BHO

Spain: August 1524

Pages 650-666

Calendar of State Papers, Spain, Volume 2, 1509-1525. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1866.

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Citation:

August 1524

3 Aug.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 32. f. 5.
664. Lope De Soria, Imperial Ambassador in Genoa, to the Emperor.
Has asked the Doge of Genoa to augment the navy, but has received for answer that that is impossible, as the Republic has no money, and the pestilence interrupts all business. Genoa is almost deserted by its inhabitants, and those who have remained avoid all communication with one another.
The French have armed a powerful fleet at Marseilles, which is stronger than that commanded by Hugo de Moncada.
The Duke of Bourbon is at Draguignan, and will march either to Aix or to Marseilles.
Two important pieces of intelligence have arrived ; one is that the citizens of Aix did not permit a French garrison to enter into their city ; the other that the King of France is weakening his army in Provence in order to employ part of it against the English.
The Marquis Del Gasto has arrived. He says he was told in Rome that the King of France would be in Italy before the end of August with a great army. Does not believe it, as mercantile letters from Flanders, dated the 30th of June, state that a portion of the English army had already crossed the sea, and was at Calais, whilst the rest of the troops were embarking in England. The English and the Imperial troops in Flanders, when united, will form a respectable army, horse as well as foot.
The merchants of Genoa have paid him the 200,000 ducats which they had promised.
Marquis de Pescara. Rome, &c.—Monastery del Boschetto, near Genoa, the 3rd of August 1524.
Addressed : "To his Sacred, Imperial, and Catholic Majesty."
Indorsed ; "To the King. 1524. Genoa. Lope de Soria. The 3rd of August. Answered."
Spanish. Autograph partly in cipher. Contemporary deciphering. pp. 6.
4 Aug.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 33. f. 216.
665. Lope De Soria, Imperial Ambassador in Genoa, to the Emperor.
News concerning the Genoese fleet. The Imperial fleet under the command of Hugo de Moncada, &c., &c.
The army of the Duke of Bourbon is at Draguignan. It is said that the King of France has ordered a portion of his troops in Provence to march to the north, in order to defend France against the English, who are passing over to the Continent.
[Written in the hand of the Chancellor Gattinara :] No answer except to thank him for the news.
The Marquis of Pescara (fn. 1) has told him that, according to intelligence received by the Pope, the King of France will be in Italy, at the head of a powerful army, in the month of August. Does not believe it, as letters from Flanders state that English troops have already crossed the seas, and are still crossing.
[Written on the margin in the hand of the Chancellor Gattinara :] Neither the invasion of Italy by the King of France, nor the invasion of France by the English, seems to be true. There is very little probability of either.
Monsieur de la Roche has arrived at Bologna, &c., &c.
Superscribed : "From Lope de Soria, the 4th of August."
Spanish. Abstract made by one of the secretaries of the Emperor. pp. 3½.
6 Aug.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 32. f. 19.
666. Lope De Soria, Imperial Ambassador in Genoa, to the Emperor.
Letters of merchants in Flanders, dated the 18th of July, and letters of merchants in London, dated the 21st of July, had arrived at Genoa. They all state that the English are not making serious preparations for war, and that the King of England, as well as his subjects, is inclined to make peace with France. It is likewise stated that the King of England would not send any more money than the 100,000 ducats he had ordered to be paid to the Duke of Bourbon.
On the other hand, a courier who left Antwerp on the 8th of July arrived two days ago. This courier told him that a considerable English army had crossed the seas, and that it was generally believed that the King of England would invade France in person.
Does not know which of these contradictory reports is true. Is more inclined to believe the first intelligence, as he has it from good sources, and as it is confirmed by facts he will hereafter mention.
Letters from Lyons state that the King of France will be in Italy in eight or ten days.
The King of France is arming a great fleet at Marseilles, on board of which a considerable number of troops are to embark. These troops will be landed at Genoa, and an attempt will be made to revolutionize that city, which is almost deserted and defenceless.
Troops in Tuscany.
Philip de Parets, &c.—Monastery del Boschetto, near Genoa, the 6th of August 1524.
Addressed : "To his Sacred, Imperial, and Catholic Majesty."
Indorsed : "To the King. 1524. Genoa. Lope de Soria. The 6th of August."
Spanish. Autograph in cipher. Contemporary deciphering. pp. 4.
6 Aug.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 33. f. 218.
667. Lope De Soria, Imperial Ambassador in Genoa, to the Emperor.
Letters from merchants in Flanders of the 18th, and from merchants in London of the 21st of July, state that the enterprise of the English is almost abandoned, that the English are inclined to make peace, and that they will not send any more money beyond the first 100,000 ducats.
[Written on the margin in the hand of the Chancellor Gattinara :] This is more credible than the other news, although the English write that they are taking measures to send, in addition to the first 100,000 ducats, 100,000 ducats besides.
On the other hand a courier who left Antwerp on the 8th, told him that English troops were still crossing over to France, and that the King of England will invade France in person.
[Written on the margin in the hand of the Chancellor Gattinara :] These troops were only infantry destined to garrison the frontiers of the King of England.
Letters from Lyons of the 30th state that the King of France is marching to Italy. The French hold the English in very slight estimation.
[Written on the margin in the hand of the Chancellor Gattinara :] According to what spies say, the King of France is not in a position to march to Italy.
Genoa is in danger of being attacked by the French.
Superscribed : "From Lope de Soria, the 6th of August."
Spanish. Abstract made by one of the Imperial secretaries. pp. 1½.
12 Aug.
P. A. d. l'Emp. Neg. K. 1639. 59.
668. The Emperor to Louis De Praet, his Ambassador in England.
Has received his letters, and learnt by them what he and Monsieur de Courrières have treated of with the King of England and the Legate.
Knows that it is not their fault that they have not obtained a more favourable result. Even the little that the King of England and the Legate have promised would be of great advantage to him, if they would only keep their promises. Their endless delays threaten, however, to ruin entirely his enterprise which hitherto has been so prosperous ; for he has received letters from the Duke of Bourbon, from the Marquis of Pescara, and from other captains of his army in Provence, stating that on the 13th of June nothing had as yet been heard of the money which the King of England promised to send, neither of the first nor of the second instalment of 100,000 ducats each.
Had a long time ago informed him of what he had asked from the King of England. His first demand was that the King of England should invade France, in which case he (the Emperor) declared himself ready to take upon himself all the expenses of the army of Monsieur de Bourbon. Does not find that the King of England is making any preparation for an invasion of France. His second proposal to the King of England was that, in case he should not like to attack France, he should pay one half the expenses of the Imperial army (under the command of the Duke of Bourbon). Has sent the Duke of Bourbon 300,000 ducats on condition that the King of England should pay the same amount of money within a reasonable period of time, in order to enable the Duke to reinforce his army. The King of England, however, has exercised no energy, and has thereby created great difficulties, which threaten still to increase, if they are not soon remedied. It is not difficult to understand that, as the French have no other enemy to fight with but his army (under the command of the Duke of Bourbon), and as the money he has sent to the Duke will be spent before anything is heard of the money from England, his army will be placed in a very dangerous position, and exposed to the greatest inconveniences. His army is strong enough to give battle to the enemy, and the captains are afraid of nothing but want of money.
It is true that his men-at-arms were not ready so soon as could have been wished, and that his fleet was not so strong as he desired. The fault, however, was not his, for the pestilence was raging in Lombardy, and had made some delay unavoidable. It must be borne in mind that he alone cannot maintain the fleet and the army which he has increased, in the hope and trust that the King of England would bear one half the expenses, as was stipulated and as he had promised. Believed the King of England would fulfil his promises, because he (Louis de Praet) and Monsieur de Courrières had written to say he would do so, and because his (the Emperor's) army which on the 1st of July invaded Provence has since been successful having taken the city of Grasse and other seaports.
He is to remonstrate with the King of England and with the Legate, and to beg them to consider well what great services the army under Bourbon, if well paid, can render him and the King of England by putting down the common enemy. If he had the money, he alone would bear all the expenses, but the long wars have exhausted him. Has ordered the German troops who are in Spain to march to Perpignan, in order to attack the French from that side. Has given orders that vessels shall be kept in readiness, to send troops, if necessary, to Italy. Has held parliaments in Aragon and Catalonia, and tried to get from them as much aid in money or troops as possible. As, however, the grants of the parliaments cannot be sent in time to the Duke of Bourbon, he has ordered the Viceroy of Naples at any rate to procure 100,000 ducats, and to pay them to the Duke. Thus, he has paid the whole 300,000 ducats which he had promised, and over and above this sum he has borne all the expenses of the men-at-arms and the navy.
He is to remind the Legate of what he promised him, viz., never to permit the army to be broken up for want of money. He is to tell the King of England and the Legate that they are in honour bound to fulfil the treaty which they have concluded, and to beseech them to send to Monsieur de Bourbon the 300,000 ducats, which is the sum the King of England has bound himself to contribute instead of invading France. If the army is maintained in an efficient state, he and the King of England are strong, and can conclude an honourable and advantageous peace with the King of France. If, on the contrary, the army is suffered to disband, the King of France will certainly not accept reasonable conditions. But whatever may happen, he will not conclude a separate peace with France, and he expects that the King of England will follow his example.
Orders him to write minutely to him with regard to the state of affairs in England.
He is to tell the King and the Legate that he has married his sister, Madame Katharine, to the King of Portugal per verba de futuro. As soon as the dispensation of the Pope arrives the marriage will be concluded per verba de prœsenti and consummated. Hopes the marriage will strengthen his friendship with the King of England.—Valladolid, the 12th of August 1524.
(Signed)
Charles.
Lalemand.
Addressed : "To the Knight our chancellor and ambassador in England, the Seigneur de Praet."
French. Contemporary copy. pp. 4.
14 Aug.
P. A. d. l'Emp. N. K. 1639. f. 62.
669. The Emperor to the Duke Of Bourbon.
Has received his letter of the 10th of July. Lurcy has not yet arrived. Beaurain has written to tell him how much pains he is taking to bring the enterprise to a successful end.
Has full confidence in him. Must, however, beg him strictly to fulfil the instructions contained in his (the Emperor's) letter of the 25th of May. Being on the spot, he (the Duke of Bourbon) is able to judge better what is necessary. Must, nevertheless, repeat what he wrote to him on the 25th of May.
If the English would have invaded France, he (the Emperor) intended to pay all the expenses of the army in Provence. He (the Duke of Bourbon) can judge for himself whether it is likely that the English will invade France this year. If the English did not invade France, he wrote to him that they were obliged to pay 300,000 ducats for the maintenance and reinforcement of the army under his (the Duke of Bourbon's) command, he (the Emperor) paying the same amount of money. The King of England has neglected to procure the money. Wrote him, further, in his letter of the 25th of May that if the English would neither invade France nor pay the money, he should not hazard himself too far into France, but take care always to be able to retreat with ease.
Is sorry that the men-at-arms arrived so late, that the fleet is inferior to the navy of the French, and that other obstacles have rendered the execution of his task so difficult. Would have been glad to remedy all the disadvantages under which he labours as soon as he was informed of them, if it had been possible. But without the assistance of the English it is impossible for him to bear such heavy burdens, and it would be unwise to stake all he has won on this enterprise. Has followed his advice, and given orders to the German troops which are in Spain to march to Perpignan, and to make a diversion. Keeps ships in readiness to transport troops to any place where they are wanted. Has held parliaments in Aragon and Catalonia, and tried to get as much money and as many soldiers from them as possible. Has written to the Viceroy of Naples to send him (the Duke of Bourbon) 100,000 ducats more as soon as he can, and hopes he will be able to maintain his army as long as is necessary to conclude a favourable peace with the King of France.
Has likewise written to the King of England, begging him to send him (the Duke of Bourbon) 300,000 ducats wherewith to pay the army. If he thinks he would be likely to gain any advantage, he may continue the war in Provence, according to the instructions contained in his letter (of the 25th of May). If, however, he does not think it probable that he would gain any advantage by continuing the war, he would do well to retreat with his army to Italy, and thereby avoid a disaster. If he retreats, he must write to Monsieur de la Roche, and tell him that he ought to conclude peace, or at least a truce. He might perhaps gain by diplomacy what it is impossible to conquer by arms. Promises him not to conclude any treaty without his knowledge and consent, and he may rest assured that he will never forsake him.
Has married his sister, Madame Katharine, to the King of Portugal. That marriage will cement the friendship between him and his allies.—Valladolid, the 14th of August 1524.
Lurcy has arrived with his letters of the 26th of July. Is glad to learn that the state of affairs in Provence is not so bad as he had feared. Will soon send Lurcy or another of the servants of the Duke with a more detailed letter. This courier leaves in great haste to bring the Viceroy the order to pay him 100,000 ducats.
The Seigneur de Monaco must be paid.
(Signed)
Your good brother Charles.
Lalemand.
Addressed : "To my good brother the Duke of Bourbonnais, my lieutenant-general representing my person."
French. Copy made by one of the secretaries of the Emperor. pp. 3.
15 Aug.
P. A. d. l'Emp. N. K. 1639. No. 61.
670. The Emperor to Gérard De La Plaine, Seigneur De La Roche.
Has received his letter from Turin dated the 10th of July.
Does not doubt that the Viceroy (of Naples) has informed him of the state of affairs in Provence, of the delays caused by the English, and of all other occurrences. He must judge for himself what line of policy he is to follow. Encloses copies of his letters to the Duke of Bourbon and to the Viceroy.
Although he must carry out the instructions which he has taken with him, he must also take into consideration what the Duke of Bourbon and the Viceroy will communicate to him, and conclude a treaty of peace on the best conditions he can obtain, or, if peace is impossible, conclude a treaty of truce.
It may be that the indemnity due to the King of England will create difficulties, as the King of France may refuse to pay the King of England the wonted pension during the time of truce. The proposal made by the Archbishop of Capua— viz., that the Pope, Florence, Lucca, and Siena are to pay one third, the King of France the second third, and he (the Emperor) and Genoa the remaining third of the pension—is contained in his instructions.
It may be, however, that the English ambassador in Rome has only a limited power, and is not authorized to take part in the negotiations before he (the Emperor) has taken upon himself the obligation to be security for the payment of the whole pension. In such a case the English ambassador would either not accept the proposal of the Archbishop of Capua, or at least ask time to consult the King of England, causing thereby new delay. In order to meet these difficulties he sends him secretly his obligation for the whole pension, that is to say, the paper signed by him which the King of England has sent to him. He must tell no one that he has that paper until the negotiations are in danger of being broken off, in which case he is to make use of it. He is to say to the Pope that he (the Emperor) has signed the paper with the expectation that the King of France will pay his portion to the King of England, and that his Holiness binds himself to pay his portion to him (the Emperor). Does not wish during the truce to have anything to do with the King of France that might offer occasion for a rupture. Hopes the King of France will not make any difficulties about so small a sum, especially as the welfare of Christendom depends on it ; besides, the King of France is the original debtor. Will on no condition consent to pay any portion of the pension to the King of England if the King of France will not bind himself to pay one third of it. His honour would suffer if he did so. Hopes he (De la Roche) will do what he can to obtain the best possible conditions, and not forget to ask the Pope, Florence, Lucca, and Siena to bind themselves towards him (the Emperor) in due form for the payment of their shares.
The Prince of Orange has been taken prisoner in Villafranca, near Nice, which belongs to Savoy. The Duke of Savoy and the Swiss have asked the King of France to set the Prince of Orange at liberty. He is to ask the Pope to employ his good services in this affair.—Valladolid, the 15th of August 1524.
Postscriptum.— The Prince of Orange must be set at liberty.
(Signed)
Charles.
Lalemand.
French. Autograph. The postscriptum is a holograph of the Emperor. pp. 4.
15(?)Aug.
P. A. d. l'Emp. M. H. K. 1640. No. 4.
671. The Emperor to All Persons.
He Charles, Emperor of the Romans, has concluded with Henry, King of England, Defender of the Faith, a bond of very near relationship and a most intimate alliance.
The King of England lent him, on a former occasion, money for his voyage to Spain.
The King of England has further declared himself an open enemy of the King of France, who was obliged by treaties to pay him annually certain sums of money and pensions. The King of France has refused, and will probably refuse in future, to pay to the King of England these sums of money and pensions.
Has, therefore, bound himself, in his letters patent dated the 19th of June 1522, to pay to the King of England 133, 305 gold crowns a year.
[The rest of the document is so much damaged that it can not be made out.]
Valladolid, [blank] August 1524.
(Signed)
Carlos.
(Illegible.)
Latin. Autograph. p. 1. On a sheet of parchment which is now half destroyed.
16 Aug.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 32. f. 52.
672. The Prothonotary Caracciolo to the Emperor.
News from Italy.
News from the army.
Letters from England of the 22nd of July have arrived, which state that an English army will march against the Scots, but that no more troops will be sent over to Calais. It is also mentioned in these letters that the King of England will pay 100,000 ducats, in addition to the sum which he has already sent to the Duke of Bourbon.
A Genoese, called Joachim, who is an agent of France, has arrived, &c.—Trezzo, the 16th of August 1524.
Indorsed : "To the King. 1524. Milan. Prothonotary Caracciolo. The 16th of August. Answered."
Italian. Holograph. pp. 5.
17 Aug.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 32. ff. 58-60.
673. The Marquis Of Pescara to the Duke Of Sessa, Imperial Ambassador in Rome.
No news of an invasion of France by the English has arrived. Imperial troops have marched to Perpignan, but their number is small and they are badly provided for.
The French have concentrated considerable forces, and among them 6,000 Germans, in and near Avignon. The Duke of Bourbon is always in a passion, and the ambassador of the King of England is as passionate as the Duke. "Thus the captains are placed between two passions." They (the Duke of Bourbon and Richard Pace?) force the commanders to attack Marseilles, Arles, and Avignon. To attack Avignon is madness. Even if it were taken, it would be impossible to cross the bridge without leaving an army on the left side of the river, or else the whole of Provence would be lost.
To take Arles is impossible as long as Marseilles is not conquered, and French troops remain on the banks of the Durance. All supplies would be directly cut off.
It is unreasonable to advance further as long as Marseilles is not taken, especially as the French are masters of the sea, and can land as many troops as they like at Marseilles.—No date.
Indorsed : "Deciphering of the letter of the Marquis of Pescara to the Duke of Sessa. The 17th of August."
Spanish. Contemporary deciphering. p. 1.
18 Aug.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Muñoz. 56. f. 223.
674. The Emperor to the Duke Of Sessa, his Ambassador in Rome.
Thinks that the French navy suffers more than his fleet from the pestilence. Has given orders to arm a new fleet of 6,000 tons on the coast of Cartagena. Has sent to Roussillon 5,000 German foot and a considerable number of horse. Hopes to obtain from the cortes in Valladolid, and from those of Aragon and Catalonia, considerable subsidies for the war. He is to tell the Pope all this. The enterprise of the Duke of Bourbon advances favourably. His (the Emperor's) object is only to obtain good conditions of peace.
Monsieur de la Roche brings him new instructions. He is first to try to obtain a peace with France. If that is impossible, he is to conclude a truce.
He must get money from the Pope.
Bishop of Salamanca, &c.—Valladolid, the 18th of August 1524.
Spanish. Draft. pp. 4.
24 Aug.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 32. ff. 83-88.
675. The Duke Of Sessa, Imperial Ambassador in Rome, to the Emperor.
This letter is an answer to his despatch of the 18th of July, which he received on the 16th of the present month.
The pestilence has been extraordinarily severe in Italy.
The enterprise on Provence would have had the best results had it been well prepared. Up to the date of this letter there are still bodies of troops, men-at-arms as well as foot, which have not entered Provence, although they ought to have been there at the beginning of the campaign. They have mutinied. Hopes the mutiny will be suppressed. The fault does not lie with the Viceroy, who has done all a man can do. The greatest difficulty is the want of money. The Pope is afraid that the army in Provence is lost. The King of France is descending the river from Lyons to Provence. Alberto di Carpi says he (the King of France) is at the head of an army of 12,000 lansquenets, 5,000 Swiss, 30,000 foot from various countries, and 2,000 horse. Thinks these numbers are exaggerated.
The English ambassador who accompanies the army writes "in a thousand colours." In one letter he says that the Imperial army is prosperous beyond all expectation, having already conquered the whole of France ; and in another letter he pretends that all is ruined, and the army is lost. Such letters do much harm.
The Cavaliere Gregory Casale has been sent to the King of England to urge him to send the money soon, and to try whether he can persuade him to make a demonstration against France in the north. Little hope is entertained that he will succeed in his mission.
Gave, in presence of the Seigneur de la Roche, a detailed account to the Pope of what he (the Duke of Sessa) had written to him (the Emperor) concerning the affairs of England, and of which he had been informed by the Pope himself. The Pope declared that he was satisfied with his explanations.
The Pope seems to be really favourable to him (the Emperor), but cannot give him money, as he has none. It is necessary to give some rewards to the Archbishop of Capua and others.
Federigo da Bozzolo.
Has told the Pope what he (the Emperor) had written to him about Luther.
Dared not ask the Pope to convoke a general council, as the Pope hates nothing more than the idea of such a council.
Patronage of the churches in Spain.
The Pope has not spoken again of his pension of 10,000 ducats out of the revenues of Toledo. The boundless avarice of the cardinals, it is to be feared, will not permit this matter to drop.
Bishopric of Utrecht. Monsieur de la Roche arrived on the 12th of August, and has begun his negotiations with the Pope.
Church preferment.—Rome, the 24th of August 1524.
Addressed : "Imperial and Catholic Majesty."
Indorsed : "To the King. 1524. Rome. Duke of Sessa. The 24th of August.
Spanish. Autograph in cipher. Contemporary deciphering. pp. 8.
25 Aug.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 32. ff. 90-94.
676. The Duke Of Sessa, Imperial Ambassador in Rome, to the Emperor.
This despatch in cipher and its contemporary deciphering are almost identical with the preceding document bearing date the 24th of August.
25 Aug.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 32. ff. 98-100.
677. The Duke Of Sessa and Gérard De La Plaine, Seigneur De La Roche, Imperial Ambassadors in Rome, to the Emperor.
Have read his instructions together, and communicated to the English ambassador such portions of them as could be seen by him without inconvenience. Went in company of the English ambassador to the Pope. Said to his Holiness that as they had already spoken with him on the subject of the mission of De la Roche, they begged him now to ratify the league, and to send one of his servants to the Swiss.
His Holiness answered that with respect to the Swiss he was expecting the return of the Bishop of Veruli, and intended to decide on what it will be necessary to do after he had been informed by the Bishop of the state of affairs in that country. Should they, however, think that something ought to be done before the arrival of the Bishop, he would do it. As he intended to be the mediator of a peace or a truce, his Holiness said it would not be well for him to ratify the league, or even to enter into negotiations about it, assuring them that in no case would he forsake him (the Emperor). His Holiness said further, he would send for the Count Alberto di Carpi, tell him that they had power to conclude peace, and ask him to state his conditions.
His Holiness conferred afterwards for a long time with Alberto di Carpi. The Count said that the King of France was surer of his game than ever ; that he would come in person to Italy at the head of a large army, and not only annihilate the troops which had invaded Provence, but also those which had remained in Italy. He asked for the restitution of the duchy of Milan, and made some other equally extravagant demands.
The Pope gave to Alberto di Carpi and to them the articles which he proposed. Enclose them. He (De la Roche) has added certain clauses, a copy of which he sends to him.
Have shown the additional articles to the ambassador of the King of England, who does not approve of them. The English ambassador objects to the long duration of the truce, saying that it ought not to be concluded for a longer period than until April. He says that the King of England insists that he (the Emperor), and not the King of France, shall remain responsible to him for the payment of the pension during the time of truce. Thus it is not only the enemy, but also the friend and ally, who makes difficulties for him. First the difficulties made by the English ambassador, and since then his (De la Roche's) illness, have prevented him (De la Roche) from delivering the additional clauses to the Pope.
Are convinced that public affairs are in such a state that a truce is now a necessity. The poverty has become excessive, and the English do not make any effort to procure money. Are inclined to strain a point if necessary, and to conclude a truce, always, however, taking care of his (the Emperor's) honour and reputation in Italy.
It is said that the Archbishop of Capua will return to France. Promise soon to send another letter.—Rome, the 25th of August 1524.
Indorsed : "To the King. Rome. From the Duke of Sessa and from De la Roche, the 25th of August."
Spanish. Autograph in cipher. Contemporary deciphering. pp. 2.
26 Aug.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 32. f. 111.
678. The Abbot Of Najera to the Emperor.
On the 16th of August the Marquis of Civita Santangelo and Garcia Manrique arrived at Nice with the rearguard, &c.
Master Rossel, (fn. 2) who is bringing 100,000 ducats from the King of England, is expected to-morrow. The 200,000 ducats which he (the Emperor) has lately sent are already spent.
Renzo da Ceri, Monsieur de Brion, and Andrea Doria defend the city of Marseilles.—Camp before Marseilles, the 26th of August 1524.
Postscriptum.—The King of England and Monsieur de Bourbon do not like to lose much time in besieging Marseilles, but prefer to advance directly further into France, although money, as well as other things necessary for such an expedition, is utterly wanting. The King of England and Monsieur de Bourbon are consequently not in favour of a truce, as a truce would prevent them from carrying out their plan. Monsieur de Beaurain will go and see him, and communicate to him the present state of affairs in Provence.
Addressed : "To his most Sacred, Imperial, and Catholic Majesty. To be delivered to the Secretary Alfonso Soria."
Indorsed : "To the King. 1524. From Marseilles. From the Abbot of Najera, the 26th of August."
Spanish. Holograph. pp. 4.
27 Aug.
M. D. Pasc. d. G. Pa. r. a. l. Hist. d. Esp.
679. The Duke Of Sessa, Imperial Ambassador in Rome, to the Emperor.
The duplicate of the letter which he (the Duke of Sessa) wrote to him (the Emperor) two days ago, and which went by the Portuguese courier, is enclosed.
The French army has passed the river Rhone near Arles, &c.
Went yesterday, in company of the English ambassador, to the Pope. The English ambassador delivered to his Holiness the articles of truce which concern England. They differ from his (the Emperor's) articles with respect to the time for which the truce is to be concluded. The English propose a truce to last only until April next, whilst he (the Emperor) proposes one which is to last for at least five years. Begs that instructions may be sent to him. Alberto di Carpi has delivered the articles of truce of the King of France. Monsieur de la Roche is ill, and could not go to see the Pope.
It is clear that the English ambassador tries to delay the conclusion of peace, and raises difficulties. The ambassador of England has sent a courier on post horses, and has asked for new instructions.—Rome, the 27th of August 1524.
Indorsed : "To the King. 1524. From Rome. From the Duke, the 27th of August."
Spanish. Autograph in cipher. Contemporary deciphering. pp. 2.
Aug.
P. A. d. l'E. M. H. K. 1639. No. 50d.
680. Projected Treaty between Henry VIII., King Of England, Charles, Emperor Elect, King Of Spain, &c., and Francis I., King Of France, &c.
1. The contracting parties bind themselves to observe a perfect truce and abstinence from all hostilities towards each other till the end of April 1525. (fn. 3) This truce and abstinence from hostilities is general for all the dominions and all the subjects of the contracting parties.
2. Whilst the truce lasts the subjects of any one of the contracting parties are at liberty to travel, stay, and carry on commerce in the dominions of the other contracting parties.
3. The contracting parties remain during this truce in possession of all the territories, cities, &c., which they at present possess.
4. If one of the contracting parties acts against the articles of this treaty, all the other contracting parties are bound to declare war against him, and to regard him as an ally of the Infidels.
5. The Pope is the conservator of this truce, and is, if necessary, entitled to interpret and to declare its stipulations.
6. The contracting parties are bound to ratify this treaty within the space of [blank] months.
7. Included in this treaty are—
a. On the part of the King of England :
The Pope, the Holy See, and the Pontifical States ;
The Kings of Hungary, Portugal, and Poland ;
Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria ;
The Princes Electors of the Holy Empire ;
Mary, Queen Dowager of France ;
Margaret, Queen Dowager of Scotland ;
Margaret, Archduchess of Austria, and the county of Burgundy, &c. ;
The Duke of Milan ;
The family De Medicis and Florence ;
The Cardinal, Bishop of Liege ;
Venice ;
The Duke of Ferrara, if the Pope consents to his inclusion ;
The Duke of Cleves and Juliers ;
The Hanse Towns ;
The Duke of Bourbon and all his adherents who espoused the cause of the Emperor and of the King of England. The King of France is not at liberty to imprison them, to prosecute them, or to molest them in any manner.
8. The allies included in this treaty must declare their adhesion to it within the space of [blank] months. They are at liberty to name other princes who wish to become parties to this treaty.
9. The King of France is bound to pay within six months, in the town of Calais, to the Queen Dowager Mary, sister of the King of England, the remainder of her dower and donatio propter nuptias, according to the treaty and stipulations dated London, the 16th of August 1514, and Abbeville, the 8th of October of the same year.
10. In case that the King of France wishes to include the King and kingdom (of Scotland) in this truce, the said King of Scotland and the kingdom of Scotland are to be accepted only on the following conditions :—
a. Scotland is a fief of the King of England, and the supremum ejus dominium belongs to the King of England.
b. The right of guardianship over the King of Scotland, who is a minor, and the government of Scotland, belong by right to the King of England.
c. The Scots are to recognize the King of England as guardian of the King of Scotland and of his kingdom. The King of England is at liberty to delegate his guardianship to such Scotch subjects as he pleases.
d. Margaret, Queen Dowager of Scotland, is entitled to go and see her son, the King, as often as she likes.
e. The dower and donatio propter nuptias of the Queen Dowager of Scotland is to be paid to her wherever she may choose to live.
f. John, Duke of Albany, is not to be permitted to stay in Scotland.
g. The castles, towers, and fortresses destroyed by the King of England are not to be repaired during this truce.
h. If the Scots refuse to accept any one of these conditions, the King of Scotland and his kingdom are not to be included in this treaty.
11. In case that the King of Scotland and the kingdom of Scotland be included in this treaty, their inclusion becomes null and void if the King of Scotland, his lieutenant, or any Scotch subjects, invade England with 300 armed men or more, and if full reparation be not given within the space of forty days. If, however, less than 300 armed men participate in the invasion of England, the case is to be judged in conformity with the stipulations of the last treaty of peace.
The King of England binds himself to abstain from making raids into Scotland. He is also to hinder raids being made by others.
The regulations respecting the preservation of the peace on the borders of England and Scotland which are contained in the last treaty of peace remain in force.
12. This treaty is to be published in the dominions of all the contracting parties within the space of thirty days.
13. Former treaties between the contracting parties are not abrogated by this treaty, and in particular all those stipulations according to which the Emperor is bound to pay certain sums of money to the King of England are to remain in full force.
Indorsed : "Articles delivered on the part of the King of England."
Latin. Contemporary copy. pp. 7.
31 Aug.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 32. f. 119.
681. The Duke Of Sessa, Imperial Ambassador in Rome, to the Emperor.
Monsieur de la Roche died last night. Johan Bartholomeo (de Gattinara) is indisposed, and eighteen of his (the Duke's) servants are seriously ill.—Rome, last day of August 1524.
Addressed : "To the most Sacred, Imperial, and Catholic Majesty."
Indorsed : "To the King. 1524. Rome. Duke of Sessa. Last of August."
Spanish. Autograph. pp. 2.
Aug.
S. E. Cor. d. Cast. L. 12. f. 287.
682. The Emperor to Xaca Ismael, Sofi Of Persia.
It was impossible for him to undertake a war with the Turks just in the month of April, especially as in that month his (the Sofi's) ambassador had not yet arrived, and as he (the Emperor) and his ally (the King of England) were engaged in a war with France. As soon as this war is concluded he will do his utmost to form a general league of all the Christian princes against the Turks. The Holy Father is very favourable to such a league.— Valladolid, [blank] August 1524.
Addressed : "To the most serene and mighty Prince Xaca Ismael Sofi, the great King of Persia, our brother, friend, and cousin."
Latin. Draft, corrected by Mercurino de Gattinara. pp. 3.

Footnotes

  • 1. Sic.
  • 2. Russell.
  • 3. "Usque ad finem mensis Aprilis qui erit in a no domini quingentesimo vigesimo quinto sint indictæ."