Wyke - Wyvill

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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703-707

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'Wyke - Wyvill', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 703-707. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51435 Date accessed: 26 October 2014.


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Wyke

WYKE, a tything, in the parish, union, and hundred of Axminster, Honiton and Southern divisions of Devon; containing 103 inhabitants.

Wyke

WYKE, a tything, in the parish of Worplesdon, union of Guildford, First division of the hundred of Woking, W. division of Surrey; containing 158 inhabitants. This place is mentioned in Domesday book under the name of Wucha, and at an early period was held by a family called De Wyke. It is detached from the rest of the parish, and locally situated in the parish of Ash. A church, standing at a distance of four miles from the parish church, was consecrated in November 1846: the living is in the gift of the Rector of Worplesdon; income, £130.

Wyke

WYKE, an ecclesiastical parish, in the parish of Birstal, union of Bradford, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 4 miles (S.) from Bradford; containing 2330 inhabitants. It is about two miles in length and one in breadth, and comprises 921 acres, of which 200, then a common, were inclosed in 1820; the surface is elevated, the air healthy, and the soil, though of inferior quality, has been improved by cultivation. The substratum abounds in coal and ironstone; the mines are let on lease to the Low-Moor Iron Company by Miss Currer, and T. Carvick, Esq., to whom the lands belong, and of whom the latter is lord of the manor. The village consists of scattered dwellings, irregularly built. The roads from Leeds to Halifax and from Bradford to Huddersfield pass through; and the WestRiding Union railway, which also runs through the parish, has a station at Pickle bridge. The township of Wyke was constituted an ecclesiastical district in May 1844, under the act 6th and 7th Victoria, cap. 37; and became a parish, conformably with the provisions of that act, on the consecration of the church in November 1847. The edifice is dedicated to St. Mary, is in the early English style, and consists of a nave, chancel, and north and south aisles, with a tower and spire at the south-west corner. It was built through the exertions of the incumbent, the Rev. W. Houlbrook, M.A., on an eligible site presented by Miss Currer, who also contributed £500 towards the cost, and valuable portions of the church furniture. The Low-Moor Company and Messrs. John and Charles Hardy were likewise munificent contributors; and the Church Commissioners, the Incorporated Society for Building Churches, and the Ripon Diocesan Society made liberal grants: the total expense of erection is estimated at between £3000 and £4000. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Crown and the Bishop of Ripon, alternately; net income, £150. There are places of worship for Independents and Moravians, the latter of whom have a small settlement here.

Wyke-Champflower

WYKE-CHAMPFLOWER, a chapelry, in the parish and hundred of Bruton, union of Wincanton, E. division of Somerset, 1½ mile (W.) from Bruton; containing 88 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; income, £30; patron and impropriator, Sir H. R. Hoare, Bart. The chapel is dedicated to St. Mary.

Wyke-Hamon, Northampton.—See Wicken.

WYKE-HAMON, Northampton.—See Wicken.

Wyke-Regis (All Saints)

WYKE-REGIS (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Weymouth, liberty of Wyke-Regis and Elwall, Dorchester division of Dorset, 1¼ mile (W. S. W.) from Weymouth; containing 1911 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, with the chapelry of Weymouth annexed, valued in the king's books at £19. 7. 1., and in the gift of the Bishop of Winchester; the tithes have been commuted for £550, and the glebe comprises 27 acres. The church, a large ancient pile with a lofty embattled tower, is the mother church of Weymouth, and the usual burial-place of its inhabitants. At Smallmouth is a ferry to the Isle of Portland.

Wykeham (All Saints)

WYKEHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Scarborough, Pickering lythe, N. riding of York, 6½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Scarborough; containing, with the village of Ruston, and the township of Longdale-End, 597 inhabitants. It comprises about 7000 acres, of which 4000 are open moorland, and the remainder a fertile tract extending southward to the river Derwent. Wykeham Abbey, the seat of the Hon. Marmaduke Langley, who is lord of the manor and chief owner of the soil, is a neat mansion, standing in a finelywooded park about a mile south of the village. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Hon. M. Langley, by whom three schools are partly supported. The church was repaired and beautified at the expense of the late Richard Langley, Esq. A priory of Cistercian nuns, in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary, was founded here about 1153, by Pain Fitz-Osbert, and at the Dissolution had a revenue of £25. 17. 6.: there are still some remains existing of the church belonging to it.

Wykeham, East

WYKEHAM, EAST, a parish, in the union of Louth, Wold division of the hundred of Louth-Eske, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 7 miles (W. by N.) from Louth; containing 32 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14, and in the patronage of the Ferrand family: there is no church.

Wykeham, West

WYKEHAM, WEST, a parish, in the poor-law union of Louth, E. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 7½ miles (W. by N.) from Louth. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £3. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown: the church is demolished.

Wyken

WYKEN, a parish, in the union of Foleshill, county of Warwick, 3 miles (N. E. by E.) from Coventry; containing 115 inhabitants, and comprising 787 acres of a highly productive soil. Some mines are worked here, the rateable annual value of which is returned at £218. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £115; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Craven. The church has a tower, and is very ancient, about 700 years old; the eastern window is of stained glass, with the arms of the Craven family emblazoned on it: the edifice was thoroughly repaired in 1839. The well-known apple called the Wyken pippin was first planted here; the parent apple was brought from Holland.

Wykin

WYKIN, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Hinckley, hundred of Sparkenhoe, county of Leicester; containing 92 inhabitants.

Wylam

WYLAM, a township, in the parish of Ovingham, union of Hexham, E. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 9 miles (W.) from Newcastle; containing 984 inhabitants. The manor was an appurtenance to the monastery of Tynemouth, and was granted by the crown to a branch of the Fenwick family, of Fenwick Tower, from whom it passed to the Blacketts, in the reign of Charles II. It is now the property of Christopher Blackett, Esq., of Wylam House. The river Tyne, over which is a wooden bridge, erected by subscription in 1835, separates Wylam from the Newcastle and Carlisle railway. On both sides of the river are extensive collieries, belonging to Mr. Blackett; and an iron-foundry was established by the Messrs. Thompson, as a rich vein of ironstone runs through the township, chiefly on the south side of the river; but the establishment has been given up. There are also quarries of excellent stone, applicable for building and other purposes. The village, which is large, contains a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a school chiefly supported by Mr. Blackett. The tithes have been commuted for £168. At the west end of the village is Wylam Hall, an ancient building, formerly a peel, or strong house.

Wyldecourt

WYLDECOURT, a tything, in the parish of Hawkchurch, union of Axminster, hundred of Cerne, Totcombe, and Modbury, Bridport division of the county of Dorset; containing 367 inhabitants.

Wly, in the county of Wilts.—See Wily.

WYLY, in the county of Wilts.—See Wily.

Wymering (St. Peter and St. Paul)

WYMERING (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Fareham, hundred of Portsdown, Fareham and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4¼ miles (W.) from Havant; containing, with the hamlet of Hilsea, and part of Potwell, 748 inhabitants. The parish comprises 3545 acres, of which 496 are common or waste. It includes the northern end of Portsea Island, across which are strong lines of defence, and which is connected with the main portion of the parish by Pos bridge, over the narrow channel between Portsmouth and Langston harbours. Great, and part of Little, Horsea island, at the upper end of the former harbour, are also in the parish. A fair for cattle and cheese is held on the 26th of July and two following days. The living is a vicaraga, annexed to the rectory of Widley: the vicarial tithes have been commuted for £432, and the glebe comprises 14 acres. The church is chiefly in the Norman style. There is a place of worship for Independents; and a national school is supported by subscription. Four almshouses were founded by Honor Wait, in the reign of Elizabeth, for widows, to each of whom £1. 10. is yearly paid in money; and the proceeds of £100 left by Mr. Soaper, and of £100 by the Rev. C. B. Henville, both in the three and a half per cent, consols., are given to them in clothing and coal.

Wymington (St. Lawrence)

WYMINGTON (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Wellingborough, hundred of Willey, county of Bedford, 2½ miles (S. by W.) from HighamFerrers; containing 270 inhabitants. It comprises 1685 acres, of which 1014 are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture, with a moderate portion of woodland. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £90; patron, Dr. Lee. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1811; the glebe altogether comprises 160 acres. The church, a handsome structure in the later English style, is said to have been built in the fourteenth century, by John Curteys, lord of the manor, and mayor of the staple at Calais, in France.

Wymondham (St. Peter)

WYMONDHAM (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 6½ miles (E.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 766 inhabitants. This place, which is of great antiquity, is still surrounded by its ancient walls. The parish comprises by measurement 2920 acres: the soil is partly clay, and partly a rich red loam; the surface is undulated. The Oakham canal passes through. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12, and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £391. The church is chiefly in the early English style, with the spire and upper portion of the tower in the later English. Sir John Sedley, in 1637, endowed a school for boys with 60 acres of land, now producing £127 per annum.

Wymondham, or Windham (St. Mary the Virgin and St. Thomas à Becket)

WYMONDHAM, or Windham (St. Mary the Virgin and St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Forehoe, E. division of Norfolk, 9 miles (W. S. W.) from Norwich, and 100 (N. E. by N.) from London; comprising the markettown of Wymondham, which forms the in-soken, and the divisions of Downham, Market-street, Silfield, Sutton, Towngreen, and Wattlefield, which constitute the out-soken; and containing 5179 inhabitants. This town derives its name from the Saxon Win Munde Ham, signifying "a pleasant village on a mount;" and is indebted for its importance to the foundation of a priory of Black monks, at first a cell to the abbey of St. Alban's, by William d'Albini or Daubeny, in 1130. Henry I. endowed the monastery with certain lands, and with the privilege of appropriating all wrecks between Eccles, Happisburgh, and Tunstead; also with an annual rent, in kind, of 2000 eels from the village of Helgay. About 1448 it was elevated to the rank of an abbey, and it continued to flourish till the Dissolution, when its revenue was returned at £72. 5. 4., and granted by Henry VIII. to the Earl of Surrey. There are still some slight remains of the church and conventual buildings; and a few years since, two leaden coffins were found near the site of the abbey chancel, one supposed to contain the remains of the founder's lady. The two Ketts, who disturbed the county in the reign of Edward VI., were accustomed to assemble their followers under an oak of which part yet remains in the vicinity of the town; and after their defeat by the Earl of Warwick, the elder was hanged in chains on Norwich castle, and the younger upon the lofty steeple of the church of Wymondham, of which town they were both natives. In the reign of Mary, Richard Crashfield and Francis Knight were burnt at the stake here. In 1615, 300 houses, and property to the amount of £40,000, were destroyed by fire; and in 1631, the plague raged with great fury among the inhabitants.

The town is situated on the road from Norwich, through Thetford, to London. It is of considerable size, and consists chiefly of five streets, diverging from the market-place, and containing many ancient and several well-built modern houses; the town has been greatly improved within the last few years, and the inhabitants are amply supplied with water from springs. The manufacture of wooden spindles, spoons, and other articles of turnery ware, was formerly carried on to a very great extent, but it gradually declined, and is now almost extinct, being superseded by the weaving of bombazin, crape, and other articles, introduced many years since, and in the manufacture of which 1200 persons are employed. There is also a large brewery and malting establishment. The Norwich and Brandon railway passes by the town; and here branches off a line to Dereham, on the north-west: the Dereham line was opened Feb. 15th, 1847. The market, granted by charter of King John in 1203, is on Friday. There are fairs on February 14th, May 17th, and September 7th, principally for cattle, horses, and pedlery; and statutefairs for hiring servants are held occasionally: when these days happen on Saturday, the fairs are held on the following Monday, so as not to interfere with the Norwich market. In the market-place is an ancient cross, erected in 1616, and having an octagonal roof supported on wooden pillars at the angles. The powers of the county debt-court of Wymondham, established in 1847, extend over part of the registration-districts of Forehoe and Depwade. A court leet takes place annually for the appointment of constables; manorial courts occur as occasion requires, and petty-sessions on the third Tuesday in the month: the inhabitants are exempt from serving on juries at assizes and sessions. The Wymondham house of correction for females contains three wards, with day-rooms, and two airingyards. The parish comprises by measurement 10,559 acres, chiefly arable; the surface is varied, and the scenery in some parts pleasingly picturesque.

The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 14. 4½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Ely, the appropriator: the great tithes have been commuted for £2192. 12., and the vicarial for £799. The church, which comprises the nave of the abbey church, is a handsome structure in various styles, containing many interesting and elegant details, among which are some highly decorated Norman arches; the roof is elaborately groined, and ornamented with sculptured figures of angels. On the south side of the chancel, which has been formed out of the nave, to supply the place of the ancient choir, is a splendid monument to the last abbot of the monastery. A window in the north aisle was embellished in 1840 with paintings of the Nativity, Crucifixion, and Ascension of Our Saviour, and with a figure of the Virgin and Infant, in modern stained glass; the font is richly sculptured, and there are several neat monuments. The Baptists, the Society of Friends, the Independents, and Wesleyans have places of worship. A free grammar school was founded in the reign of Elizabeth, and endowed with a moiety of the property belonging to certain guilds in the town, producing £100 per annum, which are paid to the master, who has also a house, left by Robert Day in 1673. A scholarship in Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, was attached to the school in 1574, by Archbishop Parker, and another, in 1580, by John Parker; and in 1659, a share in an exhibition for scholarships, to the same college, was given by Edward Colman. The school is kept in an ancient chapel dedicated to St. Thomas à Becket. The late Rev. William Papillon, in 1834, built schoolrooms for 200 children of both sexes, and gave 20 acres of land for their endowment, and for the support of an evening lectureship; the land yields £60 per annum. The Rev. John Hendry, in 1722, bequeathed £400 to be vested in the purchase of land, and the rental to be given to the vicar for an afternoon sermon in the church every Sunday; also a rent-charge of £3. 10. for a sermon every Friday in Lent. The same benefactor left a small estate for the use of the charity school; and on the inclosure of the parish in 1806, about 40 acres of land were allotted to the poor for fuel.

Wymondley, Great

WYMONDLEY, GREAT, a parish, in the union of Hitchin, hundred of Broadwater, county of Hertford, 2 miles (E. by S.) from Hitchin; containing 263 inhabitants. It comprises about 1400 acres. The soil is a strong clay, alternated with gravel and chalk, with a portion of rich deep loam; the surface is flat, and watered by a small rivulet called the Pirral. The manor is held by the service of cup-bearer to the kings of England, at their coronation. The living is a vicarage, with which that of Ippolitts was united in 1685; net income, £301; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. The tithes of Great and Little Wymondley were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1811. The church is ancient, having a Norman arch between the nave and chancel, with an embattled tower.

Wymondley, Little (St. Mary)

WYMONDLEY, LITTLE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Hitchin, hundred of Broadwater, county of Hertford, 2£ miles (S. E. by E.) from Hitchin; containing 288 inhabitants. It comprises about 1160 acres; the soil is similar to that of Great Wymondley, and the surface is hilly. In the village is a college for educating Protestant dissenting ministers, founded in 1729 by W. Coward, Esq., with a chapel attached; the establishment originated at Northampton, and the celebrated Dr. Doddridge was its first theological professor. It possesses a valuable library of about 10,000 volumes, with an extensive and complete philosophical apparatus. There are two professorships, one including the theological, philosophical, and mathematical departments; and the other, every branch of classical literature. The living is a donative curacy; net income, £20; patron and impropriator, S. H. U. Heathcote, Esq. The church contains some very ancient gravestones. A priory of Black canons in honour of St. Lawrence, was founded here in the time of Henry III., by Richard Argentein, and at the Dissolution had a revenue of £37. 10. 6. No remains exist of the building; its site is marked by some avenues of stately box-trees, and there is an old well, to the water of which tradition ascribes considerable efficacy.

Wyrardisbury, or Wraysbury (St. Andrew)

WYRARDISBURY, or Wraysbury (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Eton, hundred of Stoke, county of Buckingham, 3 miles (S. W. by S.) from Colnbrook; containing 672 inhabitants. This parish comprises 1522a. 1r. 38p., of which 873 acres are arable, and 649 meadow and pasture. Within its limits is Magna Charta island, a small islet in the Thames, on which King John, at the instance of the barons, is said by some to have signed the celebrated charter of English liberty; it is the property of G. Simon Harcourt, Esq., of Ankerwycke House, in the parish. The living is a vicarage, with that of Langley-Marish annexed, valued in the king's books at £14. 10. 5., and in the gift of the Dean and Canons of Windsor, the appropriators: the great tithes have been commuted for £377, and the vicarial for £154; the glebe comprises 18 acres. William Gill, in 1798, bequeathed to the poor £300 four per cent, consols., which were subsequently augmented by a bequest of £100 from Thos. Wright; the interest, amounting to £13. 8., is distributed on Christmas-day. John Lee, in 1807, gave two annuities to the Corporation of the Sons of the Clergy, in trust, to pay £26 per annum to a Sunday-afternoon lecturer; and the parish is also in possession of property called the Church and the Bridge lands, let for about £46 per annum. A Benedictine nunnery in honour of St. Mary Magdalene was founded at Ankerwycke, in the time of Henry II., by Sir Gilbert de Montfichet, and at the Dissolution was valued at £45. 14. 4.

Wyre-Piddle

WYRE-PIDDLE, a chapelry, in the parish of Fladbury, union of Pershore, Middle division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 1¾ mile (N. E. by E.) from Pershore; containing 188 inhabitants. It comprises 330 acres, two-thirds of which are arable. The chapel is an ancient structure, at the west end of the village: the font is Norman. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. A cross in the village having become dilapidated by age, was lately rebuilt and restored after the original model.

Wyrley, Great

WYRLEY, GREAT, a township, in the parish of Cannock, union of Penkridge, E. division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, S. division of the county of Stafford, 6½ miles (N. N. W.) from Walsall; containing 799 inhabitants. The township comprises 1600 acres, of which the Duke of Sutherland is part proprietor; and contains several collieries, largely employing the population around. The road from Walsall to Cannock passes through the village, which is long, and consists of detached houses. In 1844, Great Wyrley, with the township of Cheslyn-Hay, was formed into an ecclesiastical district, having a population of 1753. The church, dedicated to St. Mark, a highly finished structure in the early English style, was built in 1845, at a cost of £2430, of which sum £1200 were given by the Rev. William Gresley, M.A., prebendary of Lichfield; the remainder was raised by subscription, aided by £333 from the Diocesan, and £250 from the Incorporated, Society. The living is a perpetual curacy; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield. A school, purchased from the Independents, was opened in 1843.— See Cannock.

Wyrley, Little

WYRLEY, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Norton-under-Cannock, union of Penkridge, S. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 7¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Lichfield; containing 61 inhabitants. This is a township of scattered farms, lying on the Pelsall road. Several persons are employed in the Brownhill coal-mine; the shaft is 90 yards in depth, and the strata three yards thick. Wyrley Grove is the ancient seat of the Husseys, who obtained it in marriage with the heiress of the family of Fowke: the mansion stands at the head of a fine lawn, and is a noble and picturesque specimen of ancient architecture.

Wysall (Holy Trinity)

WYSALL (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Loughborough, S. division of the wapentake of Rushcliffe and of the county of Nottingham, 8¾ miles (S. by E.) from Nottingham; containing 379 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1481 acres, of which twothirds are arable, and the remainder pasture and meadow; the soil is a cold clay, and the surface is undulated. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 11. 0½.; net income, £123; patron, Sir R. H. Bromley. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1800; the glebe comprises 80 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the later English style.

Wythall

WYTHALL, a chapelry, in the parish and union of King's-Norton, Upper division of the hundred of Halfshire, E. division of the county of Worcester, 8 miles (N. E. by E.) from Bromsgrove; containing 45 inhabitants. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, and rebuilt in 1778, is a brick edifice, containing 200 sittings: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Worcester; incumbent, the Rev. Joseph Amphlett; appropriator, the Vicar of Bromsgrove. Some schools in connexion with the chapel, have been recently rebuilt by the lauded proprietors, and the tenants of the neighbourhood, at a cost of more than £200.

Wytham, or Whytham (All Saints)

WYTHAM, or Whytham (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Abingdon, hundred of Hormer, county of Berks, 3 miles (N. W.) from Oxford; containing 189 inhabitants. It comprises 1129a. 1r. 9p., of which 679 acres are meadow and pasture, 144 arable, and 284 woodland. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 5. 2½.; net income, £306; patron, the Earl of Abingdon. Here was anciently a nunnery, originally founded at Abingdon, by the sister of King Ceadwalla, and afterwards removed hither; during the war between Offa and Cynewulf, it was demolished by the nuns themselves, who had suffered great annoyance from a castle in the neighbourhood.

Wytche

WYTCHE, a hamlet, in the parish of Willoughby, union of Spilsby, Wold division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing 15 inhabitants.

Wythburn

WYTHBURN, a chapelry, in the parish of Crosthwaite, union of Cockermouth, Allerdale ward below Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 8¼ miles (S. E. by S.) from Keswick; containing, with St. John's Castlerigg, 499 inhabitants. Here is an inn from which tourists often start to make the ascent of Helvellyn, a remarkable mountain in the immediate vicinity. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £82; patron, the Vicar of Crosthwaite. The boundaries of the counties of Cumberland and Westmorland are here marked by Dunmaile-Raise Stones, which are said to commemorate the defeat of the last King of Cumberland, by Edmund, the Saxon monarch, of whom Malcolm, King of Scotland, held Cumberland in fee. Thirlmere lake is within the chapelry.

Wythop

WYTHOP, a chapelry, in the parish of Lorton, union of Cockermouth, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of the county of Cumberland, 5 miles (E. by S.) from Cockermouth; containing 125 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £51; patrons, the Proprietors. The chapel is situated on an eminence above the western bank of Bassenthwaite lake. The ancient Hall has been converted into a farmhouse. The Rev. John Hudson, a learned divine and critic, was born here in 1662.

Wyton

WYTON, a township, in the parish of Swine, union of Skirlaugh, Middle division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 5½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Hull; containing 91 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 630 acres: the village is on the road from Hull to Sproatley. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £201. 10. 6.

Wyverstone (St. George)

WYVERSTONE (St. George), a parish, in the union and hundred of Hartismere, W. division of Suffolk, 7 miles (N.) from Stow-Market; containing 348 inhabitants, and consisting of 1552a. 2r. 21p. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 14. 9½., and in the gift of John Moseley, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £350, and the glebe comprises 15 acres, with a house, lately built by the Rev. James Ware, incumbent. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a tower, and contains some remains of ancient stained glass.

Wyvill

WYVILL, a parish, in the union of Grantham, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 6 miles (N. W.) from Colsterworth; containing, with Hungerton, 137 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Hungerton united; net income, £35; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln. The church is in ruins, and the inhabitants attend that at Harlaxton.