Streatham - Stretton-upon-Dunsmore

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

246-250

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'Streatham - Stretton-upon-Dunsmore', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 246-250. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51314 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


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Streatham (St. Leonard)

STREATHAM (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Wandsworth, E. division of the hundred of Brixton and of the county of Surrey, 6 miles (S. by W.) from London; containing 5994 inhabitants. This parish, which derives its name from its situation near the great Roman road from London to Arundel, extends along the principal road to Brighton for nearly three miles, and comprises 2832 acres, of which 221 are common or waste. The houses, mostly modern, are well built, and the parish contains a number of villas and stately mansions, particularly in the neighbourhood of the common, between which and the lower part of the village was an ancient mansion of red brick, the residence, about half a century ago, of Lord William Russell. Streatham Park, where Dr. Johnson spent much of his time, was the seat of Mrs. Thrale, afterwards Madame Piozzi. The neighbourhood is richly wooded, and diversified with hills and valleys; and the air, which is considered particularly salubrious and invigorating, combined with other local advantages, has rendered the village the favourite residence of many opulent families. A mineral spring was discovered in 1660, which is still held in esteem, being highly efficacious in scorbutic eruptions, and in many other cases. The manufacture of silk has been introduced.

The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 13. 9., and in the gift of the Duke of Bedford: the tithes have been commuted for £1200, and the glebe contains 1½ acre. The ancient church, with the exception of the tower, which is of flint and surmounted by a spire, forming a picturesque object in the landscape, was taken down in 1830, and handsomely rebuilt upon an enlarged scale in the later English style. On the upper part of Brixton Hill, about 100 yards to the east of the high road, is a church dedicated to Christ, which was consecrated Nov. 19th, 1841, and is in the Eastern or Byzantine style, with a campanile tower; the cost, amounting to £8000, was raised by subscription, aided by a grant of £1300 from the Church Commissioners. The living is in the Rector's gift. In Upper Tooting is another incumbency. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans; and four almshouses for aged women have been lately erected in the Elizabethan style, by a bequest from the late Mrs. Henry Thrale, of Streatham Park. Dr. Hoadley, Bishop of Bangor, was rector of the parish.

Streatlam cum Stainton

STREATLAM cum Stainton, a township, in the parish of Gainford, union of Teesdale, S. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 3 miles (N. E. by E.) from Barnard-Castle; containing 373 inhabitants, of whom 261 are in the hamlet of Streatlam. The township is on the road from Staindrop to Barnard-Castle, and comprises by estimation 2907a. 29p., of which 1321 acres are arable, 1343 meadow and pasture, 230 wood and plantations, and 11 in roads. Its surface is undulated and hilly, and the scenery embraces extensive views of the surrounding country, including Raby Castle, and in the distance the Cleveland hills. The soil, which has been efficiently drained, is rather heavy. Here are large quarries, from which stone has been raised for the principal buildings in this part of the county; also a bed of clay from which good draining-tiles are manufactured. Streatlam Castle, a stately structure, erected by Sir William Bowes, Bart., in the seventeenth century, on the site of a former castle, is the seat of John Bowes, Esq., and stands in a deep vale, embosomed in a fine park, with high and irregular hills on every side, in some parts covered with forests. There was anciently a chapel, but no traces of it now remain.—See Stainton.

Streatley (St. Margaret)

STREATLEY (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Luton, hundred of Flitt, county of Bedford, 5 miles (N. by W.) from Luton; containing, with the hamlet of Sharpenhoe, 345 inhabitants, of whom 173 are in Streatley township. In Edward I.'s time the manor was vested in the Gobions, from whom it passed to the Botellers, and subsequently to the family of Nodes, from which it came by inheritance to the Goldsmiths. The parish is on the road from London to Bedford, and comprises by computation 2200 acres, of which 250 are pasture, 50 woodland, and the rest arable; the substratum is principally chalk. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 15. 2.; net income, £79; patron, Sir G. P. Turner, Bart.; impropriators, Messrs. Smyth and others. The church is in the decorated English style, and contains 200 sittings, of which 150 are free. The Rev. James Hadow, who was vicar for sixty years, from 1781 to 1841, died on his birthday, 30th January 1847, aged 90 years, and was buried under a beech-tree in the churchyard, of his own planting: a black-marble monument has been erected on the spot. Richard Norton, in 1686, gave a rentcharge of £10 in support of a school.

Streatley (St. Mary)

STREATLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bradfield, hundred of Moreton, county of Berks, 5½ miles (S. by W.) from Wallingford; containing 597 inhabitants, and comprising an area of 3294a. 1r. 21p. This place is supposed to have taken its name from its situation on the ancient Ikeneld-street, which here crosses the Thames to Goring, in Oxfordshire. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 7. 6., and in the gift of the Bishop of Salisbury: the great tithes, belonging to P. Pusey, Esq., have been commuted for £82. 10., and the vicarial tithes for £5; the glebe of the vicar consists of 290 acres. Here was a Dominican convent.

Street (Holy Trinity)

STREET (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Wells, hundred of Whitley, W. division of Somerset, 1½ mile (S. S. W.) from Glastonbury; containing 1219 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Bath to Exeter, and comprises 2768 acres, whereof 223 are common or waste land. Blue lias limestone is found, which supplies an excellent material for paving and building. There is a manufactory for rugs; and a small fair is held on the Monday-week after St. Andrew's day. The living is a rectory, with that of Walton annexed, valued in the king's books at £24. 12. 3½., and in the gift of the Marquess of Bath: the tithes of the parish have been commuted for £489, and the glebe contains about 16 acres. Here are places of worship for Baptists, Wesleyans, and the Society of Friends.

Street

STREET, a tything, in the parish, union, and hundred of Christchurch, Ringwood and S. divisions of the county of Southampton; with 308 inhabitants.

Street

STREET, a parish, in the union of Chailey, hundred of Street, rape of Lewes, E. division of Sussex, 6¾ miles (N. W.) from Lewes; containing 197 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Lewes to Ditchelling, and comprises 1234a. 2r. 4p., consisting of arable and pasture land in nearly equal portions, with a little wood. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 19. 7., and in the gift of H. C. Lane, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £198, and the glebe comprises 31 acres. The church is an ancient structure of flint, containing several monuments to the Dobell family and others.

Street, Long

STREET, LONG, a tything, in the parish of Enford, union of Pewsey, hundred of Elstub and Everley, Everley and Pewsey, and S. divisions of the county of Wilts; containing 81 inhabitants.

Streethall

STREETHALL, a parish, in the union of SaffronWalden, hundred of Uttlesford, N. division of Essex, 3½ miles (W. N. W.) from Saffron-Walden; containing 37 inhabitants. It is situated on elevated ground commanding a richly-diversified prospect over the surrounding country, and comprises by computation 520 acres, chiefly arable land. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £13; net income, £155; patron and incumbent, the Rev. W. Forbes Raymond: the glebe comprises about 65 acres. The church is a substantial edifice of stone, and contains several ancient monuments.

Streethay

STREETHAY, a township, in the parish of St. Michael, Lichfield, union of Lichfield, N. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 2¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Lichfield; containing 125 inhabitants.

Strelley (All Saints)

STRELLEY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Basford, S. division of the wapentake of Broxtow, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 4½ miles (W. N. W.) from Nottingham; containing 284 inhabitants. The Hall is a neat modern mansion, surrounded by well laidout pleasure-grounds, and commands fine views of the romantic scenery in the vicinity. About one mile to the north-west is Strelley Park colliery. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 4. 8.; net income, £90; patron, T. Webb Edge, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land in 1808. The church is a handsome cruciform structure, with a lofty tower: the nave is separated from the chancel by a richly-carved oak screen; there are several tombs of the Strelley family, and the windows exhibit some ancient stained glass in good preservation.

Strellington

STRELLINGTON, a tything, in the parish of Boxgrove, union of West Hampnett, hundred of Box and Stockbridge, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex; containing 23 inhabitants.

Strensall (St. Mary)

STRENSALL (St. Mary), a parish, in the wapentake of Bulmer, union and N. riding of York, 6 miles (N. N. E.) from York; containing 430 inhabitants. It comprises by computation about 2700 acres, of which 1400 are common or open moor on the east of Galtres forest; the greater portion of the cultivated land is arable. The York and Scarborough railway has a station here. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of Haxby annexed, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 4.; and the net income, as recently augmented by a grant from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, is £260: the patronage, until lately, was vested in the Prebendary of Strensall, but the funds of the prebend have been surrendered to the commissioners, and the Archbishop of York now holds the presentation. A school has an endowment of 20 acres of land, with a schoolroom and small orchard. The poor's estate consists of eight tenements and about 70 acres, producing £46 per annum, and of the interest of £72, left by Mrs. Elizabeth Cobb in 1809, but which has been transferred, under the poor law, to the parish funds.

Strensham (St. John the Baptist)

STRENSHAM (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union, and Upper division of the hundred, of Pershore, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 4½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Pershore; containing 304 inhabitants. This place, which is pleasantly situated on the river Avon, between the hills of Malvern and Bredon, is renowned in history for the siege it sustained against the parliamentary forces, and for the signal bravery displayed here by the then lord of the manor, Sir William Russel. The parish comprises 1878 acres of rich land: the soil consists of light earth, loam, and marl, with various modifications; blue lias and gravel abound in every part, and in some places fossils and minerals are met with. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12; net income, £200; patron, John Taylor, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land in 1814. The church is a noble structure, containing many memorials of the Russel family, among which are some fine specimens of Italian sculpture, in Parian and other marbles. In the parish are nine almshouses, endowed by Lady Ann Russel, and her father Sir Francis Russel; the income is about £43. Samuel Butler, author of Hudibras, was born here in 1612.

Stretford (St. Peter)

STRETFORD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Weobley, hundred of Stretford, county of Hereford, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Leominster; containing 35 inhabitants. The parish comprises 424a. 3r. 18p.: the road from Leominster to Weobley runs through it from east to west, and that from Wigmore to Hereford from north to south. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6.19. 8., and in the gift of T. Dunne, and E. Evans, Esqrs.: the tithes have been commuted for £94. 14., and the glebe comprises 15 acres.

Stretford

STRETFORD, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Leominster, hundred of Wolphy, county of Hereford, 2½ miles (E. by S.) from Leominster; containing, with Hennor, 88 inhabitants.

Stretford

STRETFORD, a parochial chapelry, in the parish of Manchester, union of Chorlton, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire, 4 miles (S. W.) from Manchester; containing 3524 inhabitants. The chapelry comprises 3121 acres, of which 85 are common or waste land. It is separated by the river Mersey from Cheshire, and lies on the road from Manchester to Northwich. Here is a large paper-mill; and the place has been for many years a celebrated mart for pigs: from 600 to 700 pigs were sent weekly to the Manchester market; but since the opening of the Manchester and Liverpool railway, this trade has been gradually removing to Manchester, so that now not more than two or three hundred pigs are slaughtered here per week. The Duke of Bridgewater's canal, and the railway from Manchester to Altrincham, pass through the chapelry. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Manchester, whose tithes here have been commuted for £430: the glebe comprises 18 acres. The chapel, supposed to have been erected by the Trafford family in the reign of Elizabeth, was taken down and rebuilt in 1718, was enlarged in 1821, and again in 1824. In 1842 it was once more taken down, being deemed unsafe, and being much too small for the accommodation of the people; and the present chapel was built on a new site, about thirty yards from the former one. It is dedicated to St. Matthew, is in the early English style, with a handsome tower, and contains 917 sittings, of which 351 are free: the cost was estimated at £3250. The edifice was erected chiefly through the exertions of the Rev. J. Clarke, the present curate and locum tenens; as were also the national schools for boys, girls, and infants, which are an additional ornament to the place, and cost about £1150. The inhabitants have testified their gratitude to the curate by presenting him an elegant teaservice, and a purse, the value together being 120 guineas. Ten children are entirely clothed during three years; and the schools may be considered as endowed with £45 per annum by a bequest from Mrs. Hind. The Manchester Botanic Gardens, and the Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb and for the Blind, are in the township.

Stretham (St. James)

STRETHAM (St. James), a parish, in the hundred of South Witchford, union and Isle of Ely, county of Cambridge, 4¼ miles (S. W. by S.) from Ely; containing, with the chapelry of Thetford, 1357 inhabitants. A third of the village of Stretham was destroyed bv fire in May 1844, The living is a rectory, in the patronage of the Bishop of Ely, valued in the king's books at £22; net income, £756. At Thetford is a chapel of ease. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans; and two free schools.

Stretton

STRETTON, a township, in the parish of Tilston, union of Great Boughton, Higher division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 4½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Malpas; containing 84 inhabitants. It comprises 900 acres, of which the prevailing soil is clay. The tithes have been commuted for an annual rent-charge of £97. 4.

Stretton

STRETTON, a township, in the parish of Great Budworth, union of Runcorn, hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 3½ miles (S. by E.) from Warrington; containing 362 inhabitants. The township comprises 1029 acres, the soil of which is partly clay and partly sand, with some moss. A church in the early English style, with a tower, was erected in 1827: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £63; patron, the Rev. Richard Greenall. A neat parsonagehouse was erected some years since; and commodious schools with a house for the master have been recently built.

Stretton

STRETTON, a township, in the parish of North Wingfield, union of Chesterfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 4½ miles (N. by W.) from Alfreton; containing 482 inhabitants. The Stretton station of the Midland railway is 6½ miles from the Chesterfield station, and 9½ from that of Belper.

Stretton (St. Nicholas)

STRETTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Oakham, hundred of Alstoe, county of Rutland, 8¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Oakham; containing 220 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 1., and in the gift of Sir G. Heathcote, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £299. 10.; the glebe comprises 3 acres.

Stretton

STRETTON, a parochial chapelry, in the union of Brewood, W. division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, S. division of the county of Stafford, 3 miles (S. W.) from Penkridge; containing 272 inhabitants. This place is thought to occupy the site of the Pennicrocium of the Romans, with the situation of which, as laid down by Antoninus in his Itinerary, it perfectly agrees: the supposition is further strengthened by the discovery of several coins, and other relics of antiquity. The chapelry comprises 1500 acres by admeasurement, in nearly equal portions of arable and pasture, chiefly the property of George Monckton, Esq.. of Stretton Hall. The road from Shrewsbury to Coventry passes along its south side; and the river Penk, the Liverpool and Birmingham railway, and the Stafford and Worcester canal, at a short distance on the east. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £96; patron and impropriator, Lord Hatherton. The chapel is dedicated to St. John, and is a small edifice mostly built of brick.

Stretton

STRETTON, a township, in the parish and union of Burton-upon-Trent, N. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 2½ miles (N.) from Burton; containing 410 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north by the river Dove, and on the east by the Trent. An aqueduct of 23 arches conveys the Trent and Mersey canal across the valley. The Clay-Mill ironworks here have been established more than a century A chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, was erected and endowed in 1829, through the exertions of the Rev. Peter French, incumbent of Trinity church, Burton.

Stretton-Baskerville (All Saints)

STRETTON-BASKERVILLE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Hinckley, Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 3 miles (E. by S.) from Nuneaton; containing 75 inhabitants. The parish borders on Leicestershire, from which it is separated by the Watling-street; it consists of 1012 acres, and is intersected by the Ashby canal. The living is a sinecure rectory, valued in the king's books at £6, and in the patronage of Miss Pinchin and Mrs. Wilcox: the church is in ruins.

Stretton, Church (St. Lawrence)

STRETTON, CHURCH (St. Lawrence), a markettown and parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Munslow, S. division of Salop, 13 miles (S. by W.) from Shrewsbury, and 153 (N. W.) from London; containing, with the townships of Minton, All Stretton, and Little Stretton, 1604 inhabitants, of whom 860 are in the township of Church-Stretton. This township, which by its adjunct is distinguished from the other townships as the seat of the parochial church, derived its name Stretton, or Street-town, from its situation within a quarter of a mile of the ancient Watling-street, which passes in a direction parallel with the road from Shrewsbury to Ludlow. The town is romantically seated in a rich and fertile vale, inclosed on one side by a bold range of mountains, among which is Caer Caradoc, the lofty and precipitous retreat of Caractacus; and on the other by the extensive chain of hills called the Longmynd, flat on the summit, but deeply indented on the south-eastern acclivity with numerous valleys, from which many mountain streams descend with impetuosity. It consists of one street, in the wider part of which is the market-house; the houses are in general of brick, and of neat and modern appearance, occasionally interspersed with handsome dwellings and small cottages: the inhabitants are amply supplied with water. The secluded and romantic situation of the place, its proximity to spots of deep interest, its fine mountain scenery, and various other attractions, render it a favourite resort for parties from the neighbouring towns.

But little trade is carried on: a manufactory for flannel was established in 1816, which is now flourishing. Large flocks of sheep are pastured on the neighbouring hills. The market is on Thursday, and chiefly for provisions: the fairs are on March 10th, for cattle, horses, and sheep; May 14th, a statute-fair; July 3rd, a great wool-fair instituted in 1819; September 25th, a very large sheep-fair; and the last Thursday in November, for cattle, sheep, and horses. The county magistrates hold petty-sessions on the third Thursday in every month; and two constables for each township are annually appointed at the court leet held in the old manorhouse, now an inn. The town is the place of election for the southern division of the county. The old dilapidated market-hall, erected in 1617, has been replaced by a handsome edifice of brick and stone, supported on columns and arches. The parish comprises 10,246 acres, whereof about 5000 are common or waste.

The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 10., and in the gift of the Rev. R. Norgrave Pemberton: the tithes have been commuted for £500, and the glebe comprises 68 acres. The church is an ancient and venerable cruciform structure, principally in the early English style, with a square embattled tower rising from the centre, strengthened by buttresses and crowned with pinnacles: in the buttress at the south angle is a figure of St. Lawrence, and in other parts of the tower are groups of figures well sculptured. The entrance to the church on the north is Norman, and the interior contains several portions in the same character, with insertions in the decorated English style. The chancel is beautifully ornamented with carved oak in antique devices, put up by the present patron, who has bestowed much care and expense on the embellishment of the church. The windows are principally in the decorated style, with flowing tracery, and are embellished with stained glass. The rectory-house, a handsome mansion, is beautifully situated at the foot of the Longmynd; the grounds have been laid out by Mr. Pemberton with a due regard to the characteristic features of the surrounding scenery. The free school was endowed by successive benefactors, and has also an endowment of twenty-seven acres of land under a late inclosure act; the building was erected in 1779, upon the site of an old school. The poor-law union of Church-Stretton comprises fourteen parishes or places, and contains a population of 6069.

On Caer Caradoc are the remains of a large encampment, defended on the steepest acclivities with one, on the more accessible ascents with two, and in some places with three intrenchments, hewn out of the solid rock. This was probably an exploratory station of Caractacus, from whom the hill received its name. On the Longmynd, which commands a panoramic view of wide extent, are many low tumuli, and cairns of stones; one of its eminences, called Bodbury, has a large intrenchment of earth. This mountain was the scene of many battles between the Romans and the Britons, and afterwards between the Welsh and the English. On an eminence at Minton is a very lofty tumulus, supposed to be one of those mounts upon which, in the earlier times of the Britons, justice was administered to the people. About a mile south-west of Church-Stretton was Brockard's Castle, of which the site, the intrenchments, the moat, and foundations, with the approaches from the Watling-street, may still be traced. Among the eminent natives of the town have been William Thynne, receiver of the Marches; Sir John Thynne, Knt., who founded Longleat House in the county of Wilts; and Dr. Roger Mainwaring, chaplain to Charles I., and Bishop of St. David's.

Stretton-En-Le-Fields (St. Michael)

STRETTON-EN-LE-FIELDS (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, though locally in the W. division of the hundred of Goscote, county of Leicester, 5 miles (S. W.) from Ashby; containing, with part of Oakthorpe hamlet, 354 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Atherstone to Burton-upon-Trent, and contains about 1000 acres of very rich land, mostly arable; and a neat and pleasant village. Sir John Robert Cave-BrowneCave, Bart., is lord of the manor. The Hall, a handsome mansion, occupies a picturesque and romantic situation, with fine views of the country around. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 10. 5.; patron, Sir J. R. Cave. The tithes have been commuted for £235; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains about 50 acres. The church has a spire, and stands on elevated ground.

Stretton-Grandisome (St. Lawrence)

STRETTON-GRANDISOME (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Ledbury, hundred of Radlow, county of Hereford, 7 miles (N. W.) from Ledbury; containing 139 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 1100 acres. The river Frome bounds it on the south; the road from Leominster to Ledbury passes through it from north to south, and the line of the Ledbury and Hereford canal crosses its south-west corner. The living is a vicarage endowed with the rectorial tithes, with the living of Ashperton annexed, and valued in the king's books at £9. 4. 2.; net income, £479; patron, the Rev. J. Hopton. The tithes of the parish were commuted for land in 1812; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe altogether contains about 160 acres.

Stretton Magna

STRETTON MAGNA, a chapelry, in the parish of Glen Magna, union of Billesdon, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 5½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Leicester; containing 38 inhabitants. Stretton Hall, the property of Sir George Robinson, Bart., is a fine seat, embellished with plantations of oak. The chapel is dedicated to St. John the Baptist, and contains monuments to the Hewitt family. The Roman Via Devana passes through the parish.

Stretton-On-The-Foss (St. Peter)

STRETTON-ON-THE-FOSS (St. Peter), a parish in the union of Shipston-upon-Stour, Brailes division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 3 miles (W. S. W.) from Shipston; containing 434 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1100 acres. It is surrounded on all sides, except the north, by portions of the counties of Gloucester and Worcester; and is intersected by the roads from Shipston to Chipping-Campden and to Moreton. The surface is hilly, and the soil chiefly a stiff clay. The living is a rectory, with that of Ditchford annexed in 1642, valued together in the king's books at £17, and in the patronage of Mrs. Jervoise: the tithes have been commuted for £184. The church was rebuilt in 1841, when 144 sittings were gained, of which 136 are free. In the neighbourhood is a spring, the water of which is slightly impregnated with salt. Ditchford is divided into three farms; there are no remains of its ancient church.

Stretton Parva

STRETTON PARVA, a chapelry, in the parish of King's-Norton, union of Billesdon, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 6 miles (E. S. E.) from Leicester; containing 108 inhabitants. It is situated on a tributary of the river Soar, to the north-east of the Harborough and Leicester road.

Stretton-Sugwas (St. Mary Magdalene)

STRETTON-SUGWAS (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the hundred of Grimsworth, union and county of Hereford, 3 miles (N. W. by W.) from Hereford; containing 190 inhabitants. It comprises 797 acres by admeasurement, and is situated on a small tributary of the river Wye. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 7. 1., and in the gift of Guy's Hospital, London: the tithes have been commuted for £200, and the glebe contains about 40 acres. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Stretton-Under-Foss

STRETTON-UNDER-FOSS, a hamlet, in the parish of Monks-Kirby, union of Lutterworth, Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 6¼ miles (N. W. by N.) from Rugby; containing, with Newbold-Revel, 336 inhabitants and an area of 1138 acres. The village is intersected by the road between Coventry and Lutterworth: and the Oxford canal is crossed by the old Fosse-road on the west of it: the rateable annual value of canal property here is £800. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Stretton-Upon-Dunsmore (All Saints)

STRETTON-UPON-DUNSMORE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Rugby, Rugby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 6 miles (S. E. by E.) from Coventry; containing, with the township of Princethorpe, 1080 inhabitants, and an area of 2781 acres. This parish, which derives its name from its situation on the Roman fosseway, nearly in the centre of what was formerly Dunsmore heath, extends for about two miles and a half on the road from London to Holyhead. The village is about half a mile south-west of the road. Plaster of Paris is made from the gypsum of which a considerable stratum is found in the parish, and large quantities of lime are burnt from the limestone that abounds here. The living is a vicarage; net income, £438; patrons, the Rev. H. T. Powell, vicar, for one turn, and other parties for two turns; impropriators, several proprietors of land. The late Rev. William Daniel, vicar, bequeathed £4000, subject to the life of his wife, to the Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry and the Archdeacon of Coventry, in trust for building a new parochial church. The edifice was erected from a design by Mr. Rickman, and was opened for divine service on Whit-Tuesday, 16th May, 1837: it consists of a nave, chancel, aisles, and tower. The whole cost was £5232, the balance being supplied by the sale of the materials of the old edifice, a charge on the church lands, the sale of pews, collections at the doors, and subscriptions. A national school is supported from the proceeds of land bequeathed by William Herbert in 1694. Here is a spring strongly impregnated with lime, which will incrust rough substances with limestone formation if left in the water for a considerable time. At Knightlow Hill, on the boundary of the parish, is an ancient stone called Knightlow Cross, one of the oldest memorials of feudal tenure existing, and on which certain fines are annually paid by the surrounding parishes.