Index: J

Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 38, 1673-1675. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1947.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:

, 'Index: J', in Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 38, 1673-1675, (London, 1947) pp. 557-563. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/venice/vol38/pp557-563 [accessed 30 May 2024].

. "Index: J", in Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 38, 1673-1675, (London, 1947) 557-563. British History Online, accessed May 30, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/venice/vol38/pp557-563.

. "Index: J", Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 38, 1673-1675, (London, 1947). 557-563. British History Online. Web. 30 May 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/venice/vol38/pp557-563.

J

Jachino. See Jenkins.

Jamaica, West Indies, governor of. See Lynch, Sir Thomas; Modiford, Sir Thomas; Vaughan, John lord.

James I, king of Great Britain:
-, negotiations for Spanish Infanta, 125; gunpowder plot in time of, 201, 328.
-, law of, concerning treason, 328.

James, duke of Monmouth, Mamut, Maumuth, Momut, natural son of Charles:
-, back from Paris, 20; returns to France to command English troops, 41.
-, distinguished himself at siege of Maastricht, 70, 78, 86–7; attentions shown to in France, 78.
-, courier from reaches Court, 73.
-, may be given command of fleet, 78; to sail with fleet, 106, 120; gives up idea of going, 121.
-, going to France with English levies, 122, 124, 127, 129; in no hurry to start, 137–8, 144.
-, recruits for regiment of, 168; may go to serve in France, 240.
-, purchases office of master of the Horse, 239; commissioner to treat with Spaar, 286.
-, takes part in all military movements, 287.
-, godfather to York's daughter, 347; performs in comedy, 371.
-, Sarotti pays respects to, 422, 425; goes with king to Portsmouth, 431; returns to London, 455.

James, duke of York, Hiorch, Joreh, 178, 297.
-, reference to joining with French fleet, 236.
-, 1673:
-,-, wants to go to fleet again, 1; king decides against, 14; agitated about, 17.
-,-, Colbert complains of granting passports to Dutch ships, 4; rewards Duras, 5.
-,-, marriage negotiations with Archduchess, 6, 23 4; begins to despair of getting her, 14, 17; relaxing his efforts, 21.
-,-, receives Dodington, 10; to remain in London, 23, 26; Rupert has freer hand than, with fleet, 36.
-,-, favours indulgence, leaning to Catholicism, 13, 17; suspicion of, as favouring Catholics, 26, 29; avoids communion, 31, 35.
-,-, cannot make king stick to decision to coerce parliament, 25; recommends king to dissolve, 27; complains that king ruining himself by his weakness, 29; says concessions went too far, 40.
-,-, French suggest Neuburg offering daughter to, 31; hopes of getting archduchess for renounced, 32.
-,-, proposed to administer Test oath to household of, 31; Lords modify but allow later, 33; king's affection for unchanged, 40.
-,-, Innsbruck match unlikely, French suggest other parties, 36; hopes of destroyed, 43.
-,-, thinks of retiring to France and sending daughters there, 37; begins to form a party of friends and dependants, 40, 52–3; Buckingham links himself with, 56.
-,-, Anglesea advanced by favour of, 40; Venice notes leaning to Catholicism, 42.
-,-, goes with king and Rupert to test new shot, 41; goes with king to inspect fleet, 42, 47.
-,-, begins to throw off the mask, about faith, 43.
-,-, may command landing in Holland, 47; unlikely to, 50; going to fleet, at Rye, 51.
-,-, rumour about marriage, and affair with lady at Court, 50; brides proposed for, 52, 59, 81.
-,-, wishes to command landing, 52; friends dissuade, 53; king inclined to allow, difficulty of test, 55, 69; talk of banishing, as suspected Catholic, 68,
-,-, persuades king to re-assert royal authority, 56; guard of horse for, 59; king treats with greatest confidence, 69.
-,-, desires Rupert's success, despite rivalry, 59; accused of encouraging criticism of Rupert, 67; goes with king to Gravesend to confer with Rupert, 72.
-,-, resigns all offices, 69, 73; not to command landing force, 71, 76; rumours about, 71.
-,-, thinks it impossible to compel Dutch to fight, 72; continues to direct Admiralty, 73.
-,-, gives way to hatred of Arlington, takes up Buckingham, 73; suspected that falling, with his party, 76–7.
-,-, talk of an Italian lady for, 73; Modena match increases suspicion of, 85; impatient for news of Modena, 101.
-,-, king goes to fleet with, 75; dissatisfaction in fleet at removal of, 79.
-,-, further attack on by parliament expected, 77.
-,-, France thought religious change of might bring about considerable changes, 86.
-,-, did not approve of Rupert's behaviour to Schomberg, 89; acting with great reserve, 101.
-,-, plan to exclude children by Modena from succession, 91; king assists, over marriage articles, 97.
-,-, speaks to Alberti about Sta. Giustina affair, 92, 102; Alberti to explain to, 97, 112.
-,-, sends courier after Peterborough, 104; considered too old and sickly for the princess, 109.
-,-, recalled from field sports for conference, 106; feared action of parliament to prevent marrying a Catholic, 126.
-,-, wants a young and beautiful wife, 117; a Catholic, but not yet publicly professed, 119, 131–2.
-,-, princess of Wirtemberg suggested for, 118; objections to French match for, 122.
-,-, Peterborough to be proxy for, 123, 135; marrying through Peterborough's eyes, 124.
-,-, asks help of Louis about dispensation, 125n. Mocenigo asked to assure pope of high character of, 126; delight at conclusion of Modena match, 129; comments on attitude of Spain and Rome, 144–5.
-,-, possibility of parliament prohibiting marriage with a Catholic, 130; remains firm in midst of crisis, 138.
-,-, Parma compared unfavourably with, 143; Rome takes no pains to oblige, 145.
-,-, pope wants Louis to intervene with about religion, 151; not surprised by Commons attack on marriage, 161.
-,-, Fresno congratulates on marriage, 155; knows that Shaftesbury played him a trick, 161.
-,-, to meet bride at Dover, 155, 162, 180; hastens his coming, 178; goes to meet her, 178.
-,-, always ready to serve Venetian interests, 156.
-,-, does not suspect brother of share in attack on marriage, 162; peril if king abandons, 162; will not run away from enemies, 169.
-,-, thought to have bribed opponents of marriage, 168; consternation at attitude of parliament 173n; advocates dissolution, 183.
-,-, gets king to summon council about dissolution, 174; criticises prorogation as inadequate, 176.
-,-, schemes for overcoming parliament, rebukes chancellor, 175; favours resolute methods, 176; asks Colbert for money to save king from parliament, 177.
-,-, becoming more attached to French party, attacks Fresno, 177.
-,-, Shaftesbury's efforts to ruin, 178, 183
-,-, expects arrival of bride will stop disturbances, 180; meets bride, marriage declared and consummated, 181.
-,-, reception in London, 181–2; thanks for Venetian civilities, 186.
-,-, partiality to France cause of unpopularity, 182; urges king to accept French offer, 184.
-,-, visits Arlington, 186; partisans of, and sea command, 196.
-,-, plan to exclude from crown, 192; wife depressed by exasperation of enemies, 197.
-, 1674:
-,-, seeing duchess of Modena off, 197; pamphlet against, 206.
-,-, Cornbury bitter enemy of, 197; king refuses money offered by, 203.
-,-, disposed to take the oath, 202; deeply hurt by declaration of peers that must do so, 206.
-,-, representation to king about encroachments of parliament, 205–6; parliament may deprive of custody of his daughters, 212, 229, 232.
-,-, has no hope of any remedy but peace, 207; hurricane about to break over, 212.
-,-, moderation in face of bill to exclude Catholic from throne, 221; party in favour of exclusion, 228.
-,-, king wishes to do penance for bad advice given, 228; parliament meant to accuse of treason, 232.
-,-, a high spirited prince, all zeal for religion, 228; gains credit by signs of influence with king, 233.
-,-, Alberti drops hint to about trade restrictions, reply, 230.
-,-, said to have advised dissolution, 232; Lauderdale supported by, 236, 263, 279; Lauderdale wavering in fidelity to, 324.
-,-, partial to France, grudge against Spain over marriage, 234; opinion on brother's attitude to Spain, 259.
-,-, on marriage of Orange to daughter, 246; Presbyterians parley with, 279.
-,-, goes to Sheerness, 259n; goes to Windsor, 261; goes to Newmarket with king, 299.
-,-, king will not allow himself to be separated from, 262; all powerful with the king, 279.
-,-, advises signing of proclamation against Jesuits and priests, 270; adherents of hope for calm, 281–2,
-,-, uses influence to advance his creatures, 279; takes part in all military movements, 287.
-,-, Fresno, and claim to succession of, 283; treasurer; a dependent of, 312.
-,-, Cornbury's party hopes to raise daughters to throne, 283; suspects Orange of designs on succession, 303, 305, 308; not loved by Dutch or Orange, 310.
-,-, advised prorogation of parliament, 298; promises help for Burnett, 303; Alberti informs of sentence, 328.
-,-, speaks of expedition to Barbary, 300–1; speaks of prospects of Guinea Company, 313; protector of the Company, 324.
-,-, does not trust offers of Presbyterians, 308; opportunities offered to by them, 311; coquetting with Presbyterians, 316.
-,-, does not favour daughter marrying Orange, 312; not privy to all instructions to Arlington, 321.
-,-, friends of hope Arlington will fail in Holland, 315; opposed to reliance on Spain, 320.
-,-, popular fear of, as absolute monarch and a Catholic, 316; everything concerning religion done under direction of, 321.
-,-, qualities recommended to Presbyterians, 316–7, 327; Presbyterians presenting petition to, for religious tolerance, 318; negotiations with nonformists 330–1.
-,-, king's effusive declaration of affection for, 231; fear of revival of king's jealousy of, 324.
-,-, obtains pardon for Bristol sect, 324, 326, 331.
-,-, enemies of, promote claims of Orange, 326; suspicious of Orange, 330.
-,-, instigates support, of bishops by Lauderdale and Danby, 330; fears reassembling of parliament, 331.
-, 1675:
-,-, nonconformists support, 337, 346; leaders fear may lose credit with, 342; relations with nonconformists, 348–9, 354, 384.
-,-, hope of male heir for, 343; congratulated on birth of daughter, 346–7.
-,-, Bergeik has audience of, 344; exclusion object of confederates, 363.
-,-, opposed to recall of Shaftesbury, 346; advances of Whig peers to, 349.
-,-, offended with Arlington, 346; Burnet in confidence of, 349; offended with Lauderdale and Danby, 358.
-,-, accused of design to reduce powers of parliament, 353; malcontents have design against, 367.
-,-, against bishops' proposal, 357; gets king to modify harshness, 358.
-,-, warns king to prevent union of bishops and Presbyterians, 358, 366; advises him to manage union, 367; opposed to, 376.
-,-, proposal to appoint cardinal agreeable to, 362; envoy from Modena sees, 374.
-,-, fears to declare himself a Catholic, 362; not eager for parliament to reassemble, 371.
-,-, dislikes being satirized, 366; friends of opposed to intrigues, 376.
-,-, ready to sacrifice ministers but saves Lauderdale, 368; regaining popularity, 371.
-,-, will not listen to Scots' complaints against Lauderdale, 372; Lauderdale most dreads opposition of, 398.
-,-, goes to Newmarket with king, 377; sends to congratulate Orange on recovery, 388, 400.
-,-, listens to Shaftesbury's offers, 378; relations with Shaftesbury, 382.
-,-, suspected of intention to reestablish popery, 381; in danger by queen's death, 382.
-,-, need for at head of Admiralty, 385; proposed reinstatement, 391, 393, 405, 407, 413.
-,-, Presbyterians and Independents recognise as protector, 390; approves of proposed oath but wants liberty of conscience, 401.
-,-, would like a new parliament, 391; king says will dissolve parliament if attacks, 392n; proposal to exempt from test, 407.
-,-, acting with great prudence, only anxious to serve monarchy, 394; says king would dismiss parliament if Louis advanced money, 397n.
-,-, refuses to help parliament attack ministers, 398; difficult position of, 402.
-,-, Bergeik blames for being too French, 405.
-,-, encourages king to be patient with parliament, 407; awaiting issue about indulgence, 413.
-,-, speaks to Alberti about base against Tripolitans, 408.
-,-, prince of Neuburg received by, 410; present at Sarotti's reception, 421; Sarotti pays respects to, 422, 425; prince of Neuburg entertains, 433.
-,-, remark anent Cardinalate of Philip Howard, 429; Ronquillo urging to declare himself protector of Catholicism, 439.
-,-, sails in Anne for Portsmouth, 431; goes to Windsor, 436; back in London, 455.
-,-, king discusses reassembling of parliament with, 452.
-,-, condolences on death of daughter, 464; parliament takes up question of education of children as Protestants, 471, 475.
-,-, confers with Ruvigny about St. Germain affair, 486.

-, daughters of. See Anne; Caterina Laura; Mary.

-, marriage of. See under marriage.

Janchins. See Jenkins.

Jarmen, Jaram [Pomerania, German Empire], 477.

Jeffreys, George, common serjeant of London, 380n.

Jenkins, Sir Leoline, Lionel Ginghins, Jachino, Janchins:
-, appointed commissioner to Cologne congress, 33; leaves for Calais, 66.
-, Sunderland offended by appointment of, 78.
-, opinion about flag incident, 259.
-, appointed ambassador to congress, 377, 380; in London, 492, 495; ready to sail, exchanges visits with Sarotti, 497; held up by weather, 498.

Jermyn, Henry viscount St. Albans, lord chamberlain of the Household:
-, talks of retiring, 71; Arlington treats with for chamberlainship, 101, 114, 239; charged to prevent papists from approaching the Court, 179.
-, resigns chamberlain's staff, 292.

Jersey, Gerse, royal navy affair of, at Zante, 60–1, 63, 79, 93–4, 101, 110, 140, 239; strong feeling in England about, 153; king not satisfied about, 241.

Jesuits:
-, proclamation banishing, 29, 32, 368; proclamation for apprehending, 269, 270n.
-, popular feeling against, 328; secular behaviour of, 429; pampered, 430.
-, desirability of having bishop over, 429; proposed inquiry concerning escape from penalties, 487.

-, See also Arimberti; St. Germain.

Jews, proposed place of worship for, at Leghorn, 160.

John, Don of Austria, natural son of Philip IV, said to be coming to Flanders, 350.

John, East Indiaman, arrives home, 105n.

John Frederick, duke of Hanover, 368, 379.

John Frederick, duke of Wurtemberg, 118n.

John William, palatine of Neuburg, Neoburgh, 422.
-, married emperor's daughter, 352n; arrives in England, 408; received at Court, 410; Sarotti calls on, 425; returns call, 427; gives banquet and departs, 433.

Joliffe, Jolif, John, commissioner to treat with Dutch, 271.

-, -, merchant, 46.

Jones, Giles, English consul at Venice, alteration of consulage by, 45, 82, 332.

Jorch. See James, duke of York.

Jovar Velasco, Pedro Fernandez de, marquis del Fresno, Spanish ambassador in England, 3, 205.
-, talks more moderately, seeks reconciliation, 9.
-, cultivates malcontents, 20; talks loudly and hardly cultivates confidence of ministers, 48.
-, Charles accuses of inventing false report, 26; untrue that received money from Spain, 48.
-, believes congress negotiations opened, 53.
-, represents peril of French invasion of Flanders, 59, 64; says England too partial to France, 65.
-, denies complicity about Charleroi, 65; sharp colloquy with Arlington, 67.
-, reported difference with Colbert, 66; particulars of, 76; told to stop Salinas, 121.
-, speaks of discovering negotiations of English in Holland, 68; says peace necessary as means for war lacking, 75.
-, unable to assist his consul, 74; jealous of Salinas, 80; gave him no assistance, 83.
-, exchanges civilities with Arlington, 85; Charles tells of determination to stand by France,137.
-, denies promise to support Dutch, 97; intimates war, 124.
-, comment on Modena match, 124; avoids offering congratulations on it, 144; goes to offer congratulations, 155.
-, king shows Dutch treaty to, denies knowledge, 128; advises peace with Dutch, 138.
-, hopes to be appointed ambassador at Rome, 144; dealings with Prince Rinaldo, 182.
-, trying to detach England from France, 154; alleged bribery of members by, 175, 177.
-, letter for, from States General, 169; sees king, hints at Spanish obligation to Dutch, 187–8.
-, York charges with rendering war unpopular in England, 177; to try to stop French help to England, 180; blames York for partiality to France, 182.
-, last to call on Mary of Modena, 186; visiting duchesses of York and Modena, 188.
-, Arlington's lack of moderation in dealing with, 186; king's reply to, 191–2.
-, Colbert avoids meeting, 188; embarrassed by king's reply, fears Spain being involved in war unprepared, 192.
-, says that Dutch have made great offers, 190; opinion on situation, 194.
-, refuses to present Dutch reply to king, 199; share in Dutch peace offers, 214; establishes treaty all to himself, 216.
-, unwilling to press England, but urges need of peace with Dutch, 199, 200; action in bringing peace about 218.
-, popular in English Court, 200; often misinformed, 211; but English watch over his business, 212.
-, fears effect of extreme views in parliament, 202; wants to be sole minister to conduct peace, 215.
-, government deliberates over replies sent by, 209; arranges second treaty between Spain and England, 219.
-, sends secretary to Hague to announce peace, 228; won great credit by peace, 234n; expresses publicly satisfaction with peace, 235.
-, wants England to mediate peace for France, 228; Arlington dissuades king from, 234.
-, York has good understanding with, 234; confined to bed, 242.
-, Catholics accuse of promoting troubles in parliament, 234.
-, says Spain inclined to peace, 237; complains of Court's partiality for France, 238; hopes for peace early, 241.
-, wishes to make most of winter, 238; Sweden sole hope of to get France to make peace, 239.
-, tries to prevent bad blood between English and Dutch, 241; England propitiatory to, 246; boasts of influence over parliament, 254.
-, complains of English serving in France, some recalled,242; tries to move England to oppose French designs, 266.
-, opinion about mediation and continuing the war, 249, 250; opinion about Franche Comté, 254.
-, laughs at report of Francophile party in Germany, 250; Ruvigny tries to thwart, 259.
-, to impart decision about mediation, 256; without instructions, id.; opinion about, mediation, 258.
-, ill, 258; taking the waters, 261, 269, 270, 275; asks to be recalled, 263; leave granted, 269, 275.
-, assumes role of interpreter of peace treaty, 259; passes civil office with the king but without substance, 261.
-, agitating for re-assembling of parliament, 260, 277; Orange's friends against remaining in London, 269.
-, blames Monterey, 269; scuffle with retinue of, 278.
-, expected back in London, 270; expects to be asked to remain, 275; different attitudes about in London, 277; means to leave, for health, 279, 281.
-, ministers pay court to, over mediation, 278; remonstrances about Modiford ignored, 281.
-, left, with good present, 283; comment on his proceedings, id., expected in Spain, 292; reply to congratulations on peace, 301.
-, responsible for Monterey's recall, 304; Monterey blamed for quarrel with, 320; policy to constrain king through parliament, 348.

-, -, secretary of, 258, 267, 269.

-, -, wife of, 292.

judges, king consults about enforcing laws against Catholics, 178; devising protection of foreigners from laws against Catholics, 229; ordered to enforce laws against Catholics, 239.

Juxon, William, archbishop of Canterbury, 181.