Dacre - Dalston

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

1-4

Citation Show another format:

'Dacre - Dalston', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 1-4. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50912+ Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

A TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY of ENGLAND.

Dacre (St. Andrew)

DACRE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland, 4½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Penrith; containing, with the townships of Great Blencowe, Newbiggin, Soulby, and Stainton, 975 inhabitants, of whom 204 are in the township of Dacre. A monastery existed here in the time of Bede; and at this place Constantine, King of Scotland, and Eugenius, King of Cumberland, placed themselves and their dominions under the authority of Athelstan. Dacre Castle was long the residence of an ancient and noble family of that name: the main body of it, consisting principally of four towers, of excellent workmanship, remains in a very perfect state. The parish comprises by admeasurement 6466 acres, of which about 808 are wood, 300 meadow and pasture, and the rest arable: limestone is obtained. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the patronage of the Crown, with a net income of £120; impropriator, the Earl of Lonsdale. The small tithes of the townships of Dacre and Soulby were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1806. There is a school endowed with £140 per annum, arising from land; another with £8. 15., a third with £7. 10., and a fourth with £3, per annum. At Southwaite, in the parish, is a mineral spring.

Dacre

DACRE, a township, in the parish of Ripon, union of Pateley-Bridge, Lower division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 4 miles (S. E.) from Pateley-Bridge; containing 695 inhabitants. The township is situated on the south-western side of Nidderdale, and comprises a considerable tract, of which a large portion is open moor; the surface is in some parts rocky, and diversified by hill and valley, and the scenery is generally bold. There are coal-mines, and several quarries of building-stone; also a flax-mill. The township forms, with Bewerley, an ecclesiastical district. The church, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, was erected in 1837, at an expense of £700, raised by subscription, aided by a grant of £150 from the Incorporated Society; it is in the early English style, with a tower surmounted by a graceful spire, and forms a pleasing object in the scenery of the valley. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Ripon; net income, £40, with a good glebe-house. There is a place of worship for Independents. A school was built in 1695, by William Hardcastle, who endowed it with £100; and in 1778, William Mountain bequeathed £100. In 1774, Edward Yates left an estate now producing £35 per annum, for the instruction of children at Padside and Braythwaite.

Dadford

DADFORD, a hamlet, in the parish of Stowe, union, hundred, and county of Buckingham; containing 159 inhabitants. The manor of Dadford belonged in part to the neighbouring monastery of Bittlesden, and has long been annexed to that of Stowe. The hamlet is situated a short distance from the western boundary of Stowe Park.

Dadlington

DADLINGTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Hinckley, union of Market-Bosworth, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 3 miles (N. W. by N.) from Hinckley; containing 180 inhabitants. Before the Conquest, Leofric, Earl of Mercia, gave this place to the priory of Coventry, and in the reign of Henry I. the priory gave it to Hugh de Hastings. The lands have since been held by many families, among others by the Ferrers family, the Pulteneys, Greys, and Burtons: in 1772 the manor was bought by William Hurst, Esq. Dadlington comprises 1021a. 3r. 23p. of land, and is situated on an eminence on the east side of the Ashby-de-la-Zouch canal; the soil is gravelly, and the surface diversified. The chapel, dedicated to St. James, is a structure of great antiquity, with a wooden turret, and a few fragments of stained glass in its windows. In the village is a small Independent meeting-house, and a school is supported in connexion with the National Society.

Dagenham (St. Peter and St. Paul)

DAGENHAM (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Romford, hundred of Becontree, S. division of Essex, 3½ miles (S. by W.) from Romford; containing 2294 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 5640 acres, whereof 3350 are arable, 970 pasture, and about 1000 wood and waste. It is bounded on the south by the Thames, a very destructive irruption of which occurred here in 1707: the waters over-flowed 1000 acres of rich land, and washed nearly 120 acres into the river, where a sand-bank was formed almost half-way across its bed; and in this state the whole remained nearly fifteen years, when the breach was stopped, and the land recovered by Captain Perry, at an expense of £40,000. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £19. 10., and in the gift of the Rev. T. L. Fanshawe: the great tithes, belonging to Brentwood school, have been commuted for £1036, and the vicarial for £850; the glebe comprises 4½ acres. The church is a handsome edifice with a tower of stone, and contains some good monuments, among which is one to Sir Richard Alibon, Knt., who was appointed a judge by James II. A school was founded and endowed by William Ford, Esq., in 1828; and there is another, endowed with £100 South Sea annuities.

Daglingworth (Holy Rood)

DAGLINGWORTH (Holy Rood), a parish, in the union of Cirencester, hundred of Crowthorne and Minety, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 3 miles (N. W.) from Cirencester; containing 302 inhabitants. This place was not a distinct parish at the time of the Conquest, but a waste in the manor of Stratton: the earliest mention of its present name occurs in a record of the thirteenth century. It comprises by computation 1811 acres, of which about 1157 are arable, 310 meadow land, and 342 wood; the soil is in general light, and there are quarries of stone for building. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 6. 3., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £261, and the glebe comprises 64½ acres, with a glebe-house. The church was built by the nuns of Godstow, in the county of Oxford, to whom the place was given in 1499. The Roman Ermin-street passes through the parish, and a tessellated pavement has been discovered.

Dagnall

DAGNALL, a chapelry, in the parish of Eddlesborough, union of Leighton-Buzzard, hundred of Cottesloe, county of Buckingham, 3½ miles (E.) from Ivinghoe; containing 382 inhabitants. The chapel, dedicated to All Saints, has long been in ruins.

Dagworth

DAGWORTH, a hamlet, in the parish of Old Newton, union and hundred of Stow, W. division of Suffolk, 2¼ miles (N.) from Stow-Market; containing 169 inhabitants. Some members of a family that took its name from this place, distinguished themselves in the wars with France, during the reign of Edward III.

Dalbury (All Saints)

DALBURY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 6 miles (W. by S.) from Derby; containing, with the hamlet of Lees, 221 inhabitants. In the reign of Edward II. Dalbury and Lees were the property of Sir Robert Holland; and both places were held by Sir Samuel Sleigh, who died in 1679. They passed with his daughter and co-heiress to Samuel Cheetham, Esq., and on that gentleman's death, without issue, to Rowland Cotton, Esq., of Bellaport, in Shropshire, who had married the other coheiress. The parish comprises 1172a. 26p., mostly rich pasture land and dairy-farms; about 29 acres are common: the surface is beautifully diversified with hill and dale, the soil is a thick loam, and the scenery is picturesque. Lees is an inconsiderable village, scattered round a green of about 36 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 16. 3.; patron, incumbent, and lord of the manor, the Rev. C. Evelyn Cotton, whose tithes have been commuted for £184, and whose glebe comprises 47 acres, with an excellent house, built by the incumbent. The church is in the later English style, and is an ancient edifice covered with ivy; it has a Norman arch over the belfry, and contains a fine stone font with a richly carved oak covering: in one of the windows, of stained glass, is a figure of St. Michael, and the date 1627. A north aisle was lately added, and the church thoroughly repaired, at a cost of £300. The communion-plate, of great value, was presented by the Cotton family. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists. £14 per annum were left by Ann Pole for putting out apprentices, or for the poor. The parish is indebted to the incumbent for a line of upwards of 1000 yards of public road, constructed at his expense, and for extensive plantations.

Dalby

DALBY, a parish, in the union of Spilsby, Wold division of the wapentake of Candleshoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3½ miles (N.) from Spilsby; containing, with the hamlet of Dexthorpe, 106 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £79; patron, Samuel Slater, Esq. A glebe in the parish of Toynton All Saints, valued at £27. 10., and land in Wildmore Fen, valued at £12, per annum, are attached to the living.

Dalby (St. Mary)

DALBY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Easingwould, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 3 miles (S. E.) from Bransby, and 15 (N.) from York; containing 155 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1156a. 2r. 37p., of which about 581 acres are arable, 525 meadow and pasture, and 50 wood. The land is undulated, in most parts very high, and the soil, though of various qualities, is in general good; the scenery in many situations is beautiful, embracing extensive views over York, towards Pontefract. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 1. 0½., and in the patronage of Wm. Gray, Jun., Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £261, and the glebe comprises 4½ acres. The church, a very ancient edifice, contains a large and curious font.

Dalby Magna (St. Swithin)

DALBY MAGNA (St. Swithin), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 3 miles (S. by W.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 479 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 2400 acres, of which about 1790 are meadow, 500 arable, and 10 woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 4. 7.; patron and impropriator, Sir Robert Burdett, Bart.: the great tithes have been commuted for £49. 7. 6., and the vicarial for £235, and there is a small glebe, with a glebe-house.

Dalby-On-The-Wolds, or Old Dalby (St. John the Baptist)

DALBY-ON-THE-WOLDS, or Old Dalby (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 6½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 410 inhabitants. A commandery of Knights Hospitallers was founded here, it is supposed by Robert Bossu, Earl of Leicester, in the reign of Henry II.; of which, at the Dissolution, the revenue was valued at £91. 2. 8. The parish comprises by computation 4000 acres; the village is supplied with water conveyed by pipes from springs at the distance of a mile and a half. The living is a donative; net income, £40; patron, the Rev. William Sawyer. A church, in which 300 of the sittings are free, was built at the expense of the patron, and opened for divine service in February 1836. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. Here is a chalybeate spring.

Dalby Parva (St. James)

DALBY PARVA (St. James), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 4½ miles (S. S. E.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 184 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9; net income, £263; patron and impropriator, E. B. Hartopp, Esq.

Dalderby (St. Martin)

DALDERBY (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, S. division of the wapentake of Gartree, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3 miles (S. by W.) from Horncastle; containing 37 inhabitants. The river Bain and the Horncastle canal pass through the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, united in 1731 to the rectory of Scrivelsby, and valued in the king's books at £4. 19. 4½.

Dale-Abbey

DALE-ABBEY, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Shardlow, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 7 miles (E. by N.) from Derby; comprising 400 inhabitants. It has its name from an abbey of Præmonstratensian canons, founded about the year 1204, by William Fitz-Rauf, seneschal of Normandy, and his son-in-law, Jeffrey de Salicosa Mara, in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary: at the Dissolution the revenue was estimated at £144. 12. The liberty comprises 1760 acres of land, the soil of which is clay, sand, and marl; and has a village situated in a vale, with a lofty range of hills on the south, commanding extensive views: the houses are mostly of brick, and thatched. Earl Stanhope is lord of the manor. Here is a chapel, an ancient and curious structure, divided into two parts by a framework screen, and having a gallery extending over three sides; it is within the jurisdiction of the manor and peculiar court of Dale-Abbey. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. A fine eastern window and a solitary arch are the only remains of the abbey, with the exception of a portion of the cloisters, now part of a house.

Dale-Town

DALE-TOWN, a township, in the parish of Hawnby, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 9½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Thirsk; containing 49 inhabitants. This township is near one of the sources of the river Rye, and comprises by computation 2000 acres of land, partly open moors: it includes a lofty and extensive cliff, called Peak Scarr.

Dalham (St. Mary)

DALHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newmarket, hundred of Risbridge, W. division of Suffolk, 5 miles (E. by S.) from Newmarket; containing, with the hamlet of Dunstall-Green, 598 inhabitants. Dalham Hall, formerly the residence of the family of Stuteville, is now the seat of the Rev. Sir Robert Affleck. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 10. 5.; net income, £419; patron, Sir R. Affleck: the tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1816.

Dallinghoo (St. Mary)

DALLINGHOO (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Woodbridge, partly in the hundred of Loes, but chiefly in that of Welford, E. division of Suffolk, 4 miles (N.) from Woodbridge; containing 346 inhabitants. The chief manor in this parish was the property, successively, of several of the earls of Norfolk, from which circumstance it obtained the appellation of Earls' Dallinghoo. A handsome mansion was erected by Sir William Churchill, then lord of the manor, and was rebuilt by his son-in-law, who had succeeded to the estate; it was destroyed by fire in 1729. The parish comprises 1530a. 1r. 4p. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; net income, £384; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Ellis Walford. The church is an ancient edifice, with a tower, of which the lower part is of earlier date: the rectory-house is a good residence, recently enlarged.

Dallington (St. Mary)

DALLINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the hundred of Newbottle-Grove, union, and S. division of the county, of Northampton, 1½ mile (N. W.) from Northampton; containing 519 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north and north-east by the river Nene, and on the south-west by the road from Northampton to Rugby; and comprises 1474a. 1r., exclusively of a plantation of firs, computed at 150 acres. The principal part of the land, which is of rich quality, is arable, the grass not amounting to more than 200 acres. About 100 persons are engaged in the manufacture of shoes. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 15. 8.; net income, £200; patron and impropriator, J. Reddall, Esq.: the glebe consists of 40 acres, with a glebe-house. The church has portions in the early English style, and contains handsome monuments to the Rainsford and Jekyll families, former possessors of the estate.

Dallington (St. Margaret)

DALLINGTON (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Battle, partly in the hundred of Foxearle and Hawksborough, but chiefly in that of Netherfield, rape of Hastings, E. division of Sussex, 6 miles (W. N. W.) from Battle; containing 612 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Battle to Uckfield, and beautifully diversified by hill and dale; it abounds with iron-ore, and several blast-furnaces were formerly in operation for smelting the ore, but the works have been long discontinued. The living is a vicarage endowed with the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £182; patron, the Earl of Ashburnham. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a spire.

Dalston (St. Michael)

DALSTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Carlisle, ward, and E. division of the county, of Cumberland; comprising the townships of Buckabank, Cumdivock, Dalston, Hawkesdale, and Raughton with Gaitsgill, and the chapelry of Highhead; and containing 2874 inhabitants, of whom 1024 are in the township of Dalston, 4½ miles (S. S. W.) from Carlisle. This place, from various circumstances, appears to have been visited by the Romans; and from some extensive quarries of freestone here, it is supposed a great part of the stone used for building the Roman wall from Carlisle to Bowness was dug; an opinion confirmed by the discovery, about the middle of the last century, of a Roman inscription on the face of a rock, and by the vestiges of three Roman encampments, that exist in the neighbourhood. Rose Castle, in the parish, is supposed to have been the principal residence of the bishops of Carlisle from the year 1228: in 1322 it was burnt by Robert Bruce, and, about 1366, was twice attacked and ravaged by the Scots. Before the civil war in the seventeenth century, the building formed a complete quadrangle, had five towers, and was surrounded by a turreted wall. In 1648, being then held for the king, it was attacked by General Lambert, and taken by storm; shortly afterwards, the Duke of Hamilton's army was here reinforced by that under Sir Marmaduke Langdale, and the castle, after having been used as a prison for the royalists, was burnt by order of Major Cholmeley. Since the Restoration it has been rebuilt, and improved by successive prelates. The parish comprises about 10,850 acres; the surface, though hilly, is not mountainous, and the valleys are watered by the river Caldew, which, after receiving the Raugh and the Ive, gives name to a beautiful vale. Stone of excellent quality is found, and at Shalk are some very extensive quarries: the cotton manufacture is carried on to a considerable extent, there being several mills; and an iron and plating forge is conducted on a large scale, for spades and implements of husbandry. The village is well built, and at the eastern extremity is an ancient cross, raised on a flight of steps, and bearing several coats of arms; a customary market is held on Friday, and the village is a polling-place for the eastern division of the county. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 18. 1½.; net income, £201; patron and appropriator, the Bishop. The church was rebuilt about a century ago. At Highhead is a separate incumbency. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a school, rebuilt in 1815, is endowed with £33 per annum. Remains exist of a Druidical circle about thirty yards in circumference. The celebrated Dr. Paley was vicar of Dalston from 1774 to 1793.

Dalston

DALSTON, a suburban village, in the parish of Hackney, Tower division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex, 2½ miles (N. N. E.) from London. This place, which has greatly increased within the last few years, extends from the village of Hackney towards Kingsland, and consists of several handsome ancient mansions, and numerous neat houses of modern erection. A church, dedicated to St. Philip, and capable of accommodating 1000 persons, was consecrated in August, 1841, having been erected at a cost of £5700, on ground given by the late Mr. W. Rhodes: the living is in the gift of the Rector of St. John's, Hackney. A school of industry was erected in Dalston-lane, by subscription, in 1837, for the reception of fifty girls, who are instructed by aid of voluntary contributions; and in Oct. 1845, a building was opened as a German hospital by Prince George of Cambridge, and Chevalier Bunsen, the Prussian ambassador.



<--Previous:
Cumberworth - Cwmyoy