East Indies: December 1614

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1864.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:

'East Indies: December 1614', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616, ed. W Noel Sainsbury( London, 1864), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp347-363 [accessed 20 July 2024].

'East Indies: December 1614', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Edited by W Noel Sainsbury( London, 1864), British History Online, accessed July 20, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp347-363.

"East Indies: December 1614". Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Ed. W Noel Sainsbury(London, 1864), , British History Online. Web. 20 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp347-363.

December 1614

Dec. 2. 813 Court Minutes of the East India Company. Letter read from Lady Raleigh to her husband, Sir Carew Raleigh, in behalf of her son Sir Henry Thynne, complaining of the wrongs done him by the merchants in crossing his intended voyages, and desiring his assistance for reasons stated, to persuade him to put off his ship. Sir Carew charged the Company in court with hindering his intended voyage to Guiana, then that which the prince had enjoined him into Persia, and this last to the East Indies; imputations upon the Company in consequence : requests them to buy the ship; objections; committee appointed to endeavour to arrange the price. Gratification to Wm. Wise of Sandwich for services in the Clove. Wm. Janson Hooft, a Dutchman, admitted and sworn. Capt. Saris' goods to be brought to the governor's house. Factors to report on the forwardness of the ships. The younger factors to assist Nicholas Sadler at Deptford. John Kenton refused. The Advice run aground, but got off, and now ready to sail. Petition of Edward Bassett for employment refused. Thos. Rastell appointed to assist Nicholas Sadler. Report on the state of his books. Alterations in the wharf, &c., at Deptford. Demand of [John Anderson]. Mr. Leate's timber. Cordage. Simon Moore, a butcher, to be entertained as a sailor. [Three pages and a half. Court Bk., III., 295–298.]
Dec. 2.
Firando,
Japan.
814.. Rich. Cocks to Rich. Wickham. Has received his letter and given the inclosure to Mr. Nealson. “If Capt. Addames will not carry John Phebe with him, let him use his own discretion. Concerning a leak in the junk; knows Capt. Addames will not venture his life “in desperate sort.” Has not received any money from Ed. Sayer; “they which owe it are none of the Hastings in paying” Wants the key of his chamber door. [Half a page. O.C., Vol. II., No. 195.]
Dec. 3.
Firando.
815. Cocks to Wickham. Wishes him to tell John Japan to send as promised the writings of the boy Tushma, how he bought him, and gave up his right to Cocks. Annexed,
815.i. A document in Japanese, probably the writings concerning the boy Tushma, above referred to. [O. C., Vol. II., Nos. 196, 197.]
Dec. 3.
Firando,
Japan.
816. Cocks to Wickham. Has received his letter “with the paper in Japan characters” [see preceding]. Is heartily glad the leaks prove otherwise than were expected. Knows not what course to take with the Spaniard, but to set him ashore at Siam, as Cocks understood to be his wish, if any English shipping be there to carry him to Bantam; knows he will favour him in what he may; has not for his part forgotten to give him something “out of my poverty, if you or others do the like no doubt God will reward you.” [Half a page. O. C., Vol. II., No. 197.]
Dec. 3–6. 817. Court Minutes of the East India Company. The Governor acquaints the court that the Papists seeking to disturb the Protestants, the States [General of the United Provinces] have craved from the King “a mutual conjunction to be firm betwixt these two nations,” and all other differences both in the East Indies and Greenland to be accorded. His Majesty's pleasure is that commissioners be sent over presently to Holland. Sir Henry Wotton, his ambassador there, nominated one, and Clement Edmondes another. The Company to appoint two merchants, “all excuses and delays set apart, finding it impossible to be further protracted.” Robt. Middleton and Morris Abbott made choice of; an offer of Sir Noel Caron to send for a ship from Holland to carry them over “conceived too dishonorable for this land;no doubt that one of the King's ships may be had. . Letter received on behalf of John Mylles for employment, with information of a ship in the Thames going to Bordeaux, thence to victual and proceed to the East Indies. Mr. Freeman's propositions for freighting a ship. Samuel Bond to go surgeon in the Attendant.
Dec. 6.—Sale of old stores at Deptford. Middleton and Abbott accept the great charge imposed on them, and request certain directions may be given for their commission. The governor acquaints the Privy Council with the Company's submission to the King's pleasure, and their choice of two merchants, who will be ready to depart whenever they have commission, “which gave their lordships' good satisfaction.” About the purchase of some fair elephants' teeth; also of Sir Henry Thynne's ship. Petition of Bryan Edlyn for a certain salary; allowed 50l. a year and a house rent free. Suits of Mr. Adderley and Martin Kentishe referred. If the Clove has arrived at “the Wall,” bulk is to be broken there. Proposals for buying or freighting Freeman's and Moore's ship the Great Defence. Remembrances for the general court; the safe return of the ship, and opinion of the auditors that three capitals in pepper may be taken out by those who have received nothing upon this voyage; debate upon the price ; offer of Mr. Hamersley for all of it at 21d. per lb. Ryals to be procured. Small shipping of 8 or 9 score tons fit for the use of the Company to be reported. John Baker, son–in–law to Mr. Offley, sworn a free brother. Dividend of half a capital upon the eighth voyage to be presently paid. Safe return of the Clove made known to the generalty. Conduct of the general, Capt. Saris, during the voyage; his discovery of a place not formerly known, where he settled a trade, capitulated upon good terms with the Emperor of Japan, and left a factory there, not without good hopes of profit to His Majesty and the English nation; imputations cast upon him ; his private trade; Mr. Fuller's misdemeanour in striking the captain; he is held “worthy of his due commendations.” Opinion of the auditors that those in the eighth voyage who have taken out nothing may have three capitals for one. Disposal of the pepper, to be sold at 22d. per lb; the garbled at 23d. per lb. Writing for three capitals in the eighth voyage to be no bar to the half–capital dividend in money. Intention of the auditors to dispatch the business of the eleventh voyage shortly. Sale of silks. The governor reminds the Company that three years since they adventured 300l. per annum for three years towards the discovery of the north–west passage, “which business hath not succeeded according to desire, through the negligence or ignorance of the commanders,” and being returned, somewhat is brought home which belongs to the Company. The hopes and probability of finding it hereafter encourage many adventurers to undertake a voyage this year; hope of the governor that the Company will not refuse to adventure again somewhat more, considering it were dishonourable to withdraw from so worthy a work, and that the honour and benefit will be great if found ; resolution to adventure 200l.,“ so there may be no expectation of any further supply” [Six pages and a half. Court Bk., III., 298–305.]
Dec. 8.
Surat.
818. Thos Elkington to John Oxwicke, at Baroach. Has heard of the safe arrival and departure from Baroach of Edwardes and the rest. Most of the elephants' teeth sold. Sixty sail of Portugal frigates lately passed within musket shot of the ships, which seemed to go to the northward. [One page. O.C., Vol. II., No. 198.]
Dec. 9.
Brodera.
819. Thos. Aldworthe to John Oxwicke. Hears there is a difference between the brokers. Recommends him to have a care that the business be not delayed. Mr. Farewell sent for his better assistance. [Half a page. O.C., Vol. II., No. 199.]
Dec. 9.
Seville.
820. Victorin Sachwxell (sic) to Sec. Winwood. Arrival of an ambassador from Japan in the last fleet, who has been well entertained, and become a Christian, bringing great presents, valued above two millions, for the King of Spain and his Holiness. Heard from some of the Ambassador's Chistian followers of one Addames, an Englishman, married there to a principal woman, and made a great lord amongst them. [Extract from Correspondence, Spain.]
Dec. 10.
Surat.
821. Thos. Elkington to John Oxwicke. The general in want of “strong dutties” for making and mending sails. Goods sent to him, including sword blades. For providing commodities. Commendations to Baily Ball. [One page. O.C., Vol. II., No. 200.]
Dec. 10.
Firando,
Japan.
822. Rich. Cocks to Lord Treasurer Salisbury. Informed his lordship in his last of 1 Dec. 1613, by Capt. Saris in the Clove, of their long and tedious voyage from England. All Jesuits, priests, friars, and nuns have since been banished by the emperor from his dominions, their churches and monasteries pulled down and burnt, and themselves shipped for Amacan [Macao] in China and the Philippines, they reported the English nation was the cause, but it is well known to be through their own deserts. The Jesuits were the first to enter Japan, arriving at Langasaque, then a little village under the King of Ombra. or Umbra, but now a populous city. The king allowed them to build a church, and became a Christian, with most part of his subjects; the whole Spanish trade thus drawn from the Philippines and the Portugals from Macao, which caused Langasque to become so great; the Christians had there ten or a dozen parish churches and monasteries, with a bishop's see. The design of the Jesuits to get the whole revenue of Langasaque into their power gave the King of Umbra such distaste that he forsook the Christian religion, and with him many thousand more, and has ever since been a mortal enemy to the Jesuits. In 1584 the Jesuits took three Japans to Spain, giving out they were sons or nephews of the Kings of Bongo, Arinia, and Umbra; knighthood was conferred upon them by the King of Spain, with many rich presents from other princes, the Pope included; but they were in truth of base parentage and all the gifts were taken by the Jesuits for their own private benefit; strife amongst them which should be vicar–general under the Pope in these parts. A Jesuit trying to save a picture, and being found with it, was beheaded and quartered. Great likelihood of wars in Japan, Ogusho Same, the emperor, demanding the castle or fortress of Osaka, the strongest in Japan, to be given up, where Fidaia Same, the son of Taico Same, the deceased emperor, resides, and the treasures are kept which his father left him. Fidaia Same, about 22 years of age, and has about 80,000 or 100,000 malcontents, and banished men with him; the emperor has come against him with an army of 300,000 men ; they have already had some bickering, and divers have been slain on both sides. It is thought this young man cannot long stand out against the emperor, who is more politic and powerful than ever Taico Same was. It is said Taico Same was of base parentage, yet by subtlety and his great value, got possession of the whole Japan empire ; he was poisoned by a Corean lord, who poisoned himself to kill the emperor, the government of whose son and the empire he left to three great Japan lords, of which the present emperor was the chief and is 75 or 78 years of age. Is in great hope to procure trade in an island in China, near the city of cording to instructions from Peter Floris and Lucas Antheuniss. Adam Denton transferred from the Globe, into which ship the writer is put. Death of Capt. Essington. John Skinner blamed. The son of the Governor of Masulipatam taken prisoner for payment of a debt of about 9,000 ryals, in spite of 1,000 of his people, and carried aboard, “to the Company's benefit, the honour of our King and country, and to the great content of all the Moors. This governor is indebted to the Dutch 7,000 ryals, and hath been these seven years.” Chauncey received the whole debt in goods within six days. Twenty–six days sailing from Masulipatam to Bantam; ships there; arrangements for their several voyages. [Two pages and a quarter. O. C., Vol. II., No. 233.]