East Indies: September 1616

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1864.

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'East Indies: September 1616', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616, ed. W Noel Sainsbury( London, 1864), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp474-476 [accessed 20 July 2024].

'East Indies: September 1616', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Edited by W Noel Sainsbury( London, 1864), British History Online, accessed July 20, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp474-476.

"East Indies: September 1616". Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2, 1513-1616. Ed. W Noel Sainsbury(London, 1864), , British History Online. Web. 20 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/east-indies-china-japan/vol2/pp474-476.

September 1616

Sept. 1.
Firando.
1155. Osterwick to Wickham. Refers to previous letters. The King of Firando has received letters from the Emperor to take up for his use some lead and steel; reasons why it could not be furnished in Firando; begs him to supply the emperor, “for we had much adoe to keep our lead here, although bargained for another.” Knows not which way to employ their money to profit. Death of Mr. Bailye on 30th Aug., he was buried the day following. Advises him as to his movements. Thinks Capt. Cocks will go for England next year, “his place cannot be denied you.” [One page and a half. O.C., Vol. IV., No. 391.]
Sept. 10.
Tecoe.
1156. [Capt. John Mill ward?] to [General Keeling]. The aim of the Orankayes is to bring all the trade of Tecoe into their own hands, they to serve the country with cloth and the English with pepper, “which if they bring to pass (as I fear it much) will prove very prejudicial to the trade in this place, for they being of an insatiable griping disposition, and having all things in their own power, will make such use thereof as shall quickly cause our nation to be weary of this place.” Advises that a ship of 100 or 120 tons should be employed on the coast, especially at Tecoe; reasons. Thinks if a ship were sent about Christmas there would be some lading for her. Has not had sufficient experience to judge of the king’s new officer, “how good or bad he may be to the English,” yet out of his small speculation thinks they have but one rogue more in the country. Fears this officer is sent by the king rather to rout the English nation out of this place than to do them any good. Prices of goods. Some disgust hath happened between Capt. Harris and the merchants on shore. Capt. Payton is able to acquaint him with the proceedings of all business. [Two pages and a half. Indorsed, “The copy of a letter written to General Keeling.” O.C., Vol. IV., No. 392.]
Sept. 10.
Jacatra.
1157. Wm. Stonywell to Wm. Sheppard at Bantam. Death of Mr. Callis, Alexander goes master, and one Whitelocke, who came in the Dragon, chief merchant in the Attendant; she is bound again for Jambee. Goods sold to a private friend. Mr. Bonner has been sick of the flux. Arrival of the Speedwell on the 6th present. No news as yet of the Concord. [One page. Indorsed, “Wm. “Sheppard’s and Stonywell’s private trade.” O.C., Vol. IV., No. 393.]
Sept. 13.
Yedo.
1158. Cocks to Wickham. Refers to previous letters. Sends one for Nealson and Osterwick. “This is the 13th day since we “delivered our present to the emperor, and as yet cannot have dis-“patch.” Wickham would wonder to see what looking there is after Padres. “It is thought there will some go to the pot before it be long, “for here are boards set up in every street, with very strict order “for bringing them to light, and utter ruin to them and their “posterity that shall conceal them. It is said the like order is sent “to all other places in Japan.” Doubtful whether all Christians should be banished out of Japan; verily thinks if it could be proved that they had christened any children with papist priests they would have been held to be of their faction, and so banished. It is said the Spaniards have direct order to depart with their ships, and on pain of their lives not to return any more. The emperor cannot abide padres in any sort. He will perceive how they are out of hope to procure sales below. It will cost no small matter to trim the two ships; besides they expect great matters to be sent in them for Bantam, and there are no other means to furnish them but of the money he procures for sales of goods at Miako and Firando. Cannot have answer whether the emperor will have their lead and tin. Begs him not to stand upon the price of anything, but sell as he can, to get in. money. Prices set upon certain goods. Sir Nich. Machievell plays the jade. The emperor went out hawking this morning; it is said with above 10,000 men. [One page and a half. O.C., Vol IV., No. 394.]
Sept. 13.
Yedo.
1159. Eaton to Wickham. Came to Yedo on 27 Aug. and delivered their present to the emperor 1st prest., but as yet cannot be dispatched by reason there is much ado about banishing all friars and Jesuits that go about disguised as merchants. Writings set up by the emperor against giving meat or drink, or harbouring any such upon pain of cruel death to them and their kindred; for that cause spies have been sent throughout all the emperor’s dominions. The ship of New Spain not yet gone. Divers things wanting of the invoice, which were either left behind or stolen, several of the chests having been opened on the way. [One page and a half. O.C., Vol. IV., No. 395.]
Sept. 15.
Firando.
1160. Osterwick to Wickham. Concerning the charging of the two factories of Miako and Yedo; Ignorance or knavery used by those employed to weigh the goods. Touching his accounts. Has consulted the surgeon of the Advice concerning his disease. “As “for your woman, she denieth utterly to have wronged you in that “kind.” Wishes he had not sent her away, “because of the speech “of people, whose tongue cannot be restrained.” Account of merchandise sent to him. [Three page. O.C., Vol. IV., No. 396.]
Sept. 21.
Firando.
1161.Osterwick to [John Jourdain at Bantam.] Thanks for courtesies shown to him at Bantam. Wrote to him by the Osiander, and should have been glad to have given him satisfaction for the great charges of that ship. Hopes to be called to a better service for the Company. Rowe. Totten, and the rest in good health. Mr. Bailye is dead; also two others of the Thomas and one of the Advice. [One page. Indorsed, “Rec. 1st Dec. 1616. Reed. 20 June 1617 in London by the Clove.” O.C., Vol. IV., No. 397.]
Sept. 21.
Firando.
1162.Wm. Nealson and John Osterwick to the Principal of the English in Patani. Arrival of two English ships, the Thomas, by way of the Moluccas, the Advice direct from Bantam; also of the Sea Adventure. Have no tidings of the two junks freighted by Mr. Farie. Death of Mr. Bailye on 30 Aug. The old emperor being dead, Capt. Cocks has gone up to his son to renew “our privileges.” [One page. O.C., Vol. IV., No. 398.]
Sept. 21.
Firando.
1163.Nealson and Osterwick to Benj. Farie, captain of the English factory at Siam. Have received his letter by Capt. Addames; also an account of such things as the King of Siain desires to be furnished with from Japan. Lading of the Thomas and Advice. On their arrival Capt. Cocks, according to the custom of the country, provided for his voyage to Miako and Yedo to present the young emperor with such merchandise as the ships had brought, taking Capt. Addames with him. Fears some ill has befallen the two junks in these tempestuous times. Price of Siam wares, wood and skins. The junk to be made ready for another voyage to Siam. Are harrowed with the Company’s expectations of such great matters there to furnish Bantam with moneys and such great charges in repairing shipping that it is impossible to answer their contents. The Hollanders junk has miscarried in Shashma with the loss of half their goods; their great junk preparing for Siam. [One page and three quarters. Indorsed, “Reed. 29 March 1617 by way of Patani.” O.C., Vol. IV., No. 399.]
Sept. 21.
Firando.
1164.Osterwick to Farie. Thanks for kindness shown to him while in Patani. Concerning the sale of Farie’s goods. Sorry he could do no better for him. Regrets Capt. Larkin’s death. [One page. Indorsed “Reed. 29 March by way of Patani, 1617.” O.C., Vol. IV., No. 400.]
Sept. 21.
Firando.
1165.John Totten, master of the Advice, to Capt. John Jourdain Arrived at Firando on 13th July in six weeks from Bantam; as also Capt. Addames with his junk from Siam, laden with wood and hides. Capt. Cocks gone to Miako, and so to the new emperor. Remembrances to Gourney and Sheppard. [Three quarters of a page. Much mutilated. Indorsed, “Reed. 20 June in London 1617 by the Clove.” O.C., Vol. IV., No. 401.]