East Indies: February 1613

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1864.

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'East Indies: February 1613', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616, ed. W Noel Sainsbury( London, 1864), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp250-251 [accessed 20 July 2024].

'East Indies: February 1613', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Edited by W Noel Sainsbury( London, 1864), British History Online, accessed July 20, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp250-251.

"East Indies: February 1613". Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Ed. W Noel Sainsbury(London, 1864), , British History Online. Web. 20 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp250-251.

February 1613

Feb. 10.
In the Road of
Tecoe upon
Sumatra.
639. Samuel Bradshaw to the Principal Resident in Bantam for the English nation. Account of proceedings since the departure from England of the Ascension and Union under command of Alex. Sharpey. Loss of time in setting up their pinnace at Saldanha prevented them going to Cambaya and Surat to establish a trade, which he hopes the general has achieved by this time, seconded by Capt. Hawkins. Parted company with Sharpey in a storm about the Cape; made for St. Augustin, where they stayed 20 days in hopes of the general 's arrival; and Rich. Wickham, factor, Rich. Kenn, purser, and another man were either taken or slain by the treachery of the Portugals; “and so with cold cheer and colder comfort we put to sea” about Feb. 1608–9. Fell into an exceeding great bay, called by the people the land of Gomano-marrow, a country very fruitful and pleasant to behold the people made great show of kindness, and great hope was conjectured of trade for ambergris. Escape from the treachery intended against them, the people in a great multitude and with great fierceness coming against them “as if they had meant to have swallowed us up at once, but we so reached them with our great ordnance that I think they now began to understand what ordnance and guns could do, and at last were forced to haste from their attempts.” The bearers Hump. Biddulph and Silvester Smyth, who the writer has sent with goods which he could not sell at Tecoe, will relate all particulars. Endeavour to recover their lost men death of seven more “by a sudden disease.” Second assault “with a great multitude of boats and many of them great vessels so thick pestered with men as was wonderful to see; “fearing mischief in the night presently weighed anchor, and for a farewell gave them a broadside, having by treachery and sickness lost 14 men. Arrived at Acheen 27 June; admittance to the king by means of presents endeavours of the Hollanders to debar them for trade, “but the more they sought the less they prevailed. . . . If our designs take place in Cambaya they shall to their grief find that others will trade as well as they.” Account of trucking with the Guzerats. Has received a letter from Mr. Finche, the resident at Surat, certifying that Capt. Hawkins was gone up to the Great Mogul, and of their friendly entertainment “and contraily the Malayans and Portugals.” [Three pages. O.C, Vol.I., No. 104.]