Syde - Sywell

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

292-294

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'Syde - Sywell', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 292-294. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51325 Date accessed: 21 August 2014.


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Syde, county of Gloucester.—See Side.

SYDE, county of Gloucester.—See Side.

Sydenham

SYDENHAM, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Lewisham, hundred of Blackheath, lathe of Sutton-at-Hone, W. division of Kent, 8½ miles (S. S. E.) from London; containing 2915 inhabitants. This place, which previously consisted only of a few scattered dwellings, was brought into notice by the discovery, in 1640, of a saline chalybeate spring, whose waters, similar in their properties to those of Epsom, made it the occasional resort of invalids. The wells have fallen almost into disuse, but the salubrity of the air, the pleasantness of its situation, and its proximity to the metropolis, have made Sydenham the permanent residence of numerous families of respectability, who have erected handsome seats and villas in its vicinity. The upper part of the common commands extensive and richly-varied prospects, and the surrounding scenery possesses much beauty; agreeable walks may be had, and the adjoining woods are frequented by parties from the metropolis on pleasure excursions. The London and Croydon railway intersects the chapelry, where a station has been established. A fair, chiefly for pleasure, is held on TrinityMonday. The proprietary episcopal chapel here, of which the Rev. P. A. French appoints the minister, was originally a meeting-house, where Dr. John Williams, author of a Greek Concordance, officiated for many years. The district church, dedicated to St. Bartholomew, was erected in 1831, at an expense of £9485, and is a handsome structure of Suffolk brick, ornamented with stone, in the later English style: it contains 1000 sittings, of which 500 are free; the nave is lighted by clerestory windows, and separated from the aisles by lofty piers and arches of graceful elevation. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £240; patron, the Vicar of Lewisham. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans.

Sydenham (St. Mary)

SYDENHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Thame, hundred of Lewknor, county of Oxford, 2¾ miles (E.) from Tetsworth; containing 438 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, in the gift of the Slater family; income, £100. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1823, under an inclosure act.

Sydenham-Damarel, or South Sydenham (St. Mary)

SYDENHAM-DAMAREL, or South Sydenham (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Tavistock, hundred of Lifton, Lifton and Southern divisions of Devon, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Tavistock; containing 369 inhabitants. The parish is separated from Cornwall by the river Tamar, and its northern extremity is crossed by the Tavistock and Launceston road. It comprises between 1000 and 1100 acres; the surface is hilly, and the soil in general a light earth. A mine of lead and copper was opened a few years since; slate is quarried, and also stone for building and for road-making. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 6. 8., and in the gift of John Carpenter, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £165, and there is a parsonage-house, with a glebe of about 80 acres. The church is a small handsome edifice.

Syderstone (St. Mary)

SYDERSTONE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Gallow, W. division of Norfolk, 7 miles (W. N. W.) from Fakenham; containing 504 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Fakenham to Docking, and comprises 2511 acres, of which 2246 are arable, 62 pasture, and 203 heath or common. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 13. 4.; net income, £534; patron, the Marquess of Cholmondeley: there is a parsonage-house, with a glebe of 45 acres. The church is chiefly in the decorated and later styles. Here are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists.

Sydling (St. Nicholas)

SYDLING (St. Nicholas), a parish and liberty, in the union of Cerne, Cerne division of Dorset, 3 miles (W. S. W.) from Cerne; containing 675 inhabitants. It comprises 4980a. 2r. 32p., of which about 1962 acres are arable, 2778 pasture, and 179 woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 1.0½.; net income, £169; patrons and impropriators, the Warden and Fellows of Winchester College. The great tithes have been commuted for £513, and the appropriate glebe contains 6¾ acres. The church is a neat structure in the later English style, with a high embattled tower; the chancel was elegantly rebuilt by the late Sir William Smith. At Hilfield, in the parish, is a chapel of ease, erected about 1680. There is a place of worship for Independents; and a national school is supported by endowment.

Sydmonton

SYDMONTON, a chapelry, in the parish, union, and hundred of Kingsclere, Kingsclere and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 7 miles (N. by E.) from Whitchurch; containing 151 inhabitants. The manor was given by Henry VIII. to the Kingsmill family, whose spacious mansion here was entirely remodelled in 1837. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, and situated in the park, has a fine Norman arch separating the chancel from the nave.

Syerscote

SYERSCOTE, a township, in the parish and union of Tamworth, N. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 3 miles (N. N. E ) from Tamworth; containing 46 inhabitants. It comprises 480 acres, of good strong wheat land, the property of Mr. Joseph Erpe.

Syerston (All Saints)

SYERSTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Southwell, S. division of the wapentake of Newark and of the county of Nottingham, 5¾ miles (S. W.) from Newark; containing 208 inhabitants. The living is annexed, with that of Coddington, to the vicarage of East Stoke: the tithes of Syerston were commuted for land and a money payment in 1792. The old Fosse-road passes through the parish, which is partly bounded by the river Trent.

Sykehouse

SYKEHOUSE, a chapelry, in the parish of Fishlake, union of Thorne, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 5 miles (N. W. by W.) from Thorne, containing 628 inhabitants. The township is bounded by the Goole canal on the north; and, including the allotments awarded to it on the inclosure of Hatfield Chase, and Thorne Common, comprises an area of 4043a. 17p., chiefly on the west side of the river Don. About one-fifth is in pasture; the soil is various, and the lands are mostly cultivated by their proprietors, by whom they have been much improved. The chapel, dedicated to St. Peter, is an ancient structure of stone, to which a tower of brick was added in 1724: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patron, the Vicar of Fishlake. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists. A school is partly supported by endowment; and £20 per annum are distributed among the poor.

Syleham (St. Mary)

SYLEHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Hoxne, E. division of Suffolk, 3½ miles (S. W.) from Harleston; containing 399 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Waveney, which separates it from the county of Norfolk; it comprises 1600 acres, of which 30 are common or waste. Syleham Hall, an ancient building, formerly the property of the Barrys, is now the residence of the Rev. A. Cooper. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £70; patron and incumbent, the Rev. A. Cooper; impropriators, Miss Doughty and others, whose tithes have been commuted for £245. The church is an ancient edifice, partly in the early and partly in the decorated English style, with a circular tower. There was once a chapel at Esham, a hamlet in the parish.

Symondsbury (St. John the Baptist)

SYMONDSBURY (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Bridport, hundred of WhitchurchCanonicorum, Bridport division of Dorset, 1¼ mile (W. N. W.) from Bridport; containing 1316 inhabitants. It is on the road from London to Exeter, and comprises about 4000 acres. The surface is marked by several conical hills; the soil in the low grounds is a strong clay, and in other parts loam and sand. The small river Simene runs through the lands. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £36. 3. 4., and in the gift of the family of Raymond: the tithes have been commuted for £770, and there is a parsonagehouse, with a glebe of 160 acres. The church is a large cruciform structure, partly in the early and partly in the later English style, with a tower rising from the intersection, and contains some monuments to the family of Syndercombe. In the neighbourhood are several springs slightly impregnated with iron.

Symond's-Hall, with Combe

SYMOND'S-HALL, with Combe, a tything, in the parish of Wotton-under-Edge, union of Dursley, Upper division of the hundred of Berkeley, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 3 miles (N. E. by E.) from Wotton; containing 576 inhabitants.

Synfin, with Arleston

SYNFIN, with Arleston, a liberty, in the parish of Barrow, union of Shardlow, hundred of Afpletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 2½ miles (S. by W.) from Derby; containing 85 inhabitants.

Syresham (St. James)

SYRESHAM (St. James), a parish, in the union of Brackley, hundred of King's-Sutton, S. division of the county of Northampton, 4 miles (N. E.) from Brackley; containing 889 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Brackley to Towcester, and comprises about 1770 acres. Stone is quarried for building and other purposes. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13: net income, £152; patron, C. C. Dormer, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1765: there is a parsonage-house, with 33½ acres of land. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. The Rev. George Hammond, in 1755, bequeathed £400 for teaching fourteen boys; and in augmentation, Conquest Jones in 1773 left £100.

Sysonby

SYSONBY, a parish, in the union of MeltonMowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 1 mile (W.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 68 inhabitants. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Melton-Mowbray; the vicarial tithes of Sysonby have been commuted for £130.

Syston (St. Peter)

SYSTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Barrow-upon-Soar, E. division of the hundred of Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 5¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Leicester; containing 1421 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1768 acres; the soil is various, and in good cultivation: plaster of Paris of very fine quality is obtained. The manufacture of stockings affords employment to about 400 persons. The Leicester navigation and the Melton navigation both pass through the parish. The Midland Railway Company have a station at Syston, for their Rugby and Derby line; and here commences their Syston and Peterborough line, for which an act was passed in 1845, and which is 47¾ miles in length. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 2. 7.; net income, £115; patrons and impropriators, the University of Oxford: the glebe comprises 7½ acres, with a house. The church contains 700 sittings. There are places of worship for Particular Baptists, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans.

Syston (St. Mary)

SYSTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newark, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 3¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Grantham; containing 226 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the east by the Ermin-street, and comprises 1864a. 3r. The Hall, which stands on the summit of a hill, and commands very extensive prospects, is surrounded by a beautiful park and gardens, containing together more than 500 acres: the library is one of the finest collections in the country. The living is a vicarage; net income, £83; patron and impropriator, Sir J. C. Thorold, Bart. The church has portions in the Norman and early English styles; in the chancel are four mural monuments to members of the Thorold family. The church and burialground, with the distant woods of Jericho, are celebrated by Sir Walter Scott, under the name of Willingham, in his Heart of Mid-Lothian.

Sywell (St. Peter and St. Paul)

SYWELL (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Wellingborough, hundred of Hamfordshoe, N. division of the county of Northampton, 6 miles (N. E.) from Northampton, on the road to Stamford; containing 211 inhabitants. The parish comprises by admeasurement 1950 acres, exclusively of 127a. 24p. occupied by Sywell woods: stone is quarried for the roads. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 1. 5½.; net income, £492; patron, Earl Brownlow. There is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 70 acres. The church is an ancient structure with a tower; the eastern window is of stained glass, inserted at the expense of the Hon. and Rev. H. C. Cust, the rector: the interior of the edifice was entirely renovated in 1838.