Stanbridge - Stanford-upon-Soar

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

180-183

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'Stanbridge - Stanford-upon-Soar', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 180-183. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51296 Date accessed: 24 July 2014.


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Stanbridge.—See Hinton Parva.

STANBRIDGE.—See Hinton Parva.

Stanbridge

STANBRIDGE. a tything, in the parish of RomseyExtra, poor-law union of Romsey, hundred of King'sSombourn, Romsey and S. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 124 inhabitants.

Stancill

STANCILL, with Wellingley and Wilsick, a township, in the parish of Tickhill, union of Doncaster, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 3 miles (N. N. E.) from Tickhill; containing 59 inhabitants. Stancill is called in Domesday book Stemesale, and appears to have been about that time a portion of the estate of Seward, one of the co-lords of Tickhill: Wilsick is styled in the same survey Wilseunice. The monks of Roche and of Nostell possessed some lands here; and among the families that have owned property in the township, occur those of Fitzpaine, Hoton, Copley, Higgins. Warton, and Jarrat. The township comprises by computation 1200 acres of land, under superior cultivation; the soil rests principally upon limestone.

Stand

STAND, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Prestwich, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire, 6 miles (N. by W.) from Manchester, on the road to Bury; containing about 6000 inhabitants. This district is co-extensive with the hamlet of Whitefield, in the township of Pilkington. An old Hall of the Pilkington family, generally known as Stand Hall, whence the place derived its name, existed so recently as 1845, when it was taken down: on the foundation stone was the date 1518. This structure was erected by the Earl of Derby, to whom the manor of Pilkington had been granted by Henry VII. after the battle of BosworthField; and the building is traditionally reported to have been five stories high, but reduced many years ago to its late elevation of three stories, the highest of the three being elaborately ornamented by the crests of the earls of Derby, the eagle and child, and the legs of Man. It probably owed its erection to the extensive views its site commanded, and the facilities it therefore afforded for observing the approach of an enemy, as well as the sports in the surrounding park.

In consequence of the great increase of population in the township of Pilkington, a grant was made by the Parliamentary Commissioners for a church at this place, the site for which was given by the Earl of Derby. The first stone was laid by the Earl of Wilton in August 1822, and the edifice was consecrated in September 1826. It is dedicated to All Saints, and is an elegant building, consisting of a nave and aisles, with spacious galleries round three of its sides: at the west end is a noble arcade with arched entrances, from which a lofty tower, enriched with turrets and pinnacles, rises to the height of 186 feet from the ground, forming a beautiful and conspicuous feature in the views of the country for many miles round. The eastern window is of rich stained glass by Evans, of Shrewsbury; and there are several mural marble monuments by Chantrey, Sievier, and others, to benefactors of the church. The cost of erection was £12,000. The living was in 1848 made a rectory, and endowed with £100 per annum from the tithes of the parish of Prestwich; total net income, £270, with a neat house; patron, the Earl of Wilton. The Independents, Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, Unitarians, and Swedenborgians have places of worship. A school, founded about 1688, has an endowment of £38 per annum, arising from lands in the vicinity left by Henry Siddal, and from bequests by other individuals. There are two other excellent schools, in connexion with the church.

Standbridge

STANDBRIDGE, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Leighton-Buzzard, hundred of Manshead, county of Bedford, 3¼ miles (E. by S.) from LeightonBuzzard; containing 519 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Vicar, with a net income of £100 per annum. The chapel is dedicated to St. John the Baptist.

Standerwick

STANDERWICK, a parish, in the union and hundred of Frome, E. division of Somerset, 4 miles (E. N. E.) from Frome; containing 89 inhabitants. Standerwick Court, the seat of Admiral Harry Edgell, is a handsome mansion, in the grounds of which are the remains of an ancient encampment, supposed to have been the connecting station between Bath and Alfred's tower at Stourton. The living is a rectory, annexed to that of Beckington, and valued in the king's books at £2. 9. 7.: the tithes have been commuted for £73. 3., and the glebe comprises 14 acres.

Standford (All Saints)

STANDFORD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Elham, hundred of Stouting, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 3½ miles (N. W.) from Hythe; containing 235 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1181 acres, of which 34 are common or waste land, and 30 in wood. The village is situated on the ancient Stanestreet. In the parish are the entrance gateway, tower, and gallery, with the garden-walls and moat, of the old mansion of Westenhanger, in which Fair Rosamond previously to her removal to Woodstock, Queen Elizabeth, and other sovereigns of England, are said to have resided. The South-Eastern railway passes on the south of the village. The living is annexed, with that of Paddlesworth, to the rectory of Lyminge: the tithes have been commuted for £170. 11., and the glebe comprises 9 acres.

Standground (St. John the Baptist)

STANDGROUND (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Peterborough, partly in the hundred of North Witchford, Isle of Ely, county of Cambridge, but chiefly in the hundred of NormanCross, county of Huntingdon, l½ mile (S. E. by S.) from Peterborough; containing, with the chapelry of Farcett, 1415 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the river Nene, and on the borders of the fens, comprises about 6000 acres, whereof 2371 are in Standground proper. The neighbouring country is flat and marshy towards the east, and slightly undulated in the other directions; the soil is clay, intermixed with veins of gravel, and there are pits both of the gravel and clay. The village is near the terminus of the Peterborough and Blisworth railway. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 6. 10½ net income, £1299; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Emmanuel College, Cambridge; impropriators, the landowners: 230 acres of land belong to the benefice, and there is a good parsonage-house. The great tithes were held by Thorney Abbey: at the dissolution of monasteries they came into the possession of Sir Walter Mildmay, the founder of Emmanuel College, by whom the vicarage was given to that establishment. The church is a large building in the decorated style, consisting of a nave, aisles, and a handsome chancel: at the west end is a lofty spire, and the edifice, being situated on rising ground, is seen at a great distance. Farcett contains a chapel of ease.

Standhill

STANDHILL, a hamlet, in the parish and hundred of Pirton, union of Henley, county of Oxford, 3 miles (W. S. W.) from Tetsworth. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £128. 13.

Standish (St. Nicholas)

STANDISH (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Wheaten hurst, Upper division of the hundred of Whitstone, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4 miles (N. W.) from Stroud; containing 540 inhabitants. The Cheltenham and Great Western Union railway passes through the parish. The living is a vicarage, with that of Hardwick consolidated, valued in the king's books at £44. 2. 8½.; net income, £527; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol. The church is principally in the decorated English style.

Standish (St. Wilfrid)

STANDISH (St.Wilfrid), a parish, in the unions of Wigan and Chorley, hundred of Leyland, N. division of Lancashire; containing 8686 inhabitants, of whom 2565 are in the township of Standish with Langtree, 3¼ miles (N. W. by N.) from Wigan. According to Whitaker, the historian of Manchester, Standish, anciently Stanedich, was one of the twelve considerable towns in the south of Lancashire in which the Saxons erected fortified castles for the residence of their chiefs, and the protection of the country. Of the castle of Standish, however, there are no remains, nor can its site even be ascertained. Jordan de Standish is named in connexion with the manor in the 16th of Edward I.; but whether his progenitors gave their name to the parish, or received it from the castle, is by no means evident: it is believed that the family have been settled here from the Conquest, or from a very short period after that event. The parish comprises the townships of Adlington, Anderton, Charnock-Richard, Coppull, Duxbury, Heath-Charnock, Shevington, Standish with Langtree, Welsh-Whittle, and Worthington. It measures from north to south eight miles, and from east to west six miles six furlongs, forming an area of 9432 acres: of these, 3040 acres are in Standish with Langtree. The greater portion of the land is in pasture, not more than a fourth part being in arable cultivation. Ordinary coal and cannel-coal mining employs a great number of hands; there are several stone-quarries; and cotton and silk weaving is extensively carried on. The Roman Watling-street passes through the parish; the Leeds and Liverpool canal winds along its south and east sides, and it is intersected by the North-Union and the Bolton and Preston railways.

The principal Halls in the parish, are those of Standish, Duxbury, Adlington, and Chisnal. Standish Hall is a large brick mansion of irregular form, long the seat of the Standish family, and now the residence of John Lord, Esq., mayor of Wigan in 1846; the moat encircling it was filled up in 1780, and much of the original building itself was then removed. The Lancashire Plot of 1694, which had for its object the dethronement of William III. and the re-establishment of the Stuarts and the Roman Catholic religion, is supposed to have been concocted in this house. The village is seated on high ground, and commands fine views: in its centre is an ancient relic, consisting of a single shaft springing from a tier of steps; and adjoining the village, in obscure lanes, are many other headless crosses. Fairs for horses, cattle, and toys, are held on June 29th and Nov. 22nd.

The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £45. 16. 8.; net income, £1874: patron, Charles Standish, Esq. The tithes of Standish with Langtree have been commuted for £384, and the glebe consists of 271 acres. The church was built in 1584, by Richard Moodie, the first Protestant rector, on the site of a much older edifice, of which the tower and spire remain attached to the present building. It is a large and elegant structure of the Tuscan order, and consists of a nave, chancel, and aisles: the nave is divided from the aisles by seven arches on each side, upheld by Tuscan columns; and there is an arch of noble span, and of fine proportions, between the nave and chancel. At Adlington and Coppull are other churches, and at Standish Hall is a Roman Catholic chapel. The free grammar school at Standish was founded in 1603, by Mary Langton, and is endowed with lauds, &c.: the master has £87 per annum, with a house and garden; and an usher receives £22 per annum. Mary Smalley, in 1794, bequeathed £1000 for a girls' school, of which the income is £50 per annum. In the parish are various other schools; and several bequests are appropriated to charitable purposes.

Standlake (St. Giles)

STANDLAKE (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Witney, hundred of Bampton, county of Oxford, 5½ miles (S. S. E.) from the town of Witney; containing, with the hamlet of Brittenton, 707 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2237a. 36p., of which 330 acres are meadow and pasture, and the remainder chiefly arable. Gaunt House, here, now occupied by a farmer, is said to have been originally built by John of Gaunt and Johan his wife, to whose memory there is a brass in the church 3 it was garrisoned for Charles I., in 1643 and 1644, by Dr. Fell, Dean of Christ-Church, to whom it then belonged. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 10. 10.; net income, £373; patrons, the President and Fellows of Magdalen College, Oxford. The church is a handsome cruciform structure in the early and decorated English styles, with a lofty octangular tower crowned by a pierced parapet, from within which rises a low spire; the arched timber-roof is supported by springers resting on corbels ornamented with heraldic devices. Some children are instructed for about £25 per annum, arising from gifts by William Plaisterer in 1711, and John Chambers in 1732.

Standlinch

STANDLINCH, a parish, in the union of Alderbury, hundred of Downton, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 4¾ miles (S. E. by S.) from Salisbury; containing 40 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the west and south-west by the river Avon, and comprises about 500 acres: the soil is a light sand, alternated with chalk; the surface is elevated, and the scenery pleasingly diversified. A chantry was founded here by Queen Elfrida, in expiation of the murder of Edward the Martyr; and on the site a small chapel was erected in 1147, which was rebuilt in 1677: the chapel is still in existence, but no living is attached to it, nor is it used for divine service, except occasionally by the family of the lord of the manor, Earl Nelson, of Trafalgar House. A rent-charge of £3. 6. 8. is payable to Winchester College in commutation of tithes.

Standon (St. Mary)

STANDON (St. Mary), a parish,and formerly a market-town, in the union of Ware, hundred of Braughin, county of Hertford, 8 miles (N. E.) from Hertford; containing with the hamlets of Colliers-End, High-Cross, and parts of Puckeridge and Wadesmill, 2299 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 7500 acres. The village is neatly built; the manufacture of paper affords employment to about 14 persons, and a few children. The market, granted by Charles II., has been for some time discontinued; a fair is held on the 25th of April, chiefly for pleasure. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 13.4., and in the gift of the Ward family: the great tithes have been commuted for £1310, and the vicarial for £520; the glebe comprises six acres. The church is a large ancient building, with a tower on the north side, and contains a handsome monument to Sir Ralph Sadlier, who was interred here. At High-Cross is a separate incumbency. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans; also a free school endowed by Thomas Fisher, in 1612, with £35 per annum, which subsequent benefactions have increased to £65. About five miles from Ware, on the Cambridge road, in the parish, is St. Edmund's College, established on the expulsion of the English Roman Catholics from Douay, at the commencement of the French revolution in 1789; it is for the education of the sons of the nobility and gentry of the Roman Catholic religion: the edifice was erected in 1795, and consists of a range of buildings four stories high, and 300 feet long. The ancient Ermin-street runs through the parish.

Standon (All Saints)

STANDON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Stone, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 4 miles (N. N. W.) from Eccleshall; containing 382 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the east by the river Sow, comprises 2548a. 34p.; the soil is partly a stiff clay, and partly a deep rich loam, alternated with light gravel. The village is situated on an eminence, and the surrounding scenery is finely varied. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 18. 4., and in the gift of the Salt family: the tithes have been commuted for £480, and the glebe comprises 90 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the Norman style.

Standon or Stondon Massey (St. Peter and St. Paul)

STANDON or STONDON MASSEY (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union and hundred of Ongar, S. division of Essex, 2 miles (E. S. E.) from Ongar; containing 291 inhabitants. It takes the adjunct to its name from an ancient proprietor of the manor. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; net income, £461; patron, John Hubbard, Esq. The church is a small edifice, with a belfry turret surmounted by a spire of wood.

Stane

STANE, a hamlet, in the parish of Withe rn, union of Louth, Marsh division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 6½ miles (N.) from Alford; comprising about 250 acres. It was formerly a parish. The living was a rectory, united to that of Mablethorpe St. Mary, and valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8.; the church was dedicated to All Saints.

Stanfield (St. Margaret)

STANFIELD (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Launditch, W. division of Norfolk, 6 miles (N. W. by N.) from East Dereham; containing 259 inhabitants. It comprises 903a. lr. 4p., of which about 761 acres are arable, and the remainder pasture and meadow. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 14. 2., and in the gift of the Rev. James Royle: the tithes have been commuted for £258, and the glebe comprises 20 acres. The church is chiefly in the early and later English styles, with a square tower.

Stanford

STANFORD, a hamlet, in the parish of Southill, union of Biggleswade, hundred of Wixamtree, county of Bedford, 3¼ miles (S. W. by S.) from Biggleswade; containing 435 inhabitants.

Stanford (All Saints)

STANFORD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Swaffham, hundred of Grimshoe, W. division of Norfolk, 8 miles (N. E.) from Brandon; containing 184 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 2565 acres, of which 1200 are arable, 630 meadow, pasture, and sheep-walks, 60 in wood, chiefly plantation, 44 furze, and 580 rabbit-warren. The surface is varied, and the low lands are watered by the river Wissey. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 13. 1½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Ely: the great tithes have been commuted for £77, and the vicarial for £75. 13. The church, built of brick, and now much decayed, has a tower of flint at the west end, circular at the base, and octangular above; the chancel and north aisle are dilapidated.

Stanford (St. Nicholas)

STANFORD (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Rugby, hundred of Guilsborough, S. division of the county of Northampton, 3½ miles (S. W.) from Welford, and 5 (S. E.) from Lutterworth; containing 32 inhabitants. Shortly after the Conquest, Guy de Reinbudcurt, one of the Norman companions of William, sold the lordship to Benedict, abbot of the Benedictine monastery of Selby, in Yorkshire. In 1471 John Cave died vicar of Stanford, having, probably, been presented to the living by his brother, then abbot of Selby. After the Dissolution, the manor and advowson were granted by Henry VIII., for the sum of £1194. 3. 4., to Thomas Cave, Esq. The old manor-house of Stanford Hall was situated on the left bank of the Avon in this county; about 1680 it was pulled down by Sir Roger Cave, and a new building was commenced on the right bank, in the county of Leicester, which was completed in 1737. The river Avon bounds Stanford on the north-west, and the Grand Union canal passes through it. The parish comprises 2056a. 2r. 33p. of land, chiefly pasture of the best kind, and rendered more fertile by draining; only small portions are in tillage, and the soil in those parts is strong and clayey. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 10. 5.; net income, £85: the patronage and impropriation belong to Baroness Braye, of the family of Cave. The glebe-house is small but convenient, and has been much improved by -the present incumbent. The church is an interesting specimen of the decorated English style, and retains more indications of the architectural good taste which distinguished the 14th century than have usually escaped the innovations of later times. The organ belonged to the banqueting-hall at Whitehall, whence it was removed and sold by order of Cromwell; it was subsequently purchased from Magdalen College, Oxford, by the proprietor of Stanford. In the church is a series of monuments of the Caves, knights and baronets, commencing in 1558, and all in excellent preservation. William Laud, afterwards the celebrated archbishop, was inducted to the vicarage of this parish, in 1607.

Stanford (St. Mary)

STANFORD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union ot Martley, Upper division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Hundred-House and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 12 miles (N. W.) from Worcester; containing 164 inhabitants. It is bounded on the east by the small river Teme, and comprises 1278a. 2r. 19p. of land, mostly pasture, with picturesque scenery, embellished with large oak timber. The substratum contains limestone, which is quarried for building and for the roads, and also burnt into lime. The Hall, built at Various times, contains a curious room with portraits of the time of Queen Elizabeth painted on the panels; in the park is a fine sheet of water, and the largest cedar-tree in the kingdom. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 4. 2., and in the patronage of Sir T. E. Winnington, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £230, and the glebe comprises 68½ acres, with a parsonage, a fine stone structure, in a commanding situation and enjoying delightful prospects. The church, an elegant edifice in the pointed style, with a handsome tower, stands on an elevated site within the park, and forms an interesting feature in the landscape; it was erected about 70 years ago, is of stone, and contains some fine monuments, one of them to the Rt. Hon. Thomas Winnington. Here is a rock of singular formation, apparently a petrifaction, from which issues a spring of remarkably pure water.

Stanford, Bishops (St. James)

STANFORD, BISHOPS (St. James), a parish, in the union of Bromyard, hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 3½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Bromyard; containing 233 inhabitants. It comprises 1480 acres, of which 230 are common or waste land. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Bromyard, with a net income of £58; appropriator, the first Portionist of Bromyard. The great tithes have been commuted for £105, and those of the vicar of Bromyard for £100. There are 7 acres of glebe.

Stanford-Dingley (St. Denis)

STANFORD-DINGLEY (St. Denis), a parish, in the union of Bradfield, hundred of Faircross, county of Berks, 10 miles (W.) from Reading; containing 151 inhabitants. It comprises 941a. 2r. 36p., of which 654 acres are arable, 85 meadow and pasture, and 129 woodland. The soil is clay, alternated with chalk and gravel; the surface is hilly, and the lower grounds are watered by the small river Fawley. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 1. 8., and in the patronage of Miss A. Baldock: the tithes have been commuted for £270. 6., and the glebe comprises 18 acres. The church is principally in the Norman style.

Stanford-In-The-Vale (St. Denis)

STANFORD-IN-THE-VALE (St. Denis), a parish, in the union of Farringdon, partly in the hundred of Ock, but chiefly in that of Ganfield, county of Berks, 4 miles (E. S. E.) from Farringdon; containing, with the chapelry of Goosey, 1149 inhabitants, of whom 970 are in Stanford township. The parish comprises 2821a. 2r. 1p. The village is neatly built, and had formerly a market on Thursday and a fair on the festival of St. Denis, granted in 1230, by Henry III., to Ferrers, Earl of Derby. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £21. 1. 10½ net income, £337; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. There is a chapel of ease at Goosey. A quarry of stone in the parish is remarkable for its variety of fossil remains.

Standford-Le-Hope (St. Margaret)

STANFORD-LE-HOPE (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Orsett, hundred of Barstable, S. division of Essex, 1½ mile (S. E. by S.) from Horndonon-the-Hill; containing 336 inhabitants. It takes its name from a stone ford across the stream separating it from Mucking and Horndon-on-the-Hill, and has the adjunct to its name from a bay formed by the river Thames, called The Hope; the ancient ford has been superseded by abridge, kept in repair at the joint expense of the three parishes. The parish comprises 2418 acres, of which 159 are common or waste land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 19. 9½.; net income, £591; patron, the Rev. J. C. Knott. The church, situated on the village green, is an ancient edifice, with a tower on the south side. Mrs. Elizabeth Davison bequeathed £950 three per cents, and £300 South Sea annuities, for instruction.

Stanford-Rivers (St. Mary)

STANFORD-RIVERS (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Ongar, S. division of Essex, 2 miles (S. W. by W.) from Ongar; containing 972 inhabitants. It derives its name from an ancient stone ford across the river Roden, and the adjunct to its name from the family of Rivers, to whom the manor at one time belonged. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26. 13. 4., and in the patronage of the Duchy of Lancaster: the tithes have been commuted for £1020, and the glebe comprises 54 acres. The church is an ancient edifice, with a tower surmounted by a shingled spire. There is a place of worship for Independents; and the workhouse of the Ongar union is situated here. Dr. John Crayford, Master of University College, Oxford; Dr. Thomas Cole, Dean of Salisbury; Dr. Richard Montague, Bishop of Norwich; Dr. Roger Manwaring, Bishop of St. David's; and the learned Drs. Richard Mulcaster and Nathaniel Lancaster, were rectors of the parish.

Stanford-Upon-Soar (St. John the Baptist)

STANFORD-UPON-SOAR, (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Loughborough, S. division of the wapentake of Rushcliffe and of the county of Nottingham, 1 mile (N. by E.) from Loughborough; containing 146 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the river Soar, at the southern extremity of the county, comprises by measurement 1500 acres. The soil is sandy, and the surface undulated; the scenery is enriched with wood, and the views from Stanford Hall are extensive and finely varied, overlooking the vale of Loughborough, and embracing the Charnwood Forest hills. The Soar navigation passes within half a mile of the parish, and the Midland railway runs through it. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 7. 6., and in the gift of the Rev. S. V. Dashwood: the tithes have been commuted for £420, and the glebe comprises 14 acres. The church is a spacious and venerable structure in the early English style, with a square embattled tower, and occupies a beautifully secluded spot embosomed in foliage. Roman coins have been discovered.