Quadring - Quy

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

623-627

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'Quadring - Quy', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 623-627. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51227 Date accessed: 22 July 2014.


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Quadring (St. Margaret)

QUADRING (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Spalding, wapentake of Kirton, parts of Holland, county of Lincoln, 8½ miles (N. by W.) from Spalding; containing, with the hamlet of Eaudyke, 971 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, united to that of Wigtoft, and valued in the king's books at £10. 1. 3.: the tithes were commuted for land in 1775. There are several endowments for education, producing £128 per annum; and £35, the amount of different bequests, and some smaller sums, are distributed among poor widows.

Quainton, or Quainton-Malet (St. Mary)

QUAINTON, or Quainton-Malet (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Aylesbury, hundred of Ashendon, county of Buckingham, 6 miles (N. W.) from Aylesbury; containing, with the hamlets of Doddershall and Shipton-Lee, 1081 inhabitants, of whom 929 are in Quainton township. This place is situated between two roads which branch off from Aylesbury, one towards Buckingham and Banbury, and the other towards Bicester and Birmingham; and is nearly equidistant from Aylesbury and Winslow. The parish contains 5331 acres, of which a good proportion is woodland, and 316 acres are or were common; the soil, for the most part, is clay to a considerable depth, and the surface is in general level. Various kinds of stone are found in the hill immediately above the village; and a kind of iron sandstone is also met with. The females are employed in the manufacture of lace. An act for inclosing lands was passed in 1840. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £30. 12. 1., and in the patronage of the Ekins family: the tithes have been commuted for £780. 8., and there are 8½ acres of glebe. The church is a handsome structure with a tower, and contains several fine memorials to the Pigott and Dormer families: also a curious monument to the memory of Dr. Brett, one of the translators of the Bible in the reign of James I., and for forty years rector of the parish. Here is a place of worship for Baptists. Thomas Pigot, in 1704, bequeathed £300 for apprenticing children of Quainton and Grendon; and Lady Saye and Sele, in 1787, left for the same purpose property consisting, in 1804, of £5500 consols. and £5500 reduced annuities. Almshouses for six widows and widowers were founded and endowed by Richard Winwood, Esq.

Quantoxhead, East (St. Mary)

QUANTOXHEAD, EAST (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Williton, hundred of Williton and Freemanners, W. division of Somerset, 13½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Bridgwater; containing 282 inhabitants. It comprises 1170 acres of cultivated land, and 1132 of common or waste; and is situated on the road from Bridgwater to Minehead. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 8. 4., and in the gift of J. F. Luttrell, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £260, and there is a glebe of 24 acres.

Quantoxhead, West (St. Ethelred)

QUANTOXHEAD, WEST (St. Ethelred), a parish, in the union of Williton, hundred of Williton and Freemanners, W. division of Somerset, 15½ miles (W. N. W.) from the town of Bridgwater; containing 232 inhabitants. This parish comprises 1412a. 3r. 31p., of which 529 are common or waste; and is beautifully situated on the road from Bridgwater to Minehead, within half a mile of the Bristol Channel. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 8. 8., and in the gift of Sir Peregrine Acland: the tithes have been commuted for £220, and there are 38 acres of glebe.

Quarles

QUARLES, an extra-parochial district, in the hundred of North Greenhoe, union of Walsingham, W. division of Norfolk, 3¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Walsingham; containing 22 inhabitants. This district, which comprises about 600 acres, had anciently a church subject to the abbey of Creak, and which was granted by the Countess of Richmond to Christ's College, Cambridge. The lodge, and part of the plantations, of Holkham Park, are within the district.

Quarley (St. Michael)

QUARLEY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and hundred of Andover, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 6½ miles (W. by S.) from Andover; containing 191 inhabitants. It comprises 1683a. 1r. 18p., of which 1325 acres are arable, 252 pasture, 90 woodland, 15 in roads and waste, and 5 glebe. A pleasure-fair is held. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 12. 1., and in the gift of St. Katherine's Hospital, London: the tithes have been commuted for £341. The Rev. Thomas Sheppard, D.D., and Richard Cox, Esq., in 1802 endowed a free school, of which the income is about £16 a year. On the summit of Quarley Mount, five miles north-west from Danebury Hill, is a considerable ancient camp with quadruple intrenchments; and various tumuli are scattered over the adjacent downs.

Quarlton

QUARLTON, a township, in the chapelry of Turton, parish and union of Bolton, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire, 4½ miles (N. N. E.) from Bolton; containing 370 inhabitants. Edward I., in the 12th year of his reign, granted free warren here to Henry de Lee. The township lies at the foot of the mountainous region of the Forest of Rossendale, and comprises 590 acres of pasture and moorland; the soil is very poor, and the scenery wild. The population is employed chiefly in collieries and print-works: the Quarlton Vale print-works, established forty years since, are now the property of George Millington, Esq.

Quarndon, or Quorndon

QUARNDON, or Quorndon, a parish, in the union of Belper, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 3 miles (N. N. W.) from Derby; containing 557 inhabitants. It comprises 790 acres, whereof 619 are grass-land, 160½ ploughland and gardens, and 10 acres plantations, &c. The soil in the lower part is a very rich marl, and in the higher a light dry sandy soil, with a gravelly substratum, and producing excellent potatoes: the surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque. The village, which is scattered, is considerable, being nearly a mile and a half in length; it is of pleasant appearance, and contains some very neat modern houses. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Lord Scarsdale: Mr. Humpston, in 1840, left £1000 for the augmentation of the income of the minister, which is at present £106. 19. A parsonage-house was built in 1843, on a site of one acre given by the patron, who subscribed £300, the Messrs. Evans £300, and Miss Evans £50, towards its erection: a sum was also granted from Queen Anne's Bounty. The church is an ancient structure, with a campanile tower nearly covered with ivy, and a Norman arch at the entrance. Sir John Curzon, in 1725, bequeathed an annuity of £20 for the support of a free school. In the village is a chalybeate spring, which was much resorted to upwards of a century since, and is still visited in summer, the water being highly beneficial in cases of debility.

Quarnford

QUARNFORD, a chapelry, in the parish of Al stonfield, union of Leek, N. division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 8 miles (N. by E.) from Leek; containing 709 inhabitants. This chapelry, which comprises by measurement 2894 acres, is separated from Derbyshire by the rise of the river Dove, while the head of the river Dane divides it from Cheshire; the Manifold and some other rivers also have their source in the district. The principal village, called Flash, is situated near the road between Leek and Buxton, and the western sea may be seen from a hill here. Several coal-mines are at work; and a silk-mill, called the Gradbatch works, employs about sixty hands. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £85; patron, Sir John Crewe, Bart. The chapel at Flash, a plain structure, was built in 1744; and in 1833 a smaller chapel was erected at Gradbatch. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Quarrendon (St. Peter)

QUARRENDON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Aylesbury, hundred of Ashendon, county of Buckingham, 2¼ miles (N. N. W.) from the town of Aylesbury; containing 64 inhabitants. The living is annexed, with the livings of Buckland and Stoke-Mandeville, to the vicarage of Bierton. The church, which is fast hastening to decay, was founded by John Farnham about 1392, and rebuilt in the reign of Elizabeth by Sir Henry Lee, to some of the members of whose family it contains handsome monuments.

Quarrington

QUARRINGTON, a township, in the parish of Kelloe, S. division of Easington ward, union, and N. division of the county of Durham, 4½ miles (S. E.) from Durham; containing 732 inhabitants. In 1644 the Scottish army, under the Earl of Leven, encamped here for several days during the month of April, and in the spring of the year 1747 a detachment from the Duke of Cumberland's forces lay for some weeks on Quarrington Hill. The place was anciently the chief town of a district called Queringdonshire, and derives its name from some quarries in the township, which have been constantly wrought. It is divided from the manor of Tursdale by a small stream called Bow burn; and the Durham branch of the Clarence railway terminates near Crow Trees, in the township, after a course of more than ten miles from Stillington Moor House. In the neighbourhood are some collieries, the produce of which is shipped on the Tees and at Hartlepool. Of the tithe rent-charges, £21. 10. are payable to the vicar, £62. 2. to an impropriator, and £87. 15. to Christ's Hospital, Sherburn.

Quarrington (St. Botolph)

QUARRINGTON (St. Botolph), a parish, in the union of Sleaford, wapentake of Ashwardhurn, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 1½ mile (S. W. by S.) from Sleaford; containing 236 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 2. 3½.; net income, £287; patron, the Marquess of Bristol. The church is partly in the early and partly in the decorated English style, and contains a font of later date, curiously shaped.

Quatford (St. Mary Magdalene)

QUATFORD (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union and borough of Bridgnorth, locally in the hundred of Stottesden, S. division of Salop, 2 miles (S. E.) from Bridgnorth; containing, with Eardington township, 553 inhabitants, of whom 204 are in the township of Quatford. The parish comprises 1813 acres, of which 514 are in the township of Quatford. The soil is chiefly light and gravelly, and the scenery very beautiful, with much gently-undulating hill and dale. In Eardington are extensive iron-works for the second and third processes of refining; there is also a coalmine, recently opened, but the produce is not of the best quality. The village of Quatford is on the north-east bank of the Severn, which is here navigable for vessels of 40 tons; the road from Bridgnorth to Kidderminster passes through it. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £59, with a parsonage-house, built about 70 years ago; patron and impropriator, Lord Sudeley. The church was originally built by the wife of Roger, Earl of Arundel, Sussex, and Shrewsbury, first cousin of William the Conqueror; the nave was rebuilt about 120 years ago: the structure is of Norman architecture, and stands in one of the most lovely situations in this part of the kingdom; it is fitted with open seats, and is in very good order. There is a place of worship for Baptists; and a Church of England school, lately erected, is supported by subscription and the children's payments. On a high rock overhanging the Severn is a remarkable encampment, where, it is said, the Danes passed a winter when they were driven back by Alfred out of Gloucestershire: this is somewhat confirmed by the names of some of the neighbouring localities.

Quatt (St. Andrew)

QUATT (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union, and partly within the borough, of Bridgnorth, but chiefly in the hundred of Stottesden, S. division of Salop, 4½ miles (S. E.) from Bridgnorth; containing 365 inhabitants, of whom 141 are in the township of Quatt-Malvern, and 224 in that of Quatt-Jarvis. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 5.; net income, £430; patrons, the family of Whitmore. The church was rebuilt in 1763, when representations of the Seven Charities, the Day of Judgment, &c., were discovered painted on the walls.

Quedgley (St. James)

QUEDGLEY (St. James), a parish, partly in the Middle division of the hundred of Dudstone and King's-Barton, but chiefly in the Upper division of that of Whitstone, union, and E. division of the county, of Gloucester, 3½ miles (S. W.) from Gloucester; containing, with Woolstrop hamlet, 276 inhabitants, of whom 230 are in the township of Quedgley. The river Severn flows on the north, and the Gloucester and Berkeley canal intersects the parish. In 1838, an act was passed for inclosing ninety-three acres of waste land, of which two were appropriated for recreation. The living is a rectory, in the gift of Mrs. C. Hayward: the tithes have been commuted for £122.

Queenborough (Holy Trinity)

QUEENBOROUGH (Holy Trinity), a parish, having separate jurisdiction, and formerly a representative borough, in the union, and locally in the liberty of the Isle, of Sheppy, Upper division of the lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, 15 miles (N. E.) from Maidstone, and 45 (E. by S.) from London; containing 634 inhabitants, and comprising 400 acres. This place, then called Cyningburgh, was a residence of the Anglo-Saxon kings, whose castle, near the entrance of the West Swale, afterwards received the name of the Castle of Sheppy. In the reign of Edward III. the castle was entirely rebuilt, on a magnificent scale, from a plan by William of Wykeham, subsequently Bishop of Winchester. That monarch, on visiting the place for a few days, made it a free borough, and, in honour of his queen Philippa, conferred upon it its present name; in 1366 he incorporated the town by charter, and three years after gave it the staple of wool. The castle was repaired by Henry VIII., in 1536, at which time he erected several others for the defence of the coasts; but on a survey made by order of parliament, in 1650, being found unserviceable as a fortress in modern warfare, it was soon demolished. The only remains are the moat and a very deep well, which latter was cleared out by order of the commissioners of the navy, on account of the want of water at Sheerness. Here was anciently an hospital, dedicated to St. John.


Seal and Arms.

The town or village is situated near the West Swale, which is navigable. It consists principally of one wide street, and the houses in general are modern; the inhabitants are supplied with water from the castle well. The chief employment is fishing and oyster-dredging; there is also a copperas manufactory. Two weekly markets and two annual fairs were granted by Edward III., but at present only one fair is held, on August 5th. The charter now in force was bestowed by Charles I., and the corporation consists of a mayor, four jurats, and two bailiffs, with a recorder, chamberlain, town-clerk, and other officers; the freedom is obtained by the eldest son of a freeman, being a native, and by servitude under freemen residing within the borough. The town first sent representatives to parliament in the 13th of Elizabeth, from which period it continued to return two, till disfranchised by the act 2nd of William IV., cap. 45. The mayor and senior jurat are justices of the peace, with exclusive jurisdiction; and a court of session is held half-yearly before the recorder and magistrates. The guildhall is a neat edifice, near the centre of the town. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £66; patrons, the Corporation. The church has an ancient tower at the west end. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Queen-Charleton.—See Charleton.

QUEEN-CHARLETON.—See Charleton.

Queenhill

QUEENHILL, a chapelry, in the parish of Ripple, union of Upton-on-Severn, Lower division of the hundred of Pershore, Upton and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Upton; containing 26 inhabitants. It is situated on the right bank of the river Severn, which bounds it on the east; and consists of 689 acres of moderately good land.

Queeniborough (St. Mary)

QUEENIBOROUGH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Barrow-upon-Soar, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 1½ mile (S.) from Rearsby; containing 530 inhabitants. At the period of the civil war, in 1642, Prince Rupert had his army in this place; and an original letter still exists, dated from Queeniborough, to the mayor of Leicester, in which the prince requests the loan of £1000 for the service of the king. The parish comprises by measurement 2082 acres, and is partly bounded on the northwest by the river Wreke; the road from Leicester to Melton-Mowbray intersects the lordship about a mile below the village, and the Midland railway approaches within two miles. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £85; patron and impropriator, W. Blake, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in the year 1794; there are about 9 acres of glebe. The church, which is remarkable for its tapering crocketed spire, stands in a valley. There are places of worship for Baptists and Ranters. Some years since, a few Roman antiquities were dug up a quarter of a mile below the village.

Queenshead

QUEENSHEAD, an ecclesiastical parish, partly in the parish and union of Bradford, but chiefly in the parish and union of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (N. by E.) from Halifax, on the road to Bradford; containing upwards of 4000 inhabitants. This parish, which was constituted in June 1845, under the act 6th and 7th Victoria, cap. 37, extends about a mile in every direction from its church; and occupies a very lofty situation, being almost the highest ground in this part of Yorkshire. The surface consists of hill, dale, and plain, and is intersected by a deep valley called Shibdendale, which almost approaches the nature of a ravine, and is covered with wood: there is otherwise a great deficiency of wood, as well as of water, in the landscape. The climate is very cold, so much so, that no wheat is grown, and very little oats; grass and potatoes are the main produce. The population is employed chiefly in the manufacture of worsted, and in coal-mining: the mines mostly belong to Joseph Stocks, Esq., to whom the vale of Shibdendale also belongs; and to John Foster, Esq., who is the principal manufacturer. There are likewise quarries, the property of various individuals. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Crown and the Bishop of Ripon, alternately; net income, £150: the church, built at a cost of £2700, was opened for divine service in August 1845. Here are places of worship for Independents, General Baptists, Wesleyans, and the New Connexion of Methodists.

Quemerford

QUEMERFORD, a tything, in the parish, union, and hundred of Calne, Chippenham and Calne, and N. divisions of Wilts; containing 635 inhabitants.

Quenby

QUENBY, a hamlet, in the parish of Hungerton, union of Billesdon, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 7 miles (E. by N.) from Leicester; containing 19 inhabitants. The manorhouse is a curious specimen of domestic architecture.

Quendon

QUENDON, a parish, in the union of SaffronWalden, hundred of Uttlesford, N. division of Essex, 6 miles (N. N. E.) from Bishop-Stortford; containing 213 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road to Newmarket, and comprises 643 acres, of which 189 are pasture, and 106 wood; the surface is agreeably diversified, and the soil, though various, fertile. Quendon Hall, which has been rebuilt in a handsome style, is surrounded by a fine park. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9, and in the patronage of Mrs. Cranmer: the tithes have been commuted for £150, and there are 35 acres of glebe. The church is a small ancient edifice.

Quenington (St. Swithin)

QUENINGTON (St. Swithin), a parish, in the union of Cirencester, hundred of BrightwellsBarrow, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 2 miles (N.) from Fairford; containing 371 inhabitants. Here was a commandery of Knights Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem, founded before the reign of John, and the revenue of which was valued at £137. 7. 1.; the gateway still remains, but the edifice itself has been converted into a farmhouse. The parish contains an abundance of stone applicable to building purposes; and a paper-mill employs a large number of persons. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 18. 4.; net income, £192; patron, Sir Michael Hicks Beach, Bart.: there are 75 acres of glebe, with an excellent house. The original church is supposed to have been built soon after the Conquest; and two ancient doorways, of rich and curious Norman architecture, are still preserved: the interior is modern, and very neat. There is a place of worship for dissenters. Various Roman coins have been found on the line of a Roman road here.

Quernmoor

QUERNMOOR, a township, in the parish of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of Lancashire, 3¼ miles (S. E.) from Lancaster; containing 556 inhabitants. The ancient limits of the forest of Quernmoor comprised the whole of the township, and perhaps even extended into the township of Bulk. Parts of the forest were inclosed by Edmund, brother of Edward I.; and it now comprises 3000 acres of inclosed land, in addition to extensive wastes. The perambulation of the forest within the borough jurisdiction, by the corporation of Lancaster, was latterly repeated every seven years, and continued until 1809. In 1811 an act for the inclosure of the remainder of the forest was obtained, and from that time the perambulation has been confined to the limits of the borough proper. Gray's prospect of Lunedale, as described in his works, was taken at Queen's road; where is an ancient well, which tradition represents to have been visited by a queen of England. From a higher station is a view of an isthmus fringed by tall trees, the site of an ancient hermitage. The park of the Hon. Mr. Clifford, mentioned by the poet, and the old Hall, were purchased by Charles Gibson, Esq., from Lord Clifford; and the present mansion of Quernmoor Park was built by Mr. Gibson, about sixty years ago, of variegated freestone from the adjacent moor. The stone here is full of those hard flinty particles that constitute what is called "hunger-stone;" small millstones or querns were formerly made of it, and it is probable that Quernmoor derived its name from the aptitude of the stone for this purpose, an opinion strengthened by the discovery of several ancient millstones in the neighbourhood. A church was erected in 1833, and dedicated to St. Peter; it contains 300 sittings, half of which are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Vicar of Lancaster, with a net income of £100. There is a small national school. Many natural curiosities are met with here, including specimens of petrified moss, and remarkably fine septaria. Remains of a Roman pottery were found in the park some years ago, when a variety of bricks, tiles, and ancient vessels were taken from the ovens: a tile with elevated edges, and many of the bricks, bore the inscription ala sebusia, which designates a wing of Roman cavalry not before known. These antiquities are supposed to be of the time of the Emperor Severus.

Quethiock (St. Hugh)

QUETHIOCK (St. Hugh), a parish, in the union of St. Germans, Middle division of the hundred of East, E. division of Cornwall, 4 miles (E.) from Liskeard; containing 657 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 4220 acres, and is bounded by the river Lynher on the east, and by the Tidy or Tide on the west; the former is a considerable stream, and on each river are several very picturesque points. The soil towards the south is rich, gradually deteriorating as it approaches the northern boundary; it lies chiefly on a slate and a loamy formation, and in the valleys and near the rivers is alluvial. Some mines of manganese are occasionally worked; veins of copper have been found, and likewise indications of the existence of a sulphuret of lead and silver. There are also numerous quarries, producing a material applicable to building purposes and for pavements. A fair is held on the last Monday in January. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £15. 11. 0½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Exeter: the tithes have been commuted for £680, half payable to the vicar, and half to the incumbent of Haccombe, in Devon; there are 32 acres of vicarial glebe, and 8 belonging to the incumbent of Haccombe. The church was chiefly erected about the twelfth century, parts of it earlier; and contains some ancient bronze monumental tablets, one of which, finely engraved, bears the date 1371.

Quick, county of York.—See Saddleworth.

QUICK, county of York.—See Saddleworth.

Quiddenham (St. Andrew)

QUIDDENHAM (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Guilt-Cross, W. division of Norfolk, 2 miles (E. by N.) from East Harling; containing 83 inhabitants. The Keppel family have a seat here. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Snetterton united, valued in the king's books at £8. 4. 6½.; net income, £636; patron, the Earl of Albemarle. The tithes of Quiddenham have been commuted for £215, and there is a glebe of about 60 acres, with a house. The church is chiefly in the decorated style, with a tower at the west end.

Quidhampton

QUIDHAMPTON, a tything, in the parish of Fugglestone, union of Wilton, hundred of Branch and Dole, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of the county of Wilts; containing 333 inhabitants.

Quinton (All Saints)

QUINTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Shipston-upon-Stour, Upper division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Chipping-Campden; containing, with the hamlet of Admington, 666 inhabitants. The parish is distinguished as the scene of a great battle between the Saxons and the Danes; and on the summit of Meen Hill are the remains of a Saxon camp with double intrenchments, supposed to have been occupied by the West Saxons, at the period of their engagements with the Mercians at Barrington. In the 3rd of Henry II., Quinton was given to the nunnery of Polesworth; and in the 5th of Henry III., the hamlet of Admington belonged to Winchcomb Abbey. The parish comprises by measurement 1113 acres, of which about 753 are arable, and 360 pasture, wood, and water. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £18. 13. 4.; net income, £70; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Worcester, who, with Magdalen College, Oxford, are appropriators. Land and money payments were assigned in lieu of tithes in 1772; and lately some tithes of the Dean and Chapter have been commuted for a rentcharge of £63. The church is a spacious structure in the Norman style, with a fine tower, and is supposed to have been erected by the Lacys, soon after the Conquest.

Quinton (St. John the Baptist)

QUINTON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Hardingstone, hundred of Wymmersley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 4½ miles (S. S. E.) from Northampton; containing 143 inhabitants. The parish is situated near the borders of Buckinghamshire, and consists of 1149 acres, of which 500 are arable. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 3. 9., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £235. Land was assigned in lieu of tithes in 1814, under an inclosure act.

Quinton, The

QUINTON, THE, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Hales-Owen, Upper division of the hundred of Halfshire, Hales-Owen and E. divisions of Worcestershire, 2¼ miles (N. E.) from Hales-Owen, and 4¾ (W. by S.) from Birmingham. It is on the Kidderminster and Birmingham turnpike-road; the surface is elevated, the soil clay and gravel, and the scenery pleasing. Two small coal-mines are in operation, and many of the inhabitants are employed in making nails. The church, erected in 1840, at a cost of £2500, and dedicated to Christ, is in the early English style, with lancet windows, and a spire; it contains 605 sittings, of which 401 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Hales-Owen, who has endowed it with the vicarial tithes of the hamlets of Cakemore and Ridgacre, producing, with a sum from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, about £150 per annum: there is a glebe-house. The Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, and Baptists, have places of worship; and an infants' school on the national plan has been established.

Quoisley, with Marbury.—See Marbury.

QUOISLEY, with Marbury.—See Marbury.

Quorndon

QUORNDON, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Barrow-upon-Soar, hundred of West Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 1½ mile (N. W.) from Mountsorrel; containing 1811 persons. Stockingweaving, and the manufacture of warp and bobbin-twist lace, afford employment to a great portion of the inhabitants. The Loughborough canal passes through the northern part of the parish. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £122; patron, the Vicar of Barrow: the tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1762. The chapel is dedicated to St. Bartholomew. The Wesleyans, Baptists, and Primitive Methodists have each a place of worship. A fund of £92. 16. a year, arising from lands and houses, is appropriated to various useful and charitable purposes; and about £31 per annum, principally from Thomas Rawling's charity at Woodhouse, are distributed among the poor; to whom also George Hyde, in 1826, bequeathed £1000, the interest to be divided half yearly.

Quy, county of Cambridge.—See Stow.

QUY, county of Cambridge.—See Stow.



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