BHO

Index: J, K

Pages 571-578

Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 10, 1603-1607. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1900.

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Citation:

JK

J

Jacqueline, Countess of Holland, Zealand and Hainault, wife of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, her right usurped by House of Burgundy, 230.

James I., of England (1603), letter from, to Lord Mayor of London, 6.

- -, promises to support established religion, 6.

- -, puts slight on Privy Council, 6, 22.

- -, his agent in London solicits Venetian alliance, 6.

- -, money voted for his journey to England, 6, 28.

- -, his family, 6.

- -, French view of has succession, 10, 16.

- -, enters Berwick on Tweed;

significance of, 12.

- -, inclines to style of King of Great Britain, 12, 16.

- -, his orders to the Council during pleasure, 12.

- -, to be crowned, consecrated, and anointed, like Kings of France and of the Romans, 12, 69.

- -, French negotiations with in Queen Elizabeth's lifetime, directed against the union of the crowns, and the use of the title King of France, 12, 16.

- -, his relations with the Pope, prior to his succession;

with Spain;

and with France, 16, 34, 91.

- -, his character, able, secretive, personally timid, 17.

- -, -, lettered, sportsman, linguist, 22.

- -, declines to see Queen Elizabeth, even dead, as author of his mother's execution, 22.

- -, his religion, shewn by the Basilikon Doron to be Protestant, not Calvinistic, 22 and note.

- -, his negotiations with Venice, before his accession, 22.

- -, leaves eldest son in Scotland, 28.

- -, his proclamation at Richmond and London, 32.

- -, his accession agreeable to English and Scots alike, a proof of his judgment, or luck, 32, 33.

- -, honours conferred by, on English nobility, proof of his relations with them in Queen's lifetime, 34.

- -, his intrigues with Pope, &c, solely due to desire to secure succession, 34, 36.

- -, coronation of, and Queen, fixed for St. John's day, O.S., 34.

- -, urged to succour Ostend, 34,

disinclined, 36.

- -, rebellious nature of Scottish inclines him to peace, 36.

- -, his adhesion to a General Council, if summoned by the Pope, for re-union of Christendom, predicted by Lord Kinloss, 36.

- -, revenue and treasure of, in England, at his accession, 36.

- -, his entry into London fixed for May 14, 38.

- -, personal appeals to, of Roman Catholics, 38,

rejected, 40.

- -, refuses to wear mourning for Queen, 40.

- -, begins English housekeeping at Theobalds, 40.

- -, lukewarm and languid by nature, efforts to encourage him in rude sports, and to act on his prerogative, 40.

- -, criminals hung on his warrant only, at stages of his journey to London, 40.

- -, his attitude to those responsible for his mother's death, and to persons concerned in Essex's plot, 40.

- -, pilots to murder, 40.

- -, his coronation postponed to 5 August, 40.

- -, stays at Charterhouse, enters Tower, proceeds to Greenwich, 55.

- -, appointment by, of Scotsmen, to English office, consequent jealousy;

slights Cecil, danger of so doing, 55.

- -, supports reformed religion, and affects peace with Spain, consequent danger of French support for Roman Catholics, 55;

his claims on France, ancient, and for repayment of Queen's loans, 55;

openly discusses and deprecates Dutch demands for aid, 55.

- -, his personal objection to French Ambassador, and request for his recall, 63, 67, 73,

overcome, 76.

- -, description of, giving audiences at Greenwich, his personal resemblance to a Venetian, Frederick Nani;

his desire for peace with Spain, his disapproval of the Dutch, as rebels, desires to be invited to arbitrate between them, and Archduke: contrast between, and the late Queen, 66.

- -, his relations to his wife, 66;

might marry the Lady Arabella in case of wife's decease, 66.

- -, declares himself head of Anglican Church, 66.

- -, question of anointing at his coronation;

declines to touch for King's Evil, 69, cf. 295.

- -, anger of, with Dutch, for trying to intercept Ambassador from Archduke, 69, 72.

- -, review of his obligations to Spain, and his desire to retain commerce with, for benefit of Scotland, 69, 91.

- -, civil reception by, of Archduke's Envoy, 70.

- -, his modest scale of living in Scotland, contrasted with pomp of his English Court, 72.

- -, accepts payment from Henry IV., on account of French loans, 73.

- -, causes of his resentment against Henry IV., 73.

- -, his policy of truce with Spain, and recognition of the States of Holland on the one hand and the Archduke on the other, 73.

- -, his indolence, and fear of union of Roman Catholic States against him, incline him to peace, 73.

- -, receives Scaramelli in audience, refers to his tutor, Buchanan, and promises to repress buccaneering by sending ship through Straits, 78,

promise not kept, 125, 166, 170.

- -, resents the appearance of French special mission in mourning for late Queen, 81.

- -, his informal interview with Olden-Barneveldt, 81.

- -, no ministers and no law of which he is not the master, a saying of his, 81.

- -, his coronation fixed for St. James' day, N.S., 81.

- -, money sent to, as present, from Spain, 83.

- -, declares question of peace or war depends upon his own supreme will and not on Parliament, 87.

- -, his wearing jewelry, 66, 87.

- -, refuses definite alliance with France and Holland, but agrees to levy, by States, of troops in England and Scotland, and assigns part of debt due from France, to States, 90, 98.

- -, tells De Rosny he would never hurt a Catholic, 91.

- -, his promises to Pope before accession, 91, 97.

- -, Dutch offer of aid to, on accession, 91.

- -, dates fixed for entry into London (3 Aug., N.S.), and coronation (5 Aug.);

preparations for coronation of, 91.

- -, authorizes French translation of Basilikon, 93.

- -, plot against (Raleigh's) discovered, 96, 101, 111, 124, 127, 132, 136, 158, 160, 164, 167, 168, 172, 175, 179.

- -, to stay at Lambeth for Coronation, crossing river to Westminster, to avoid London and plague, 97.

- -, enters Tower, ungirt with sword, to indicate pacific inclinations, 97.

- -, his jest, re Spanish Ambassador, 97.

- -, his religious indifference, 97.

- -, his wife's influence with, 97.

- -, recognizes title of King of France, as belonging to Henry IV., 98, 142, 240, 249.

- -, resents being addressed as Our good Friend and Brother, by Archduke, 98, 147, 516.

- -, too learned' to be converted, 100.

- -, foolishly devoted to Kingly pursuit of stags, neglects affairs, consequent ascendency of Cecil, 101.

- -, interview with, described, 102.

- -, his promise to Flemish Agent that troops should not leave England to aid Dutch, 101, 104.

- -, his little favour to the (Raleigh) conspirators due to their concern in Essex's death, 104.

- -, his anxiety to have Coronation over;

description of ceremony, 105;

the Earl of Pembroke and, 105.

- -, knights created by, to imitate King Arthur, 106.

- -, his devotion to the chase;

Queen's influence with, on Roman Catholic side, 111.

- -, his answer to Papal Agent, re religion, 111.

- -, his Protestant toast at banquet, and answer to Irish deputation, 113, 118.

- -, message from, to Pope, declining to grant liberty of conscience, or to educate Prince of Wales as Roman Catholic, 118, 353.

- -, Sir Anthony Sherley's exile from Venice rescinded in compliment to, 123, 141.

- -, neglects State affairs for hunting and low company, 125, 132.

- -, attitude of, to Roman Catholics, after Raleigh's plot, 132.

- -, parliament summoned by, to vote supplies, settle religion, and to decide union with Scotland, 132, 147.

- -, convenes conference of theologians, 136, 158.

- -, King Henry IV.'s estimate of, 137.

- -, proposals to, by Huguenots, 138.

- -, M. de Rosny's negotiations conducted with, to neglect of ministers, results, 139.

- -, description of audience of Venetian Ambassador with, 141.

- -, vows to suppress piracy, 141.

- -, request to Archduke by, for Neapolitan horses;

Barbary horses presented to, by Henry IV., 141. 185.

- -, pledge to, of Henry IV. to prevent his excommunication by Pope, 141.

- -, resents omission by Spanish of his title of lord of Ireland, 142.

- -, directs payment to Dutch by France of English loan, 154, 168.

- -, applies to City of London for loan, refused;

causes of his lack of money, 158.

- -, description of, at reception of Ambassadors;

his portrait presented to Doge and Senate, 164, 166.

- -, his indecision how to treat the Lady Arabella, 164.

- -, his promises, re suppression of piracy;

laments present he had had to make to High Admiral, to compensate for loss of perquisites, 166.

- -, his language as to conclusion of peace with Spain, 166, 169.

- -, sends Prince of Wales, and is minded to go himself, to house of Venetian Ambassadors, 167, 169.

- -, description of banquet given by, in honour of Venetian Ambassadors, 169.

- -, describes Henry IV. as his oldest and dearest friend, 169.

- -, repudiates desire for Turkish alliance, 169.

- -, attends Council to secure execution of Piers, 170.

- -, reprieves conspirators in Raleigh's plot on scaffold, 175.

-(1604), denies reported connivance of Spain and Archduke in Raleigh's plot, 179.

- -, puts slight on Ambassador of Savoy, 182.

- -, his proclamation summoning parliament, deprecating Roman Catholic, Puritan, Bankrupt or Outlawed members, 186, 207 note.

- -, Spanish loan for, 186.

- -, presides over Hampton Court Conference, 187.

- -, aware of bribery of his Ministers by Spain, 189.

- -, sanctions bribery of Ministers by France, 191.

- -, sets free Roman Catholic priests after 18 years' imprisonment, 193, 199.

- -, orders priests and Jesuits to leave England by proclamation, 199.

- -, visits Tower, with Queen, witnesses bull-baiting, 201.

- -, his disapproval of rebellious subjects (Poland), 202.

- -, opens parliament, with long speech, favourable to Roman Catholics, 204.

- -, his eagerness for peace with Spain, 205.

- -, desires Union of England and Scotland, 205.

- -, does not assert right of nominating the Undertaker, 205, 217.

- -, his Agent recommends Calvinists to Henry IV.;

his use of the name Protestant, 206.

- -, his attitude on the Bucking hamshire election, 205, 207, 214.

- -, Henry Constable's libel on his irreligion, 213.

- -, his efforts to promote Union, stubbornness of parliament, 217, 220.

- -, barbarous laws, unworthy of a civilized people, his words to Venetian Ambassador, re distinction (English) between Civil and Criminal actions, 221.

- -, interferes to protect chartered trading companies, 236.

- -, opposition to, of Lower House, 238.

- -, reviews fleet at Rochester, 238;

review postponed owing to accident to, 242.

- -, favourable to Roman Catholics, in contrast to repressive legislation against them in Commons. 241, 243.

- -, his impatience for conclusion of peace with Spain, 242.

- -, his speech on proroguing Parliament;

confers knighthood on the Lord Mayor, and exhorts him and the Aldermen to expel priests, 243.

- -, presents mules to Henry IV., 258.

- -, suspicious of the French, 258, cf. 249.

- -, his love of quiet, Cecil's uncertainty as to its continuance, 261.

- -, his impecuniosity;

resorts to loans on Privy Seals, 261, 415.

- -, scene at his ratification of the treaty of peace with Spain, 266.

- -, presents made by, and received from, Spanish Ambassadors, 266, 267.

- -, gives up Progress to attend to discussion of Union, 274.

- -, influence over, of Privy Council, 274.

- -, his preoccupation with question of Union, 278, 415.

- -, informs Levant merchants he has no desire for an English Ambassador in Constantinople, or to continue friendly relations with Turks, 278.

- -, currant tax levied by, for own benefit, 278.

- -, appoints Archbishop;

dispute with Chapter, 288.

- -, goes coursing, 291.

- -, his interpretation of clause in Anglo-Spanish treaty relating to East India navigation, 291.

- -, causes commissioners for Union to meet, in absence of two members, 292.

- -, resolves to issue proclamation, assuming style of King of Great Britain, &c., 292,

- -, farms the customs and currant tax, 295.

- -, his income under 1,500,000l., 295.

- -, attends sermon every Tuesday, touches for scrofula after, 295.

- -, libelled on papers posted publicly, his rage, 301.

- -, treaties with, as King of Scots, voided by new title of Britain, 301.

- -, orders new translation of the Bible, 312.

- -, treats petition, presented at Royston, of Puritans, as almost act of rebellion;

concerts action against, 313.

- (1605), present at wedding of prime favourite, Lord Montgomery, 323.

- -, not anxious for arrival of Dutch Commissioners, 325, 333.

- -, will see personal attendants only, when at Royston, 331.

- -, inconveniences of his refusal to regulate precedence of Ambassadors, 332. See Precedence.

- -, reply to Spanish Ambassador defining his neutrality, 333.

- -, pressed by merchants interested in Levant trade for change of policy;

refers them to Council, 340.

- -, his letter to Privy Council, whereby he delegates to them his powers, his health necessitating his absence from London and constant exercise, 341.

- -, investigates case of person afflicted with spirit of prophecy, 341.

- -, his violent dislike to the Puritans, 341,

determined to repress, while enforcing laws against Roman Catholics to prove himself a good Protestant and correct reports from Rome, 347, 353, 361.

- -, his errors pointed out to him by Puritan, 352.

- -, history of his negotiations with Pope;

his reported conversion, 353.

- -, his anger against men of Dunquerque, 357.

- -, gives magnificent tournament, 360.

- -, requires members of Privy Council to take Communion with him;

draws up list of absentees, 360.

- -, his attitude to Spanish recruiting in England, 360, 374, 385, 391, 393, 397, 404, 408, 410, 416, 426.

- -, his endeavours to revive Levant trade he had ruined, 364.

- -, investigates case of the Sleeping Preacher, 364 and note, 368.

- -, unable to approve penalties under recusancy laws which he had himself suffered to be put in motion, he saves his pledge to respect life and property in cases of conscience, by leaving their execution to the Privy Council, 373.

- -, peacemaker between his wife and her brother, 384.

- -, quite content that his Roman Catholic subjects, taking service with the Archduke, should be destroyed by Dutch fleet, on way to Flanders, 385, 404.

- -, his signature forged, 390 and note.

- -, accident to, hunting, 396.

- -, informed by Sir Charles Cornwallis of Spanish pensions accepted by his Privy Council, 399,

his attitude to, 404.

- -, his urgent request for M. de Vitry, Henry IV.'s surprize, 402.

- -, no soldier, 405.

- -, supposed designs of, on France, 405.

- -, his progress to Oxford, 404,

his interest in, 407,

its costliness and inconvenience to country, 410,

his discourse, &c., at Oxford, 415.

- -, his proposed interference in parliamentary elections, 410, 415.

- -, exhorts Oxford students to fly and loath perfidious and cursed superstition of Rome, 415.

- -, his influence with electors of his kindred solicited by Emperor, 426.

- -, intercedes with Emperor for favourite of Duke of Holstein, 426.

- -, abandons hope of securing the Union, 433.

- -, resistance encountered by, in Scotland, in the matter of the Bishops, 433,

proposes to visit, 440, 453.

- -, his Irish policy;

sends Protestant preachers, 433, 453, 464.

- -, hunting at Royston, 433, 435, 440.

- -, his need of a subsidy, 415, 433,

probable opposition to, 440.

- -, grievance of purveyance heightened by his perpetual absences and hunting in the country, 440.

- -, forbids Irish levies for Archduke, 440.

- -, plot against. See Gunpowder Plot.

- -, his alarm, preference for Scots about his person, 445;

but declines Scottish bodyguard, 456.

- -, proclamation by, that Foreign Princes had no part in plot, 446.

- -, his speech to Parliament, acknowledging his lack of attention to public affairs, 447;

his account of plot to Venetian Ambassador, 447.

- -, goes to Hampton Court for hunting, 453,

with extra precautions, 456.

- -, causes' Oath of Supremacy to be re-administered to Court and Ministers, 456.

- -, further plot against alleged, 457.

- -, Basilikon Doron put on Index, 459.

- -, Spanish present for, 460.

- (1606), threat to excommunicate, 463.

- -, his anger with Archduke for not surrendering Gunpowder Plot conspirators, 464.

- -, receives Venetian Ambassador, 473.

- -, application to, by Dutch, grants leave to recruit for defence of Brill, 474.

- -, his extraordinary sagacity in divining plot, 475, 498.

- -, negotiates peace between Archduke and Dutch, 488, 495.

- -, his anxiety at great Spanish preparations against Dutch, 490.

- -, balances the Archduke's harbouring conspirators, against his own breaches of Anglo-Spanish treaty, 499, 501.

- -, subsidies granted to, subject to reform of household, 499.

- -, the Union he longed for, miscarries, 499, 510, 517.

- -, declines to determine precedence of Venetian Ambassador, 502, 539.

- -, account of misunderstanding leading to report of his death, 503.

- -, inconvenience caused by his constant absence hunting, remon strance fastened to door of Privy Chamber, 526.

- -, refuses to consider remonstrance by Parliament, 526.

- -, Venetian Ambassador's audience, with report of his remarks on precedence, 531;

his long discourse, to his own great satisfaction, on Papal claims, 532.

- -, studies Bellarmine, 532.

- -, spends newly-collected subsidy on entertaining his brother-in-law, 537.

- -, invited to baptism of Henry IV.'s daughter, difficulties of precedence of his, over Papal representative, 537,

overcome, 542.

- -, his good will, useless to Dutch, increases Spanish ill-feeling, 538,

its genuineness, 573.

- -, Neuce's plot against, 550, 553, 555, 556, 558, 560, 562, 565, 569, 570, 581, 599.

- -, his hearty approval of the punishment by the civil power of the Abb Brandolin and the Canon Saraceni, for crimes, no mere peccadilloes, 554.

- -, his protracted dinner at Theobald's with King of Denmark, 561.

- -, promises assistance to Venice, against Pope;

expresses satisfaction with, and regard for, Sir Henry Wotton, 561,

who confirms promise, 572, 582, 584, 586, 590, 591, 593.

- -, deputation of merchants to, complaining of Spanish outrages;

King Christian's surprise at his enduring such injuries, 564.

- -, tilts, at a joust, 564,

to disadvantage as compared with his brother-in-law, lampoon on, suppressed by Queen, 573.

- -, starts on progress, 566,

to Salisbury, 573, 578.

- -, supposed Papal communication to, 578.

- -, considers Scottish ecclesiastical reform a preliminary to Union;

to be discussed in London, 578;

the proceedings, 592.

- -, Henry IV.'s estimate of, ready of promises, backward of fulfilment, afraid of Spaniards, 586.

- -, emphatically renews promise of assistance to Venice, on ground of independence of Princes, 591.

- -, questions the General of the Republic as to Venetian resources, 608.

- -, expected at Hampton Court, 608.

- -, his policy, to act with a league of princes in aid of Venice, 617, 618;

pressed to publish his declaration in favour of Republic, 618, 623, 627.

- -, his gifts to his servants, proposal to check, by limiting control over properties and adding them to Crown estate, 623.

- -, keeps anniversary of Gunpowder Plot, 623.

- -, professes his old predilection for Venetian constitution, 627.

- -, opens Parliament, careful speech by, 632.

-, endeavours to force the Union on Parliament, 635.

- -, approves book by Lord Northampton against temporal authority of Pope, 635.

- -, compelled by Lord Salisbury to withdraw permission for export of grain, 636, 658.

- -, his keen interest, and assistance, in the literary controversy between Venice and the Pope, 642, 652.

- -, designs to visit Scotland, to promote Union, 643.

- -, assists at marriage of his favourite, Lord Hadington, 652, 660.

- (1607), his difficulty in obtaining supplies without declaring war on Spain, or sanctioning privateering;

proposal to resume lands usurped from Crown, 654.

- -, indignant at conclusion of peace between Turks and Empire, attributes result to Pope stirring up discord, 654.

- -, receives Sir Albertus Morton in audience, on arrival from Venice, 654, 659.

- -, stays in London, reluctantly, for Lord Hadington's marriage, consoled by dreaming of the chase, 660.

- -, proposed marriage between his daughter and son of Duke of Savoy, 663, 675,

- -, his indignation at Brief of Paul V., addressed to Roman Catholics in England, 666, 667, 675, 689, 699, 700.

- -, warmth of his language, touching Venice, to the Count of Vaudemont, 673.

- -, Sir Henry Wotton on his behalf asks for declaration by Venice of the resolute determination of the Republic not to yield to Pope, as preliminary to negotiation of English alliance, 673.

- -, unwonted resolution displayed by, to support Republic, 675.

- -, Venetian Ambassador instructed to report to him result of discussion with French and Spanish Ambassadors at Venice touching proposed league, 677.

- -, Spanish distrust of his alarm at positive proof of negotiations commenced between Archduke and States for truce, his threats, 678.

- -, the Duke of Lerma's strictures on his support of Venice against Pope, and his opposition to truce or peace between Spain and Dutch, 679.

- -, out of town hunting, his return probable, on account of bad weather, and urgent questions, viz., the Union, and the policy of England in Italy and Holland, waiting decision, 680.

- -, returns for few days, gives priority of audience to Venetian over Flemish Ambasador, 683.

- -, French policy in Italy as modified by his effort of French Ambassador to arrive at his intentions;

growing inclination of, to make common cause with France against Spain, 684 and note.

- -, notified by Venetian Ambassador of readiness of Republic to join Anglo-French league against Spain;

in reply, requests proof of readiness, 686.

- -, his neglect of Dutch, inference drawn in France that the Venetian Republic had better not rely on, 687, 688.

- -, receives Venetian Ambassador in audience;

hints at approaching arangement of dispute with Pope;

declares his interest in question is not religious, but as concerning that independence God has granted to Princes, 689,

the authority of Secular Princes, 690.

- -, his taste for the chase, in the company of very few and with a most private freedom, 689.

- -, his views on the relations of France to the Grisons, as an excuse for French action against Pope on behalf of Venice, 690.

-, - his amazement at favour shewn by Henry IV. to Jesuits, 690, 691.

-, -, formally declares himself in favour of league, provided he can be assured of co-operation of France, 691.

- -, writes his instructions to Sir Henry Wotton, 696.

- -, entertained at Venetian Ambassador's house, 696.

- -, increasing fervour of, for Venice, 699.

- -, leaves London, March 9th, on month's absence, for usual amusement of the chase, 699.

- -, his zeal for the Union;

an English Member of Parliament committed to Tower, during pleasure, for speaking against it, 699.

- -, replies to Papal Brief by execution of two Roman Catholic priests, 699,

one reprieved, 702.

- -, constrained with great justice, much against his will, to stay in town on affair of the Union, 701.

- -, expected developments of his policy, once the Union is carried;

hitherto more inclined to spending than to saving;

but expected to attend to the Navy and Finance and to increase his greatness on foundation of Union, 701.

-, reported interchange by, of declarations, with Spanish Ambassador, touching Venice and Pope, 702.

- -, poor opinion of, in Spain, 703.

- -, leaves for country, to neglect of Union, 707.

- -, contempt expressed for, by Henry IV., who warns Venice against reliance on, 710;

the like warning by M. de Rosny, 711.

- -, repents his advocacy of the Union, and reproaches ministers for committing him to it;

consequent growth of parliamentary, as opposed to royal, authority, alleged, 713.

-, Scottish demand addressed to, that he, or his son, should reside in Scotland, 713.

-, -, his annoyance at publication in Flanders of life of Garnet, 714.

- -, successful issue of the dispute between Venetians and Pope, due to his declaration in their favour, 715.

- -, joust in honour of his accession, 716.

- - , his anxiety at conclusion of truce between Dutch and the Archduke;

reproaches his ministers with receipt of Spanish bribes, 717.

- -, violent speech by, to Parliament, and threats re the Union;

proposed exercise of his absolute authority to carry the Union without parliamentary sanction, 718.

- -, re-affirms his approval of the Venetian attitude to Pope, 719.

- -, is informed by express from Duke of Tuscany of accord between Venice and Pope, 719.

- -, stress laid by, on recognition by Spain of Dutch, independence, viz., he could now support them openly and treat their Agent as an Ambassador, 720.

- -, his dislike to truce between Dutch and the Archduke;

his desire to pose as mediator between, them baulked;

the continuance of war a protection against Spain, 721.

- - officially notified by Venice of her accord with Pope;

proposal to send an Ambassador Extraordinary on this occasion negatived, 725.

- -, his interpretation of Dutch independence, as acknowledged by Spain, 727.

- -, expected in London for Chapter of Garter, 727.

- -, still bent on the Union, 727;

effect of opposition on his great mind, it breeds temper in him, 733.

- -, expected to intercede for his kinsman the Prince de Joinville, who visits England, 733, 738.

- -, the terms of the accord between Venice and the Pope formally communicated to, by Venetian Ambassador;

his satisfaction at the result, as protecting princes from such Papal claims;

his anxiety for the safety and welfare of the theologians who had defended the Republic, 735.

- -, minded to dissolve Parliament, and to procure suitable returns to another, that Union may be passed, 738.

- -, seeks to display the vigour of his prerogative by issuing constitutions against Puritans, 738.

- -Character of, 739 (pp. 509524).

- - his jealousy of his eldest son, 739 (pp. 513514).

- -, sayings of, 40 bis, 81, 91, 97, 101, 102 bis, 104, 111, 113 bis, 141, 147, 164, 217n, 221, 291, 332, 344, 532, 550, 554, 627, 689.

James V., of Scotland, 81.

Janverin, Walter, pirate, 146.

Jerace, Bishop of, Papal Nuncio at Venice, 641.

Jerusalem', 342.

Jesuits, certain, leave Madrid (1603) for England, 62;

three Scottish, effect conversion of Anne of Denmark, 66;

visit of one (Creichton) to England, 97;

plot of (Parsons') against King, disclosed by Creichton, 105;

their intrigue with Sir Anthony Standen, 188;

proclamation against, 199;

letter to General of mentioned, 397n;

attempt to expel brothers Cigla from order of, 412;

Provincial of, see Garnet;

Spanish protection for, 496;

Cardinal Bellarmine and, their relations with Pope, 505;

bad impression produced by perjury and equivocation of Henry Garnet at his public examination, 510;

discourse on, by Sir Henry Wotton, 518;

slaves and spies, King's description of, 532;

General Chapter of, to be held, 533;

Henry IV.'s confessor, a Jesuit, 543 (see Cotton);

attacks by, in England, on Venice, 544;

those expelled from England meet in Brussels and urge Pope to excommunicate King James;

their activity in Poland, 547;

Jesuit, in Dominican garb, at Spanish Embassy, 550;

their expulsion from Venice, 554;

two, executed at Plymouth, 596;

Englishman, in Papal service, in close relations with, 600, 601, 602;

English spy watches, at Calais, 606n;

letter to Jesuit in Venice found on English spy, 612, 630;

ex-priest, Cicala, accompanies Don Francesco de Castro on Venetian mission, 622;

supposed work by Jesuit on Papal quarrel with Venice, 641;

garbelled translation by, into Spanish, of English laws against Papists, 647;

in France, by means of Father Cotton, the King's Confessor, endeavour to persuade Henry IV. to secure re-admission of their order to Venice, 656;

King Henry IV.'s infatuation for, proposed introduction of, into Rochelle, 690,

into Venetian territory, 691;

their relation to the dispute between Venice and the Pope, 704;

Sir Henry Wotton on, 706, 708;

life and death of the Jesuit Garnet published in Flanders, 714;

their position in Venetian territory, as regulated by accommodation between Venice and Pope, 720a, 720b;

position of, in England, 739 (p. 512).

Jesus. See Ships.

Jews, proposed tax on, in Spain, 568.

Joinville, Prince de, to be entertained in England, as King James' cousin, free of charge, 733, 738.

Jonah, Capt., English Consul in the Morea, his ship taken by French, 88, 115;

put in irons by English Ambassador, 133.

Joyeuse, Franois, Cardinal de, 673;

his mission to Venice, 689,

results anticipated from, 691,

its progress, 695, 702, 704, 705,

and success, 715, 717, 719, 720a, 720b.

Judge Advocate of Fleet, 141. See Csar.

Juliers, Duke of. See Cleves.

Julius II., Pope, 588.

K

Katharine, Queen (of Aragon), 132.

-, - (Howard), 22.

-, -See also Catherine.

Keith, George, Earl Marischal, opposes Union, 292,

banished accordingly, 295.

Kent, levy of seamen ordered in, 97;

the best county for wheat, 598.

Kerseys. See, Trade.

Kimolo alias Argentiera, 494 note.

King (Bianchini, Giovanni, Chinch), John, captain of the Royal Merchant, (George) his past and present services to Venice, 22;

his frolic at the expense of the Podesta of Cittanuova, 210,

Venetian complaint concerning, 225, 236;

his explanation, 248;

intercession for, 403, 419,

successful, 420, 422.

King-at-arms. See Heralds.

King of the Romans, intrigue touching election of, 426.

King's Evil, King James, at first, declines to touch for, on rational grounds, 69, 295,

cures worked by, 517.

Kingston on Thames, Ambassador of Brunswick lodged and boarded at, 111;

despatches dated from, 145, 147.

Kinloss, in Scotland, lay Abbot, or Commendator of, 22 and note.

Kinloss. Lord. See Bruce, Edward.

Kronland, Duke of, kinsman of Queen Anne, comes to England, to seek King James' mediation with Duke Charles of Sweden, 583.