at Clarkenwell, there to remain until he should have paid the fine, undergone the punishment, and found good sureties for his good behaviour during the twelve months next following. S. P. R., 12 Jan., 1 James II.

18 December, 1 James II.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Pascene (?) Rose late of the said parish laborer, with intention of bringing Charles Osborne J.P. for Middlesex into hatred and contempt, in the presence and hearing of divers of the said King's lieges and subjects then and there maliciously and diabolically spoke these words, "God dam Justice Osborne! I am sorry I had not a rasour for him." Pascene (?) Rose confessed the indictment, and was thereupon fined £3 6s. 8d., and was sentenced to be stript from his middle upwards on the next Thursday and to be publicly whipt on his back till his body should be bloody at the hinder part of a cart, from the west end of Rosemary Lane to a place called the Armitage, and to be imprisoned in the New Gaol, till he should have paid the fine, undergone the flogging and put in good sureties for his good behaviour during an entire year. S. P. R., 12 Jan., 1 James II.

23 December, 1 James II.—True bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co Midd. on the said day, Patrick Mac-Donnell laborer, being at that time the servant and not the apprentice of the Honorable Bernard Howard of the said parish esquire, and above the age of eighteen years, feloniously imbeasilled (sic) and converted to his own use one hundred pieces of coined gold called guinneyes, of the value of one hundred and seven pounds, ten shillings and four pence, belonging to the said Bernard Howard, and feloniously withdrew himself and departed, with the intention of stealing the said money, and defrauding his said master of it. Found ' Guilty,' Patrick Mac-Donnell asked for the book, read it and was branded. G. D. R., 15 Jan., 1 James II.