BHO

America and West Indies: April 1633

Pages 161-165

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies: Volume 1, 1574-1660. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1860.

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Citation:

April 1633

April 10.
London.
The Company of Providence Island to Capt. Bell, Governor. Have received his letters of 9th Nov. and 19 Dec. last. Allow him 32 servants for salary, and encourage him to look after the planting of cotton, madder, and other commodities which will return good profits. Will take care that by the next ship the surgeon's chest is well furnished. Thank him for his good usage of the Indians. Are glad that former breaches are made up, and desire that unity may be preserved. Conceive that 20 or 40 negroes might by very useful for public works, but think that too great a number in the island might as yet be dangerous. If any ordnance taken by the Dutch, is offered, he is authorized to give commodities or victuals in exchange. Some restrictions in trading with strangers removed, and certain privileges allowed. Hope that the reports of the enemy's preparations are untrue. Recommend diligence in fortification. Rejoice to hear of the people's thankfulness for faithful ministers and their desire for a continual supply; intend to send one over by the next ship to supply Mr. Ditloff's place if he still purposes a removal. Concur in approbation of the mates, Wells and Collins. Will entertain his proposals for procuring cochineal, &c. Wants for the communion shall be prevented hereafter. Commend his attention to their instructions concerning Mr. Morgan; and his advice in getting able men experienced in martial employments; hope to send a supply by the next ship. "Our Dutch Carpenter" to be encouraged. Request him to defer setting out the 20 proportions [of land] for the Company; to enquire into Wil. Russell's complaints that agreements had not been kept with him. Mr. Punt's misdemeanors are under examination. Truck for the Indians now sent. Directions concerning the meal taken over in the Hopewell. Commend the readiness of Capt. Rudyerd and his men to finish his fort. Will maintain the authority of the Council table. Masons, carpenters, and sawyers by the next ship. Commend Serjeant Whitehead. Justify his censure of Jeremy Elfrith for opposing Mr. Morgan, but desire him to inform Elfrith that the Company are willing to take him into their favour. Agree to widow Bunberry's request, to be discharged from the Company's service. Explain the meaning of the 23rd Article of their late instructions, touching those that die in the island. Comment upon Mr. Ditloff's reasons for suspending Mr. Halhead from the sacrament. Desire that Mr. Holligrove, Mr. Yeo, and their servants may be carefully "disposed of." Twenty passengers now sent over. Desire he will assign portions of land in the most convenient places to Mr. Hook, Mr. Bradley, and Mr. Lane. Request that Mr. Lane may be afforded every facility for planting his madder. Direct him to entertain Capt. Hilton with all fitting courtesy should he go in the pinnace to Providence, and to allow Lane and Roger Floud to accompany Hilton. Detailed instructions concerning the voyage. Liberty to Captain Bell, notwithstanding any former restraint, to dispose of his tobacco to the Dutch. [Colonial Entry Bk., Vol. IV., pp. 46–48.]
April. The Governor and Company of Providence Island to Governor Bell. Have received his letters and are rejoiced to hear of the safety and plenty of the colony. Complain that their instructions were not attended to, for taking in a freight, prepared against the return of the Charity to Association, whereby the Company have sustained much loss, and the planters much damage. Directions for the disposal of 20 men and goods now sent. Another supply of a larger proportion may shortly be expected. Recommend care in planting necessary provisions and in the further discovery of ways of profit for the Company. Wish cotton to be planted, but forbid the sending home of any freight by this ship. [Colonial Entry Bk., Vol. IV., p. 44.]
April 10.
London.
The Company of Providence Island to the Governor and Council. Have received their letters of 9th Nov., and approve of their care. Have remitted Mr. Morgan's offence upon his submission. Are very sorry that the passengers were visited with "that dangerous infection;" great care taken for their comfort, and inquiry is being made by whom the Company's intentions were abused. A magazine could not be transported by this pinnace [the Elizabeth] but supplies will be furnished by the next ship, particularly necessaries for the surgeon, a good quantity of wine for the communion, and a convenient supply of strong waters to be "used for health and not for disorder." Answer complaints concerning the "illness" of the meal. Hope the planters' future diligence will recompense their former slackness in fortification. Small returns from the island; means to be adopted to increase them. Encourage the planting of cotton. Are exceedingly glad of the reformation occasioned by their instructions, and strongly recommend the preservation of unity and peace. Disposal of servants and plantations by the next ship. Instructions to put the coneys into the little islands or else destroy them, as being more destructive than rats. Desire a valuation may be put upon the estate of Ed. Williams. Complain of the long detention of the ship at Providence. Intend to lay the foundation of a trade at Cape Gratia de Dios, and to employ persons acquainted with the character and language of the Indians. Forbid trucking with them. Conduct to be observed towards them. Direct examination into complaints that the stores are partially distributed. Hope that former experience will prevent the planters from incurring the hazard of want. Commend the courage shown upon "the Dutchmen's" approach, and desire that a course be resolved upon in case "any suspicious ship shall press on the shore in that manner." [Colonial Entry Bk., Vol. IV., pp. 45, 46.]
April 10.
Brooke House.
Minutes of a Committee for Providence Island. Mr. Hollygrove to have authority to take with him from St. Kitt's to Providence twenty men, upon certain conditions; Capt. Camock to buy Lord Paulet's pinnace for the Company. Two mates, Wells and Collins, to be again employed in the Company's service. Mr. Upton to purchase Irish beef and other provisions in Devonshire for their next voyage. Answers to the general letters from Providence and Association are signed and sealed. [Colonial Entry Bk., Vol. III., p. 97.]
April 13.
Brooke House.
Minutes of a Committee for Providence Island. Examination of the accusations against Punt, in presence of the Masters of the Trinity House; particulars of the charge to be submitted for their opinions. Finance [Colonial Entry Bk., Vol. III., pp. 97, 98.]
April 15. Instructions from the Company of Providence Island to Richard Lane, bound in the Elizabeth to the West Indies. On his arrival at Association, if Capt. Hilton resolve not to accompany him, to receive from him and Capt. Bell directions for "our intended trade." If Capt. Hilton goes, to accompany him to Providence, and after planting his madder to depart with Capt. Hilton for managing the trade, an account of which is to be kept. Preservation, making inventories, and sending home the commodities procured; if of value, to be kept with all possible secrecy. To receive instructions from Capts. Hilton and the Governor and Council of Providence, and to accompany the goods home if he see cause. [Colonial Entry Bk., Vol. IV., p. 49.]
April 15.
London.
Instructions from the Company of Providence Island for Rich. Lane, in case Capt. Hilton does not go with him from Association to Providence. After having planted his madder, to take on board Roger Floud and other persons, not to exceed eight, as the Governor and Council of Providence think fit. To go to the Bay of Darien, with goods for trade. To provide against fear of discovery by the Spaniards, and foul weather. To use means to ingratiate himself and company with the Indians. Not to give cause to suspect the value of their gifts. To conceal the object of their coming, but express a desire of renewing friendship with them, "favourers of the English nation, and especially of Don Francisco Draco (whose name they seem to honour)." To make advantage of them by trade for gold, &c.; discover what things may be obtained from them, and their value; labour to possess them with the natural goodness of the English nation; and restrain any boisterous carriage to the women, and particularly "mocking, pointing, or laughing at their nakedness." To prohibit the seamen from entertaining much familiarity with the natives, much less trade. Power to inflict reasonable punishment upon offenders. When furnished with a good return to go back to Providence and dispose of the good as formerly instructed. Observance of directions from Capt. Hilton, commended to his care. [Colonial Entry Bk., Vol. IV., p. 50.]
April 15. Instructions from the Company of Providence Island to Mat. Harbottle, master of the Elizabeth, bound thither. To go to the West Indies, touch at St. Christopher's or Barbadoes, for cotton seed and all other fruits, seeds, plants, and commodities growing there, and thence to Association, to deliver the Company's letter to Capt. Hilton, and take him and others on board. Thence to sail for Providence, deliver the letters and supplies, and land Capt. Hook, Bradley, and Lane. If Capt. Hilton cannot or will not remove from Association, to attend to Mr. Lane's instructions. Private trade forbidden, nor any seaman under his command to be permitted to truck for commodities. To return to England when required to do so. [Colonial Entry Bk., Vol. IV., p. 49.]
April 15.
Brooke House.
Minutes of a Committee for Providence Island. Instructions to Harbottle, master of the Elizabeth; to Lane, for managing the trade in the Bay of Darien, in case Capt. Hilton does not go with him; and to Bradley, are signed and sealed. Security given against a bond. Captain Camock, having bought Lord Paulet's pinnace for the Company for 405l., Collins is ordered to bring her into the Thames, and make her ready with all speed for a voyage. [Colonial Entry Bk., Vol. III., p. 98.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
74. The Privy Council to Capt. John Pennington. Warrant to require all commanders of ships coming from any of the English plantations to give bond to bring their vessels and lading, without breaking bulk, into the port of London, or some other port of the kingdom, there to enter and unlade their goods. [The date has been altered from 18 February 1632–3.]