East Indies: February 1616

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1864.

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'East Indies: February 1616', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616, ed. W Noel Sainsbury( London, 1864), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp457-461 [accessed 20 July 2024].

'East Indies: February 1616', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Edited by W Noel Sainsbury( London, 1864), British History Online, accessed July 20, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp457-461.

"East Indies: February 1616". Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Ed. W Noel Sainsbury(London, 1864), , British History Online. Web. 20 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp457-461.

February 1616

Feb. 10.
Jambee.
1089. Richard Westby to John Jourdain, captain of the English house in Bantam. Concerning the sale of his damasks and sword blades. Whether he shall return his adventure in pepper or gold of the country, it being good sand gold such as is vendible at Succadana. Wishes him to bespeak some cloth for shirting. Headstrong and base conduct of Robt. Burgess; has sent him down to the ship to stay for his misdemeanors. John Smyth, a disorderly man, fit for nothing but drink and sleep, is sent back. Are generally petitioners to him to supply their wants. [One page. Indorsed “Rec. by the Attendant 18 March 1616.” O.C., Vol. III., No. 337.]
Feb. 11.
Jambee.
1090. John Tucker to Sir Thos. Smythe. Wrote to him from Bantam by Thos. Elkington touching the Attendant and Gift’s pinnace being bound for discovery of Jambee, Rich. Westby, himself, and Wm. Varnon, merchants. They came to the river’s mouth 27th September, and departed towards Jambee leaving the ship to ride there till further advice, arriving at Jambee after great trouble 21st October. The King, at first, would not give them leave to settle a factory, because the King of Jhor had sent a letter not to entertain them, for they were a vile people, drunkards and thieves, which was procured by the Flemings. Leave since given to settle a factory and build a house, which is begun. A ship of 200 tons may come up the river in August. There is great store of pepper and gold. Civil wars amongst the people. Shipping which has left Jambee laden with pepper this year. The commodities taken in little request, because the Portugals and Flemings have already sold them at very base prices. Thinks the Portugals will go there no more, one of their frigates having been taken by the Flemings. No pepper to be had at present, all having been carried away, coming so late the cause; hopes by the next return to have good store. [One page and a quarter. Indorsed, “Received by the Dragon 14 May 1617 . . for proof of the Dutch defaming us.” O.C., Vol III., No, 338.]
Feb. 15.
Masulipatam.
1091. Lucas Antheuniss to Sir Thos. Roe, ambassador, resident in Agra. Arrival of the Solomon at Masulipatam from Patani. The wars in Siam kept him so long there before he could dispatch the goods belonging to the Globe. Movements of other ships. Was forced after Gourney’s arrival to spend one year more in Siam, before he could finish the account of the 7th voyage. Prejudice to the Company through divers principals resident almost at all places, each striving for his own voyage, but now all matters are redressed by the orders brought by Capt. Middleton. Having made an end in Siam, he embarked in a small junk for Patani. Arriving there he was constrained to take the charge upon himself, through the death of Chauncey, to avoid growing disorders amongst the merchants, and least any trouble should arise from Floris having forcibly taken the Governor’s son from the Custom House aboard the Globe, there being no other means to recover about 7,000 or 8,000 ryals from the Governor. Left Patani 27th October. Found a Dutch man–of–war one of a fleet appointed for the siege of Malacca, with the aid of the King of Acheen, at the entrance of the Straits of Singapore. Conference with the King of Jhor, who came aboard their ship and informed them that “the Achender” was discontented with the English nation, because two of their ships had refused to assist him in the siege of Malacca; difficulties of their position in consequence. Coming before Malacca, “found them lustily shooting with great ordinance one another.” News of the decease of General Downton aboard the Gift, before Bantam; the loss of the Thomasine before Macassar, laden with mace and nutmegs from Banda, and the arrival of a small ship from England since Capts. Downton and Middleton’s fleets. Arrival at Masulipatam; difficulty of obtaining intelligence from Surat; goods to be bought there for Bantam. Information brought by Peter Gilson from Ajmere. Reasons for the delay in unlading his ship. Contends with the Governor of Masulipatam for good conditions. The Dutch, at a cost of 20,000 ryals, have compounded for their customs fur 4,000 ryals a year at Masulipatam; at Pettapoli, 18 leagues from hence, they pay 3½ per cent. custom; the English pay 4 per cent. Sheathing the ships will be very troublesome, through the exactions of the governors. How the Dutch have acted. A Holland ship arrived at Masulipatam with 40,000 ryals, to return directly to Holland; her lading. Goods he has orders from Bantam to buy at Masulipatam. Desires musters of indigo from Agra. Means to abide at Masulipatam till the last of October. The Concord has been in Amboyna, accompanied by the Thomasine appointed for Banda, but forced by the Dutch to depart. Fight of Spanish galleys with Dutch ships in Macassar road, “whereby discord rising between the King, English, and Dutch, he favouring the Spaniard, the two nations ashore united their forces together, but the king thinking to mend himself plotted a tragedy on the ship, wherein his son or the Sabundar remained present, and the rest most of them slain in the stratagem, whereupon the English and Dutch factors all fled in the Dutch ship, except an English quartermaster of the Globe, that would not leave the Company’s goods.” The king, they say, has sequestred the Dutch goods, but the English are untouched. The Osiander left Patani 5th July for Firando. Cocks has sold all his cloth there, through civil wars between the king and the son of him deceased. Miscarriage of the capital sent to Cochin China, and murder of Tempest Peacocke. Has not heard of the junk furnished with a capital worth above 1,000l. having reached Siam. Is of opinion that Japan will not prove, for vent of commodities out of England, near the expectation of the Company. Proceedings of John Gourney, who remained in Siam, at the writer’s departure, through the slow markets occasioned by the war between the King of Ava and Siam. Thinks him a fit man for president of the coast. Goods fit for Siam and Patani. Has come to an agreement with the Governor of Masulipatam to pay 4 per cent. customs on goods, money to be free. Fears that the Portugals have designs against the Dutch fort at Pulicat, also against Masulipatam. The land altogether revolted, and in an uproar through the war betwixt the Mogul’s son and Nissamshaw and the king of this place named Cattabashaw. [Six pages. Indorsed, “Sent by the Lord Ambassador to the factors at Surat. Received in London by the Globe 5 September 1617.” O.C., Vol. III., No. 339.]
Feb. 20.
Whitehall.
1092. Earl of Suffolk to John Wolstenholme. The King having by patent granted licence to the East India Company to transport 30,000l. in any one of their voyages, provided they return so much again into this realm, Wolstenholme is appointed to keep a private book of all moneys brought in by the Company, to be kept secret so as not to be prejudicial to them. [DOMESTIC, Jac. I., Vol. LXXXVI, No. 112., Cal., p. 351.]
Feb. 20.
Osaka.
1093. Wm. Eaton to Rich. Wickham at Firando. Commodities sold. Concerning the daughter of Oman, who says Eaton has sold her to one that will carry her away from Japan, “I wish that you nor I had never meddled with her, for that I am like to come in trouble about her.” Sadedon, the king’s secretary, is dead. “Osaka is here on fire, and there are seven streets already burnt, at least in them 500 houses, and still the lire is very vehement, and is like to do much harm by reason the wind is so big.” Commendations to Mr. Nealson. [One page. Indorsed, “1616. March 4). From Osaka by the Dutch.” O.C., Vol III., No. 340.]
Feb. 24.
Patani.
1094. Court held at Patani by Robt Larkin, chief factor, Benj. Farie, Wm. Sheppard, Geo. Savidge, John Browne, and Rich. Pitt, assisted by John Gourney, chief agent for the coast of Coromandel. The Solomon having gone to Masulipatam, before the arrival of Gourney, it is resolved to purchase a junk to take him and his goods to Bantam; also that the Advice, which after endeavouring to reach Japan returned by way of Siam to Patani, should likewise go back to Bantam before further attempting Japan. [One page. O.C., Vol. III., No. 341.]
Feb. 25.
Firando.
1095. Rich. Cocks to [the East India Company]. The Osiander arrived 31st Aug., having touched at Succadana and Patani, and brought Cocks letters “that all [voyages] are now united into one” [joint] stock. Orders left by Capt. Saris for payment of half wages. The junk Sea Adventure left on her second voyage towards Siam, 7th Dec. last. Merchandise burnt at Sakaii in these wars. The wars in Japan ended, Ogusho Same having overthrown Fidaia Same’s forces of above 120,000 men who lost his life. Has sent the journal of all matters passed here till 31st Aug. to Jourdain, principal at Bantam. Death of Gilbert Cunyng, a Dutchman, one of the Company’s servants who came to Japan with Wm. Addames. Resolution to give 20l. per annum, or 80 tais, to all merchants in Japan; Wickham to have 150 tais. Concerning the two men taken by the Portugals and Spaniards, and condemned to be hanged because they served the English, whose liberty he obtained and sent them to Bantam. A Portugal junk taken by the Hollanders and brought to Japan, allowed good prize by the emperor, both goods, junk, and men. A ship of 500 tons and a junk of 150 tons, laden with victuals and munition sent this year by the Hollanders to the Moluccas; how they had misused the English there, and how they are generally hated there worse than either Spaniards or Portugals. As to the arrival of a ship from New Spain, with broad cloth and other stuffs which were sold at such base rates that they quite spoiled the English market, “which I think they do of purpose;” and the emperor defending his subjects any more trade into New Spain, refusing the present sent by the King of Spain, and forbidding all priests and Jesuits to remain in Japan. The time which Addames promised to serve the Company being over, he desires to be tree, the emperor offering him more revenue, and counselling him not to go to sea in Japan junks; his request that the Company would lend his wife 30l. or 40l. The King of Firando will pay all his old debts; he has been trusted with merchandise for 3,000 tais to pay next year before ships go away. Has great hope to get a trade with China; and to that purpose has had one of the blank letters from His Majesty filled up to the Emperor of China, and letters and presents sent to two great China lords, by the China captains in Firando and Langasaque. Ordnance cast by the Hollanders in Japan Samples of three sorts of iron sent to Bantam. Desire of a trade into Xaxma; obtained the emperor’s letter to that king. Cargo of goods sent to Bantam. Reports of the English and Dutch East India Company being joined in one. Evil of seamen being left in the Indies at the ships going away. The mariners run into debt in Firando in tippling houses, making away with clothes and all; command from the king not to trust any mariner upon pain of losing the debt. Goods sold and which it were well to make trial of. [Twelve pages. Much mutilated. O.C., Vol. III., No. 342.]
Feb. 25.
Firando.
1096. Abstract of the preceding. [Ibid.]
Feb. 25.
Firando.
1097. Rich. Cocks to Rich. Westby at Bantam. Thanks for the pair of knives. Is sorry to hear of the death of so many of our good friends; all the Englishmen who came in the Clove have been very sick except himself. Capt. Addames and Edmond Sayer gone in the Sea Adventure for Siam; Wickham, Eaton, and Nealson remain in Japan. The goods sent in the Osiander spotted, stained, and ill conditioned; “our presents and gifts have cost much for the settling of us in a strange country.” The great troubles and wars in Japan since their arrival have put them to much pains and charges. Two great cities, Osaka and Sakaii, have been burned to the ground, each one almost as big as London, and not one house left standing, and it is reported above 300,000 men have lost their lives, “yet the old Emperor Ogusho Same hath prevailed and Fidaia Same either slain or fled secretly away, that no news is to be heard of him.” Jesuits, priests, and friars banished by the emperor and their churches and monasteries pulled down; they put the fault on the arrival of the English; it is said if Fidaia Same had prevailed against the emperor, he promised them entrance again, when without doubt all the English would have been driven out of Japan. [One page and a third. O.C., Vol. III., No. 343.]
Feb. 26.
Firando.
1098. Rich. Cocks to John Gourney at Siam. With his last of 6th December by the Sea Adventure he dispatched a cargo of goods. The Osiander was sent away yesterday, and a great Dutch ship and a junk left for Bantam two days before. Most part of the merchandise which came in the Osiander is sold, the King of Firando having bought for 3,000 tais. Wishes him to send some goods by the Sea Adventure, having little or none. A rise in the price of silks. The Emperor expected on a sudden at Miako with the King of Yedo his son; he has sent for all the Kings of Japan to come to Yedo and bring their wives or queens with them, there to stay seven years; the King of Firando left to go ten days past, most of the others having gone before. [One page and a quarter. Indorsed, “Received 26th March 1616.” O.C., Vol. III., No. 344.]
Feb. 26.
Firando.
1099. Rich. Cocks to Adam Denton at Patani. [The substance of this letter is the same as the preceding.] Denton is requested to send some goods if he has an opportunity. A postscript adds a report of the death of Gourney, agent at Siam, and that Sheppard is in his place; hopes it will prove untrue. [One page and three quarters. Indorsed, “Received 26th March 1616.” O.C., Vol. III., No. 345.]