East Indies: August 1613

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1864.

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Citation:

'East Indies: August 1613', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616, ed. W Noel Sainsbury( London, 1864), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/p254 [accessed 20 July 2024].

'East Indies: August 1613', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Edited by W Noel Sainsbury( London, 1864), British History Online, accessed July 20, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/p254.

"East Indies: August 1613". Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Ed. W Noel Sainsbury(London, 1864), , British History Online. Web. 20 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/p254.

August 1613

Aug. 1. 648. Memorial of books and writings, chiefly wills and inventories of the goods of men who had died since they left England, delivered by Benj. Farie to John Jourdain, captain of the Darling. [One page. O. C. Vol. I., No. 108.]
Aug. 13
Aleppo.
648. Consul Barth. Haggatt to the Governor and Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies. Has occasionally written to Morris Abbott, to whom he has also sent three letters for the Company. Death of Wm. Finche, the Company's late servant, Capt. Boys and Lawrence Piggott, all at Babylon, soon after their arrival. Eleven mules and the goods of Finche taken away by the Bashaw of Babylon, “and so eaten up by the Turks.” Unsuccessful efforts of the Venice viceconsul to recover them, but there being no English consul or viceconsul to defend them, no means nor threats could prevail. Has sealed Finche's writings and given them to the bearer, Thos. Styles, for the Company. Commendations of his worth ; thinks some part of the goods might yet be recovered if the Ambassador at Constantinople would call Cigalla, the bashaw of Babylon, to account. Thos. Styles, Finche's servant, apprehended, imprisoned, and vilely treated by the bashaw, escaped to Aleppo; cause of his long stay; the writer's good opinion of him, and his ability to give some relation not impertinent to the Company's affairs in the Indies, having travelled from Cambaya and those parts into Persia and Aleppo. Martin Cheshire, another of the Company's servants, arrived some six months past in the Ascension, who escaped in very great danger from Ormus to Ispahan, and so to Babylon and Aleppo; found him a man of fair condition and honest, from whom some very good notes may be gathered of the ports, places, and manner of trade of the Portugals in those parts. Desire to do the Company service, being a freeman of their charter though no adventurer. [Two pages and a half. O. C, Vol. I., No. 109.]