Layer-Breton - Lea-Newbold

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

40-42

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'Layer-Breton - Lea-Newbold', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 40-42. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51098 Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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Layer-Breton

LAYER-BRETON, a parish, in the union of Lexden and Winstree, hundred of Winstree, N. division of Essex, 6 miles (E. by S.) from Kelvedon; containing 290 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 933 acres, of which 803 are arable, 90 pasture, and 40 heath. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7; net income, £288; patron, the Rev. R. W. Sutton. There are places of worship for the Society of Friends and Independents.

Layer-De-La-Hay

LAYER-DE-LA-HAY, a parish, in the union of Lexden and Winstree, hundred of Winstree, N. division of Essex, 4¼ miles (S. W. by S.) from Colchester; containing 731 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2577 acres, of which 59 are common or waste; it is the most eastern of the three parishes of the name of Layer. The land is generally wet: in some parts it is a light soil, well adapted for turnips, and in others a very shallow loam. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £82; patron, Sir G. H. Smyth, Bart.; impropriator, J. Pearson, Esq., whose tithes have been commuted for £680. The church is a plain edifice, with a stone tower.

Layer-Marney (St. Mary)

LAYER-MARNEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Lexden and Winstree, hundred of Winstree, N. division of Essex, 5 miles (E. by S.) from Kelvedon; containing 256 inhabitants. It comprises 1900 acres, of which about 100 are woodland and plantation, and the remainder chiefly arable. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 3. 4., and in the gift of Quintin Dick, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £466, and the glebe comprises 3 acres. The church is principally in the later English style, and contains several fine monuments of the Marney family. In an ancient brick edifice about 50 yards from the church, William de Marney, in 1330, founded a college for a warden and two chaplains.

Layham (St. Andrew)

LAYHAM (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Cosford, W. division of Suffolk, 1½ mile (S. by E.) from Hadleigh; containing 549 inhabitants, and consisting of 2488a. 2r. 29p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 0. 7½., and in the gift of St. John's College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £800, and the glebe comprises 71 acres.

Laymore

LAYMORE, a tything, in the parish and hundred of Crewkerne, union of Chard, W. division of the county of Somerset; containing, with part of BlackDown hamlet, and the hamlets of Horn, Ash, and Greenham, 208 inhabitants.

Laysters (St. Andrew)

LAYSTERS (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Leominster, hundred of Wolphy, county of Hereford, 4 miles (S. S. W.) from Tenbury; containing 226 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the east by a part of Worcestershire, and intersected by the road from Tenbury to Leominster; and comprises by measurement 1977 acres. Its soil is generally a moderately tenacious clay, resting on a bed of coarse limestone; the surface is finely undulated, and the surrounding scenery diversified. The grain produced is of excellent quality, and the breed of cattle in much repute. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £335; patron, the Rev. Thomas Elton Miller; impropriator and incumbent, the Rev. J. K. Miller. An ancient ecclesiastical establishment here was connected with the priory of Sheen, in Surrey; and there are still some vestiges of the buildings, on a farm called the Cinders, partially surrounded by a moat.

Laysthorpe, York.—See Newton, East.

LAYSTHORPE, York.—See Newton, East.

Layston (St. Bartholomew)

LAYSTON (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Buntingford, hundred of Edwinstree, county of Hertford, ¾ of a mile (N. N. E.) from Buntingford; containing 1187 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, with the perpetual curacy of Buntingford annexed, valued in the king's books at £14. 16. 2.; net income, £149; patron and impropriator, William Butt, Esq. The ancient village of Layston has totally disappeared.—See Buntingford.

Laytham

LAYTHAM, a township, in the parish of Aughton, union of Howden, Holme-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 8 miles (N.) from Howden; containing 109 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1270 acres, the property of various persons; the river Derwent passes on the west, and the road from Duffield to Holme on the south.

Layton

LAYTON, with Warbrick, a township, in the parish of Bispham, union of the Fylde, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 2½ miles (S. W.) from Poulton; containing 1968 inhabitants. Layton is mentioned in the Domesday survey, and in former times was of some importance as containing a mansion belonging to the ancient family of Botiller or Butler, barons of Warrington, and afterwards to the Rigbys; while, at the same time, it enjoyed the privilege of a weekly market and an annual fair, obtained by Robert Botiller. In the reign of Elizabeth, Layton and Warbrick were held by Thomas Fleetwood. The township lies on the coast, and comprises 2401a. 28p. of land. Of the tithe rent-charges, £1. 4. are payable to an impropriator, £38. 3. to the perpetual curate of Trinity Chapel, South-Shore, and £201. 17. to the curate of Bispham, who has also a glebe of 4 acres. In this township is Blackpool, which see.

Layton, East

LAYTON, EAST, a township, in the parish of Stanwick St. John, union of Richmond, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, 10 miles (E. N. E.) from Darlington; containing 117 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 1010 acres of land: the village is situated on the crown of a fertile eminence commanding extensive views. The clergymen of the adjoining parishes officiate here by turns in a small chapel.

Layton, West

LAYTON, WEST, a township, in the parish of Hutton-Magnum, union of Richmond, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, 4¾ miles (S. E. by E.) from Greta-Bridge; containing 88 inhabitants. It comprises about 730 acres, partly the property of Lord Rokeby. The village, which is small, is seated on an eminence, on the road from Greta-Bridge to Hartforth. The lands are partly in farms.

Lazonby (St. Nicholas)

LAZONBY (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland; containing, with the chapelry of Plumpton-Wall, 891 inhabitants, of whom 570 are in the township of Lazonby, 7 miles (N. N. E.) from Penrith. The township comprises 7980a. 1r. 17p., of which 3888a. 2r. 20p. are arable, 1140a. 2r. 35p. wood and plantations, 62a. 2r. 7p. meadow and pasture, and 2888a. 1r. 35p. waste. The village is situated on the west bank of the river Eden, and the surrounding country is pleasing. There are good quarries of freestone, and a quarry producing stone for millstones. The living is a vicarage, endowed with a portion of the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £13. 1. 3.; net income, £551; patron, the Bishop of Carlisle: the remainder of the rectorial tithes belong to the poor of the chapelry of Witherslack, Westmorland. At Plumpton-Wall is a separate incumbency. In Baron Wood is a lofty rock, containing an artificial cave called Giant's Chamber, or Samson's Cave. The great Roman road passes from north to south, and another intersects the parish in a direction towards Salkeld Gate. At Castle Rigg are the ruins of a moated building; and upon the fell, urns containing bones and ashes were discovered some years since. There are also several cairns.

Lea

LEA, a township, in the parish of Backford, union of Great Boughton, Higher division of the hundred of Wirrall, S. division of the county of Chester, 4 miles (N. N. W.) from Chester; containing 115 inhabitants. The manor was part of the original endowment of the monastery of St. Werburgh, and at the Dissolution was granted to the Glasier family, who resided in the Hall for many generations, but who are now supposed to be extinct. The township comprises 671 acres, of a clayey soil; and is divided from the township of Backford by a small rivulet that flows down a deep vale. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £29, and the appropriate for £62, payable to the Bishop of Chester.

Lea

LEA, a township, in the parish of Wybunbury, union and hundred of Nantwich, S. division of the county of Chester; containing 68 inhabitants. It comprises 403a. 25p. The tithes have been commuted for £50. 10., of which £9 are payable to the vicar, and £41. 10. to the Bishop of Lichfield.

Lea, county of Derby.—See Dethwick-Lea.

LEA, county of Derby.—See Dethwick-Lea.

Lea

LEA, a tything, in the parish of Almondsbury, Lower division of the hundred of Thornbury, poorlaw union of Thornbury, W. division of the county of Gloucester; containing 57 inhabitants.

Lea (St. John)

LEA (St. John), a parish, in the union of Ross, hundred of Greytree, county of Hereford, 4½ miles (E. S. E.) from Ross; containing 209 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Gloucester to Ross, comprises 661a. 2r. 12p. Building-stone is found in several parts of the parish, but there is no regular quarry. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £68; patron, the Vicar of Linton. The church is an ancient structure.

Lea, county of Lancaster.—See Ashton.

LEA, county of Lancaster.—See Ashton.

Lea (St. Helen)

LEA (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Gainsborough, wapentake of Corringham, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Gainsborough; containing 198 inhabitants. Gypsum is found under the marl in the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 4. 2., and in the gift of Sir C. H. J. Anderson, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £392. 8. 10., and the glebe comprises 42 acres. At Hevening, in the parish, are some fish-ponds and a moat, the remains of a Cistercian nunnery founded in 1180, by Reyner Evermue; it was dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, and at the Dissolution had a revenue of £58. 13. 4.

Lea (St. Giles)

LEA (St. Giles), a parish, in the union and hundred of Malmesbury, Malmesbury and Kingswood, and N. divisions of Wilts, 1¾ mile (E. S. E.) from Malmesbury; containing, with the hamlet of Cleverton, 446 inhabitants. The parish is situated near the river Avon, and comprises by measurement 1691 acres, of which 312 are arable, 1332 pasture, and 10 woodland; the soil of nearly one half is a sandy loam, and of the remainder a tenacious clay. The living is annexed to the rectory of Garsdon; the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £30, the vicarial for £188. 9., and the glebe comprises 44 acres. The church is supposed to have been erected before the Conquest, and appears to have been partly rebuilt at a remote period; it contains 200 sittings.

Lea-Bailey

LEA-BAILEY, a tything, in the parish of Newland, union of Ross, hundred of St. Briavell's, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 4½ miles (S. E.) from the town of Ross; containing 135 inhabitants. It is situated on the borders of Herefordshire.

Lea-Hall

LEA-HALL, a hamlet, in the parish of Bradborne, hundred of Wirksworth, S. division of the county of Derby, 4½ miles (N. N. E.) from the town of Ashbourn; containing 22 inhabitants.

Lea-Marston (St. John the Baptist)

LEA-MARSTON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Meriden, Atherstone division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, 3 miles (N.) from Coleshill; containing 278 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the banks of the river Tame, and contains 1422 acres, of which 57 acres are woodland, the remainder being arable and pasture, the former predominating; the surface is level, and the soil light and gravelly, and of productive quality. The Birmingham and Fazeley canal is only three-quarters of a mile distant from the village; and in the neighbourhood the Derby railway branches off into two lines, one leading to Birmingham and the other to Hampton-inArden. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £99; patron and impropriator, C. B. Adderley, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land in 1775. The church is of very ancient date. Schools for boys and girls have been lately built at the cost of the patron.

Lea-Newbold

LEA-NEWBOLD, a township, in the chapelry of Buerton, parish of St. Oswald, Chester, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 6 miles (S. S. E.) from Chester; containing 42 inhabitants. It comprises 708 acres, the soil of which is clay. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £31.



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