Stanney, Great - Stanwix

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

186-192

Citation Show another format:

'Stanney, Great - Stanwix', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 186-192. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51298 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Stanney, Great

STANNEY, GREAT, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Great Boughton, Higher division of the hundred of Wirrall, S. division of the county of Chester, 6¾ miles (N.) from Chester; containing 53 inhabitants. This liberty, which belonged to the adjacent abbey of Stanlow, comprises 947 acres of excellent arable and meadow land, in which is found marl of very good quality, composed of alluvial matter: large trees have been dug up in the meadows. The ancient mansion here of the family of Bunbury, called Rake Hall, has been repaired by its present owner, Sir Henry Bunbury, Bart.; several farm-buildings have been erected, and the roads much improved. The Chester canal passes through the liberty.

Stanney, Little

STANNEY, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Stoke, union of Great Boughton, Higher division of the hundred of Wirrall, S. division of the county of Chester, 5½ miles (N.) from Chester; containing 163 inhabitants. It comprises 790 acres, of a clay soil, the property of Sir Henry Bunbury. A free school was founded by Sir Thomas Bunbury, with £5 per annum.

Stanningfield (St. Nicholas)

STANNINGFIELD (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Thingoe, hundred of Thedwastry, W. division of Suffolk, 5¼ miles (S. by E.) from Bury; containing 327 inhabitants. It comprises 1344 acres, of which 37 are woodland. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 0. 2½., and in the gift of J. Gage Rokewoode, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £345, and the glebe comprises 44 acres. The body of the church is of Norman architecture. Mrs. Inchbald, the ingenious novelist and dramatic writer, who died in 1821, was a native of this place.

Stanninghall

STANNINGHALL, a hamlet, in the parish of Horstead, but formerly a parish, in the union of St. Faith, hundred of Taverham, E. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (N.) from Norwich; containing 53 inhabitants. It comprises 314a. 2p. of land, chiefly arable, forming part of the Hall farm, and paying church-rates to Horstead. The living was a discharged rectory, now annexed to that of Frettenham, and valued in the king's books at £1. 13. 6½. The church has been long in ruins.

Stanningley

STANNINGLEY, a hamlet, partly in the township of Bramley, parish of Leeds, and partly in the townships of Calverley cum Farsley, parish of Calverley, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 5½ miles (W. by N.) from Leeds. This place, which is supposed to have taken its name from its situation in a district abounding in stone, contains about 4000 inhabitants, and consists chiefly of one long street, built on an eminence overlooking Airedale, and near the source of a tributary to the river Aire. The houses in the village, and the fences in the adjoining lands, are of stone from the neighbouring quarries. The inhabitants are employed in the worsted and woollen manufactures, in raising and working stone, and in iron-works. A church, dedicated to St. Thomas, and containing 600 sittings, was built in 1840–41, in that part of the hamlet which is in the township of Bramley, on a site given from the glebe land by the Rev. Thomas Furbank, M.A., incumbent of Bramley. It is a handsome structure in the Norman style, erected by subscription at an expense of £1700, and consecrated on the 29th of March, 1841, by the Bishop of Ripon. Of £300, a grant from the Diocesan Society, £200 are appropriated to the endowment. The living is in the gift of the Vicar of Leeds.

Stannington (St. Mary)

STANNINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and W. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland, 5 miles (S. by E.) from Morpeth; containing 1121 inhabitants, and comprising the seven townships of Blagdon, Bellasis, Clifton with Coldwell, Duddo, Plessey with Shotton, Saltwick, and Stannington. The parish formed part of the extensive barony of Merlay, and among the proprietors have been the noble families of Greystock and Dacre. It is situated on the river Blyth, over which is a modern stone bridge: the soil is stiff, but generally fertile, and well fenced and tilled; the substratum abounds with coal, and with freestone. The vale of Stannington is beautifully picturesque; the village occupies a bold and tolerably dry situation, on the road from Newcastle to Morpeth. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 13. 4.; patron, the Bishop of Durham; impropriator, Sir M. W. Ridley, Bart. The great tithes have been commuted for £852; and the vicarial for £342, with a glebe of 21 acres. The church had formerly a chantry; one of the windows exhibits some fine specimens of stained glass, inserted in 1772, by the late Sir M. W. Ridley. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a school has an endowment of £11 per annum.

Stannington, York.—See Stainington.

STANNINGTON, York.—See Stainington.

Stansfield (All Saints)

STANSFIELD (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Risbridge, W. division of Suffolk, 5¼ miles (N. by E.) from Clare; containing 510 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 9. 4½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £481, and the glebe comprises 68 acres. There is a small place of worship for dissenters, of ancient date. Dr. Samuel Ogden, a learned divine, who died in the year 1778, was rector of the parish.

Stansfield

STANSFIELD, a township, in the chapelry of Heptonstall, parish of Halifax, and union of Todmorden, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (S. W.) from Hebden-Bridge; containing 8466 inhabitants. The township is bounded on the north and north-west by the county of Lancaster, on the east by the Colden brook, and on the south by the river Calder; and comprises by computation 5920 acres of land, chiefly the property of the Earl of Scarborough, who is lord of the manor. Nearly 2000 acres of moor and common were inclosed in 1816, but they have not yet been wholly brought into cultivation. The surface is boldly varied, rising in some parts into hills of considerable elevation, on the summits of several of which are Druidical remains; in the township is also a large cluster of rocks, called the Bride Stones. There is no village properly so called, but numerous detached houses and scattered hamlets extend to the town of Todmorden, of which a considerable portion is within the township. The inhabitants are partly engaged in agriculture; the soil is fertile when under proper management, and the waste lands are rapidly coming into a state of profitable cultivation. Ashlar stone, of good quality for building, is extensively quarried. The cotton, woollen, worsted, and silk manufactures are carried on in several mills and factories, and many persons are employed in the handloom weaving of cotton and worsted goods. The Rochdale canal joins the township; and the Manchester and Leeds railway passes through it, for three miles, to Eastwood, where is a station with a large tavern. The vicarial tithes were commuted in 1815 for land. There are places of worship for General and Particular Baptists, Independents, and Wesleyans. The ancient manorhouse of the Eastwoods, rebuilt in 1600, is now occupied by a farmer; and the site of another old manor-house is pointed out near Castle Hill, an eminence which was formerly crowned with a castle.

Stanstead (St. Mary)

STAN STEAD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Malling, hundred of Wrotham, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 2 miles (N.) from Wrotham; containing 427 inhabitants. It comprises 1956 acres, of which 342 are in wood. The living is a rectory, in the gift of the Archbishop of Canterbury; income, £400 per annum.

Stanstead (St. James)

STANSTEAD (St. James), a parish, in the union of Sudbury, hundred of Babergh, W. division of Suffolk, 10 miles (S.) from Bury St. Edmund's; containing 387 inhabitants. The parish is situated near the border of the county of Essex, upon a tributary of the river Stour, and to the west of the road between Bury St. Edmund's and Sudbury. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the gift of the Rev. S. Sheen: the tithes have been commuted for £270, and the glebe comprises 24 acres.

Stanstead, Abbots' (St. James)

STANSTEAD, ABBOTS' (St. James), a parish, in the union of Ware, hundred of Braughin, county of Hertford, 2¾ miles (N. E. by E.) from Hoddesdon; containing 1017 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the west by the navigable river Lea, on the north by the Ashe, and on the east and south-east by the navigable Stort; thus being nearly insulated. The Rye House here, noted for the plot laid in 1683 against the lives of Charles II., and James, Duke of York, was built in the reign of Henry VI., by Andrew Ogard; the only remains of the structure are an embattled gate-house of brick with a handsome stone doorway, long since converted into a workhouse. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10; patron, W. K. Thomas, Esq.; impropriator, D. Hankin, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £301. 10.; and the vicarial for £92, with a glebe of 39 acres. The church, situated on an eminence one mile south-east from the village, was built in 1578, by Ralph Baesh. Almshouses for six widows were founded in 1636, by Sir Edward Baesh, who endowed them with lands and a rent-charge of £25, and also established a free grammar school with £20 per annum.

Stanstead St. Margaret's

STANSTEAD ST. MARGARET'S, a parish, in the union of Ware, hundred and county of Hertford, 1½ mile (N. by E.) from Hoddesdon; containing 92 inhabitants. The parish is situated between the New River and the Lea. A college, or chantry, for a master and four secular priests, was founded at Stanstead in 1315, by Sir William de Goldington, Knt., in consequence of the impoverishment of the tithes and rights of the church; but it was dissolved in 1431, from neglect, and misapplication of its revenue. Here is a station of the Hertford branch of the railway from London to Cambridge. The living is a donative curacy; net income, £6; patron, Mrs. C. Pratt. The tithes have been commuted for £87. 3. 8.

Stansted-Mountfitchet (St. Mary)

STANSTED-MOUNTFITCHET (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bishop-Stortford, partly in the hundred of Clavering, but chiefly in that of Uttlesford, N. division of Essex; containing, with the hamlet of Bentfield, 1637 inhabitants, of whom 1141 are in Stansted township. The parish takes its name from a branch of the Roman road between Bishop-Stortford and Colchester, which passes through it, and the adjunct to its name from its possessor at the time of the Conquest, Robert Gernon, surnamed Montfitchet, who erected a castle here, of which there are still some remains. It is about twelve miles in circumference, comprehending a great variety of surface, and is generally well cultivated. The village, which contains many wellbuilt houses, is chiefly on the road to Newmarket, and partly on that to Takely; a fair is held in it on the 12th of May. The Stansted station of the railway from London to Cambridge is three miles distant from the Bishop-Stortford station. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8., and in the patronage of E. F. Maitland, Esq.: the great tithes have been commuted for £315. 15., and those of the vicar for £305. 14.; there are 2 acres of glebe. The church, a small ancient edifice with a tower of brick, has a very ancient font rudely sculptured, several monuments and brasses, and some other interesting features. Here is a place of worship for Independents. About two miles from the church was the priory of Thremhall, founded by Richard de Montfitchet, and dedicated to St. James.

Stanthorne

STANTHORNE, a township, in the parish of Davenham, union and hundred of Northwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 1¼ mile (W. N. W.) from Middlewich; containing 169 inhabitants. It comprises 1050 acres, the soil of which is partly clay and partly sand.

Stanton

STANTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Youlgrave, union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak.N. division of the county of Derby, 3¾ miles (N.) from Winster; containing 691 inhabitants. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1809.

Stanton, with Newhall

STANTON, with Newhall, a township, in the parish of Stapenhill, union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Burton; containing 1531 inhabitants. The township comprises 1613 acres, the hamlet of Stanton forming its western side; Newhall hamlet lies to the east, and has a large village. Here is an extensive bed of coal of superior quality, 24 feet in thickness; and a superior clay is found in the coal-mines, from which straw-coloured earthenware is manufactured. A church, erected at the sole expense of the Rev. John Clay, vicar of Stapenhill, was opened for divine service in July 1833; the cost of erection, including a parsonage and schools, was £7000. The living is endowed with £2000, and is in the gift of the founder. The Methodists have a place of worship.

Stanton (St. Bartholomew)

STANTON (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Winchcomb, Lower division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Winchcomb; containing 319 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Snowshill annexed, valued in the king's books at £17. 11. 5½.; net income, £377; patron and incumbent, the Rev. W. H. Bloxsome.

Stanton

STANTON, a township, in the parish of Long Horsley, union, and W. division of the ward, of Morpeth, N. division of Northumberland, 6 miles (N. W. by W.) from Morpeth; containing 128 inhabitants. This place, from the discovery of numerous foundations of buildings in the immediate vicinity, appears to have been formerly of greater extent and importance. Among the earlier proprietors were the Merlays, Corbets, Mitfords, and Fenwicks. The ancient manor-house, the seat of the last-named family, has been converted into a house for the reception of the poor; and a chapel which stood a little to the north of it, has altogether disappeared. The township comprises about 1875 acres of land, divided into several farms; the surrounding scenery is pleasingly varied, and from an eminence on the north bank of the Font is a beautiful prospect over the valley of Witton-by-the-Waters, and the woods of Langshaws and Nunriding. The substratum contains coal and limestone; a colliery is in operation, and there are several quarries of limestone, and kilns for burning it into lime.

Stanton

STANTON, a township, in the parish of Ellastone, S. division of the hundred of Totmonslow, N. division of the county of Stafford, 3½ miles (W.) from Ashbourn; containing 393 inhabitants. The township comprises 2308a. 2r. 24p. of land, principally the property of the Earl of Shrewsbury and Lord Scarsdale. Extensive freestone-quarries are in operation. The village is seated on a pleasant acclivity above the vale of the Titbrook. A church was consecrated in Sept. 1847; it was built by subscription, and accommodates 181 persons. Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, was born here in 1598.

Stanton (All Saints)

STANTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Thingoe, hundred of Blackbourn, W. division of Suffolk, 2½ miles (N. E.) from Ixworth; containing, with Stanton St. John, 1029 inhabitants, and an area of 3254a. 1r. 12p. It is on the road from London to Norwich. A fair for cattle takes place on the 31st of May and the day following; and petty-sessions are held on the several Mondays of the month, except the first, when they are held at Ixworth. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of St. John united, valued in the king's books at £9. 6., and in the patronage of R. E. Lofft, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £975, and the glebe comprises 36 acres, with a residence. The church is chiefly in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Edward Capell, editor of Shakspeare's works, was interred here.

Stanton (St. John)

STANTON (St. John), a parish, in the union of Thingoe, hundred of Blackbourn, W. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (N. E.) from Ixworth. The living is a discharged rectory, united to that of Stanton All Saints, and valued in the king's books at £9. 4. 10. The church is a neat edifice.

Stanton St. Bernard (All Saints)

STANTON ST. BERNARD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Devizes, hundred of Swanborough, Devizes and N. divisions of Wilts, 5¾ miles (E. by N.) from Devizes; containing 362 inhabitants. The Kennet and Avon canal passes through the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7; patron, the Earl of Pembroke. The great tithes have been commuted for £400, and the small for £170; the impropriate glebe consists of 13 acres, and the vicarial of 39 acres. The church was lately rebuilt at an expense of £500 by subscription.

Stanton-Bury (St. Peter)

STANTON-BURY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Newport-Pagnell, hundred of Newport, county of Buckingham, 3 miles (W. by S.) from Newport-Pagnell; containing 42 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 6. 8.; net income, £54; patron and impropriator, Earl Spencer. The church exhibits many Norman remains, including a richly-decorated arch between the nave and the chancel.

Stanton-By-Bridge (St. Michael)

STANTON-BY-BRIDGE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Shardlow, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 6¾ miles (S. by E.) from Derby; containing 205 inhabitants. The distinguishing appellation of this place arises from an ancient bridge over the Trent, termed Swarkstone bridge, which connects two parishes. The parish comprises 1278 acres of rich strong land: excellent building-stone is wrought, of which the greater part of the stone-work on the Derby canal was constructed. The village is small but pleasant, and overlooks the vale of the Trent and the country around. Sir Robert Burdett and Sir John Harpur Crewe, Barts., are owners of the soil and joint lords of the manor. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 12. 8½.; net income, £345; patron, Sir John Harpur Crewe. The church is partly Norman, and partly in the decorated English style; it was rebuilt in 1683, by Augustine Jackson, then rector, and consists of a nave, chancel, north aisle, and turret with two bells: there are some ancient monuments. The late Sir George Crewe gave land near the church for a school, and, with the rector, defrayed the expense of the building.

Stanton-By-Dale (St. Michael)

STANTON-BY-DALE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Shardlow, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 2½ miles (N.) from Ilkeston; containing 480 inhabitants. It is intersected by the Erewash and Nutbrook canal, and comprises 1400 acres, of which the larger portion is pasture and meadow, a few acres wood, and the remainder arable: the soil is of a light sandy quality. Coal is wrought, but in small quantity; ironstone is also worked: bricks are made, and there is a good buildingstone quarry. Lace-making and frame-work knitting also employ some hands. The village is pleasantly situated on an eminence, and commands very extensive prospects; in its centre is an ancient cross bearing the date 1632. The living is a vicarage endowed with the rectorial tithes, with the chapel of Dale-Abbey; patrons, Trustees appointed by the proprietors of the lordship. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £300. The church is a plain neat edifice, with a tower. Almshouses for eight persons were founded in 1711, by Joseph Middlemore, with an endowment of more than £100 per annum.

Stanton-Drew (St. Mary)

STANTON-DREW (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Clutton, hundred of Keynsham, E. division of Somerset, 1½ mile (W. by S.) from Pensford; containing 704 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the living of Pensford St. Thomas annexed, valued in the king's books at £7. 2. 8½.; patron, the Archdeacon of Bath. The great tithes have been commuted for £234. 18., and the vicarial for £237; the impropriate glebe comprises 48 acres, and the vicarial one acre. Richard Jones, Esq., in 1668 bequeathed to his executors a large sum of money for charitable uses (with which they purchased an estate), one-fifth for the instruction of poor children of this parish and that of Stowey, and another fifth for apprenticing boys of this parish only: the portion allotted to Stanton-Drew is £72 per annum. Near the church is an extensive Druidical temple of three circles of stones, of which the diameters are respectively 120, 43, and 32 yards, spreading itself over ten acres of ground. In the parish is also the hamlet of Belton, supposed to be a corruption of Belgeton, or the town of the Belgæ, being situated on the line of the Wansdyke, the ancient boundary of their territory.

Stanton, Fen, Hunts.—See Fen-Stanton.

STANTON, FEN, Hunts.—See Fen-Stanton.

Stanton-Fitzwarren (St. Leonard)

STANTON-FITZWARREN (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Highworth and Swindon, hundred of Highworth, Cricklade, and Staple, Cricklade and N. divisions of Wilts, 2¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Highworth; containing 170 inhabitants. It comprises 1340a. 11p. The substratum contains stone which is quarried for building, and for mending the roads. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 2. 6.; net income, £174; patron, the Rev. Dr. Trenchard. The tithes have been commuted for land, under an act of inclosure; the glebe comprises 58 acres. The church is in the Norman style, with a tower, on which is the date 1003.

Stanton St. Gabriel

STANTON ST. GABRIEL, a parish, in the hundred of Whitchurch-Canonicorum, union of Bridport, Bridport division of Dorset, 4 miles (W. by S.) from Bridport; containing 106 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south by the English Channel; and on the shore, upon one of the highest hills in the county, a signal staff has been erected. The living is annexed, with the livings of Chideock and Marshwood, to the vicarage of Whitchurch-Canonicorum. The church, of which the first stone was laid in July 1840, was completed at the expense of the Hon. and Rev. W. T. Law, prebendary and chancellor of Wells, being the third church built at the cost of that gentleman.

Stanton-Harcourt (St. Michael)

STANTON-HARCOURT (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Witney, hundred of Wootton, county of Oxford, 4½ miles (W.) from Oxford; containing, with the hamlet of Sutton, 665 inhabitants. This place was granted by Adeliza, second queen of Henry I., to her kinswoman, Milicent, wife of Richard de Camville, whose daughter Isabel married Robert de Harcourt, from whom it derived the adjunct to its name, and in whose descendants the manor has remained for more than 600 years. It is situated near the confluence of the small river Windrush with the Thames, and abounds in interesting scenery. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £16. 13. 4.; net income, £136; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Oxford. The tithes were commuted for land in 1773. The church is a cruciform structure, chiefly in the decorated English style, with a lofty square embattled tower, and some Norman portions. The principal entrance is through a large Norman door-case, contiguous to which is a smaller for women only; the windows in the lower part of the tower are Norman, and those in the upper stages of more recent date. The nave is Norman, and is lighted by a range of clerestory windows in that style. On the north side of the chancel are a rich altar-tomb, and a recessed monument to Maud, daughter of John, Lord Grey, of Rotherfield, with her recumbent effigy in the costume of the time of Richard II.; on the south side is the sepulchral chapel of the Harcourt family: the late venerable Archbishop of York was buried here in November, 1847. There is a chapel of ease at South Leigh, in the parish; and a school is supported by benefactions amounting to £14 per annum. A small portion of the ancient mansion of the Harcourts is still remaining, in the occupation of a farmer: the chapel, with a chamber over it, and the adjoining tower, are in a very good state of preservation. The tower contains three apartments, one above another, of which the uppermost is called Pope's study, from the poet having passed much of his time in it while employed in his translation of Homer, during the progress of which he spent two summers at Stanton-Harcourt. He was occasionally visited here by Gay, who was then at Cokethorpe, a neighbouring seat of Lord Harcourt's. The kitchen, which bears marks of remote antiquity, was repaired about the reign of Henry IV., and has a great resemblance to the abbot's kitchen at Glastonbury. Some remains in the parish, called the Devil's Quoits, probably commemorate a victory obtained by the Saxon king Cynegils, and his son Cwichelm, over the Britons.

Stanton St. John (St. John the Baptist)

STANTON ST. JOHN (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Headington, hundred of Bullingdon, county of Oxford, 4½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Oxford; containing 510 inhabitants. This place takes the adjunct to its name from the family of St. John, who held the manor in the reign of Edward III. A hill in the neighbourhood, called Irondon Hill, is supposed to have obtained that appellation from Ireton, who lived there after his marriage with the daughter of Cromwell. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 9. 4½.; income, £287; patrons, the Warden and Scholars of New College, Oxford. The church is in the early English style, with a handsome embattled tower; part of the north aisle is inclosed by a richlydecorated screen, and used as a vestry. Lady Elizabeth Holford, in 1717, gave £500 in support of a school. About a mile north-east of the church is the hamlet of Woodpury, in which are some interesting remains of the ancient village and church of that name. Roman tiles and pottery, with two coins, have been dug up.

Stanton, Lacy (St. Peter)

STANTON, LACY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Ludlow, hundred of Munslow, S. division of Salop, 3 miles (N. N. W.) from Ludlow; containing 1540 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 7000 acres, two-thirds of which are arable, and the remainder pasture; the surface is undulated, the soil various, and the scenery picturesque. Good building-stone is quarried; and at Hayton, in the parish, copper-ore of fine quality is found, but only in small quantities. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £16; net income, £485; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Craven: the glebe-house was built in 1820. The church, a cruciform structure, was restored and repewed in 1845; it has a fine Saxon arch on the north side, and a piscina. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists; and a national school supported by subscription. The interest of £100 was left by Mr. Nash for the poor. In the hamlet of Hope is a petrifying spring.

Stanton, Long (All Saints)

STANTON, LONG (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Northstow, county of Cambridge, 6¼ miles (N. W.by N.) from Cambridge; containing 409 inhabitants, and comprising 1900 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 13. 4½.; net income, £155; patron, the Bishop of Ely; impropriators, the Hutton family. The tithes were commuted for land in 1811; the glebe comprises 45 acres, with a house. The church is an ancient structure. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. £27 per annum, arising from bequests, are appropriated to the poor. The bishops of Ely formerly had a palace here, at which Queen Elizabeth was entertained on the day after her visit to the university of Cambridge, in August 1564.

Stanton, Long (St. Michael)

STANTON, LONG (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Northstow, county of Cambridge, 5½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Cambridge; containing 139 inhabitants, and comprising about 838 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 12. 8½.; net income, £237; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Magdalen College, Cambridge. The church is a small thatched building.

Stanton, Long (St. Michael)

STANTON, LONG (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Bridgnorth, hundred of Munslow, S. division of Salop, 7¾ miles (S. W. by S.) from Wenlock; containing 327 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 2211 acres: the river Corve separates it from Shipton. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7; net income, £134; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Hereford. The church is an ancient cruciform structure.

Stanton-On-The-Wolds (All Saints)

STANTON-ON-THE-WOLDS (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Bingham, N. division of the wapentake of Rushcliffe, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 7½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Nottingham; containing 154 inhabitants. It comprises 1300 acres, and is bounded on the east by the old Fosse-road: the village is irregularly built, consisting chiefly of scattered dwellings. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 13. 4.; net income, £109; patron, Sir Robert H. Bromley, Bart.: the glebe comprises 125 acres. The church is very ancient.

Stanton-Prior (St. Lawrence)

STANTON-PRIOR (St. Lawrence),a parish, in the union and hundred of Keynsham, E. division of Somerset, 5 miles (W. S. W.) from Bath; containing 148 inhabitants. The parish comprises 841 acres, of which 83 are common or waste. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10.1.10½., and in the gift of the Langton family: the tithes have been commuted for £187, and the glebe comprises 20 acres. On a long isolated eminence called Stanton Bury, are the remains of an ancient intrenchment, inclosing more than thirty acres; it has been thought a work of the Romans, some of their coins having been found near it; but, being situated on the Wansdyke, it had probably a more remote origin, and was only subsequently occupied by them.

Stanton St. Quintin (St. Giles)

STANTON ST. QUINTIN (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Chippenham, hundred of Malmesbury, Chippenham and Calne, and N. divisions of Wilts, 4¼ miles (N. by W.) from Chippenham; containing 302 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1600 acres; the soil is various, and the substratum furnishes limestone, and stone which is used for tiling. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 5. 7½.; net income, £312; patron, the Earl of Radnor. The tithes were commuted for land and an annual money payment in 1782. The church is an ancient Norman structure, and contains some fine details of that style. Here are the remains of a monastic building, now a farmhouse; the old hall has an ascent from the outside.

Stanton-Stoney (St. Michael)

STANTON-STONEY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Hinckley, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4¼ miles (E. by N.) from Hinckley; containing 663 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1470 acres: there are some quarries of stone, used chiefly for mending the roads. The village is situated near the road from Leicester to Hinckley, and the inhabitants are partly employed in weaving stockings at their own dwellings. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 13. l½.; net income, £348; patron, Richard Boyer, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land in 1764; the glebe altogether comprises 210 acres.

Stanton-Under-Bardon

STANTON-UNDER-BARDON, a chapelry, in the parish of Thornton, union of Market-Bosworth, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 9 miles (W. N. W.) from Leicester; containing, with Horsepool, 315 inhabitants. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1779. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. £40 per annum, bequeathed by Luke Jackson and St. John Cole, are distributed among the poor.

Stanton-Upon-Arrow (St. Peter)

STANTON-UPON-ARROW (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Kington, partly in the hundred of Stretford, but chiefly in that of Wigmore, county of Hereford, 5½ miles (E. N. E.) from Kington; containing 376 inhabitants, and comprising an area of 2925 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 7. 10., and in the patronage of the Crown; appropriator, the Bishop of Hereford. The appropriate tithes have been commuted for £120, the impropriate for £52, and the vicarial for £225; the glebe comprises 35 acres.

Stanton-Upon-Hine-Heath (St. Andrew)

STANTON-UPON-HINE-HEATH (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Wem, Whitchurch division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop; containing 669 inhabitants, of whom 264 are in the township, 5½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Wem. The parish is situated on the river Roden, and comprises 5539a. lr. 6p.; the substratum is chiefly sandstone of inferior quality, which is quarried for building purposes. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 10. 10., and in the patronage of Lord Hill, who is also impropriator: the vicarial tithes have been commuted for £175, and the impropriate for £95. 15.; there are 62 acres of glebe. The church is an ancient structure in the later English style.

Stanton-Wyville.—See Stonton-Wyville.

STANTON-WYVILLE.—See Stonton-Wyville.

Stanway (All Saints)

STANWAY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Lexden and Winstree, Colchester division of the hundred of Lexden, N. division of Essex, 4 miles (W. by S.) from Colchester; containing 807 inhabitants. This parish, which is about nine miles in circumference, and situated in a highly cultivated district, appears, from the remains of a second church, to have been formerly divided into the two parishes of Magna and Parva. A fair is held on the 23rd of April. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 17. 6., and in the gift of Magdalen College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £776, and the glebe comprises 79 acres. The church, which stands near the London road, is a small ancient edifice with a wooden turret. A second incumbency in the parish, a perpetual curacy, is in the gift of the Bishop of Rochester. Here is the workhouse for the union of Lexden and Winstree, built in 1837, at a cost of £6500: the union comprises 35 parishes or places, and contains a population of 20,881. A number of large bones and other remains, probably of elephants brought over by Claudius in the year 43, were found in 1764, lying in a stratum of sea sand and shells.

Stanway (St. Peter)

STANWAY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Winchcomb, Upper division of the hundred of Tewkesbury, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 3½ miles (N. E.) from Winchcomb; containing, with the hamlet of Taddington, 384 inhabitants. It comprises about 3023 acres: the soil is in some parts light, and in others a deep clay; the surface is generally hilly, and the substratum limestone. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9, and has a net income of £220; the patronage and impropriation belong to Lady Elcho. The tithes were commuted for land in 1810; the glebe comprises 163 acres.

Stanway, with Adforton.—See Adforton.

STANWAY, with Adforton.—See Adforton.

Stanwell (St. Mary)

STANWELL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Staines, hundred of Spelthorne, county of Middlesex, 2¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Staines; containing, with part of Colnbrook chapelry, 1495 inhabitants. The parish comprises by estimation 3963 acres, of which 2466 are arable, 1148 meadow and pasture, and 31 woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9, and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriator, Sir John Gibbon, Bart., and others. The great tithes have been commuted for £552, and the small for £280: the vicar has 7 acres of glebe. The church is principally in the later English style. There is a place of worship for Independents; also a school for boys, endowed in 1624 by Thomas, Lord Knevitt.

Stanwick (St. Lawrence)

STANWICK (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Thrapston, hundred of Htcham-Ferrers, N. division of the county of Northampton, 2¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Higham-Ferrers; containing 577 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Nene, and comprises 1953a. 13p., of which 1405 acres are arable, 526 pasture, and 21 woodland. The soil is partly clay, alternated with sand and lime, and the surface generally level. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 9. 4½., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £373. The church, originally of Norman architecture, exhibits portions in the early, decorated, and later English styles, and has an octangular tower, strengthened with buttresses of elegant design, and surmounted by an enriched spire. There is a place of worship for Wesleyau Methodists. Richard Cumberland, the dramatist, was born here in 1732.

Stanwick St. John (St. John the Baptist)

STANWICK ST. JOHN (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Richmond, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, 8½ miles (W. by S.) from Darlington; containing, with the townships of Aldborough, Caldwell, and East Layton, 907 inhabitants, of whom 37 are in the township of Stanwick. This parish, which extends nearly to the river Tees, comprises by computation 5800 acres of arable, meadow, and pasture land, interspersed with tracts of woodland and plantations. The surface is beautifully diversified, the soil generally fertile, and game of every kind is found in abundance. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4.; net income, £58. 16.; patron, John Wharton, Esq. The church is a very ancient structure, covered with ivy, and contains some interesting monuments, among which are finely-executed marble statues of Sir Hugh and Lady Smithson, and, near the pulpit, a beautiful monument erected in 1838 to the memory of three daughters of the second Duke of Northumberland. A chapel was lately built at Caldwell, by the Countess of Bridgewater, by whom it was endowed. In the parish is an intrenchment inclosing an area of nearly 1000 acres, ascribed to the ancient Britons, to the Romans, and to the Scots; nothing of its history is distinctly known.

Stanwix (St. Michael)

STANWIX (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Carlisle, partly in Cumberland ward, but chiefly in Eskdale ward, E. division of Cumberland; containing, with the townships of Cargo, Etterby, Houghton, Linstock, Rickerby, Stainton, and Tarraby, 2088 inhabitants, of whom 789 are in Stanwix township, ½ a mile (N.) from Carlisle. The parish is bounded on the south by the river Eden, which is crossed by a handsome stone bridge, leading into the city of Carlisle: the village is beautifully situated. A soft freestone abounds in the neighbourhood. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9; net income, £264; patron, the Bishop of Carlisle, who, with the Dean and Chapter, is appropriator. The old church, lately rebuilt, was erected upon the site, and out of the ruins, of the Congavata of the Romans, of which station Severus' Wall formed the northern rampart, and near which many altars and inscriptions have been found. A district church was erected at Houghton in 1841.