Simancas: September 1563

Calendar of State Papers, Spain (Simancas), Volume 1, 1558-1567. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1892.

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Citation:

'Simancas: September 1563', in Calendar of State Papers, Spain (Simancas), Volume 1, 1558-1567, ed. Martin A S Hume( London, 1892), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/simancas/vol1/p347 [accessed 16 July 2024].

'Simancas: September 1563', in Calendar of State Papers, Spain (Simancas), Volume 1, 1558-1567. Edited by Martin A S Hume( London, 1892), British History Online, accessed July 16, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/simancas/vol1/p347.

"Simancas: September 1563". Calendar of State Papers, Spain (Simancas), Volume 1, 1558-1567. Ed. Martin A S Hume(London, 1892), , British History Online. Web. 16 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/simancas/vol1/p347.

September 1563

1 Sept. 241. Luis Roman to Cardinal De Granvelle.
By the relation of Diego Perez, secretary of Bishop Quadra, now in heaven, your Lordship will have learnt of his death and of the other events here. As I have remained here until his Majesty shall be pleased to order what shall be done with his household, and in my capacity of secretary of the Bishop, had knowledge of affairs here concerning the injuries inflicted on his Majesty's subjects in these seas, I have thought well to advise your Lordship of the progress of events.
Her Highness (the duchess of Parma) wrote to the Bishop in the interests of the inhabitants of Dunkirk, Newport, and Ostend to ask the Queen to prevent her subjects from robbing them and to give orders for them to remain free and unmolested in their voyages, especially now during the herring fishery. As these attacks upon them were very frequent I consulted Antonio de Guaras, a very worthy person and a friend of the Bishop, in view of her Highness' representations, and we thought I had better speak to the Council on the matter. They have not sat for five or six days in consequence of the illness of secretary Cecil from an ague from which he has not yet recovered, but to-day as I was in the antechamber of the said secretary for the purpose of seeing him Lord Robert came out and asked me whether I wanted anything. I informed him briefly of the business that had brought me, and he at once sent a servant to ask the secretary to give me audience. He sent a clerk of the Council to say from him how unwell he was and ask me to state my business to him that he might convey it to the secretary. I did so in detail, and he answered that it should be all considered and orders should be given that the King's subjects in these seas should suffer no molestation from the subjects of the Queen, and if anything else occurred I was to apply to him. Three days since a courier arrived from Scotland, and I have heard from a trustworthy source that the marriage of the Queen with our lord the Prince or Don John of Austria has been arranged. They could not tell me, however, who had despatched this courier or by what channel this advice had come. I thought well to tell your Lordship, for your information, and also that a courier arrived to-day from France with a despatch for the Queen which came by way of Antwerp (Envers). I can hear nothing certain, but it is to be supposed that if these people have any assurance that the news from Scotland is true they will come to terms with the French.
The earl of Warwick entered here yesterday with only his servants and some of the gentlemen of the court, but no member of the Council. He carried his right leg tightly bound up with taffety and a wide large band of red taffety as a support.
Asks for a cipher alphabet.—1st September 1563.