Spain
1515

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

G. A. Bergenroth (editor)

Year published

1866

Supporting documents

Pages

251-276

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Spain: 1515', Calendar of State Papers, Spain, Volume 2: 1509-1525 (1866), pp. 251-276. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=93636 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

1515

1515. Jan. (?)
S. E. R. L. 847. f. 113.
207. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Hieronymo De Vich, his Ambassador in Rome.
Has answered all his letters by the couriers who left on the 3rd and on the 12th of the present month of January. Sends him back the copy of the draft of the general league, with some additions and alterations which seem desirable.
The King of France has died. He was an old man, and tired of his wars in Italy. The new King of France, on the contrary, is young, ambitious, and popular. He is, therefore, much more dangerous than his predecessor was, and the general league becomes thereby only the more necessary.
Has sent his consent to the marriage of Doña Teresa Cardona with Lorenzo de Medicis.
Has further asked the Emperor to resign his claims on Bergamo, Brescia, and Este, in order to give those towns to the Duke of Milan, in exchange for Parma and Piacenza, which are to be made over to Giuliano de Medicis.
Having thus done all that the Pope had desired of him, it is to be hoped that the Pope, on his part, will enter the general league without delay.
The news forwarded from France to Rome, namely, that he (King Ferdinand) has sent a friar to the King of France, to ask Madame Renée, the late King's daughter, in marriage for the Infante Ferdinand, is, in common with all the intelligence that comes from France, pure invention. The friar in question is the confessor of the Count Pedro de Novaro, and has gone to see him, and to treat about his liberation.
Promises never to make peace, or to conclude a truce with France, without the consent of the Pope, whose obedient son he is.
The King of France is determined to conquer Milan. His friendly letters to the Pope and other Princes are compliments, and nothing else.
The Pope must be aware how important it is, under such circumstances, to separate the King of England from the King of France, and to gain England over to the cause of the league. There is a good opportunity to do so just now, as there are affairs pending between England and France which will become the cause of disunion. Besides, the King of England hates the French at the bottom of his heart, and does not like to see them become more powerful in Italy. The English are determined to throw obstacles of every kind in the way of the King of France. Is willing to do the same. The Pope, however, must do his utmost to influence the King of England, and to induce him to declare himself an enemy of the King of France.—No date. No signature.
No contemporary indorsement.
Spanish. Draft, written by Secretary Quintana. pp. 7.
12 Feb.
S. E. N. L. 1004. f. 55.
208. Treaty between Pope Leo X., the Emperor Elect, King Ferdinand The Catholic, the Duke Of Milan, the family Of De Medicis, Florence, Genoa, the Swiss Confederacy, and the German (Suabian) League.
The contracting parties bind themselves to defend one another against any aggressor.
If the King of France should attack the Pope or the Duke of Milan, the Emperor is bound to send them a succour of 600 German horse, and King Ferdinand of 800 heavy and 400 light horse, together with 2,500 German or Spanish infantry.
If the King of France should attack one of the other allies, the Pope is bound to send him succour in proportion to the aid he has a right to ask when attacked.
If the allies should decide on undertaking an offensive war with the King of France, the Emperor and King Ferdinand are at liberty to enlist from 10,000 to 12,000 Swiss, who, however, are not obliged to march further than to Burgundy or Dauphiné.
If the Swiss should declare war with the King of France in order to enforce the observation of the treaty of Dijon, the Emperor and King Ferdinand are bound to send them succour, and to pay them 30,000 ducats a month.
If the Emperor or Prince Charles should be attacked in Burgundy or Flanders, all the other allies are bound to defend them. The Swiss are, in such a case, bound to march an army of 10,000 or 12,000 men against the aggressor.
If the King of France should attack the Swiss, the Emperor is to succour them with 600 German horse.
None of the confederates is at liberty to conclude a separate peace or truce with the King of France. The conditions on which peace may be concluded with the King of France are, that he should abandon the Duke of Gueldres, promise not to assist Venice, renounce all his claims on Naples, Genoa, Milan, and all other territories in Italy ; that he should not be the occasion of King Ferdinand having any difficulties in Navarra, and that he should fulfil the treaty of Dijon.
The Emperor binds himself to pay to each of the Swiss cantons 300 Rhenish gold florins a year, to Sion and each of the three Grisons 200 Rhenish gold florins a year, &c. King Ferdinand binds himself to pay to each of them 1,000 Rhenish gold florins a year.
Each of the contracting parties binds himself to do all he can to persuade the other Christian princes, and especially the King of France, the King of England, the King of Scotland &c., to enter this league, and to make war with the Infidels.
Indorsed : "Copy of the league made in Switzerland. Answered the 12th of February 1515."
Latin. Contemporary copy. pp. 3½
22 Feb.
S. E. Pat. Re. Trat. c. Pont. L. 2. f. 40.
209. Pope Leo X. to All Persons.
Ratifies the treaty which he has concluded with the Emperor elect, King Ferdinand the Catholic, Maximilian, Duke of Milan, &c., and the Swiss Confederacy. Has conferred on the Swiss the title of "Protectors of Religious Liberty." The object for which this treaty is concluded is that the allies shall defend him (the Pope), his dignities and dominions, against all and every aggressor, and shall wage a general war with the tyrant of the Turks. Hungary, Rhodes, Cyprus, and other Christian countries stand in great need of help from the allies.
The allies have bound themselves to do all in their power to persuade the other Christian princes, and especially the King of France, the King of England, the King of Scotland, the King of Portugal, &c., to enter this league. Calls upon these princes to declare their adhesion to the league.
[Details concerning the contributions of money, &c., follow.]
Rome apud Sanctum Petrum, 1514th year of the incarnation, 8th Kalends of March, 2nd of his pontificate.
Indorsed : "Copy of the bull of the general league."
Latin. Contemporary copy. pp. 25.
22 Feb. (?) (fn. 1)
P. Neg. K. 1639. No. 1g.
210. The Nuncio of the Pope and the Ambassadors of the Emperor Elect, King Ferdinand The Catholic, the Swiss Confederacy, and the other members of the most Holy League to François I., King Of France.
The members of the most Holy League complain :—
1. That the late King Louis of France acted in prejudice of the rights and privileges of the Holy Church in making the Pragmatical Sanction.
2. The late King Louis did not fulfil the treaty which he had concluded with the Emperor concerning the duchy of Milan. The late King Louis acted against all right and against his solemn promises in showing favour to Duke Charles of Gueldres.
3. When the King of England concluded peace with the late King Louis, he included in it the Holy Roman Empire and the Archduke Charles. The King of France broke this treaty with the King of England by favouring Duke Charles of Gueldres, and by instigating the Duke of Saxony to aid the Frisians, who are rebels.
4. The late King Louis made a treaty of alliance with Venice, the old enemy of the Emperor and of King Ferdinand the Catholic.
5. The late King Louis made peace with the Swiss at Dijon, but broke it to their great prejudice.
The members of the most Holy League, therefore, summon the present King of France—
1. To give full satisfaction to the Holy Father, and to abstain from all violence against the Church.
2. To renounce all his claims on Milan and Genoa.
3. Not to favour Duke Charles of Egmont in his revolt against the Holy Empire, and to indemnify the Emperor and the Archduke Charles with a goodly sum of money for their losses sustained in the war with the said Duke Charles of Egmont.
4. To declare null and void his alliance with Venice, and not to aid that republic.
5. Not to create any troubles or difficulties to King Ferdinand the Catholic in his kingdoms, and to fulfil his obligations towards the Swiss.
Indorsed : "Summons of the nuncio and ambassadors of the Holy Father, the Emperor, and King Ferdinand, directed to King François, of France."
Spanish. Original copy. pp. 2.
2 May.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 1.
211. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Bernard De Mesa, his Ambassador in England.
Empowers him in his name, as well as in the name of Queen Juana of Castile, to renew the old treaties of peace and friendship between England and Spain, or to conclude new treaties with the King of England.—Ventosilla, the 2nd of May 1515.
Latin. Draft, written by Quintana. pp. 3.
Summer (?) S. E. R. L. 847. f. 117. 212. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Hieronymo De Vich, his Ambassador in Rome.
Has received his letter of the 17th of last month.
The Pope has not sent the men-at-arms and light horse which he is bound to send, and leaves the whole defence of Italy to the Swiss. Begs the Pope instantly to fulfil his obligations as a member of the league. He is to animate the Pope and to revive his courage when it fails. The army of the league is by no means despicable.
Besides, the King of England is much disposed to assist the Pope and the league against the King of France. The Pope ought to write to the King of England, and to publish the bull of excommunication against the King of France. The King of England desires it very much.—No date. No signature.
No contemporary indorsement.
Spanish. Draft, written by the Secretary Quintana. pp. 5.
July (?)
S. E. A. L. 635. f. 14.
213. Pedro De Urea, Spanish Ambassador at the Imperial Court, to King Ferdinand The Catholic.
Has been ordered, in the letter of the 4th of June, to procure the marriage of the Emperor with the Queen of Sicily. In other despatches has been ordered to negotiate a marriage between the same Queen of Sicily and the Duke of Milan.
Has sounded the feelings of the Emperor, who declared that he would have married the sister of the King of England, who was in France, in order to punish the French, but that he would on no account contract a marriage either with Madame Anna, or with any other lady in the world.
It would perhaps be possible to marry the Emperor to the Queen of Sicily, if the Infante (Ferdinand) were married to the daughter of the King of Hungary. The Emperor esteems this marriage as dearly as his life. The Emperor urges Madame Margaret to declare whether she is willing or not to marry the Duke of Milan.—No date. No signature.
This document is apparently a deciphering of a ciphered despatch from the Spanish ambassador at the Imperial Court to King Ferdinand of Spain.
On the back is written, in the hand of Secretary Quintana, but almost obliterated : "On Saturday, the 22nd March, I gave my wife 20 ducats for the expenses of the larder." (fn. 2)
Spanish. Deciphering. p. 1.
8 Aug.
S. E. Pat. Re. Cap. c. l. Cas d. Aust. L. 2. f. 38.
214. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Juan De Lanuza. his Privy Councillor and Ambassador to Flanders and England.
Empowers him to conclude a most intimate and everlasting alliance with Maximilian, Emperor elect, and Henry, King of England.—Aranda, 8th of August 1515.
Latin. Copy or draft. pp. 2.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. Pont. L. 2. f. 35. 215. Treaty between King Ferdinand The Catholic and King Henry Of England. (fn. 3)
Bernard de Mesa, Bishop of Trinopoli, and ambassador of King Ferdinand the Catholic and Queen Juana ; and
Thomas, Presbyter, Cardinal of York, Primate of England and Legate of the Apostolic See, in the name of Henry, King England, conclude the following treaty :—
Although King Ferdinand the Catholic and King Henry of England have always been friends, their friendship has of late been less intimate than in former times. The reason thereof was partly the common law of all earthly things, which deteriorate in course of time, and partly a want of clearness in the former treaties. In order to re-establish the former intimacy between King Ferdinand the Catholic and the King of England, the ambassadors conclude the articles which follow :—
1. All injuries done by one of the contracting parties to the other are to be buried in oblivion ; and the contracting parties, their successors, and subjects are to be friends and allies for all time to come. If one of the contracting princes is attacked, or if his territories are invaded, the other party which is not attacked is to succour the injured party with all his might until the aggressor is repelled.
If King Ferdinand or Queen Juana is attacked by any other prince or republic, the King of England binds himself to send them as many men-at-arms, bowmen, and armed vessels as they require, and he is able to procure ; King Ferdinand and Queen Juana, however, paying his expenses.
In case the King of England is attacked, King Ferdinand and Queen Juana bind themselves to send him as many men-at-arms, arquebusiers, and armed vessels as he requires ; he paying the expenses occasioned thereby.
2. The subjects of either of the contracting parties are at liberty to carry on commerce in the states of the other contracting party or parties.
3. Neither of the contracting parties is to show favour to the rebels and exiles of the other contracting party or parties.
4. If either of the contracting parties henceforth concludes a treaty with any other prince or republic, the other contracting party or parties are to be included in it.
5. Letters of marque and reprisals are not to be given by one of the contracting parties in prejudice of the subjects of the other contracting party or parties. The vessels which sail from the ports of either of the contracting parties are to give security for their good behaviour towards the vessels of the other contracting party or parties at sea.
6. If the subjects of either of the contracting parties do any injury to the subjects of the other contracting parties or party, full satisfaction is to be given to the injured subjects, but the treaty itself is not to be regarded as broken.
7. If the local authorities of one of the contracting parties refuse to do justice to the injured subjects of the other contracting party, this treaty loses nothing of its binding force, and the injured subjects must appeal for redress to their own king or queen, who will recommend them to the king or queen to whom the local authorities in question are subjected. If, however, even in this way, reparation cannot be obtained, letters of marque and reprisals may be granted to the injured person or persons.
8. This treaty is to be published in the dominions of the contracting parties within six months after its ratification.
9. Stranded vessels and goods are not to be robbed, but given back to their proprietors.
10. Each of the contracting princes is bound to swear to the treaty when required to do so. The ratifications of this treaty are to be exchanged within the space of six months after it is signed.
Indorsed : "A copy of the articles."
Indorsed in a more modern handwriting : "Treaty of the Catholic King with the Apostolic See and other Christian princes." (fn. 4)
Spanish. Draft, written partly by Secretary Quintana. pp. 14.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. l. f. 22. 216. Draft of a Treaty Of Alliance between King Ferdinand The Catholic and King Henry VIII. Of England.
This document is in all essential respects identical with the preceding one.
Indorsed : "Copy of the draft of the treaty. It is uniform with the draft that remains in the hands of the King of England. The preamble is the same in both drafts."
Latin. Copy or draft. pp. 8.
14 Sept.
S. E. R. L. 847. f. 104.
217. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Hieronymo De Vich, his Ambassador in Rome.
The secret courier (fn. 5) whom he (Vich) sent to him arrived on the 3rd, and brought him his letters of the 16th of last month. Has likewise received his letters dated the 23rd of August, and a duplicate of the letter which he sent him on the 18th of August, viâ Lyons. Has learned by his letters that the French have invaded Italy, and that Prospero Colonna and his men have been taken prisoners. This news has made a deep impression upon him. Is sure that the great disorder in which are Italian affairs is the cause of the disaster.
He is, however, not to say so to the Pope. On the contrary, he is to tell the Pope that God has permitted the French to conquer Italy only that they may be expelled from that country with greater ignominy. Is fully persuaded that "His Divine Majesty (fn. 6) " will give a complete victory to the Pope and to him over the French. Their cause is better than that of the King of France. Begs the Pope, for God's sake, not to lose courage, and not to fear. The Church is always strongest when she seems feeble and powerless.
Has ordered his Viceroy, without loss of time, to unite his army with the Papal troops and the Swiss, leaving or not leaving a garrison in Verona. Milan, or at least the Papal States, must be defended at all risks. For that purpose it is very desirable that the friendship of the Swiss should be preserved.
Is making preparations to begin war against France on the frontiers of Spain, and has sent a courier to his ambassador in England, in all haste (fn. 7) , ordering him to beg the King of England, in his name and in the name of the Pope, to invade France and to succour the Holy Father. Has very earnestly entreated the King of England to do so. The Pope ought to do all he can to satisfy the wishes of King Henry. He is to publish, without delay, the bull of censure against the French which the King of England has asked of him. He is to stigmatise the French as usurpers of the property of their neighbours and disturbers of the peace of Christendom, and as the obstacle to war with the Infidels. Such a bull will have great weight with the King of England. It will animate him and furnish him with a good pretext for declaring war. The bull will justify the war in the eyes of the English as well as of the Spaniards.
Arms his fleet, and intends to send it to Italy. Is ready to sacrifice his life and his states, and the states of his daughter, the Queen of Castile, for the defence of the Pope. Would not hesitate to give "a thousand lives and a thousand states if he had them," in order to avert all danger from such an excellent Pope as the present Pontiff.
He is to tell the Pope not to be afraid of the French. Even if they had conquered the whole of Italy, the King of England and he would be able to wrest from them all their conquests in two days.
He must write to him directly, and send his letters by two or three couriers, and by different routes.
Has ordered his Admiral of Naples to form an army for the defence of that kingdom.—No date. No signature.
Indorsed : "Vich. Segovia, the 14th of September 1515."
Spanish. Draft. pp. 7.
Sept. (?)
S. E. Var. L. 1554. ff. 38, 39.
218. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Diego De Aguila, his Ambassador in Milan.
The French have crossed the Alps, Prospero Colonna is taken prisoner, his army is disheartened, and the Swiss have assembled in Rivoli, in order to decide what they are to do.
Orders him to go and see the Swiss, whom he is to encourage, and to persuade to invade France. The King of England is ready to invade her from the other side. He and his son, the King of England, will never forsake the Swiss.—No date. No signature.
Indorsed : "Aguila."
Spanish. Draft. pp. 4.
20 Sept.
P. A. d. l'E. Mon. Hist. K. 1639. No. 44a.
219. Treaty (projected) between Pope Leo X. and François I., King Of France.
1. The contracting parties bind themselves to assist one another to defend their persons and dominions against all and every aggressor without exception.
2. The King of France, who claims the right to be Duke of Milan and Seigneur of Genoa, binds himself to defend the states of the Roman Church and those which the Holy See may in future obtain. He is bound to assist the Holy Father to reconquer those states which belong to him by right, but which are occupied by other personages.
The Pope, on the other hand, binds himself to assist the King of France to defend the towns, territories, &c., which he possesses at present in the duchy of Milan or which he may possess in future.
3. The Pope is to restore Parma and Piacenza, within ten days, to the King of France.
4. The King of France is not at liberty to take under his protection places or territories which belong to the Church. If vassals or feoffees of the Church should in future wish to place themselves under the protection of the King of France, the right of the Church must be expressly reserved.
5. Salt, intended to be used in the duchy of Milan, must be bought in the states of the Church.
6. The King of France takes the family de Medicis, with all their present and future possessions in Florence and in other places, under his especial protection.
7. Duke Charles of Savoy is, as umpire, to pronounce on the reparation which the Florentines are to make to the King of France in atonement of their offences. If they abide by the arbitration of Duke Charles, they are to be received as allies ; if not, they are not to be allies.
9. The King of France binds himself to pay to Giuliano de Medicis, his wife, and legitimate children, a pension of 8,000 livres Tournois a year, and to give him the title of a French dukedom. This pension is to lapse to the King of France if Giuliano de Medicis and his wife die without legitimate children begotten in their marriage.
10. The King of France binds himself, further, to pay Giuliano de Medicis a pension of 20,000 livres Tournois for life.
11. He binds himself to pay another pension of 8,000 livres Tournois to the wife of Giuliano de Medicis for life.
12. The King of France binds himself to pay Lorenzo de Medicis 6,000 livres Tournois a year for life.
He further binds himself to give to the same Lorenzo de Medicis 500 French lances. The lieutenant, ensign, men-at-arms, &c., of these troops are to be Frenchmen. Lorenzo de Medicis is at liberty to choose, instead of the 500 lances, a pension of 4,000 livres Tournois a year.
13. The allies of both contracting parties are excepted from this treaty.
14. The King of France binds himself to permit the Spanish army to march to Naples, provided that it leaves within 24 hours after the conclusion of this treaty, and stays in no place more than one day.
15. The Pope and the King of France bind themselves to do their best to bring about a general peace.
16. The Pope is to recall his army from Verona and the territories of the Venetians.
17. The ambassadors swear that this treaty shall be strictly observed for all time to come.
The ambassadors signed this treaty.
It is dated the 20th of September 1515.
Indorsed : "Copy of the treaty which the King of France sent to the Pope."
Spanish.
This document is an old translation, or rather an abstract of the treaty, which served, probably, for the information of King Ferdinand.
Spanish. pp. 4.
22 Sept.
S. E. A. L. 635. f. 21.
220. The Emperor Maximilian to Albertus Pius, Count Of Carpi, his Ambassador in Rome.
The enemy has conquered the whole of Milan, with the exception of the citadels of Milan and Cremona. He threatens to besiege Brescia or Verona. The Swiss have returned to their own country.
Has concluded a new treaty with the Swiss, the object of which is to drive the French out of Italy and to invade France. Is prepared to go in person to Italy. Hopes to render great services to the cause of the league. The King of England may perhaps be induced to declare war with France.—Inspruck, the 22nd of September 1515.
Latin. Copy. pp. 3.
Sept. (?)
S. E. R. L. 847. f. 115.
221. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Hieronymo De Vich, his Ambassador in Rome.
Answered his letters of the 8th, 17th, and 23rd of August by despatches sent on the 3rd and 14th of September.
Hears that the Pope intends to go to Gaeta, or to Isola There is no necessity to leave Rome, for the league is in a most prosperous state. The Swiss have sworn to live and to die with the league, and to defend Milan to the utmost of their power against the King of France. The last courier from Italy brought him news that his Viceroy of Naples had left Verona, and had gone with the Spanish army to Cremona. When the courier left, it was expected that on the next day the Viceroy would accomplish a junction with the Papal and Florentine troops. As soon as that was done, the three allied armies were to march, without loss of time, to succour the Swiss.
It is not to be presumed that the French will dare to give battle to an army consisting of 40,000 Swiss, and of the Spanish, the Papal, and the Florentine contingents. It would be madness to do so, and the King of France would thereby expose himself to the risk of losing not only his army, but also his kingdom.
The most necessary thing now to be done is to procure money for the pay of the Swiss.
The Pope has asked whether he must fly from Rome in case the French should be victorious, or whether it would be better to begin negotiations with them. Can only advise the Pope to have more courage. The French will not come to Rome, even if they should gain some advantages at the beginning of the campaign. At Ravenna they were victorious, and they lost Italy in consequence of their victory. Is preparing war on the Spanish frontiers of France, and has written to the King of England, asking him to make war upon France in the north. Even in case France should conquer the whole of Italy, she would be obliged to give up her conquest in order to defend herself against the continued invasions of the King of England and the Spanish army.
If, however, the Pope wishes to go to Gaeta or to Isola, he may do so, and he shall be well received there.
Is glad to hear that the separate and more intimate league between the Pope and the King of England is concluded. The King of France, there is no doubt, will be much disturbed in his plans by this alliance between Rome and England, and the general league will gain much power when he (King Ferdinand) concludes a new treaty of friendship and brotherhood with his son the King of England, which, as he confidently hopes, will soon be done.
Has received letters from the Bishop of Tripoli, his ambassador in England, dated the 1st of September, by which he learns that the King of England has not changed his mind, but is still desirous to enter into a new and most intimate alliance with him (King Ferdinand). The King of England was only waiting for the arrival of a messenger whom he (King Ferdinand) had sent to that country with certain papers. This messenger has written to him that he disembarked at Southampton, which is a port in England, on the 7th of the same month (September), and that he hoped in four or five days more to reach the court of the King of England. There is no doubt that immediately after his arrival the alliance will be concluded.
Is informed by his ambassador that the King of England is willing to become a member of the general league if he is invited by the Pope to enter their confederacy. The Pope ought, therefore, without delay, to write to the King of England, making use of all his powers of persuasion in order to induce the King of England to take part in such a holy work as that of defending the dominions of the allies. The Pope must send a copy of the league to the King of England, who, with good reason, has complained that he has been left in the dark respecting the details of the treaty, and has said that the only reason why he has not already entered the league was that the Pope had not invited him to do so. The Pope ought not to lose one moment in writing to the King of England. Will do the same.
Has been informed by his ambassador that the Duke of Albany, whom the King of France has sent to Scotland, has taken prisoner the Queen, who is the sister of the King of England. Declaring the husband of the Queen a traitor, the Duke of Albany has taken upon himself the government of Scotland ; keeps the sons of the late King of Scotland in prison, and, as it seems, intends to kill them, declaring himself King of Scotland. The Scots have, moreover, besieged a castle belonging to the King of England, who is greatly scandalized by their proceedings. Thus, God has ordained in his mercy that the interests of the league shall be advanced on all sides, and that the pride of the French shall be lowered.
Monsieur d'Esparres, brother of Monsieur de Lautrec, has sent him a messenger, asking a safe-conduct for an ambassador, who is to go to Spain. Has answered that he wishes for peace, but only an honourable and profitable peace for all the members of the league, and especially for the Holy Father of all Christians.—No date. No signature.
No contemporary indorsement.
Spanish. Draft. pp. 13.
Sept. (?)
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 1.
222. Treaty between Pope Leo X., the Emperor Elect, King Ferdinand The Catholic, Henry, King Of England, the Duke Of Milan, the Republic Of Florence, and the Swiss Confederacy. (fn. 8)
1. None of the contracting parties is at liberty to make war on any other of the contracting parties. Disputes of one of the contracting parties with another are to be decided by the other allies.
2. The contracting parties are bound to succour one another in case of one of the allies being attacked. If one of the allies who has dominions in Italy is attacked, the other allies who possess dominions in Italy are bound to send him more succour than those who do not possess states in Italy.
If one of the allies is attacked whose states are not in Italy, the allies who possess states out of Italy are bound to contribute more to his defence than those who possess states in Italy only.
In case the Pope, the Emperor in his Italian dominions, King Ferdinand the Catholic, the Duke of Milan, or the republic of Florence be attacked,—
The Pope is bound to send a succour of 300 horse and 1,500 foot ;
The King of Aragon, 400 horse and 2,000 foot ;
Florence, 300 horse and 1,000 foot ;
Milan, 300 horse and 1,500 foot.
The Emperor is to be rated according to the extent and wealth of the Italian states which he will acquire in his war with Venice.
The Swiss are bound to send 2,000 foot, on condition, however, that the other allies take 2,000 or 3,000 more Swiss into their pay. Should Switzerland be invaded during the war, the other allies are bound to pay the Swiss the expenses of 4,000 foot and 400 horse.
If the King of England, the Emperor, or the King of Aragon are attacked in their Transalpine (fn. 9) dominions, the Pope, the Duke of Milan, and the republic of Florence are not bound to send troops to succour them. But the allies who either have no states in Italy, or who are attacked in their extra-Italian dominions, on the one hand, and the allies whose dominions are in Italy, on the other hand, are bound to assist one another with money, that is to say, to pay to the attacked ally a sum equivalent to the pay of 1,000 foot. The Swiss alone are excepted from this obligation.
3. Any one of the contracting powers who, after the conclusion of this league, has a secret understanding with the enemy, or shows him favour, is to be punished by the league as though he were an enemy.
4. The punishment is to be very severe if one of the allies entertains an understanding with the King of France, who is the enemy of almost all the allies.
5. The Venetians, being allied with the King of France, are to be considered as enemies.
6. The Emperor being at war with Venice, the other allies are to succour him till the war is ended, viz.,—
The Pope with 300 horse and 1,500 foot ;
The King of Aragon with 1,000 horse and 3,000 foot ;
The Duke of Milan with 300 horse and 2,000 foot ;
Florence with 200 horse and 2,000 foot.
7. The Imperial cities in Italy are bound to obey the orders of the Emperor ; and the allied princes, if necessary, are bound to compel them to do so.
8. As some years ago a treaty of alliance was concluded between the late Pope Julius, the King of Aragon, the King of England, and Venice, from which Venice afterwards was excluded, in order to suppress the schism, the duties towards one another imposed upon them by the said treaty must be fulfilled by them.
9. The exclusive object of this alliance being to render a war with the Infidels possible, the King of France and the Venetians are to be admitted as members of the league, if they wish.
10. The treaties of peace and friendship existing between the members of this league remain in full force.
11. All the allies are bound to assist the Pope with all their forces to entirely extirpate and annihilate the schismatics.
12. The common expedition against the Turks is to take place next year. The object of the allies is to reconquer the holy city of Jerusalem, as well as all the other provinces belonging by right to the Christians, but occupied by the Infidels. All the allies are bound to send ambassadors to Rome, who are to assemble once a week, and to consult with the Pope about the best means of carrying out the expedition against the Infidels.
13. If one of the allies should be attacked by the Turks, all the other allies are to succour him with all their forces. The Pope and the Emperor, being the heads of the league, will in such a case give the necessary orders.
14. Should one of the allies delay to send succour in defence of the league, saying that he is prevented from doing so, his excuses are not to be accepted, as it is incumbent on all Christians to prefer the common safety to private advantage. Should any one of the allies persist in refusing to succour the others, he is to be deposed from his throne and deprived of all his honours and dignities.
15. A crusade will be preached in all the churches of Christendom.
16. The Emperor elect is to be the commander-in chief of all the Christian armies which are to be sent against the Turks.
Constantinople and the whole of Greece is to be his share of the conquest. The old empire of the Occident and of the Orient is to be revived, and to be re-united in the person of the Emperor.
The other provinces to be conquered will be divided among the allies. The Pope and the King of Aragon reserve to themselves all the rights they may have in the countries of the Infidels.
17. The war with the Turks once begun, it is not to be interrupted or abandoned before "Jerusalem and the whole of Syria, the Constantinopolitan Empire, and the other kingdoms, provinces, and districts" occupied by the most cruel enemy of Christendom have been conquered by the league.
18. If the league undertake a war against the schismatics, the Pope and the Emperor will decide upon the contingent to be sent by each member of the confederacy.
19. None of allies is permitted to assist the subjects of the other allies against the wishes of their sovereign.
20. Every member of the league is bound to expel the rebels of any other member of the league from his states and territories.
21. The right to become members of the league is reserved to the Kings of Hungary, Poland, Portugal, Scotland, Denmark, and to the other Christian princes.
22. If one of the allies dies before the expedition against the Turks is at an end, his successor has a right to enter, in his stead, into the league if he wishes.
24. The Pope has a right to excommunicate such of the allies as may refuse to fulfil the obligations laid on them by this treaty.
25. The members of the league are at liberty to nominate their allies within two months.
26. This treaty is to be ratified within three months.
27. It is to be published on the day of [blank].
28. The conservators of the treaty are—
The Sacred College of Cardinals,
The King of Hungary,
The King of Poland,
The King of Portugal,
The Princes Electors of Germany,
They and the contracting parties will force any reluctant member of the league to fulfil his duties towards the confederacy.
Indorsed : "Articles concluded between the members of the league.
"Copy of the articles of the treaty of alliance and of the league which have been concluded between the Pope, the Emperor, and the other Christian princes."
Latin. Draft or contemporary copy. pp. 8.
30th Sept.
P. A. d. l'E. Mon. Hist. K. 1639. No. 44b.
223. Pope Leo X. to François I., King Of France.
Charles, Duke of Savoy, and Luis, Bishop of Tricarico, acting as his proxies and commissioners ; and Anthonius du Prat, Great Chancellor of France, in his quality as procurator and ambassador of the King of France, have concluded an alliance, the object of which is to prepare a general peace of Christendom.
Has read all the chapters of this treaty, which he modifies, ratifies, and approves, as follows :—
1. He and the King of France are bound to defend one another against any aggressor, without exception.
2. The King of France is bound to defend the present and future possessions of him (the Pope) and the Church, and to assist in reconquering the territories which by right belong to the Church, but are withheld from her by other persons.
3. The King of France is not at liberty to take territories, places, &c., belonging to the Church under his protection.
4. The King of France is not at liberty to take any vassal of the Church under his protection, without making an express reservation of the rights of the Church.
5. All salt used in the duchy of Milan must be taken from the Papal States.
6. The King of France is bound to defend his (the Pope's) native town and the republic, which he has never ceased to love.
7. The King of France is bound to take the family de Medicis under his particular protection.
8. The King of France binds himself in especial to protect and assist the Magnificent Giuliano de Medicis, brother of the Pope, and Lorenzo de Medicis, nephew of the Pope, and their descendants, helping them to preserve their possessions, present and future, in Florence and in all other countries and cities whatever.
The Pope, on the other hand, binds himself to assist the King of France to defend his present and eventual rights on the duchy of Milan. The Pope binds himself, further, to deliver immediately to the King of France the cities of Parma and Piacenza.
9. The treaties of alliance and friendship of the contracting parties with other princes and republics, and especially the treaty of the Pope with the Swiss, remain in full force, except in as far as they are incompatible with this treaty.
10. Both contracting parties bind themselves to do all in their power to bring about a general peace of Christendom. They promise to use their influence with the Emperor elect, King Ferdinand the Catholic, the King of England, &c., in order that a general war with the Turks may be undertaken.
Sealed with the seal of the Ring of the Fisherman.—Given at Rome, in the Palace of St. Peter, the 30th of September 1515, the 3rd year of the pontificate of Pope Leo X.
The Pope has commissioned the Bishop of Tricarico to deliver these articles to the King of France, and to tell him that he (the Pope) is not willing to recall his troops from Verona. Should the King of France insist on this condition, the Bishop is to break off all further negotiations, and to leave the court of the King.
The Pope has likewise ordered the Bishop to insist on the article concerning Florence. If the King of France refuses to accept it, all further negotiations are to cease.
The Bishop is to take care that the Marquis of Mantua and Prospero Colonna be included in this treaty.
All these articles are of great importance to the Pope. If the King of France refuses to accept any of them, no treaty with him will be concluded by the Pope.
The Pope does not wish the pensions to Giuliano and Lorenzo de Medicis to be mentioned in the treaty.—No indorsement. No signature.
This paper seems to be an abstract of the projected treaty, and of the instructions given by the Pope to his ambassador. They were probably sent from Rome to King Ferdinand for his information.
Spanish. pp. 4.
Oct. (?)
S. E. A. L. 635. f. 12.
224. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Pedro De Urea, his Ambassador at the Imperial Court.
Has often written to him, but he has not answered. Has not seen a letter from him for more than three months. He must write directly, and henceforth send his letters by two or three different routes.
Has been informed by his ambassadors in Italy of the defeat of the Swiss by the French, (fn. 10) who are in possession of the whole duchy of Milan, with the exception of the citadels of Milan and Cremona. The manner in which the battle was lost gives him even more pain than the loss of Milan. The Swiss were mad with presumption, and would not wait for the armies of the allies. His Viceroy and Lorenzo de Medicis did not hasten to join the Swiss with their armies, and the Emperor went far away to Germany, instead of doing his duty. He left Verona destitute of a good garrison.
The past cannot be changed ; but the allies must do what they can to retrieve their losses. Is now more confident that the French will be defeated than he had been formerly. The French have suffered heavy losses in the battle with the Swiss.
Is resolved to remain true to the league, and hopes the Emperor, the Pope, and the Swiss will do the same. Does all in his power to re-animate the Pope and the Swiss. Begs the Emperor to do the same. The Emperor ought to go in person to Italy.
The King of France intends to have an interview with the Pope. Begs the Emperor to prevent this meeting. The Emperor is perhaps also inclined to go to the meeting of the Pope and the King of France, but on no account can he be permitted to do so. The King of England and the Swiss would be very distrustful of the Emperor, if they heard of his intention to meet the Pope and the King of France.— No date. No signature.
Indorsed : "Don Pedro de Urea."
Spanish. Draft. pp. 4½.
Oct. (?)
S. E. Var. L. 1554. ff. 223, 224.
225. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Ramon De Cardona, his Viceroy in Naples, and Captain-General of his Army in Italy.
The misfortune which has befallen the army of Italy cannot be remedied. Believes that he has done all in his power to prevent it, and that his is not the fault.
As the Swiss are always venal, it may be that they may again be bought, and induced to turn their arms once more against France. If the Swiss can be prevailed upon to invade France on the frontiers of Switzerland, the King of England will invade her from the north. France will thus be obliged to accept reasonable conditions.—No date. No signature.
Indorsed : "Viceroy."
Spanish. Draft. pp. 4.
1 Oct.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. y Cap. c. Pont. L. 2. f. 17.
226. Pope Leo X. to Hieronymo De Vich, Ambassador Of King Ferdinand The Catholic in Rome.
Declares, on the faith of a Pope and a Christian, that although he has entered into negotiations with the King of France, he will never conclude a treaty with that prince to the prejudice of King Ferdinand.—Rome, the 1st of October 1515.
(Signed)
Sadoletus.
Latin. Copy. p. 1.
Beg. of Oct. (?)
S. E. Nap. L. 1004. f. 24.
227. Treaty between King Henry VIII. and the Archduke Charles.
[Project of the treaty which was concluded between the King of England and the Archduke Charles on the 24th of January 1516. Queen Katharine mentions it in her letter of the 31st of October 1515. Although she states that it had been concluded a fortnight earlier than the treaty between England and Spain of the 18th of October 1515, it seems to have remained a project until the 24th of January 1516. At all events, this document is in all essential parts identical with the treaty of the 24th of January, and it is therefore superfluous to give an abstract of it.]
Indorsed : "1512. (fn. 11) Naples."
Latin. Contemporary copy. pp. 7.
12 Oct.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 36.
228. Henry VIII. to Cardinal Wolsey.
Commissions him to conclude a treaty of peace and alliance with the ambassador of King Ferdinand the Catholic and Queen Juana of Castile.—Westminster, the 12th of October 1515.
(Signed)
Henry Rex.
Porter.
Indorsed : "Commission of the King of England to the Cardinal of York to conclude the treaty with the Catholic King. 1515."
Latin. Written on one sheet of parchment. Autograph.
19 Oct.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 12.
229. Treaty between King Henry VIII. Of England and King Ferdinand The Catholic.
The commissioners are—
Thomas, Cardinal of York, for the King of England ; and
Bernard de Mesa, Bishop of Tripoli, for King Ferdinand the Catholic, in his name and in the name of Juana, Queen of Castile.
1. All injuries, offences, losses, &c., caused by one of the contracting parties to the other contracting party, either at sea or on land, are forgotten and forgiven. The contracting princes, as well as all their subjects, are to live henceforth in the most perfect harmony and friendship. Neither of the contracting princes will invade the present or future dominions of the other contracting prince, nor assist any other power which intends to invade them. On the contrary, King Henry and King Ferdinand, as well as their heirs and successors, are and shall be allies and confederates, and promise to defend, with their united forces, their present and future dominions against all and every aggressor, without any exception.
If one of the allies is attacked by another prince or republic, the other allied prince who is not attacked will summon the aggressor to desist from his enterprise, and if his summons remains without effect, he will declare himself an enemy of the attacking prince or republic.
If the King of England is attacked, and requests King Ferdinand to send him an auxiliary army, King Ferdinand and Queen Juana will send him, without delay, as many troops and ships as are required, or as they can spare. The King of England is to pay the expenses. In case King Ferdinand or the Queen of Castile is attacked, the King of England is bound to send them the same assistance, if requested to do so.
2. Merchants and other subjects of either of the contracting princes are at full liberty to travel without passports, and to carry on commerce and other business in the dominions of the other contracting party, if they respect the laws and privileges of the towns or city in which they live.
3. Rebels and exiles of one of the contracting princes will not be favoured or permitted to stay in the dominions of the other contracting party. On the contrary, they will be arrested and delivered to the prince whose subjects they are.
4. If either of the contracting princes conclude any alliance, peace, or truce with any other power, he is bound expressly to include the other contracting prince in the alliance, peace, or truce.
5. No letters of marque and reprisals will be given by either of the contracting parties in prejudice of the subjects of the other contracting party. All vessels belonging to subjects of the contracting parties are to give security, amounting to the double value of the vessel and merchandise, that they will keep peace at sea with the subjects of the other contracting party. If any captain or crew of a vessel belonging to one of the contracting princes injures subjects of the other contracting prince, the injured party is to be indemnified out of the security given.
6. If this treaty of peace be broken by the subjects of one or of both the contracting princes, the prince whose subjects have done wrong will take care that prompt reparation is given.
7. If subjects of one of the contracting princes are injured by subjects of the other contracting prince, and cannot obtain reparation from the ordinary judges, they are at liberty to ask redress of the prince of the injuring party, who will see that prompt justice be done. No letters of reprisals will be given before the redress asked from the prince of the injuring party has remained without effect.
8. This treaty is to be promulgated in all large towns and seaports of the dominions of both parties within six months after its date.
9. If a ship belonging to subjects of one of the contracting parties is wrecked on the shores belonging to the dominions of the other contracting prince, all assistance possible is to be given. The goods saved are to be collected and to be restored to their proprietors, who are only bound to pay a moderate sum, settled by four expert men, as recompense for the salvage.
10. Both contracting parties will swear strictly to observe all the articles of this treaty.
11. The ratified treaties will be exchanged within six months.
The commission of the King of England, dated Westminster, the 12th of October 1515, follows.
The commission of King Ferdinand, dated Ventosilla, the 2nd of May 1515, follows.
Given in London, the 19th of October 1515.
(Signed)
T. Cardinalis Ebor.
Indorsed : "1515. League and confederacy between the Catholic King, Doña Juana, his daughter, and the King of England. X (fn. 12) October 1515."
Latin. Written on one large sheet of parchment. Autograph.
19 Oct.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 27.
230. Treaty of King Henry VIII. Of England with King Ferdinand The Catholic.
Is a transcript of the same treaty.
Latin. Written on paper. pp. 7.
20 Oct.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 30.
231. Henry VIII., King Of England, to King Ferdinand The Catholic.
The Bishop of Tripoli, Spanish ambassador in England, has introduced to him Luis Gilaberte, a gentleman of his (King Ferdinand's) bedchamber. Both of them have delivered their credentials, and have told him what they were instructed to say to him. After having heard them attentively, and taken the advice of his councillors, he gave them a reply which they, no doubt, will faithfully relate.
They have, at the same time, delivered to him the splendid presents and jewellery which he (King Ferdinand) has sent to him. Great as the value of the presents is, he values them principally because they show his (King Ferdinand's) love and benevolence towards him. No one could send such presents who is not animated by the most sincere and tender love towards him. Sees how much he values and esteems him. Loves him as much and as sincerely as he ever did before, and even more. Has forgotten all the disagreeable things which have passed between them. Begs to be allowed to regard him as a brother or as a son. Often looks at the presents, and every time he sees them, his (King Ferdinand's) image is recalled to his mind's eye. Promises to do for him all that he is able to do, and wishes for nothing so much as to contribute to his prosperity.—Greenwich, the 20th of October 1515.
(Signed)
Vester bonus frater et filius,
Henry R.
And. Ammonius.
Addressed : "To the most serene and mighty Prince Ferdinand, by the grace of God King of Aragon, &c., our most beloved father."
Latin. Autograph. pp. 2.
20 Oct.
S. E. Pat. Re. I. L. 806. f. 23.
232. Henry VIII., King Of England, to King Ferdinand The Catholic.
This document is a Spanish translation of the preceding letter.
20 Oct.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 29.
233. King Henry VIII. to King Ferdinand The Catholic.
Had asked his (King Ferdinand's) ambassador, Luis Caroz, to write to him (King Ferdinand) begging him to send a good physician to him. Thanks him very much for having done so. Magister Hernando Lopez is a most distinguished doctor.
The Magister Hernando Lopez has told him how much he (King Ferdinand) loves him.—Palace at Greenwich, the 20th of October 1515.
(Signed)
Henry R.
And. Ammonius.
Addressed : "To the most serene and mighty Prince Ferdinand, by the grace of God King of Aragon, &c., our most beloved father."
Latin. Autograph. p. 1.
27 Oct.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 34.
234. King Henry VIII. to All Persons.
Ratifies the treaty with King Ferdinand the Catholic, concluded on the 19th of October 1515.
Given under the great seal, Westminster, the 27th of October 1515, 7th of his reign.
(Signed)
Henry Rex.
Indorsed : "Ratification of the league and confederacy concluded between the Catholic King, Don Ferdinand, and Doña Juana, and Henry, King of England. 1515."
Latin. Written on parchment. Autograph.
7 Oct.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 33.
235. King Henry VIII. to All Persons.
This document is a copy of the same ratification, written on common paper.
27 Oct.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 32.
236. King Henry VIII. to All Persons.
Swears, in the chapel of his palace at Greenwich, to the treaty with King Ferdinand the Catholic, concluded the 19th of October 1515.—Greenwich, 27th October 1515.
Indorsed : "Testimony of the oath sworn by the King of England to observe the treaty which was concluded with his Highness in the year 1515."
Latin. Written on parchment. p. 1.
27 Oct.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 35.
237. Henry VIII. to All Persons.
Swears to observe the treaty concluded by him on the 19th of October with King Ferdinand the Catholic, in his own name and in the name of Queen Juana, his daughter.—No date.
(Signed)
Henry R.
Indorsed : "Oath of the King of England."
Latin. Written on parchment. Autograph.
31 Oct.
S. E. I. L. 806. f. 24.
238. Katharine, Queen Of England, to King Ferdinand The Catholic.
God alone knows how glad she was when she heard from Gilaberte the good tidings respecting his health. Had been very anxious to have news from him since she knew that he was so ill. Joins daily with the King of England in praying to God to restore him, her good father, to perfect health.
The King of England is very proud of the splendid presents he has sent for him. (fn. 13) All say that never did more magnificent presents come to England. It is due to his presents that the treaty with England is concluded and the alliance renewed. This treaty will be much better observed than the preceding one. His ambassador will write to him more fully on this subject. The former treaty contained clauses which the King of England and his Council had never liked to consent to. These clauses were neither profitable to him (King Ferdinand) nor advantageous to the King of England.
As the money he is to receive from England is, according to the new treaty, to be given to him as a loan, he may rest assured he will obtain it. Before the time of repayment arrives means may be found to arrange matters in such a manner as he likes. The English will do all in their power to please him.
This disposition of mind in the English was very visible in the last transactions, and that, too, at a time when the English affairs were going on well, and the French were very prosperous. The English had only a fortnight before concluded a most intimate alliance with Flanders. The time for concluding a treaty between Spain and England could not have been worse chosen. There is no people in the world more influenced by the good or bad fortunes of their enemies than the English. A small success of their enemies prostrates them, and a little adversity of their antagonists makes them overbearing. Such being the case, he may judge for himself how much the English love him, and how much they are persuaded that his friendship is necessary to them. The ambassador will write to him the very words the King of England has said to him.
The Spanish ambassador has behaved very well and has rendered good services.
She and the King of England are in good health. Gave birth to a child after Candlemas.—Greenwich, the day before All Saints.
(Signed)
The Queen.
Postscriptum.—Recommends to him Fray Diego Hernandez, her confessor and chancellor, who has gone to Spain. He has served her very faithfully all the time he was in England, and much better than certain persons pretend. Had he remained in England things would not have come to so bad a pass as they did. Begs him to show favour to Fray Diego Hernandez.
Begs him to assist Maria de Salinas, who has faithfully served her, and who has always comforted her in her hours of trial. Considers a service rendered to her servant as a service rendered to herself.
Spanish. Holograph. pp. 4.
5 Nov.
P. A. d. l'E. Mon. Hist. K. 1482. No. 44.
239. Bernard De Mesa, Bishop Of Tripoli, and Spanish Ambassador in England, to King Ferdinand The Catholic.
Luis Gilaberte left London on Friday, the 2nd of November. Received, the same day, letters from the Spanish ambassador in Rome, dated the 12th of October, informing him that the city and castle of Milan, together with the Duke, were lost. Learnt by the same letters that the Pope persisted in his purpose of not treating separately with the King of France, and requested the Emperor, him (King Ferdinand), and the King of England not to forsake him. The Emperor, he was informed in the same letter, was presiding in person over a diet of the Swiss, who were fully decided to risk their lives in order to drive the French out of Italy.
Went on Sunday, the 4th, to the King of England, to communicate these tidings to him. The King, however, had already received the same information from his ambassador in Rome.
Begged the King to tell him his opinion.
The King said he was right glad to hear of the persistence shown by the Pope, especially as the King of France had written to him on the 17th of October that he had settled all his disputes with Rome, and nearly all his disputes with the Swiss. The King of England does not believe what the King of France wrote to him.
The King of England approves of the presence of the Emperor in Switzerland, although he thinks the Swiss are too avaricious and too villanous a people to persevere in any virtuous undertaking.
Answered the King that, in his opinion, the presence of the Emperor would keep the Swiss to their duty, and if they heard that he (King Ferdinand) was resolved not to forsake the Pope and the Church, they would be ashamed of betraying the Holy Father to the French.
The King replied that this was the very pith of the whole question, namely, to know whether he (King Ferdinand) would undertake a war with the King of France. He added that there was never a better opportunity for such an enterprise.
After having said to the King that his remark was perfectly just, he ventured to express his hope that the King of England would assist him (King Ferdinand).
The King replied, that if he (King Ferdinand) would begin the war, he would find some one who would come forward to his aid.
The King of England did not express himself more clearly, but the Cardinal repeated to him two or three times that, if he (King Ferdinand) should begin a war with France, the King of England would succour him.
Thinks the King of England is waiting for the answer of the Swiss to the communication he has made to them through the Secretary of the Duke of Milan.
He is able to judge for himself whether he can undertake a war with France before he knows what the King of England will do. Believes, however, that the King of England will not positively promise any assistance before he sees that he (King Ferdinand) is ready for an enterprise.
On the other hand, if the Swiss accede to the demands of the King of England, it is probable that he will ask him (King Ferdinand) to undertake something against France, because the English are very desirous to do some injury, whatever it may be, to the French.
Writes almost verbatim what he hears in England, in order that he (King Ferdinand) may be enabled to decide for himself on this most important question.
The courier whom he sends with this letter to the Master of the Port is the bearer of a despatch from Juan de Lanuza. —London, the 5th of November 1515.
Addressed : "To the most serene and mighty Prince the King of Aragon, &c., our sovereign Lord."
Indorsed : "To his Highness, from the Bishop of Tripoli."
Spanish. Autograph. pp. 2½.
Nov. (?)
S. E. R. L. 847. f. 116.
240. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Hieronymo De Vich, his Ambassador in Rome.
Wrote to him on the 26th of last month and on the 5th of the present month of November. Writes once more to him, because it is not certain that his former letters have arrived.
Has been informed that the Pope intends to sign a treaty of peace with France. It seems that his Holiness has hitherto been playing a double game, and that all his zeal for the delivery of Italy from the French was only a pretence.
If the Pope refuse his assistance, he (King Ferdinand) must drive the French out of Italy without the help of the Pope. The Pope, however, must be treated as though he were a decided enemy of the French, and had consented to the treaty with them only from overwhelming necessity. As the affairs of the league stand, the Pope may, if he likes, mediate a treaty of peace between him (King Ferdinand) and his daughter Juana, on the one part, and the King of France on the other part. But it must be well understood that he consents to this peace only in order to gain time, and to await an opportunity of expelling the French from Italy.
The Pope has said that he very much approves the plan of forming a state for Prince Ferdinand out of the continental possessions of Venice ; but that is hypocrisy. The Pope dislikes the scheme, fearing that he (King Ferdinand) and the Emperor might thereby render themselves masters of Italy. This apprehension is one of the principal reasons why the Pope desires to conclude peace with France. It would be best not to speak with the Pope on this subject.
Wishes the concession of a cruzada in Naples.—No date. No signature.
No contemporary indorsement.
Spanish. Draft. pp. 5.
11 Dec.
S. E. Cap. c. l. Cas. d. Aust. L. 2. f. 39.
241. King Ferdinand The Catholic to All Persons.
Swears, in the Abbey of the diocese of Coria, and in presence of Giovanni Ruffo, Archbishop of Cosenza, and Micer Galeazo, envoys of the Pope, of Bernard de Rojas, Marquis of Denia, and of Ferdinand de Toledo, Commendador Mayor of the Order of Santiago, strictly to fulfil the treaty concluded with the King of England on the 19th of October 1515.
Spanish. Original copy. p. 1.
11 Dec.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 31.
242. King Ferdinand The Catholic to All Persons.
Swears, in the Abbey of Coria, to the treaty lately concluded with Henry, King of England.—Abbey, in the diocese of Coria, the 11th of December 1515.
Indorsed : "Testimony of the oath which his Highness has sworn to observe the treaty concluded with England in the year 1515."
Latin. Copy. pp. 2.
Dec.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 28.
243. King Ferdinand The Catholic to the Alcaide and Governor of the Town of Tripoli.
Orders him to proclaim in Tripoli that a treaty has been concluded with the King of England, according to which the most intimate friendship exists between England and Spain.
Orders him to execute the clauses of the treaty touching the securities to be given by Spanish captains and masters sailing from that port, that they will not injure English subjects at sea.—Plazencia, [blank] of December 1515.
Indorsed : "Letter to the Alcaide and Governor of Tripoli, in which it is ordered that the peace with England shall be proclaimed."
Spanish. Draft. pp. 2.

Footnotes

1 It is not easy to state positively the date of this document. From its contents, however, it is clear that it was written soon after the death of King Louis XII. of France, and it is not improbable that it was dated on the same day as the preceding letter patent of the Pope.
2 "Sabado XXII. de Marzo di a mi mujer para la despensa XX. D." As the receipt of the letter of the 4th of June is mentioned in this despatch, the 20 ducats must have been given by the secretary to his wife on the 22nd of March of the following year ; and, in fact, the 22nd of March fell on Saturday in the year 1516. Thus, the date of this despatch is almost beyond doubt in as far as the year is concerned. From the mention made in it of the letter of the 4th of June, it is probable that this despatch was written in the course of the summer. The note written by Quintana is difficult to read ; it has been misread, and false deductions have been drawn from it.
3 This document is the rough draft of the treaty which was concluded on the 18th of October. It differs from it in many parts.
4 It is evident that this indorsement is an error.
5 Secreto coreo.
6 "Su Divina Majestad."
7 Con toda furia.
8 This treaty, or project of a treaty, seems to be the one which is mentioned in the preceding despatch of King Ferdinand to Hieronymo de Vich. According to that despatch, the King of England had declared his readiness to be a member of it.
9 It seems that this treaty was concluded or drawn up in Rome.
10 Battle of Marignan, on the 13th and 14th of September 1515.
11 Although this treaty is indorsed 1512, it is clear, from its contents, that was concluded or projected after the conquest of Tournay by Henry VIII.
12 Sic.
13 "... el qual esta el mas soberbio del mundo con la gran dadiva que Vuestra Alteza le embyo y todo su Reyno claramente conoçen y confiesan que ha sydo la mayor que nunca a Ynglaterra vino."


<--Previous:
Spain:
December 1514
Next:-->
Spain:
1516