BHO

America and West Indies: March 1655

Pages 421-423

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies: Volume 1, 1574-1660. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1860.

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Citation:

March 1655

March 1. Similar Orders. Directing the Governor of Tynemouth Castle, to certify to the Council the number of prisoners taken at Dunbar, that those who are fit may be delivered to Martin Noell, to be sent to Barbadoes; those also at Plymouth to be similarly dealt with. [Ibid., p. 705.]
March 1. Similar Orders. For nine prisoners to be delivered to Martin Noell; as also prisoners at Tynemouth and at Plymouth. Approved by his Highness 20th March. [Ibid., p. 733.]
March 2. Order of the Council of State. Referring petitions of Peter Lutzen, commander of the Neptune of Copenhagen, and of Lawrence Magnus, merchant of the Hope of Copenhagen, praying for release of their ships detained at Plymouth, in respect of their trading with the English at St. Christopher's and Nevis, though they had licence from the Governors of those islands, to the Judges of the Admiralty for their report. [INTERREGNUM, Entry Bk., Vol. CIII., p. 706.]
March 6. 36. Petition of Samuel Mathews, on behalf of the inhabitants of Virginia, to the Lord Protector. Notwithstanding the planting of tobacco in England has been prohibited by several Acts of Parliament, and by a late ordinance of his Highness, far greater quantities of ground are being prepared in England for that purpose than ever. Prejudice to trade, customs, and excise. Prays that the premises may be taken into consideration, and that his Highness will cast a favourable eye upon the plantations in America, and in particular upon that hopeful colony of Virginia, which in a few years will be in a condition to raise several staple commodities. Signed by Sam. Mathews.
March 6. 37. Petition of merchants and mariners, trading to the English plantation in America. Similar in substance to the preceding. Pray that a speedy course may be taken for the total suppression of planting tobacco in England by imposing a mulct or fine. Signed by W. Underwood, Thos. Gower, Robt. Wilding, and 188 others.
March 6. Minute of the Council of State. Petition of merchants and mariners, trading to the English plantations in America, and of Samuel Mathews, on behalf of the inhabitants of Virginia, concerning the restraint of planting English tobacco, were delivered to the Council by his Highness and read. [INTERREGNUM, Entry Bk., Vol. CIII., p. 712.]
March 12. 38. Petition of Martin Noell of London, merchant, to the Lord Protector and his Council. For a warrant to ship 2,000 dozen of shoes, and 300 dozen of boots for the service of Barbadoes and the other Caribbee Islands, as also for the fleet.
March 12. 39. Petition of John Deane to the Lord Protector and his Council. For a warrant to transport 30 horses to Barbadoes, upon payment of the usual custom of 20 shillings per horse.
March 12. Orders of the Council of State. For warrants to Martin Noell, merchant, to export to Barbadoes and the other Caribbee Islands, 1,000 dozen pairs of shoes, and 100 pairs of boots; and to John Deane to transport 20 horses to Barbadoes, upon payment of customs. [INTERREGNUM, Entry Bk., Vol. CIII., p. 720.]
March 12. The warrants above mentioned. [Ibid., Vol. CXXXIII., p. 101.]
March 15. Orders of the Council of State. For release of the Hope of Copenhagen and the Sea Fortune of Schiedam and all their lading, seized at Plymouth for trading with the English plantations in America. [INTERREGNUM, Entry Bk., Vol. CIII., p. 725.]
March 24. 40. Reasons by the petitioners, alluded to ante, No. 36, for suppressing the planting of tobacco in England. Endorsed, "Presented 24 March 1655."
March 24? Reasons why no tobacco should be planted in England. Presented to the Commissioners appointed to put in execution an Act of Parliament prohibiting the same. [DOMESTIC Corresp., INTERREGNUM.]
March 24? 41. Reasons why the English plantations abroad should be encouraged, and the planting of tobacco in England, contrary to several Acts and Ordinances, prohibited. Also, reasons why the planting of tobacco in England is very prejudicial to the English plantations abroad, and the manufacture of this nation at home.
March 26. Order of the Council of State. Referring some considerations, relating to the Forts of St. John, Fort Royal, and Penobscot in Acadia, lately taken from the French, to the Committee for Foreign Plantations, for their report how the matters therein contained may be best accommodated for the service of the Commonwealth. [INTERREGNUM, Entry Bk., Vol. CIII., pp. 740–41.]
March 30. Similar Orders. For a pass for the David of Bristol, Wm. Stratton, master, to New England, notwithstanding the late embargo. Letter from Thos. Shewell, collector of customs at Bristol, certifying that the David set sail for New England, in contempt of the embargo, to be referred to the Mayor of Bristol and Robt. Aldworthy, for their report. Robt. Johnson, taken at sea, a prisoner at Lambeth House, to be sent to Barbadoes with the other prisoners, on account of Martin Noell. [Ibid., pp. 757–58.]
March 30.
Whitehall.
42. Copy of the preceding Order concerning Robert Johnson.
March 30. Warrant for the David of Bristol, William Stratton, master, to pass with her company and lading to New England. [INTERREGNUM, Entry Bk., Vol. CXXXIII., p. 111.]