Memoir of William Page and list of his writings

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Victoria County History

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William Page (editor)

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1935

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9-16

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'Memoir of William Page and list of his writings', A History of the County of Rutland: Volume 2 (1935), pp. IX-XVI. URL: https://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66189 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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WILLIAM PAGE, D.LITT, F.S.A. BY SIR CHARLES PEERS

This volume of the Victoria History, the ninety-third to be issued, marks a stage in the already long story of the great undertaking. For it is the first to be published after the death of Dr. William Page. In his last years, desirous above all things to secure the future of the work which he had so long directed, he transferred the whole of his interests in the History, with all the materials in his possession, to the University of London, in order that the Institute of Historical Research might from that time onwards carry on to its appointed end the task which had claimed the greater part of his time and energy for more than thirty years.

The History is his memorial. Whatever developments may be in store for it, his name will ever come first in its story, and it is fitting that this volume shall begin with a record of his life and work.

William Page was born on September 4, 1861, in the house of his father, Henry Page, in Norfolk Square, London, W. His first school was one kept by Dr. Westmacott in the same district, and thence in due course he went to Westminster School. Family reasons made it necessary that his schooldays should be cut short, and after his father's death in 1875 he served his articles as a civil engineer, being appointed to a post under the Queensland Government in 1881. Though he was not destined to remain long in this position, the experience he then gained, as is so generally the case, was of definite value to him in the very different profession to which he was to devote the rest of his days. History and archæology were his natural studies, and the occasion which was to allow him to follow his bent was not long in coming. His sister had married Mr. W. J. Hardy, antiquary and record agent, and in 1885 Page deserted engineering to become his brother-in-law's partner in the firm of Hardy and Page, record agents and legal antiquaries. The partners were employed in a number of important cases where expert knowledge of records was essential and the range of enquiry practically unlimited. No better general training for an 'all-round' antiquary could be desired.

In 1887 Page was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, and what seems to be his first contribution to the proceedings of a learned society dates from 1888, when there was printed in Archæologia his paper entitled Some remarks on the Northumbrian palatinates and regalities. From this time, in spite of, or perhaps as a result of, his professional labours, papers from his pen appeared with regularity, as may be seen from the list appended to this notice, and it must suffice here to record his special interest in Hertfordshire, where, at St. Albans, his brother-in-law lived for many years, and Page himself from 1896 to 1902. The St. Albans Archæological Society, of which he became assistant secretary in 1897, owed much to him: he took an active part in the excavation of Verulamium, and became one of the founders of the Hertfordshire County Museum. But a wider sphere of usefulness awaited him. In the last years of the reign of Queen Victoria a project for a complete series of County Histories of England was brought forward, and developed with an enthusiasm and thoroughness which cannot be too highly commended. The Queen herself accepted the dedication of the History and allowed her name to be attached to it.

Under an Advisory Council full of distinguished names, and with Mr. H. A. Doubleday as editor, work was begun in the last years of the century, and the first volume of the History—Vol. I of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight—was published in 1900. Then the difficulties of the task became apparent. General articles by competent writers were to some extent procurable, but the mass of records in which all the details of the history of the counties were contained needed expert investigation and tabulation, and there was no one to do it. The management of the History in this impasse were well inspired when they turned to Page and offered him the joint editorship. This was in 1902, and Page's immediate task was to build up an expert staff. How he succeeded in this the record of the History itself witnesses. In the year of his appointment one volume, the first of Hertfordshire, appeared; in 1903 one volume, Hampshire II; in 1904 two volumes (Bedford I and Warwick I); in 1905 six volumes, in 1906 ten, in 1907 eleven, and in 1908 twelve. From 1904 Page had been sole general editor, and it is not too much to say that the whole credit for this brilliant piece of work was due to him. Then came a disaster for which he himself was in no degree responsible. The funds of the History failed, and many of the staff which he had with such labour got together and trained had to be dismissed. One volume appeared in 1909 and one in 1910, and though a new source of support appeared the work continued on a much reduced basis, the annual output being from four to five volumes. Then came the war, and no further volume was published till 1923.

Such misfortune might discourage any man, but Page, if one may say so, was singularly fitted to cope with adverse circumstances. Of an equable temper, kindly and generous to a fault, he was accustomed to make the best of things, and those who worked with him have cause to remember his unfailing serenity and considerateness. The duties of the History had brought him to London from St. Albans; he lived in Battersea from 1904 to 1906, and at Frognal Cottage, Hampstead, from 1906 to 1922. Then, when the whole burden of the History devolved on him in its post-War phase, he took all its materials with him to Middleton in Sussex in 1922, arranging and storing them in a wooden hut in his garden. Finally, in 1928, he came into possession of the whole interest and assets of the History, and continued to send to press such further instalments of copy as it was possible to do. Last of all, in 1931, he did what he could to ensure the continuance of his work by making over the History to the University of London, who appointed a committee to carry it on. Of this committee Page became the chairman, and so continued to the day of his death, February 3, 1934.

In spite of his preoccupations he was able to play a part in other undertakings, where his knowledge and capabilities were much in request. He was a member of the Editorial Committee of the Society of Antiquaries from 1910 for many years, and served his term as Vice-President of the Society from 1916 to 1920. He was a valuable member of the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments for England, being an Assistant Commissioner from 1909 and a Commissioner from 1921. He was Lecturer in Archæology to London University 1923–4; chairman of the Local History Section of the AngloAmerican Historical Conference, 1926; and a member of the Committee on House of Commons Personnel and Politics, 1929.

In 1932 his services to history were recognised, somewhat tardily, by the conferment of a Doctorate of Letters by Oxford University. The Public Orator, in presenting him for the degree, rightly dwelt on his long and untiring labours and the weight of responsibility which he, a second Hercules, had sustained. It is not for a Public Orator to belittle the honours which his University bestows, but he might have added with truth that, like his great prototype, the rewards which he had received for his labours were for the most part conspicuous by their absence. It is to posterity that men like Page must look for their meed of praise. But as long as his contemporaries survive, his personality will not be forgotten. He was dowered with good looks beyond the common, enhanced by a natural dignity. Whether in youth or in age, he was a striking figure, and acquaintance with him only confirmed the impression that he was no ordinary man. The details of private life have no place in a memoir such as this, but for those who were privileged to meet him in his home there will remain the memory of an unaffected kindness and courtesy which were the natural counterpart of his bearing in the outer world.

Compiled by Agnes E. Roberts

THE VICTORIA COUNTY HISTORY

From 1902 to 1904 Dr. Page acted as joint general editor of the Victoria History of the Counties of England. From 1904 onwards he was sole general editor and, in addition, editor or joint editor of particular volumes.

A Guide to the Victoria History of the Counties of England. By H. A. Doubleday and W. Page. Pp. 140. [1902.]

Volume published under the general editorship of H. A. Doubleday

Hertford. Vol. i. Ed. W. Page. 1902.

Volumes published under the joint general editorship of H. A. Doubleday and Dr. Page

Essex. Vol. i. 1903.

Hampshire and the Isle of Wight. Vol. ii. 1903.

Bedford. Vol. i. 1904.

Warwick. Vol. i. 1904.

Volumes published under the sole general editorship of Dr. Page

Cumberland. Vol. ii. Ed. James Wilson. 1905.

Surrey. Vols. ii, iii, iv. Ed. H. E. Malden. 1905–12. Include:

Vols. iii–iv. Topography: Manorial descents compiled under the superintendence of W. Page and H. E. Malden.

Vol. iv. Romano-British Surrey, by W. Page and Edith M. Keate.

Northampton. Vol. ii. Ed. the Rev. R. M. Serjeantson and W. Ryland D. Adkins. 1906. Includes:

Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents by W. Page and others.

Lancaster. Ed. William Farrer and J. Brownbill. Vols. i, ii, iii, iv, v, vi, vii, viii. 1906–14.

Worcester. Vols. iii, iv. Local editor: J. W. WillisBund. 1913–16. Include:

Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents compiled under the superintendence of W. Page.

Volumes edited solely by Dr. Page

Buckingham. Vols. i, ii, iii, iv, and Index. 1905–28. Include:

Vols. ii, iii, iv. Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents compiled under the superintendence of W. Page.

Derby. Vols. i, ii. 1905–7.

Durham. Vols. i, ii, iii. 1905–28. Include:

Vol. iii. Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents compiled under the superintendence of W. Page.

Sussex. Vols. i, ii. 1905–7.

Cornwall. Vol. i, and pts. 5 and 8. 1906–24.

Devon. Vol. i. 1906.

Lincoln. Vol. ii. 1906.

Norfolk. Vol. ii. 1906.

Nottingham. Vols. i, ii. 1906–10.

Somerset. Vols. i, ii. 1906–11.

Gloucester. Vol. ii. 1907.

Leicester. Vol. i. 1907. Includes Romano-British Leicestershire, by W. Page and Miss Keate.

Oxford. Vol. ii. 1907.

Suffolk. Vols. i, ii. 1911, 1907.

York. Vols. i, ii, iii, and Index. 1907–25.

Bedford. Vols. ii, iii, and Index. 1908–14. Include:

Vol. ii. Romano-British Bedfordshire, by W. Page and Miss Keate.

Vols. ii–iii. Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents compiled under the superintendence of W. Page.

Dorset. Vol. ii. 1908.

Hampshire and the Isle of Wight. Vols. iii, iv, v, and Index. 1908–14. Include:

Vols. iii, iv, v. Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents compiled under the superintendence of W. Page.

Hereford. Vol. i. 1908.

Hertford. Vols. ii, iii, iv, and Index. 1908–23. Include:

Vol. ii. Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents by W. Page and others.

Architectural descriptions of Shenley, Wheathampstead with Harpenden, and Redbourn by W. Page, and of St. Albans Cathedral, by C. R. Peers and W. Page.

[The account of St. Andrew's chapel is taken from a paper on the chapel by W. Page in the Trans. of the St. Albans and Herts Archit. and Arch. Soc. N.S. i, 84.]

Vols. iii–iv. Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents compiled under the superintendence of W. Page.

Vol. iv. Celtic and Romano-British Hertfordshire. Ecclesiastical history before the Conquest. Abbey of St. Albans before the Conquest.

Kent. Vols. i, ii, iii. 1908–32.

Rutland. Vol. i. 1908.

Shropshire. Vol. i. 1908.

Stafford. Vol. i. 1908. Includes:

Romano-British Staffordshire, by W. Page and Miss Keate.

Warwick. Vol. ii. 1908.

London, including London within the Bars, Westminster and Southwark. Vol. i. 1909.

Middlesex. Vol. ii. 1911. Includes:

Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents compiled under the superintendence of W. Page.

Surrey. Index. 1914.

York North Riding. Vols. i, ii, and Index. 1914–25. Include:

Vols. i–ii. Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents compiled under the superintendence of W. Page.

Worcester. Index. 1926.

Berkshire. Index. 1927.

Northampton. Vol. iii. 1930. Includes:

Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents compiled under the superintendence of W. Page.

Kettering, by F. W. Bull, W. Page, and others.

Volumes edited by Dr. Page with collaborators

Berkshire. Vols. i, ii. Ed. the Rev. P. H. Ditchfield and W. Page; iii, iv. Ed. W. Page and the Rev. P. H. Ditchfield, assisted by J. Hautenville Cope. 1906–24. Include:

Vol. i. Romano-British Berkshire, by W. Page and Miss C. M. Calthrop.

Vols. iii–iv. Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents compiled under the superintendence of W. Page.

Worcester. Vol. ii. Ed. J. W. Willis-Bund and W. Page. 1906. Includes:

Topography: Blackenhurst Hundred. General descriptions and manorial descents prepared under the superintendence of W. Page.

Essex. Vol. ii. Ed. W. Page and J. Horace Round. 1907.

Huntingdon. Vol. i. Ed. W. Page and Granville Proby, assisted by H. E. Norris; ii. Ed. W. Page, Granville Proby and S. Inskip Ladds. 1926–32. Include:

Vol. i. Appendix: Little Gidding, by W. Page.

Vol. ii. Political history to 1660, by the Rev. R. H. Murray and W. Page.

Parliamentary history, by W. Page and Granville Proby.

Topography: General descriptions and manorial descents compiled under the editorship of W. Page.

Huntingdon borough, by W. Page, S. Inskip Ladds, and others.

Hurstingstone and Toseland hundreds: Introductions, by W. Page.

Broughton, by W. Page and Maud E. Simkins.

Bury cum Hepmangrove, by Canon W. M. Noble and W. Page.

Ramsey, by W. Page.

Little Raveley, by W. Page.

Architectural descriptions of Abbots Ripton, Somersham and Wistow, by W. Page.

OTHER WORKS

Some remarks on the Northumbrian palatinates and regalities.

Archæologia, li, 143–55. 1888.

Jottings from the Public Record Office.

The Antiquary, xxi, 118. 1890.

A list of the inventories of church goods made temp. Edward VI.

The Antiquary, xxi, 165–8, 210–5, 269–70; xxii, 28–9, 76–9, 120–3, 167–9, 214–6, 256–60; xxiii, 37–8, 116–8, 270–1; xxiv, 31–2, 74–6, 120–1; xxvi, 29–32, 73–5, 268–70; xxvii, 218–9; xxviii, 69–71, 212–5, 265–9; xxix, 81–3; xxx, 26–8, 164–6. 1890–4.

Three early assize rolls for the county of Northumberland, saec. XIII. Surtees Soc., vol. lxxxviii. Pp. xxviii, 476. Durham, 1891.

Reprint from The Antiquary, xxi, 165–6, of list of Berkshire inventories of church goods made temp. Edward VI. Berks Archæological Journal, i, 184–5. 1891.

Historical Manuscripts Commission. Thirteenth report. Appendix, part iv. The manuscripts of Rye and Hereford corporations. Capt. Loder-Symonds, Mr. E. R. Wodehouse, M.P., and others. [Calendared by W. J. Hardy and W. Page.] Pp. [iv], 577. [C.-6810] H. C. (1892) XLV, 1. 1892.

A calendar to the feet of fines for London and Middlesex.

Vol. i: Richard I to Richard III, by W. J. Hardy and W. Page. Pp. [iv], 240, lxiii. 1892.

Vol. ii: 1 Henry VII to Michaelmas 11 and 12 Elizabeth. Pp. [iv], 159, xxxv. 1893.

The Chartulary of Brinkburn Priory. Surtees Society, vol. xc. Pp. xvi, 224, plate. Durham, 1893.

Letters of denization and acts of naturalization for aliens in England, 1509–1603. Huguenot Society, vol. viii. Pp. liii [lxii], 258. Lymington, 1893.

[Extracts from a paper on] The Marian survey of the town of St. Albans.

The Herts Advertiser and St. Albans Times, 20 May, 1893, p. 6, cols. 1–3.

[Printed in full in] Transactions of the St. Albans Architectural and Archæological Society, 1893 and 1894, pp. 8–24. 1896.

The history of the monastery of St. Mary de Prés.

The Herts Advertiser and St. Albans Times, 19 May, 1894, p. 6, cols. 5, 6.

[Reprinted in] Transactions of the St. Albans Architectural and Archæological Society, N.S. i, 8–18. 1898.

Life at Westminster School in the days of Charles I. Middlesex and Hertfordshire Notes and Queries, i, 17–9. 1894.

The certificates of the commissioners appointed to survey the chantries, guilds, hospitals, etc., in the county of York.

Part i. Surtees Society, vol. xci. Pp. xviii, 210. Durham, 1894.

Part ii. Surtees Society, vol. xcii. Pp. xviii, 211–607. Durham, 1895.

Notes on the remains of Verulamium.

The Herts Advertiser and St. Albans Times, 15 June, 1895, p. 6, col. 3.

[Printed in full in] Transactions of the St. Albans Architectural and Archæological Society, 1893 and 1894, pp. 49–67. 1896.

Hendon parsonage in 1540.

Middlesex and Hertfordshire Notes and Queries, i, 116–9. 1895.

Historical Manuscripts Commission. Fifteenth Report. Appendix, part i. The manuscripts of the Earl of Dartmouth. Vol. iii, pp. x [xii], 332. [C.—8156] H.C. (1896) XLVIII, 333. 1896.

Old helmet and shackles at St. Peter's, St. Albans.

Middlesex and Hertfordshire Notes and Queries, ii, 97. 1896.

St. Andrew's Cross, Chancery Lane.

Middlesex and Hertfordshire Notes and Queries, ii, 146. 1896.

Table of pontifical years of the bishops of Durham.

Transactions of the Architectural and Archæological Society of Durham and Northumberland, iv, 19–48. 1896.

A calendar of the Inner Temple records.

Ed. F. A. Inderwick. Calendar prepared by W. Page.

Vol. i. 21 Hen. VII (1505)–45 Eliz. (1603). Pp. xcviii [c], 536, plates. 1896.

Vol. ii. 1 James I (1603) - Restoration (1660). Pp. cxxxi [cxxxix], 427, plates. 1898.

Vol. iii. 12 Charles II (1660)–12 Anne (1714). Pp. xcviii [c], 533, plates. 1901.

The inventories of church goods for the counties of York, Durham, and Northumberland. Surtees Society. vol. xcvii. Pp. xviii, 186. Durham, 1897.

Notes on the chantries and guilds of Hertfordshire.

Middlesex and Hertfordshire Notes and Queries, iii, 24–6, 69–71, 144–6, 172–3. 1897.

St. Albans Grammar School.

Middlesex and Hertfordshire Notes and Queries, iii, 208. 1897.

Notes on discoveries at St. Albans.

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries, 2nd series, xvii, 10–11. 1898.

Historical Manuscripts Commission. Fifteenth report. Appendix, part vii. The manuscripts of the Duke of Somerset, the Marquis of Ailesbury, and the Rev. Sir T. H. G. Puleston, bart. Pp. xvii, 410, [C.–8552] H.C. (1897) LI, Pt. ii, 1. 1898.

St. Alban's Cathedral and Abbey Church. A guide. Together with some extracts from the history of the abbey by the late Rev. H. J. B. Nicholson. Pp. x, 98, plates. 1898.

Report by W. Page and F. G. Kitton respecting the remains of the old Roman wall of Verulamium.

The Herts Advertiser and St. Albans Times, 4 March, 1898, p. 7, col. 7.

Note on the recent discovery of a Romano-British potter's kiln at Radlett.

The Herts Advertiser and St. Albans Times, 5 November, 1898, p. 8, col. 3.

The brasses and indents in St. Alban's Abbey.

Home Counties Magazine, i, 19–25, 140–61, 241–7, 329–32. 1899.

[Reprinted separately in the same year. Pp. 40, plates.]

On some recent discoveries in the abbey church of St. Alban.

Archæologia, lvi, 21–6. 1899.

Notes on a Romano-British pottery lately found at Radlett, Herts.

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries, 2nd series, xvii, 261–70. 1899.

[Also printed as "A Romano-British kiln discovered at Radlett" in Transactions of the St. Albans and Hertfordshire Architectural and Archæological Society, N.S. i, 176–84. 1901.]

The parochial chapel of St. Andrew, formerly attached to St. Alban's Abbey.

Transactions of the St. Albans and Hertfordshire Architectural and Archæological Society, N.S. i, 84–102. 1899.

Report on the condition of Gorhambury Block and St. Germain's Block by Messrs. Kitton and Page.

Transactions of the St. Albans and Hertfordshire Architectural and Archæological Society, N.S. i, 129–30. 1899.

St. Alban's Cathedral and Abbey Church. A guide. Being abridged from the guide and historical notes of the same church by the late Rev. H. J. B. Nicholson and William Page. Pp. vi, 39. 1900.

Extract from report on the year's work of the St. Albans and Hertfordshire Architectural and Archæological Society.

The Herts Advertiser and St. Albans Times, 14 April, 1900, p. 6, col. 6.

Excavations on the site of Verulam. Report for 1898–9. Report for 1899–1900.

Transactions of the St. Albans and Hertfordshire Architectural and Archæological Society, N.S. i, 198–209. 1901.

The history of Hatfield [being a report of paper entitled Some notes on the history of Hatfield].

The Herts Advertiser and St. Albans Times, 13 July, 1901, p. 5, col. 7.

[Printed in full in] Transactions of the St. Albans and Hertfordshire Architectural and Archæological Society, N.S. i, 334–56. 1903.

The St. Albans school of painting, mural and miniature. Part i: Mural painting.

Archæologia, lviii, 275–92. 1902.

Excavations of Verulamium.

Transactions of the St. Albans and Hertfordshire Architectural and Archæological Society, N.S. i, 396–8. 1903.

Berkhampstead Castle, by W. Page and Duncan Montgomerie.

The Herts Advertiser and St. Albans Times, 3 June, 1905, p. 2, cols. 4–5; 10 June, 1905, p. 2, cols. 1–2.

Romano British Berkshire.

The Berks, Bucks and Oxon Archæological Journal, xiii, 106. 1907. [Notes in reply to Mr. Harold Peake's article "Romano-British Berkshire," ibid. 82–6, reviewing the article on Roman remains in Berkshire in The Victoria History of Berkshire.]

Bedfordshire County Records. Compiled by Messrs. Hardy and Page, record agents, with an introduction regarding the work of the County Records Committee.

Vol. i. Notes and extracts from the county records comprised in the Quarter Sessions rolls from 1714 to 1832. Pp. [viii], 298. [Bedford, 1907.]

Vol. ii. Notes and extracts from the county records, being a calendar of volume i of the Sessions Minute Books 1651 to 1660. Pp. [x], 54, xxi. [Bedford, 1909.]

Vol. iii. Notes and extracts from the county records, being a calendar of old deeds found in the County Muniment Room, and an index to the documents contained in the Muniment Room. The calendar compiled by Messrs. Hardy and Page. Pp. 63, fac. [Bedford, 1921.]

Historical Manuscripts Commission. Report on the manuscripts of the Earl of Egmont, vol. ii. Pp. xviii, 271, viii. [Cd. 4599] H.C. (1909) XXVI, 1. 1909.

Notes on the heart-case of Roger Norton, Abbot of St. Albans, and other antiquities found at St. Albans.

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries, 2nd series, xxii, 453–5. 1909.

Historical introduction to the Inventory of the historical monuments in Hertfordshire, pp. 1–26. Royal Commission on Historical Monuments (England). 1910.

St. Albans and its neighbourhood. viii: Archæology.

Transactions of the Hertfordshire Natural History Society and Field Club, xiv, 245–50. 1911.

Some notes on Watling Street and its relation to London.

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries, 2nd series, xxiv, 137–43, 146. 1912.

Kingsbury Castle.

Transactions of the St. Albans and Hertfordshire Architectural and Archæological Society, N.S. ii, 149–57. 1912.

Historical summary in the Inventory of the historical monuments in Buckinghamshire, ii, 1–35. Royal Commission on Historical Monuments (England). 1913.

Some remarks on the churches of the Domesday survey.

Archæologia, lxvi, 61–102. 1915.

Kings and Queens of England. Ed. Sir Robert S. Rait and W. Page. 4 vols. [1917]–22.

History of the Abbey of St. Alban, by L. F. Rushbrook Williams. [Review.]

History, iii, 49–50. 1918.

Commerce and industry. A historical review of the economic conditions of the British Empire from the Peace of Paris in 1815 to the declaration of war in 1914, based on parliamentary debates. With a preface by Sir William Ashley. 2 vols. 1919.

Vol. i. Historical review. Pp. xvi, 492, maps.

Vol. ii. Statistical tables. Pp. xx, 239.

Notes on some early riverside settlements of London. [Report of a paper.]

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries, 2nd series, xxxi, 125–6, 127. 1919.

St. Albans. The Story of the English Towns. Pp. [iv], 114, plates. 1920.

The origins and forms of Hertfordshire towns and villages.

Archæologia, lxix, 47–60. 1920.

The early development of London.

The Nineteenth Century, lxxxvii, 1042–56. 1920.

Clifford's Inn.

Clifford's Inn, Fleet Street, in the city of London. Particulars, plan and conditions of sale of . . . the principal portion of Clifford's Inn . . which Sir David Burnett . . . will submit for sale . . . on Wednesday, 2nd Feb., 1921. Pp. 15–23, plates, plan. [1921.]

The History of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, by Norman Moore. [Review.]

The Antiquaries' Journal, i, 65–6. 1921.

F. Haverfield 1860–1919, by Dr. G. Macdonald. [Review.]

The Antiquaries' Journal, i, 249–51. 1921.

London: its origin and early development. Pp. xii, 300. 1923.

General survey of Essex monuments. Anglo-Saxon and Danish.

Inventory of the historical monuments in Essex, iv, xxvii–xxxi. Royal Commission on Historical Monuments (England). 1923.

The monastic chronicler and the early school of St. Albans, by Claude Jenkins. [Review.]

The Antiquaries' Journal, iii, 277. 1923.

The infirmary of St. Albans Abbey.

Transactions of the St. Albans and Hertfordshire Architectural and Archæological Society, 1924– 1926, 24–8. 1924.

British borough charters, 1216–1307, ed. A. Ballard and J. Tait. [Review.]

The Antiquaries' Journal, iv, 75–7. 1924.

The care of county muniments, by G. H. Fowler. [Review.]

The Antiquaries' Journal, iv, 293–4. 1924.

London on the Thames, by H. Ormsby. [Review.]

The Antiquaries' Journal, iv, 428–30. 1924.

Three Roydon families, by E. B. Royden. [Review.]

The Antiquaries' Journal, v, 87–8. 1925.

Notes on the types of English villages and their distribution.

Antiquity, i, 447–68. 1927.

The History of Middleton in the county of Sussex.

Pp. 21, plates. Privately printed, 1928.

Family origins and other studies by the late J. Horace Round. Edited with a memoir and bibliography by William Page. Pp. lxxiv, 303, plate. 1930.

Note on the late Dr. Philip Norman.

History, xvi, 132. 1931.

Note on the Victoria County History.

History, xvii, 331–2. 1933.

Forms of mediæval settlements in England. [Pp. 4.] n.d.

[Historical Manuscripts Commission] Report on the manuscripts of Major-Gen. Gillespie of Trewyn House, Abergavenny. Not yet published.



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