Winnall - Winstone

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

618-620

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'Winnall - Winstone', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 618-620. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51414&strquery=Winsham Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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Winnall

WINNALL, a parish, in the union of Winchester, hundred of Fawley, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, ¾ of a mile (N. N. E.) from Winchester; containing 113 inhabitants. This is a small parish, north of the road to Alresford, and east of the river Itchin.—See Winchester.

Winnersh

WINNERSH, a liberty, in the parish of Hurst, union of Wokingham, hundred of Sonning, county of Berks; containing 547 inhabitants, and comprising by measurement 1777a. 27p. of land.

Winnington

WINNINGTON, a township, in the parish of Great Budworth, union of Northwich, Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 1 mile (N. W.) from Northwich; containing 321 inhabitants. It is situated on the banks of the Weever, over which is a stone bridge; and comprises 563 acres, of a sandy soil. Winnington Hall, anciently the seat of the Winningtons, and subsequently of the Warburtons, was purchased, with the estate, in 1806, on the death of Richard, Lord Penrhyn (who had obtained it in marriage), by the Stanleys. Of this family, Edward John Stanley, Esq., the present owner, was created Baron Eddisbury, of Winnington, in May 1848.

Winnington

WINNINGTON, a township, in the parish of Muckleston, union of Drayton, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 4½ miles (N. E.) from the town of Drayton; containing 208 inhabitants.

Winnow, St.

WINNOW, ST., a parish, in the union of Bodmin, hundred of West, E. division of Cornwall, 2½ miles (S. E.) from Lostwithiel; containing 1056 inhabitants, and comprising 5000 acres. The great London road passes through the parish; the navigable river Fowey runs on the west and south, and is crossed by a bridge at Resprin. Stone is quarried for building and the repair of roads. A fair is held at Bridgend on the 12th of January. The living is a vicarage, with the chapel of Nighton, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Exeter (the appropriators), valued in the king's books at £5: the great tithes have been commuted for £416, and the vicarial for £297. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. On Beacon Hill, a square battery was constructed by the royalists, a short time before the capitulation of the parliamentary army, in 1644.

Winscales

WINSCALES, a township, in the parish of Workington, union of Cockermouth, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 2½ miles (S. E.) from Workington; containing 111 inhabitants. The tithes were commuted for land in 1809.

Winscombe (St. James)

WINSCOMBE (St. James), a parish, in the union of Axbridge, hundred of Winterstoke, E. division of Somerset, 2 miles (N. by W.) from Axbridge; containing, with the hamlet of Woodborough, 1436 inhabitants. It comprises 4140 acres, of which 467 are common or waste land. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £16. 2. 11.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Wells. The great tithes have been commuted for £200, and the vicarial for £250: the appropriate and vicarial glebes contain respectively, 125½ acres, and 1¾ acre. The church is a handsome structure, with a stately tower crowned by pinnacles. Symons Cardinbrook, in 1761, gave the residue of his estate to be applied in teaching poor children; a schoolroom was erected by subscription, aided by about £60 from the bequest: the permanent annual income is £15.

Winsford, county of Chester.—See Over.

WINSFORD, county of Chester.—See Over.

Winsford (St. Mary Magdalene)

WINSFORD (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Dulverton, hundred of Williton and Freemanners, W. division of Somerset, 5 miles (N. by W.) from Dulverton; containing 581 inhabitants. The parish comprises 8656 acres, including 2035 common or waste; and is situated on the river Exe, which forms its boundary for 6 or 7 miles. Iron-ore is abundant, and there are indications of its having been formerly wrought to a great extent; common stone, of the slate species, is quarried for roads and for building rough walls. A cattle-fair is held on the 20th of August. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 13. 9., and in the gift of Emmanuel College, Cambridge. Of the impropriate tithes, ¼ belongs to Sir T. D. Acland, Bart., ¼ to the poor of the parishes of King'sBrompton, Kingston, and Bishop's-Lydeard, and ½ is appropriated for exhibitions at St. Mary's Hall, Oxford. These tithes have been commuted for £130, and the vicarial tithes for £370; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe comprises 92¾ acres. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Winsham

WINSHAM, a parish, in the union of Chard, E. division of the hundred of Kingsbury, W. division of Somerset, 4 miles (E. by S.) from Chard, on the new road to Bridport; containing 999 inhabitants. There are quarries of freestone and flint, used for building. The manufacture of woollen-cloth was formerly carried on to a considerable extent, but it has of late greatly diminished. A pleasure-fair is held on the Thursday in Whitsun-week. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 13. 4.; net income, £287; patron, the Bishop of Bath and Wells; impropriator, H. H. Henley, Esq.: the great tithes have been commuted for £139. 10. The church is an ancient structure, with a tower rising from the centre: in the belfry is a representation of the Crucifixion of Our Saviour, considered to be perfectly unique. Sir Matthew Holworthy, in 1680, gave some premises now producing about £6 per annum, which sum is applied towards instruction in a national school erected in 1818.

Winshill

WINSHILL, a township, in the parish and union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 1½ mile (E. N. E.) from Burton; containing 377 inhabitants.

Winskill, with Hunsonby.—See Hunsonby.

WINSKILL, with Hunsonby.—See Hunsonby.

Winslade (St. Mary)

WINSLADE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Basingstoke, Basingstoke and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3 miles (S. by E.) from Basingstoke; containing, with the tything of Kempshott, 169 inhabitants, of whom 100 are in Winslade hamlet. The parish is situated on the road from Basingstoke to Alton, and comprises 1448 acres, of which 743 are arable, 351 meadow and pasture, 312 wood, and 30 waste, &c. The land under tillage has a substratum of chalk, and produces good barley and turnips. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 12. 1., and in the gift of Lord Bolton: the tithes have been commuted for £204. 14. 6.; there is a glebehouse, and the glebe comprises 12 acres.

Winsley, with Snitterton, in the hundred of Wirksworth, Derby.—See Snitterton.

WINSLEY, with Snitterton, in the hundred of Wirksworth, Derby.—See Snitterton.

Winsley

WINSLEY, a tything and chapelry, in the parish, union, and hundred of Bradford, Westbury and N. divisions, and Trowbridge and Bradford subdivisions, of Wilts, 1½ mile (W.) from Bradford; the tything containing 2269 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. Nicholas: there is a second chapel at Limpley-Stoke. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Bristol; income, £147. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Winsley, with Hartwith.—See Hartwith.

WINSLEY, with Hartwith.—See Hartwith.

Winslow (St. Lawrence)

WINSLOW (St. Lawrence), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Cottesloe, county of Buckingham, 6½ miles (S. E.) from Buckingham, and 50 (N. W.) from London; containing, with Shipton hamlet, 1434 inhabitants. This town, which is of considerable antiquity, having been given by King Offa to the abbey of St. Alban's so early as 794, is situated on the brow of a hill, and consists principally of three streets regularly built and of neat appearance; the houses are chiefly of brick: water is amply supplied from wells. The land in the vicinity is extremely fertile, and in a high state of cultivation. The white poppy was so successfully grown here, in 1821, as to produce 60lb. of opium, worth at least £75, from four acres, and 143lb. in the next year from eleven acres; for which, on both occasions, the prize of 30 guineas was awarded by the Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce. The market, granted by charter of Henry III., is on Thursday; a small quantity of corn is pitched in the market-house. Fairs are held on February 18th, March 20th, Holy-Thursday, August 21st, September 22nd, and November 26th, for cattle; and on the Thursday before Old Michaelmas-day, and the first and second Thursdays following, are statute-fairs. The parish comprises 1900 acres, of which 310 are arable, 1570 pasture, including homesteads, and 20 woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 5. 10., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £185; impropriator, W. S. Lowndes, Esq. The church is a spacious and venerable structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower at the west end; it has been repewed. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, and Wesleyans. A school was endowed by Joseph Rogers, in 1724, with property now producing an income of £30; and coal and bread are annually distributed among the poor to the amount of about £35, from bequests. The union comprises 17 parishes or places, containing a population of 8376.

Winslow

WINSLOW, a township, in the parish and union of Bromyard, hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 2½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Bromyard; containing 424 inhabitants, and comprising 2832 acres. The tithes have been commuted for £490, of which £210 are payable to the first, and £55 to the second, portionist of Bromyard, and £225 to the vicar. There is a glebe of 8 acres.

Winson

WINSON, a chapelry, in the parish of Bibury, union of Northleach, hundred of Bradley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 5 miles (N. W.) from Fairford; containing 202 inhabitants, and comprising by admeasurement about 1300 acres, chiefly arable land. The chapel is dedicated to St. Michael.

Winstanley

WINSTANLEY, a township, partly in the chapelry of Up Holland and partly in that of Billinge, parish and union of Wigan, hundred of West Derby, S. division of Lancashire, 3¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Wigan; containing 681 inhabitants. At the period of the Conquest, Uctred, a Saxon, held Wibaldeslei; and in the reign of John, Roger de Winstanesley held lands in the township. A long race of gentlemen taking their name from Winstanley, succeeded these ancient proprietors. In the reign of James I., the manor belonged to James Bancks, a descendant of the Bankes, of BankNewton, in Craven; in whose family the property continued until about 1731, when, by marriage with the heiress of William Bankes, it passed to the family of Holme, who eventually changed their name to Bankes. This is a fertile and picturesque township, rich in coal, the prevailing mineral of the district; it comprises 1866 acres, of which 600 are arable, 900 meadow and pasture, 100 woodland, and the remainder common and waste. Winstanley Hall, existing in the 16th century, is the seat of the Bankes family, and stands in a spacious and delightful park: it has been lately re-edified and improved. The tithes of the township have been commuted for a rent-charge of £203. 9.

Winster

WINSTER, a market-town and chapelry, in the parish of Youlgrave, union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 4½ miles (W. by N.) from Matlock, and 145 (N. N. W.) from London; containing 1005 inhabitants. This small town is situated on the road from Ashbourn to Bakewell, about midway between the river Derwent and the Cromford and High Peak railway. It is badly supplied with water, which in dry seasons is only to be procured at the distance of a mile. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the adjacent lead-mines, which were once much more extensively worked; the market, on Saturday, is very indifferently attended, and four fairs formerly held annually have also declined. The chapelry comprises 1049a. 1r. 24p. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £104; patrons, the Inhabitants. The tithes were partly commuted for land, under inclosure acts, in 1763 and 1809; the Duke of Rutland is entitled to the tithe of lead-ore. In 1702, Mrs. Anne Phermey and Mrs. H. Fanshaw bestowed on the minister one-fourth of the tithes of corn and hay in the township; and about 50 acres of land belonging to the benefice. The chapel, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, was rebuilt, with the exception of the tower, in 1843. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have each a place of worship. Thomas Eyre, Esq., in 1717 bequeathed £20 per annum for instruction; and an annuity of £5 was left in 1718, by Robert Moore, for the same purpose. In the neighbourhood are several barrows, in one of which, opened in 1768, two glass vessels were found, containing some clear but green-coloured water, a silver bracelet, some glass beads, and other trinkets.

Winster

WINSTER, a chapelry, in the parish, union, and ward of Kendal, county of Westmorland, 7 miles (W.) from Kendal; containing, with the township of Undermilbeck, in the parish of Windermere, 1033 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £97, derived from two small farms and the glebe land; patron, the Vicar of Kendal. Winster once formed part of the chapelry of Crook, and the inhabitants still contribute towards the repairs of the chapel there.

Winston (St. Andrew)

WINSTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Teesdale, S. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 10 miles (W. by N.) from Darlington, on the road to Barnard-Castle; containing 293 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises about 3150 acres, belongs to the Trustees of the Earl of Bridgewater. The village is situated on an elevation rising from the northern bank of the river Tees, which is crossed here by a handsome stone bridge of one arch, 111 feet in the span, built in 1764. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 18. 1½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Durham: the tithes have been commuted for £385. 10. to the rector, £25. 14. to Trinity College, Cambridge, and 13s. to the vicar of Gainford; the glebe contains 29½ acres. The church is a small ancient fabric, chiefly of early English character: the churchyard is shaded by venerable elms, beneath the branches of which a noble prospect of Raby opens to the north. The parsonage, with its beautiful gardens laid out in hanging terraces, joins the church on the east, and commands one of the richest views of the Tees, the wild range of the Richmondshire hills bounding the horizon on the south and west.

Winston (St. Andrew)

WINSTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Bosmere and Claydon, hundred of Thredling, E. division of Suffolk, 1 mile (S. S. E.) from Debenham; containing 399 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 3. 9.; net income, £169; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Ely. There is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains about 32 acres. The church is chiefly in the early English style, with an embattled tower.

Winston (St. Bartholomew)

WINSTONE (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Cirencester, hundred of Bisley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 6 miles (N. W. by N.) from Cirencester; containing 262 inhabitants. It comprises 1400 acres by admeasurement. Stone is quarried for building. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 10., and in the patronage of J. W. Lyon, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £190; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 80 acres. The Baptists have a place of worship. The ancient Ermin-street passes through the parish.