Parishes
Clayhanger - Columpton

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Daniel and Samuel Lysons

Year published

1822

Pages

102-129

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'Parishes: Clayhanger - Columpton', Magna Britannia: volume 6: Devonshire (1822), pp. 102-129. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50572 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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Clayhanger, or Cleyhanger

CLAYHANGER, or CLEYHANGER, in the hundred of Bampton, and in the deanery of Tiverton, lies about six miles from Tiverton, and about four from Bampton, on the borders of Somersetshire.

At the time of the Norman survey, the manor of Clayhanger was held by Robert, under William de Moion or Mohun. It was afterwards given by Hubert de Perepont to the Knights Templars (fn. 1) , who had a hospital there (fn. 2) , and were patrons of the church. After the abolition of the order, the manor did not pass with most of the estates of the Templars to the Knights Hospitallers, but remained in the crown in the reign of Edward II. (fn. 3) Sir William Pole does not give the descent of this manor, nor have I found any thing relating to it, except that some years ago it was a divided property, and that the whole became vested in the Rev. Nutcombe Nutcombe, late chancellor of the church of Exeter. Some part of it is supposed to have belonged to the Nutcombe family by inheritance; part of it was purchased by the chancellor, and one-fourth was bequeathed to him by Buckland Bluett, Esq., who died in 1786. This fourth had been purchased by Mr. Bluett. This estate, with the barton of Nutcombe, and the manor of Doningston, or Dunston, which had long been in the family of Nutcombe, are now vested in the chancellor's three daughters and coheiresses. In consequence of his having inherited the estates of Richard Nutcombe, Esq., the last heir male of the family, in 1792, being then the Rev. Nutcombe Quick, he took the name of Nutcombe.

In the parish church are several memorials of the family of Nutcombe. (fn. 4)

The church of Clayhanger, which had belonged to the Templars, appears to have been the property of the Knights Hospitallers in the reign of Edw. III. (fn. 5)

Richard Harrison, Esq., is patron of the rectory.

Mrs. Bluett (who had been relict of Nutcombe) founded a charity school in this parish in the year 1747, and endowed it with 5l. per annum. Mr. John Norman, in 1749, gave the interest of 50l. to this school.

Clay-Hidon, or Cleyheydon

CLAY-HIDON, or CLEYHEYDON, in the hundred of Hemiock, and in the deanery of Dunkeswell, lies on the borders of Somersetshire, four miles from Wellington, and seven from Taunton.

The manor belonged, as early as the reign of Henry II., to the ancient family of Hidon, whose heiress brought it to Dinham about the beginning of the fourteenth century. Sir John Popham, Chief Justice of the King's Bench, purchased it of the coheirs of Lord Dinham, or their representatives. Alexander Popham, Esq., his descendant, was possessed of it about the middle of the last century: it was afterwards by purchase in Sanxey, who sold it to Gifford, and is now the property of George Gifford, Esq., of Exeter.

The manor of Columb Pyne in this parish, which belonged in early times to the family of Pyne, was afterwards successively in the families of Courtenay, Calmady, Chase, Baker, Gill, and Edgell. It was purchased of the latter by Mr. William Quick, who devised it to his nephew Mark Farrant: this estate, which is surrounded by the parish of Hemiock, is now the property of Mr. Robert Farrant.

Middleton, some time belonging to the priory of Taunton, was for several generations in the family of Colles: it is now the property of Mr. Shapleigh. Newcourt belonged to the family of Rogus, and passed to the Wyndhams as coheirs of Wadham. It is now the property of Mr. William Farrant. Bolham belonged to the abbey of Dunkeswell, and was afterwards in the Bourchiers, Earls of Bath; it is now the property of Mr. William Leman, of Chard.

The Rev. William Clarke is patron and incumbent of the rectory.

Mary Waldron, in 1749, gave land for teaching poor children of this parish, Hemiock and Church-Stanton; it produces now 2l. 2s. per annum, to each parish.

Broad Clist or Clyst

BROAD CLIST or CLYST, in the hundred of Cliston and deanery of Aylesbeare, lies about five miles from Exeter. The villages of Burraton, Lower Budlake, Beer, and Westwood, are in this parish.

There are cattle fairs at Broad-Clist on the first Monday in April, and the first Monday in September.

Broad Clist was burnt by the Danes in 1001.

The manor of Broad Clist, or as it was anciently called Cliston, had belonged to Ordulf, Earl of Devon, and was in the crown at the time of taking the Domesday survey. It was granted to the family of Novant by King Henry I. Sir Roger Novant, the last heir male, conveyed the manor of Clist Novant, in or about 1343, to John de Chudleigh, by whose descendant of the same name it was alienated before the year 1600 to Sir Matthew Arundell. The Chudleighs were some time resident at BroadClist. At a later period the manor was in the family of Morice; it is now the property of Sir T. D. Acland, Bart., who purchased it in the year 1808 of Mrs. Levina Luther, and her sister Miss Elizabeth Bull, devisees of the Right Honourable Humphrey Morice, who died in 1784. The lord of this manor had formerly the power of life and death. (fn. 6)

Columbjohn, which takes its name from the river, and from John de Culme, who possessed it in 1233, was inherited by this John from his grandfather Walter. It was afterwards in the family of Clifford, whose heiress brought it to Prideaux. Sir John, son of Sir Roger Prideaux, conveyed it to Courtenay, Earl of Devon: after the attainder of the Marquis of Exeter, it came into the possession of the Bassets. Having been previously conveyed to Rowsewell; it was purchased by Sir John Acland, who built a new mansion on a foundation said to have been begun by the earls of Devon. This mansion was garrisoned during the civil war by its loyal owner; and it is said by Clarendon to have been at one time the only force which the king had in the county of Devon to control the power of the parliamentary army, then under the command of the Earl of Stamford, at Exeter. (fn. 7) In the month of March 1646, we find Columbjohn to have been the head quarters of Sir Thomas Fairfax, his army being then stationed at Silverton. (fn. 8) The old mansion at Columbjohn, which had been built by Sir John Acland in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, has been pulled down.

Killerton, the present seat of Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, Bart., was for several descents in the family of Killerton, one of whose coheiresses married Sir John Vere. After passing through several hands, this estate was purchased, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, by Edward Drewe, Esq., Serjeant at law, who built a mansion on it for his own residence. His son sold this estate to Sir Arthur Acland, father of Sir John, who was created a baronet by King Charles in 1644, for his loyal services. The letters patent having been destroyed during the civil war, they were renewed to his son Sir Hugh, in 1677, with precedence from the former date. Killerton is now the seat of Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, the present and tenth baronet. It was built as a temporary residence by Sir Thomas Acland, who died in 1788, and has been enlarged and improved by his grandson, the present baronet.

The manor of Clist Gerald belonged, in the reign of King John, to Gerald de Clist, and was divided among his coheiresses, two of whom married Valletort and Frankcheney. The greater part came eventually to the Frankcheneys, who possessed it till the reign of Henry VIII., when the heiress of that family brought it to Strode. It afterwards passed by successive sales to Elliot and Dennis. This manor belongs to the corporation of Exeter, as trustees of St. John's Hospital, having been settled upon that hospital by Sir John Maynard as one of the estates left for charitable uses by Elizæus Hele, who died in 1635.

The manor of Southbrooke was formerly in the Dinhams; a few years ago it belonged to John Pyne Heath, Esq., and is now the property of Edward Gattey, Esq. The manor of Langacre was anciently parcel of the barony of Barnstaple, and passed with it to the Lords Martin, and with their coheiress to Lord Audley. Having become vested in the crown by virtue of an entail, it passed by successive grants to the Duke of Exeter, Margaret Countess of Richmond, and the Throckmortons. Sir Arthur Throckmorton sold this manor in 1596 to Mr. John Davy, a merchant of Exeter: it is now the property of his descendant, Sir John Davie, Bart. The ancient family of Langacre formerly held this manor under the barons of Barnstaple.

Franceis Court, in this parish, is said to have been anciently called Killerington or Killerton. In the reign of Edward I. it belonged to the Raleghs, who were succeeded by Franceis. Sir William Franceis of this place was slain by the rebels in 1549, in an engagement at St. Mary Clist; his descendant, William Franceis, Esq., possessed it in the beginning of the seventeenth century. Franceis Court, and the manor of Killerton Franceis, are now the property of Sir T. D. Acland, Bart., having been purchased of John Franceis Gwynn, Esq., of Ford Abbey, the representative of the Franceis family. There is a farm-house on the estate, but no remains of the old mansion which belonged to the family of Franceis.

Eveleigh, anciently Yeveleigh, was, at an early period, in the family of Clifford, from whom it passed by successive heirs female to Valletort, Speke, Fishacre, Ufflete, and Walrond. The farm of this name now belongs to Sir T. D. Acland, Bart. Eveleigh gave name to a family, of whom Dr. Eveleigh, the late provost of Oriel College, in Oxford, was a descendant.

Ash Clist, and Cliston Hayes, in this parish, formed the corps of two of the prebends in the ancient collegiate chapel of the castle of Exeter. The manor of Ash Clist was alienated from the chapel by Robert de Courtenay, in 1242, and given to Tor Abbey. After the dissolution of monasteries, it was granted (in 1563), with the prebend of Cliston Hayes, to John Peter, Esq. Ash Clist is now the property of Sir T. D. Acland, Bart. I cannot learn who is the proprietor of Cliston Hayes.

Brockhill belonged successively to the families of Sachville, Neville, Norton, Chelvedon, and Bere. It was purchased of the latter in the sixteenth century by Mr. William Chapple, of Exeter, in whose family it continued many years. It is now the property and residence of Lieutenant General Thomas.

Blue Hayes is the property and residence of Lieutenant Colonel Lang, who possesses also the barton of South Whimple, in this parish, formerly belonging to the priory of St. Nicholas, in Exeter. Spreydon House is the property and residence of Aaron Moore, Esq.

In the parish church is a handsome monument for Sir John Acland, who died in 1613, with recumbent effigies of himself in armour, and his two wives. There are the monuments also of Edward Drewe, Esq., Serjeant at Law to Queen Elizabeth, who died in 1600. (fn. 9) Henry Burrough, Gent., 1605; and Thomas Theophilus Cock, Esq., 1811.

Sir Thomas Dyke Acland is patron of the vicarage, which is endowed with one-third of the great tithes. Sir Thomas is impropriator of the remainder, which belonged formerly to the priory of Totnes.

At Columbjohn is a domestic chapel endowed by Sir John Acland, with an estate in the parish of Bickleigh. Sir T. D. Acland presents the minister. There were formerly, as appears by ancient records, chapels in this parish dedicated to St. David, St. Catherine, and St. Leonard. The latter, which was at Clist-Gerald, has been converted into a barn.

Henry Burrough, Gent., who died in 1605, founded an alms-house for twelve poor persons at Broad Clist, and endowed it with 23l. 11s. per annum, allotting 1s. a week to be paid to five poor persons of this parish inhabiting in his alms-house; 2d. a week to six other poor persons in his alms-house; and 1s. 6d. a week to one person, to be appointed to the remaining apartment, alternately from Cadbury and Netherex. The remainder was to be appropriated to repairs; and 2l. for sermons to be preached to the poor.

Thomas Weare, in 1691, gave 4l. 10s. per annum for teaching poor children of this parish. George Leach, in 1684, gave the sum of 100l. for the same purpose: this had by some means accumulated, in 1786, to 320l. 11s., and produced 9l. 10s. per annum. A house, with a large school-room for boys, and another for girls, has been built at the expense of Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, Bart. The average number of scholars in this school, which is supported by subscription, (Sir Thomas Dyke Acland being the chief contributor,) is 130. There is another school for about 30 female children, supported by Lady Acland.

Clist, or Clyst St. George

CLIST, or CLYST ST. GEORGE, in the deanery of Aylesbeare, and in the hundred of East Budleigh, lies about five miles from Exeter.

The manor of St. George's Clist, anciently called Clist Champernowne, belonged to the ancient family of Champernowne, or De Campo Arnulphi, whose original residence in Devonshire appears to have been at this place. From Champernowne this manor passed by successsive heirs female to Polglass and Herle. Sir John Herle conveyed it to William Lord Bonville. After the attainder of Henry Duke of Suffolk, it was purchased by Prideaux, but had been alienated by that family before 1600. In the last century it was a considerable time in the family of Trosse, and afterwards in the Fortescues of Fallopit. It was purchased by the late J. Dupré Porcher, Esq., and is now the property of his son.

In this parish is a small freehold estate, which, till within a few years, had been for several centuries in the family of Sukespic or Sokespitch: it has been said from before the time of the Conquest; but the deeds from which such tradition originated show that it was conveyed by Henry de la Pomerei in the reign of Henry II. (fn. 10) , to William Sukespic of Exeter: it was to be held by the annual render of an ivory bow. This estate is now, by purchase, the property of Alexander Hamilton Hamilton, Esq. The son of Mr. John Sokespitch, the last of the family who resided at Clist, is now in the East Indies. Some relations of the same name still remain in this parish.

In the parish church are memorials of the families of Osborne (fn. 11) , and Gibbs (fn. 12) , and Richard Pidgley, Esq., 1802.

The Rev. William Rous Ellicombe is the present patron and incumbent of the rectory,

Mr. Thomas Weare in 1691 gave 3l. per annum for teaching poor children of this parish. Sir Edward Seaward, Knight, and dame Hannah his widow, in 1705 gave a house and lands at Woodbury, now producing nearly 40l. per annum, for the education of poor children of this parish. Mr. George Gibbs, who died in 1723, charged the manor of Ashmore in Clist St. Mary, given by him for charitable uses, with the purchase of hats and Bibles for boys at the charity-school, and an exhibition of 4l. per annum for one boy going from Clist school to the university.

Clist Hydon, or Heydon

CLIST HYDON, or HEYDON, in the hundred of Cliston, and in the deanery of Plymtree, lies about four miles from Collumpton, about ten from Honiton, and about the same distance from Exeter.

The manor was, from a very early period, in the ancient family of Hidon, a younger branch of which was settled here for several descents: the heiress married St. Clere. Gabriel St. Clere, Esq., conveyed it to his brother-in-law Edmund Parker, Esq., by whom it was sold to John Periam, Esq., of Exeter. The heiress of Periam brought it to Richard Reynell, Esq., one of whose coheiresses married Huyshe of Sand. The whole of the manor eventually became vested in the last-mentioned family, and is now the property of their descendant, the Rev. Francis Huyshe, who is patron also, and incumbent of the rectory.

Anke in this parish was given by King Henry I. to William, his steward; the heiress of this William married Robert de Hiford, whose posterity took the name of Anke: a coheiress of Anke brought it to Dagville. It afterwards passed by sale to Tantifer, and by successive heirs female to Chiseldon and Wadham; by the latter it was sold to Borough, who conveyed it to Reynell. This estate was afterwards in the family of Pole, and was sold by the late Sir John Pole, Bart., to the father of John Matthew, the present owner, who possesses also Ferrant Hayes, which had been for many generations in the family of Ferrant.

Yard, in this parish, was the ancient property and residence of the family of that name, from whom it passed by inheritance to Newhall and Coliford. It now belongs to Mr. John Carnal.

The Rev. Dr. Robert Hall in 1667 gave a rent-charge of 15l. (fn. 13) , payable by the dean and chapter of Exeter, towards the maintenance of a schoolmaster in this parish, and 5l. per annum for apprenticing children. The Rev. Francis Huyshe in 1751 gave land, now let at 4l. per annum, for the schoolmaster and poor labourers. (fn. 14)

Honiton Clist

HONITON CLIST, in the hundred of East Budleigh, and in the deanery of Aylesbeare, lies about four miles and a half from Exeter.

The manor belongs to the dean and chapter of Exeter. The barton of Holbrook, which was for many descents in the family of Holbrook, is now the property of the Right Honourable Lord Graves: that of Higher Holbrook, which belonged to the late Edward Lee, Esq., Major in the East Devon regiment of militia, is now the property of John Hanning, his nephew, who, upon his coming of age, is to take the name of Lee.

In the parish church are memorials of John Yarde, Esq., of Treasurer's Bere, 1575; Edward Yarde (no date); and John Short, Esq., 1657.

The tithes are vested in the dean and chapter of Exeter, and they are patrons of the curacy, which is in their peculiar jurisdiction.

Thomas Weare, in 1691, gave a rent-charge of 4l. 10s. per annum for teaching poor children of this parish.

Clist, or Clyst St. Lawrence

CLIST, or CLYST ST. LAWRENCE, in the deanery of Plymtree, and in the hundred of Cliston, lies about eight miles from Exeter.

The manor (fn. 15) belonged as early as the reign of Henry II. to the Valletorts, a branch of which ancient family had a seat here, and continued to possess the manor till the reign of Henry VIII. The heiress of this family brought it to Sir Hugh Pollard, whose grandson sold it to Walter Hele. Elizæus Hele, who died in 1635, bequeathed this, among other estates, to charitable uses; and this manor was subsequently allotted by Sir John Maynard, one of his trustees, to St. John's Hospital at Exeter: it is vested in trust for that hospital, in the corporation of Exeter, who, as lords of the manor, present to the rectory.

St. Mary Clyst, or Clist

ST. MARY CLYST, or CLIST, in the hundred of Aylesbeare, and in the deanery of East Budleigh, lies about four miles from Exeter. Part of Bishop's Clist is in this parish.

St. Mary Clist was one of the chief scenes of the rebellion which happened in 1549, on account of the reformation in religion. An ancestor and namesake of Sir Walter Ralegh having observed an old woman going towards the church with a string of beads in her hand, advised her to comply with the laws, and renounce her superstitious usages: going into the church, the old woman so inflamed the minds of her neighbours by her representation of what had passed, that they broke out into open insurrection. Mr. Ralegh narrowly escaped with his life, and was afterwards taken prisoner, and kept some time in durance. The disaffected of the neighbouring country having joined the rebels, they laid siege to Exeter. The bridge, at the end of the village towards that city, was fortified with cannon, which they procured from Topsham. This was in the month of June: the rebels remained intrenched here till the begining of August, when Lord Russell having relieved Exeter, the King's army attacked them in their quarters. By a stratagem of Sir Thomas Pomeroy's, one of their chief captains, they obtained a temporary victory, and the waggons belonging to the King's army, laden with ammunition, treasure, &c., fell into their hands; but Lord Russell having rallied his troops, returned to the attack, in which Sir William Franceis lost his life, but the rebels were defeated with great slaughter, and the village of Bishop's Clist was burned: the fortified bridge was taken; and the rebels, who had rallied from all quarters on Clist heath, sustained another and a total defeat. (fn. 16)

The manor of St. Mary Clist belonged, in the reign of Henry III., to the family of Le Blund, afterwards successively to Tantifer and Chiseldon. From the latter it passed by marriage to Wadham. Of late years it has been successively in Tanner, Jackson, and Cotsford. It is now the property of J. Dupré Porcher, Esq. Winslade-house, the seat of Mr. Porcher, was some years in the family of Spicer.

The manor of Ashmore, in this parish, was given by Mr. George Gibbs, who died in 1723, in trust for charitable uses.

In the church-yard at St. Mary Clist is the monument of Edward Cotsford, Esq. M. P. for Midhurst, who filled many important offices in the East Indies, and died in 1810.

The Rev. Thomas Strong is patron and incumbent of the rectory.

Thomas Weare, in 1691, gave 8l. per annum for teaching poor children of this parish.

Clovelly, or Clavelleigh

CLOVELLY, or CLAVELLEIGH, in the hundred and deanery of Hartland, lies on the sea-coast, about four miles from Hartland, and about eleven from Bideford. The village stands in a most singular and picturesque situation, on the side of a steep rock adjoining the sea.

There was formerly a considerable herring fishery here, but it has much declined: there are now between sixty and seventy boats employed during the fishing season, which lasts about two months.

The manor was ancient demesne of the crown, and had been settled by the Conqueror on his consort Matilda: it belonged at an early period to the Giffards, and is said to have been purchased in the reign of Richard II. by Sir John Cary. It appears by a pedigree of the ancient family of Cary, in the possession of George Cary, Esq. of Torr Abbey, that Sir William Cary, father of Sir John, married the heiress of Boson, or Bosum, of Clovelly: it is probable, therefore, that the Bosons possessed the manor, but this I have not been able to ascertain. Sir John Cary, who had been appointed chief baron of the Exchequer in 1387, held that situation but a short time. He rendered himself obnoxious to the Duke of Gloucester and his party by having joined the Chief Justice Tresilian, Belknap, and others of his brethren, in the opinion and declaration which pronounced their proceedings treasonable. One of the first acts of the Duke, when he, and the lords of his party, came to London, with a power which his weak monarch was unable to resist, was to bring his enemies before Parliament: among others, the judges were condemned to death in the month of March, 1388-9; but their sentence was changed to banishment. Sir John Gary's place of destination was Waterford, where he ended his days. This branch of the Cary family nevertheless inherited Clovelly, and continued to possess it till it became extinct, in 1724. Soon afterwards Zachary Hamlyn, Esq., who had been connected with the family by marriage, purchased the manor. Dying without issue, he bequeathed the Clovelly estate to his great nephew, James Hammett, Esq., who took the name of Hamlyn, and was created a baronet in 1795. It is now the property of his son and successor, who has taken the name of Williams, in consequence of his father's marriage with the heiress of Williams of Edwinsford, in Carmarthenshire.

The lords of this manor had formerly the power of inflicting capital punishment. (fn. 17)

Clovelly Court, the seat of Sir James Hamlyn Williams, Bart., is situated within a park, and commands a fine view of the Irish Channel. Some of the scenery in the grounds is singularly picturesque.

In the parish church are monuments of the families of Cary (fn. 18) , and Hamlyn. (fn. 19)

Sir William Cary made the parish church of Clovelly collegiate in the year 1387; settling therein a warden and six chaplains, to whom he gave the advowson, and appropriated the tithes. (fn. 20) Sir James Hamlyn Williams is patron of the rectory.

The rent of the seats in a gallery of the church, amounting now to about 3l. 1s., are appropriated to the support of a charity-school.

Cockington

COCKINGTON, in the hundred of Haytor, and in the deanery of Ipplepen, lies near the sea-side, on the Torbay coast, about three miles from Torquay, and about six from Newton Abbot. The village of Chelston is in this parish. There was in ancient times a market on Mondays at Cockington, granted in or about the year 1297, to Walter de Woodland, together with a fair for three days, at the festival of the Holy Trinity. (fn. 21) There has not been any trace of either within the memory of any person living.

The manor of Cockington belonged, when the survey of Domesday was taken, to William de Falesia (fn. 22) ; not long afterwards, all the lands of this William were vested in Robert, son of Martin Tours, Lord of Camois, in Wales. This manor was given by the said Robert, who was baron of Dartington, to Roger, his younger son, afterwards called Roger de Cockington. Sir James Cockington, the last heir male of this family, died in the beginning of Edward the Third's reign, and was succeeded in the possession of this estate by Sir Walter de Woodland, usher of the chamber to the Black Prince: his widow had this manor for her jointure. Sir John Cary, chief baron of the Exchequer, possessed Cockington in the reign of Richard II., most probably by purchase. (fn. 23) Sir George Cary, who died in 1615, was lorddeputy of Ireland, where his only son, Sir George, lost his life in the wars. Sir Henry Cary, son of his nephew and adopted heir, George Cary, Esq., having been ruined in the civil war, sold it in 1654 to Roger Mallock, Esq., ancestor of the Rev. Roger Mallock, of Cockington Court, who is the present proprietor of this manor, and of the manor of Chelston, which has passed by the same title. The lords of the manor of Cockington had formerly the power of inflicting capital punishment. (fn. 24)

At Livermead, in this parish, is a villa beautifully situated on the seacoast, belonging to Mr. Mallock, and now in the occupation of Sir John Colborne, K.C.B.

Queen Elizabeth leased the rectory of Torr Mohun, with the chapel of Cockington, for life (fn. 25) , to George Cary, Secretary of War, in the year 1601. In 1607 it was granted to Sir Oliver Cromwell in fee. This estate is now the property of Mr. Mallock, who is patron of Torr Mohun and Cockington, and has the power of proving wills within the manor of Cockington.

Cockington is a donative and a separate benefice, having been augmented by Queen Anne's bounty, and by parliamentary grant.

Sir George Cary, in the year 1609, founded seven alms-houses at Cockington for poor men or women, and endowed them with a rent-charge of 30l. per annum, out of the manors of Cockington and Chelston, or Chilson. The pensioners are to be nominated by the owner of Cockington Court, and to receive 1s. each weekly, with an allowance of clothes out of the residue of the endowment. The alms-houses have been taken down and rebuilt on a new site.

Dr. Robert Cary, a younger brother of Sir Henry Cary before-mentioned, was author of a chronological work in folio, entitled "Palæologia Chronica." He was many years rector of Portlemouth, where he died in 1688.

Coffinswell

COFFINSWELL, in the hundred of Haytor and in the deanery of Ipplepen, lies about three miles from Newton Abbot. The village of Daccombe is in this parish.

The manor of Well belonged, in the reign of Henry III., to Sampson Foliot, afterwards to Robert Coffin. After the death of the son of this Robert, it was divided among four coheiresses. Two shares were purchased by the abbot and convent of Tor. One of the other coheiresses having died without issue, a moiety of the manor became vested in the Scobhull family, and passed by successive female heirs to Holbeme, Marwood, Cole, and Prideaux.

The manor of Coffinswell now belongs to Sir Henry Carew, Bart.; the barton, &c. to James Buller, Esq.

The manor of Daccombe was the ancient inheritance of a family of that name, who removed into Dorsetshire, and appears to have become extinct about the middle of the seventeenth century. Jordan de Daccombe gave it to the abbey of Torr. A moiety of this manor now belongs to Mr. John Eastley of Paignton; the other moiety is in severalties.

Coffinswell is a daughter-church to Mary-Church. It is in the peculiar jurisdiction of the dean and chapter of Exeter, who are the patrons.

Colebrooke or Colbrooke

COLEBROOKE or COLBROOKE, in the hundred of Crediton and in the deanery of Cadbury, lies about five miles from Crediton, and thirteen from Exeter. The village of Coleford is in this parish.

The manor was held under the Bishop of Exeter successively by the families of Colebrook, St. Vedast, Bathe, Metsted, and Walleis. It continued in that of Walleis from the reign of Edward III. to that of Henry VII., when it passed with its heiress to Digby. It was afterwards in the family of Mills, and having passed by marriage to Coryton, is now the property of John Tillie Coryton, Esq.

Coplestone, in this parish, was the ancient property and residence of the family of that name. The coheiresses of the elder branch of that family sold it, about 1659, to the ancestor of its late proprietor, Sir George Yonge, Bart, and K. B. It is now the property and residence of Mr. John Madge.

Wootton belonged to a family of that name, under a grant from St. Vedast, Lord of Colebrooke. This estate became Sir William Periam's, and passed to Reynell. Great Wootton belongs to the Rev. S. Pidsley, of Uplowman, whose family have possessed it for two centuries. Upper Wootton has lately been purchased by R. H. Tuckfield, Esq.

Horwell was for many generations a seat of the Pryes. It was afterwards in the Bruttons, and passed, by successive alienations, to the families of Tuckfield, Yarde, Gatcliffe, and Rowe. It is now the property and residence of Mr. Samuel Norrish.

The manor of Painston, in this parish, belongs to John Newcombe, Esq., of Starcross.

Wolmerstone, or Wolmston, passed at an early period from Peverell to Hungerford by marriage. It was some time in the Fortescue family, and afterwards successively in Northleigh and Helyar; by the latter it was sold to the Hamlyns of Paschoe.

Paschoe became the property and residence of the Hamlyn family about the year 1611. It now belongs to Calmady Pollexfen Hamlyn, Esq., of Bridestowe.

Hooke, the property and residence of Samuel Hooke, yeoman, has been many generations in his family: the tradition of the place refers their possession to a very remote period; and it is most probable that it has been at least from the reign of Henry III., when surnames came into general use, and were chiefly taken by families from the place of their abode.

Landsend, which had been for many generations in the family of Yonge, now belongs to John Sillifant, Esq., of Combe Lancells, in this parish.

In the parish church are memorials of the Burringtons (fn. 26) of West Wonford, and the monument of Elizabeth, wife of Sir John Coryton, Bart., 1677.

There were formerly chapels at Coplestone, Landsend, Horwell, Hooke, and Wolmerstone, of which there are now no remains. Three of these (fn. 27) were standing in 1772, and the ruins of that at Coplestone.

The great tithes of Colebrooke are vested in the dean and chapter of Exeter, and they are patrons of the vicarage, which is in their peculiar jurisdiction.

Coleridge or Colerudge

COLERIDGE or COLERUDGE, in the hundred of North Tawton and in the deanery of Chulmleigh, lies about five miles from Chulmleigh, and about twelve from Crediton. The village of Leigh is in this parish.

The manor was sold by Sir Ralph de Siccavilla or Sackville, in the reign of Henry III., to the Champernownes, from whom it passed by successive heirs female to Polglass and Herle. It was sold by Herle to Bonville, and by the attainder of Henry Duke of Suffolk fell to the crown. This manor is now the property of Montagu Parker, Esq., in whose family it has been a considerable time. Sir John Hamlyn Williams, Bart., is the proprietor of Coleridge barton. Birch barton belongs to the Rev. Arundel Radford.

The Bishop of Exeter is patron of the rectory, which was formerly appropriated to the college of Crediton.

There is no endowed school in this parish, but a school is supported by the Honourable Newton Fellowes and others.

Columpton, Collumpton, or Cullompton

COLUMPTON, COLLUMPTON, or CULLOMPTON, in the hundred of Hayridge and in the deanery of Plymtree, is an ancient market-town, twelve miles from Exeter, and 172 from London.

The market at this place was originally granted, in 1278, to Baldwin de Insula Earl of Devon (fn. 28) , to be held on Thursday; together with a fair for three days at the festival of St. John the Baptist: in 1317, the abbot and convent of Buckland had a grant of a market, to be held on Tuesday, together with a fair for three days at the festival of St. George. (fn. 29) The market is now held on Saturday, for butchers' meat, vegetables, &c.: corn is only sold occasionally. There are two fairs for cattle, cloth, &c., on the first Wednesday in May, and the first Wednesday in November. (fn. 30)

The principal villages in the parish are Poundsford, Westcott, Langford, Mutterton, Weaver, East-Butterleigh, and Colebrooke.

The manor of Collumpton was bequeathed by King Alfred to his son Ethelward. It was granted by King Richard I. to Richard de Clifford; and by King John, in 1199 or 1200, to his brother, Walter de Clifford. (fn. 31) It was afterwards in the Earls of Devon: Isabel de Fortibus, Countess of Devon, being possessed of this manor in her own right as the sole heiress, gave it to the abbot and convent of Buckland. After the dissolution it was granted to Sir George St. Leger: his son sold it to Thomas Risdon, Esq. It was afterwards in the Hillersdons. The late Francis Colman, Esq., some time of Hillersdon, sold this manor to David Sweet, Esq., and it is now the property of John Laxon Sweet, Esq. No courts are held for it; but the lord appoints the town-crier, and exercises some other manerial rights. The lord of this manor had formerly the power of life and death. (fn. 32)

The manor of Langford belonged to an ancient family of that name, who had a charter for a market in 1334 on Thursday, at this their manor of Langford, and a fair for three days at the festival of St. James. (fn. 33)

John Langford, Esq., the last of this family, after seven descents, gave the manor of Langford to Corpus Christi College, in Oxford, to which it still belongs. The manor of Bole Aller belongs to the dean and chapter of Exeter: the greater part of the manor of Bradfield, the property of W. H. Walrond, Esq., is in this parish. The manor of Aller Peverell in this parish belonged to the family of Peverell; afterwards to Sir William Ashthorp, who conveyed it to Margaret Duchess of Clarence; having, in consequence, become vested in the crown, King Henry VIII. granted it to Richard Moore. Sir William Periam having purchased it of Loosemoore, to whom it had been conveyed by Moore, gave it with his daughter to Sir William Pole. This estate was dismembered about the year 1790; the royalty was purchased by Mr. John Hole, of Peverstone, to whom it still belongs. The manor of Moorehayes had been for sixteen generations the property and residence of the ancient family of Moore, when Sir William Pole made his collections in the early part of the seventeenth century. George Moore, Esq., the last heir male, died in 1711, leaving an only daughter, married to John Blackmore, grandfather of Mr. William Blackmore, the present proprietor.

Hillersdon, the ancient property and seat of the Hillersdons, was sold by them about the middle of the sixteenth century, when they removed out of the county. It was then for some descents in the family of Cockeram; afterwards in that of Cruwys, It was lately the property and residence of Francis Colman, Esq.; now of John Laxon Sweet, Esq.

Chalvedon or Chaldon, was the property and seat of a family of that name, whose heiress brought it to Bere. About the year 1600, it was sold by John Bere, Esq. of Huntsham, to Collyns, who conveyed it to Fly: it is now the property of Mr. Elias Baker.

Luttockshele, in this parish, which in the reign of Edward III. was the property and residence of Sir Salvin Souththorpes, belonged afterwards successively to the families of Ralegh, Dinham, Hidon, and Whiting. From the latter it passed by inheritance to Walrond. No estate of this name is now known; but it is supposed to have been at Colebrooke, where there was standing, a few years ago, an ancient mansion with a chapel attached to it.

Kingsmill, formerly the residence of Lord Chief Justice Pratt, is now the property of Mr. Richard Mortimore: the barton of Hackland belongs to Mr. Elias Baker; that of Rull, to Henry Blackmore Baker, Esq.; Upton, to Mr. Philip Martin; Peverstone, to Mr. John Hole; and Court, to Mr. Samuel Farrant.

The parish church is a handsome Gothic structure: on the south side, is a rich chapel, built by John Lane, merchant, 1528.

King William the Conqueror gave the collegiate church of Collumpton, with its five prebends, Colebrooke, Hineland, Waevre, Esse, and Upton, to the abbot and convent of Battle, in Sussex. (fn. 34) The members of the collegiate church were then removed: this church and its prebends were afterwards bestowed on the priory of St. Nicholas, in Exeter, founded in the same reign. There was a gild in the church of Collumpton, dedicated to St. Nicholas, the lands of which were valued in 1547 at 5l. 7s. 2d. per annum. (fn. 35) The great tithes of this parish, were formerly appropriated to the priory of St. Nicholas. Queen Elizabeth in 1565 granted the rectory and church of Collumpton, with the advowson of the vicarage and parish church of Upton Wever, alias Collumpton, to Robert Freke and John Walker. It passed some time in moieties through various hands: the great tithes have lately been purchased by the land-owners.

The Rev. Walker Gray, the present incumbent, is patron of the vicarage.

There was formerly a chapel at Langford.

There are meeting-houses at Collumpton for the Quakers, Unitarians, Particular Baptists, and Wesleyan Methodists.

John Trott founded an alms-house in this town in the year 1523, for six poor men, and endowed it with lands then valued at 8l. 11s. per annum. The house remains and belongs to the parish, but has been diverted from its intended purpose: the lands, which would now have been of considerable value, have been appropriated to other uses.

Mr. George Spicer, in 1624, gave lands now let at 80l. per annum, for apprenticing poor children.

There is no endowed school, but a free-school has lately been established by subscription on Dr. Bell's plan: the present number of children educated is 170.

Footnotes

1 Dugdale's Monast. II. 551.
2 Tanner.
3 Ibid.
4 Dr. Nicholas Nutcombe, 1650; Dr. John Nutcombe, 1657; Richard Nutcombe, Esq., 1680; Richard Nutcombe, Esq., the last of the family, 1736; he had been sheriff of the county in 1716.
5 Mr. Oliver's notes from Bishop Grandison's Register.
6 Hundred Roll, temp. Edw. I.
7 Clarendon, vol. ii. p. 281. 8vo.
8 Sprigge's England's Recovery, p. 233.
9 There is no date on the monument, but it appears by the parish books that he was buried in that year.
10 The deed has no date, but it may be collected from the name of the grantee, and that of one of the witnesses, that it was in the reign of Henry II. Henry de la Pomerei appears then to have possessed a manor called Clist Wick, of which I have found no other mention. It is expressed in the deed, that William Sukespic, at the time of the conveyance, gave to Henry de la Pomerei a cask of wine, and to his son Henry an ivory bow.
11 Julian Osborne 1614;
"Bonifant a virgin; Osborne a loyal wife
For thirty years; a widow was forty and more:
A hundred years almost she led her life," &c. &c.
Richard Osborne, Esq. 1706.
12 Mr. John Gibbs, 1652; George Gibbs, 1685; George Gibbs, 1723.
13 Out of an estate in Broadwood Kelly.
14 In such proportions as "the stock-money" of the parish is paid and applied.
15 Either this or Clist St. Mary must have been the manor of Clyst which was one of the five held in demesne by the Bishop of Constance at the taking of the Domesday survey.
16 Hoker's History of Exeter.
17 Hundred Roll.
18 An old monument, without inscription, with the arms of Cary inpaling Pawlet; George Cary, Esq., 1601; William Cary, Esq., 1652; Sir Robert Cary, 1671; Elizabeth, wife of George Cary, Esq., and daughter of Jenkins, of Trekening, Cornwall, 1677; Dr. George Cary, Dean of Exeter, Chaplain to King Charles II., who is said in his epitaph to have twice refused a bishopric, ob. 1680; Sir George Cary, son and heir of Dean Cary, 1685; Joan, wife of William Cary, Esq., and daughter of Wyndham, 1637; Robert Cary, Esq., 1724.
19 Zachary Hamlyn, Esq., 1759; Sir James Hamlyn, Bart., 1811; and his lady, the heiress of Williams. There is a memorial also for Gertrude, wife of William Cook, and daughter of Richard Granville of Poughill, Cornwall, 1703.
20 Dug. Monast. vol. iii. p. 100.
21 Cart. Rot. 25–27 Edw. I.
22 William de Falesia held another manor or berwick, as an appendage of Cockington, called Depdon. No estate of this name is now known.
23 After the attainder of Sir William Cary, the manor of Cockington was granted to Sir William Bourchier, but was afterwards restored to the family. See Pat. 7 Edward IV. pt. 1.
24 Hundred Roll.
25 In the deed of conveyance he is called "late knight." It is probable that he had been degraded by the then ruling power for his loyalty, since he had been an active officer for the King, and commanded Kingsweare fort, at the siege of Dartmouth. He is said to have been reduced to such great poverty, as to have subsisted on charity for some years previous to his death, which happened about the year 1660.
26 1659. 1666.
27 Landsend, Horwell, and Hooke. Chappie's MSS.
28 Cart. Rot. 7 Edw. I. No. 33.
29 Cart. Rot. 11 Edw. II. No. 38.
30 This fair had been held annually on the 8th of November till the year 1777. Chappie's Collections.
31 Cart. Rot. 1 Joh. No. 162.
32 Hundred Roll, temp. Edw. I.
33 Cart. Rot. 7 Edw. III. No. 14.
34 Dugdale's Monasticon, vol. 1. p. 315.
35 Chantry Roll.