East Indies: December 1615

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1864.

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'East Indies: December 1615', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616, ed. W Noel Sainsbury( London, 1864), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp446-453 [accessed 20 July 2024].

'East Indies: December 1615', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Edited by W Noel Sainsbury( London, 1864), British History Online, accessed July 20, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp446-453.

"East Indies: December 1615". Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Ed. W Noel Sainsbury(London, 1864), , British History Online. Web. 20 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp446-453.

December 1615

Dec. 5.
Firando.
1063. Raphe Coppindall to [John Gourney ?] the chief factor of the East India Company in Siam, by Capt. Addames. Doubts not that he has received the Company’s instructions and turned over all remainders of former voyages to the joint stock. Reasons for his opinion that it was needless to send him any money in the junk Sea Adventure; but three thousand ryals with other goods are sent by Capt. Cocks’ advice. About selling the Company’s business in Patani, and having a junk laden from Siam with wood and hides to meet English ships appointed for Firando. What little profit is made on goods brought by the writer from Bantam and Patani is eaten up by great presents and charges, “Which this country requireth,” although, no customs are paid. Next to the hope of profit to be made in Firando by trade into China, if it can be obtained, is the trade of Siam, which is like to be a great help to mitigate the great charge of continuing this factory, which must of force be continued, if the Company join not with the Hollanders to watch an opportunity of setting foot in the Moluccas as the Hollanders, Portugals, and Spaniards have done, and then this place will be a commodious storehouse to furnish the Company with men, munition, and victuals at much cheaper rates than elsewhere, for which cause the Hollanders principally continue this factory. Several sorts of India cloth and new paintings must be provided every year, for the Japanese desire not English commodities so much for cheapness as for strangeness, “having both silk and linen stuffs made rather better and cheaper than we can afford ours.” Prices of certain goods. The Portugals and Spaniards grow daily more and more out of the emperor’s favour. The Hollanders have for a time overthrown the English trade of broadcloth; trusts a course will be taken to make them pay dearly for all the cloth they have out of England; such a business the Parliament had in hand at the writer’s coming out of England. Report of Mr. Gourney’s death. Refers to the report of Capt. Addames and Saris for any further news. [Two pages. O.C., Vol III., No. 316.]
Dec. 5.
Firando.
1064. Raphe Coppindall to Robt. Larkin and Adam Denton in Patani, by Capt. Addames. Arrived at Firando 4th Sept., where he found Addames, who did not put into China, as was reported, but into the island of Leques Grande. The greater part of this letter contains the same intelligence as the preceding, but Coppindall adds Capt. Cocks is of opinion that white and brown ginghams will prove a good commodity in the King of Shashma’s country, who is king of certain of the westermost islands of Japan, a man of great power and has conquered the Leques Islands, which not long since were under the government of China; Leque Grande yields great store of the best sort of ambergris and will vent 1,000 or 15,000 (sic) pieces of coarse cloth yearly. At his being with the Emperor, the writer procured his letters to the King of Shashma to grant the English free liberty of trade in the Leques and all his other dominions; Rich. Wickham is to go there in February and remain. Will write to him from Bantam. Prices at which the Hollanders sell English broad cloth, “the Devell hawle some of them for theire paines.” [Two pages. O.C., Vol III., No. 317.]
Dec. 5.
Firando.
1065. Raphe Coppindall to Adam Denton. Is sorry to write had news of his adventure, which is worth nothing in Firando; no man will buy his quicksilver, but the emperor who has not yet bought the Company’s, and none other hath use for it. Thinks he shall return him all again. China stuffs are not so cheap in Bantam. A Portugal junk laden with ebony taken by “the little Jackatra.” Great store of raw silks sold. [Three quarters of a page. O.C., Vol. III., No. 318.]
Dec. 6.
Firando.
1066. Rich. Cocks to [John Gourney ?]. A cargo of red wood and deer skins, the most vendible commodities, sent in the Sea Adventure, Capt. Addames master; prices at which they are sold. Directions for her lading and return. The emperor very graciously accepted the present carried up by Capt. Coppindall, and offered to give the English anything that might be for the benefit of their nation, “esteeming us above all other Christian nations whatsoever.” A Portugal junk taken on the coast by the Hollanders, and brought to Firando, the emperor allowed a good prize; and gave liberty to make all Portugals or Spaniards, as well as their goods, prize, except they have the emperor’s pass. Arrival of a ship from New Spain, with broadcloth, &c.; thinks it is the last that ever will be brought from thence, because of proclamations on both sides, forbidding, on pain of death, trade between New Spain and Japan. The emperor is no friend to Spaniards or Portugals. Concerning the commodities sold and the accounts of Lucas Antheuniss. Requests him to use all Chinas in general kindly. Jars of biscuit or rusk sent to John Gourney and Antheuniss. Could get but 500 sheets of paper. [Three pages. O.C., Vol. III., No. 319.]
Dec. 6.
Firando.
1067. Rich. Cocks to Adam Denton, principal agent of the English nation at Patani. Received his letters by the Osiander on 31st Aug., the two Dutch ships which arrived before having refused to bring them. Taking of a Portugal junk by the Jacatra. An Italian mariner and a Spanish passenger of the Sea Adventure on going to Langasaque were taken by the Portugals and Spaniards there, put in chains, and condemned to death for serving the English and Hollanders,“ their enemies (as they take us),” but the writer procured their liberty from the emperor, “to the great grief of the Spaniards and Portugals, who are not a little ashamed thereof and laughed to scorn of the Japons.” Refusal of the emperor to speak to ambassadors from the Viceroy of New Spain, or to receive their present. Seven or eight great ships, either English or Dutch, in the South Seas have done so much hurt to the Spaniards that all New Spain are up in arms and have sent a fleet to seek them. Concerning the goods sent from Patani. Has sent a cargo of money and wares sufficient to lade the Sea Adventure if she cannot recover the port of Siam, but puts into Camboja. [Two pages and a quarter. O.C., Vol. III., No. 320.]
Dec. 10.
Firando.
1068. Rich. Cocks to Rich. Wickham in Osaka. Reasons for not giving over the Siam voyage and returning to Yedo; the junk departed on the 7th present; the Dutch junk will not be ready for some days; the Osiander not these 20 days. Sends a cargo of wax, pepper, and lead to Mr. Eaton; could have sold all the lead long time past had he not kept it for the emperor; will not again keep goods by him if he can sell them. Concerning the presents for the Emperor and the King of Yedo. To bring what money Eaton can procure with him, for “we are altogether moneyless.” A Japan letter was cast into their English house, accusing Femage to be a w . . . [sic] but Capt. Addames so handled the matter that the knavery was found out, and the writer of the letter asked her forgiveness; “otherwise, if the matter had been followed, it had cost him his life, the wench putting herself to the trial of fire with a firm and stout resolution;” it was contrived against her by the malice of the Hollanders. A chest sent to her cannot be heard of; Capt. Coppindall gave the key to Mr. Nealson. [One page and a third. O.C., Vol. III., No. 321.]
Dec. 14. 1069. Grant of confirmation to the Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading to the East Indies, for transporting foreign bullion and other things, to them and their successors. [Minute. Grant Bk., p. 177. DOMESTIC, Jac. I., Cal., p. 338.]
Dec. 16.
Firando.
1070. Rich. Cocks to President Jourdain at Bantam. [The first part of this letter is contained in his three previous letters.] Concerning the goods sent in the Osiander. Is still of his former opinion as to the hope of trade in China. Cannot write of any great good to be done in this Japan trade as yet. Prices of silks; some of them may be compared to those of Naples and other parts in Christendom; none such go to Bantam. About the Italian mariner and Spanish passenger mentioned in his letter above to Denton. Thinks “duttie” will prove a good commodity, now they have permission to trade into Shashma. [Two pages and a half. Indorsed, “Sent in copy to the Company, received in London 20th June 1617, by the Clove.” O.C., Vol. III., No. 322.]
Dec. 18.
Bantam
1071. Hugh Greete to Sir Thos. Smythe. Has written four times, the tenor of his letters being to understand the rate of diamonds in England, but having received no answer is forced to buy them at hap–hazard. Intended coming to England, but at Capt. Jourdain’s request, he has accepted the appointment of chief at Succadana. Concerning his wages. Has bought diamonds weighing 455¼ carats; with money sufficient he could have made every hundred a thousand. Sends him a present of a Japan staff set with mother of pearl and fine Coromandel napkins for Lady Smythe. [One page and a half. Indorsed, “Entred.” O.C., Vol. III., No. 323.]
Dec. 20.
Bantam.
1072. Samuel Boyle to the Governor and Committee of the East India Company. The Osiander appointed for Japan sailed from Bantam in April last, being also enjoined to visit and supply the factories of Succadana and Patani. The Darling laid up at Patani through bad agreement amongst her company. Capt. Downton with the Gift and Solomon arrived at Bantam in June last, with news of the fight with the Portugals, and the departure of the Hope, laden. The Hector appointed to go to Acheen to sell her cloth before going to Bantam, thence to the coast of Sumatra where Cambaya cloth is well esteemed. The Advice and Attendant arrived at Bantam 24th July last; the Advice sailed for Japan 14 days after. The Solomon sailed for Masulipatam in August last, when the Concord arrived at Bantam from the Moluccas, having made a barren voyage through the hard measure of the Flemings; the people ot Amboyna and Banda generally stand well affected towards the English, and desire nothing more than free liberty of trade with them. The Bandanese sent one of their principal men to capitulate with the chief in Bantam concerning conditions of agreement between themselves and the English; they demand to be furnished with powder, shot, cloth, and rice, and promise to reserve their nuts, mace, and cloves, only for the English, within the liberties of their five confederate islands; at Pooloway, one of the islands, the Company have a factory established, from whence Sophony Cozucke brought the ambassador to Bantam. Account of the Thomasine being cast away upon the Celebes, after a hard voyage in the Moluccas. The Attendant sent to Jambee on the east side of Sumatra, “hitherto not discovered by any Christians;” the Flemings have sent a ship thither this year upon good hopes of the place. The Thomas arrived this month at Bantam from Sumatra, having settled factories at Acheen and Priaman. Why the country is glutted with cloth. The Gift upon her departure for England. State of the factory at Bantam; dishonest dealings of the Chinese merchants. The Thomas with a pinnace appointed to go this year for the Moluccas, where they may soon procure a lading, if not hindered by the Flemings; their gross and peremptory dealings towards the Concord and Thomasine last year. [Two pages. Indorsed, “Entred.” O.C., Vol III., No. 324.]
Dec. 20.
Firando.
1073. Rich. Cocks to John Gourney at Siam. Refers to his previous letter of 6th present. A great ship arrived this year at Langasaque from Amacan [Macao] laden by Portugals; prices of the silks, &c.; there is much deceit in some of the pieces “being good for a fathom or little more in the beginning, and all the rest of the piece worth nothing, but merchants that stand upon their credit will sell no such.” Account of their own goods which have been sold, and their prices. Japan linen cloth is so good cheap that little good is to be done in those commodities. Arrival of a ship from Acapulca out of New Spain, which went last year from Japan. News of eight great ships in the South Sea, which have done some spoil on the coast of New Spain, from whence a fleet has been sent to seek them. About the two Spaniards [sic; see ante No. 1067.] being seized by the Portugals, and afterwards set at liberty, through the writer's exertions. The Osiander will not be ready for a month, having sprung her mast. [Two pages. Indorsed, “Received 14 February 1615–6,” O.C., Vol. III., No. 325.]
Dec. 21. 1074. Commission to Benjamin Joseph, commander of the Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies [sic] to use martial law and other things, and to Henry Popewell [Pepwell] after his decease. [Minute. Grant Bk., p. 182; DOMESTIC, Jac. I., Cal., p. 339.]
Dec. 21.
Aboard the
Thomas,
Bantam Road.
1075. Capt. Rich. Rowe to the East India Company. Resolution concerning the proceedings of the Hector and Thomas; the former to attend the factory of Tecoe and parts adjoining, and the Thomas to go to Bantam. His arrival at Bantam on 8th present. “Moneys are here scant and debts hard to get in.” Was in good hopes to have gone for England this year, but understands he must sail for Banda and Amboyna. [One page. Indorsed, “Read in Court 27 June 1616.” O.C., Vol. III., No. 326.]
Dec. 23.
Bantam.
1076. Cassarian David to the East India Company. Was placed by Capt. Saris a factor in the Darling in March 1614 to go for Patani, Robt. Larkin chief; arrived at Succadana 2d April, and proceeded with a cargo of goods to Sambas in Borneo where a factory had been established. The trade of the country nothing answerable to the great charges and dangers. Through the treacherous dealing of the people, he got leave of the King to go for Succadana and shipped all his goods and slaves in the night time, “with an excuse to fetch more goods, thinking better to save my life and that which remained, than stay upon no hopes at all and endanger all.” Arrived at Succadana 18th Dec.; found a junk belonging to the English in which he shipped himself with a cargo of goods, searched the coast along, and came on 10th January to Banjermassin, where he found the people very kind and tractable, and landed his goods, dispatching the junk for Macassar to fetch more, finding the sale of cloth very quick; abundance of diamonds, sand gold, and bezoar stones; remained there till 18th Oct. 1615; reasons for his return to Bantam, leaving slaves, house, and remainder of goods in the king’s hands. The people of Banjermassin are very sociable and kind, their language is Malay and their habit Java; commodities which the country yields; sends a parcel of bezoars which are exceeding good and great; their diamonds as good as those of Landak. Is ready to return to the same place, where he hopes supplies will not be wanting. Pleads his poverty, having but 15l. a year wages, scarce enough to maintain him in clothes. [Two pages. Indorsed, “Read in court 27th June 1616. Entered.” O.C., Vol III., No. 327.]
Dec. 25.
Surat.
1077. Richard Baker to Sir Thos. Roe, Ambassador to the Great Mogul at Ajmere. Many conflicts with the Governor of Surat; his abuse of King James, saying, “our King was but as one of the noblemen here of a little island,” and that if the English sent for another firman, “though he did nothing, yet with the holding up of his finger never a boatman would put his hand to, nor porter to work for us.” They have been forced to let him take what he will; he hath things both of the company and particular men, which they do not know how to be paid for, and although he has had many presents, they have not obtained licence to carry their goods out of town. Connivance between the governor and Portugals, the latter have their prisoners at liberty. The governor says he has received two firmans importing the departure of the English from the country this monsoon, and they were forced to subscribe to a note to leave by the next easterly monsoon, before they were allowed to take any of their goods out of the Custom House. Thinks the governor wishes to make fair weather with the Portugals till their ships be clear of the coast. The Portugals would have gone aboard the English ships, but the general refused it. Disorderly conduct of Roe’s page. [One page and three quarters. O.C., Vol III., No. 329.]
Dec. 26.
[Bantam.]
1078. President John Jourdain to the East India Company. Recapitulation of his previous letter of 30th Sept. [No. 1022.] The succession of Elkington to the place of General Downton, deceased, has compelled the writer to remain in Bantam, which he was very loath to do. Ill success of the English in the Moluccas, being as it were beaten from thence by the Hollanders. The castle of Cambello, delivered up to the English for His Majesty’s use, they were fain to forsake, the Hollanders shooting at it, as also at Hitto. Desire of the people of all those countries to trade with the English notwithstanding. At Banda the Hollanders did the like, but the Bandanese put them to the worst, and killed above 300 of their best soldiers. A small English pinnace stayed it out till the last of August, and then departed laden with mace and nuts, and left at Pooloway a factory of two Englishmen. An “Arankey” and six others brought by Sophony Cozucke to Bantam; they desire aid and trade, and to be furnished with victuals and munition, promising to sell no spices to any but the English. A kinsman of the King of Macassar and the Sabundar forcibly brought prisoners to Bantam by the Flemings,—who also killed seven of the “Macassares,”—and delivered into the custody of the King of Jacatra, but he has secretly promised to give them up to the writer. Determination of the King of Macassar never more to have friendship with the Flemings; he hath already 30,000 fighting men at 12 hours’ warning to defend his country. Intention to send the Thomas, Concord, and small pinnace for Banda and Amboyna, but fears they shall not be able to furnish them all, for want of men and money. Concerning trade at Tecoe. The Thomas not permitted by the king to trade without licence; a house taken there. Strife for superiority, for the advancement of each his particular voyage. “This year doth fall out so bad that all our debtors doth fail us.” The envy of the Hollanders is so great “that to take out one of our eyes they will lose both their own.” The state of Bantam in ill case, for all the chief merchants are grown to decay; knows not by what means, except it be by sending all their wealth to China. The Hollanders undersell them purposely. The English get little justice in the recovery of their debts; without a bribe “the great king” will not do justice to any man nor hear his cause. Although the King of Jacatra has given the English a plot of ground, they are not allowed to build anywhere at Java, but at Bantam. Customs have been granted free to the English at Jacatra, “which doth much torment his [the great king’s] mind,” he being an utter enemy to his brother the King of Jacatra who daily entreats the English to build in what fashion they please. The Hollanders have their chief house at Jacatra, where their greatest stock always remains. Shall be forced to hire blacks to sail the Thomas and the Concord, as there are not 15 Englishmen left for them, although Capt. Elkington has at least 116 men well provided with all things. The most part of those who stay in the country stay against their will; it is very necessary that an agreement should be made at home for them, and also that those merchants who remain in Bantam should be good writers and skilful in accounts, of which there is great want. Lading of “this ship,” including a present of mace from the King of Macassar to King James, with a letter delivered to Mr. Elkington. Sees no great hopes of any great profit from the trade of Japan, except it be for silver to bring for Bantam, for there is no other commodity to be had. The Attendant is gone to discover the east side of Sumatra and Borneo, where there is good hopes of the vent of Guzerat cloth; as for Bantam, there is no commodity that will sell for money at any profit, and “to trust we shall be in danger to lose all.” No English commodity fit for Bantam except lead, iron, and a small quantity of broad cloth. Requests the Company to pay 1502. to his cousins Ignatius or John Jourdain, merchants in Exeter, and 26l. to his poor blind brother; also directions for the disposal of money realized by the sale of commodities belonging to General Downton and Mr. Battye. [Five pages. Indorsed, “December 1615. Read in court 27mo (sic) 1616.” O.C., Vol. III., No. 330.]
Dec. 26.
Miako, Japan.
1079. Wm. Eaton to Rich. Wickham at Yedo. Capt. Coppindall departed from Osaka 20th Nov., and arrived at Firando 28th of the same. Expected his coming long since. Sends letters left by Coppindall, who, Eaton makes account, has written to Wickham of the unkind dealing of Capt. Addames, who left Coppindall behind and would not so much as stay one day for him, “which was a unkind parte.” Wonders he has not received a letter from Capt. Cocks or any other since 18 Nov.; has written for more pepper and wax, having sold all he had; cannot sell anything else. Their ship will not be ready to depart .before February. [One page. O.C., Vol III., No. 331.]
Dec. 29.
Madrid.
1080. Sir John Digby to [Sec. win wood?] Only one carack returned this year from the East Indies, the rest having been cast away. The Portugals brought so low and that trade so ill managed, that Digby thinks there is little cause for them to brag now of any benefit they reap from the East Indies, “and I little doubt but by God’s blessing and our own perseverance, the chief profit of those countries may be diverted towards our own kingdom.” [Extract from Corresp., Spain.]