Index: N

Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 38, 1673-1675. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1947.

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Citation:

'Index: N', Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 38, 1673-1675, (London, 1947), pp. 581-590. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/venice/vol38/pp581-590 [accessed 16 June 2024].

. "Index: N", in Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 38, 1673-1675, (London, 1947) 581-590. British History Online, accessed June 16, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/venice/vol38/pp581-590.

. "Index: N", Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 38, 1673-1675, (London, 1947). 581-590. British History Online. Web. 16 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/venice/vol38/pp581-590.

N

Naarden, Naerden [Prov. N. Holland, Netherlands], retaken by Orange, 121.

Namur [Belgium], threatened by French, 410n.

Nancy [Meurthe et Moselle, France], despatches dated at, 87–8, 90, 94–5, 105, 107–9, 118.

Nani, Battista, chosen as Venetian minister to congress, 498.

Naples [Prov. Napoli, Italy]:
-, Spanish fleet withdraws to, 370n.
-, kingdom of, French offer Venice advantages in, 492.

Narbrough, Narborough, Sir John:
-, with convoy at Cadiz, 15n.
-, commands expedition to Barbary, 300n; at Cadiz, 326.
-, sent home Bristol with ransomed slaves, 360n.
-, ships going to, 453.
-, before Tripoli, in treaty with new dey, 455; reports success, 460n.
-, at Zante with squadron, report on operations, 479, 480; reception by Proveditore, 480.

Nassau, Henry Casimir of, prince of Nassau Dietz, governor of Friesland, 341.

-, Henry Frederick, prince of Orange, Albertina, daughter of, 341n.

-, Isabella of, Arlington's wife, 293n, 310.

-, Louis of, heer van Beverweert, 293n.

-, Maurice of, 293n.

-, -, governor of Utrecht, 341.

-, William II of, prince of Orange, 388.

claim for money lent by, 351; died of smallpox, 387.

Nassau, William III of, prince of Orange:
-, 1673:
-,-, repulse at Charleroi, I; losing ground in the States, 3, 8; Spain disowns action, 6.
-,-, Spaar achieves nothing with, 5; interview with Monterey and Salinas, 76.
-,-, conference with Monterey at Malines, 80; Charles refuses to see letters from, 85.
-,-, Naarden retaken by, 121; will join with Monterey against the French, 124.
-,-, envoy sent to, 185; proposed marriage to York's daughter, 192, 197, 215, 219, 246, 269.
-, 1674:
-,-, intrigue to secure inheritance to crown for, 197, 228; negotiations for marriage to York's daughter increase French misgivings, 225.
-,-, news of restoration to hereditary dignities, 216; England would have liked a greater share in, 219.
-,-, peace against, interest of, 217, 225, 233–4; hopes much from war, 236–7.
-,-, Sylvius takes congratulations to, 219; Arlington is of party of, 233, 236.
-,-, why marriage with York's daughter not hastened, 228; party in England, 238; birth of son to York will affect prospects, 269.
-,-, king will not transfer troops in France to, 241; army of, 254n.
-,-, Reede sent on behalf of, 241; protests anxiety for good understanding with England, 252.
-,-, supposed intention of Charles to help through France, 249; Spain aware of Charles's interest in, 251.
-,-, difference with Monterey, 261–2, 267; Monterey had to give way to, 282.
-,-, friends of against Fresno staying in London, 269; English exasperated against, 281.
-,-, not sound policy to abandon Spain for reconciliation with France, 270; fear of turning to France, 303.
-,-, induces Souches to move, 276; Condé captured baggage of, at Seneffe, 284.
-,-, curt reply to Temple's request for audience, 281.
-,-, will need England in struggle with the States, 281; tends to comply with English wishes, 293; opposition to, in Provinces, 295, 303.
-,-, hampered by Souches at Seneffe, 296; complains of him, 297; removal of Souches should satisfy, 305.
-,-, Haro tries to persuade not to go to Hague, 299; operations at Grave, 302, 306.
-,-, tries for reconciliation with uncle, 300, 303; ministers propose to support against States, 306.
-,-, fears a sudden peace, 303; said to be impatient for peace, 305.
-,-, York suspects of designs on succession, 303, 305, 308, 330; efforts to form party for, in England, 305; in correspondence with Presbyterians, 310.
-,-, concern in England about, 309, 315, 317; mission of Arlington and Ossory touching, 310–2, 322.
-,-, incensed by imperialists, 309; Spaniards offended with, 336.
-,-, re-establishes Lowenstein faction, 311, 317; van Beuningen revives States' jealousy of, 336.
-,-, supposed to be using France to secure position in Provinces, 317; supposed treaty with Arlington, 326.
-,-, Arlington reports interviews with, 321; will make no separate treaty with France, 323.
-,-, projects for succession a chimera, 326; very circumspect about English offers, 330; gives haughty answers, 336.
-,-, Spain curious about Arlington's negotiations with, 335; Arlington advised to cultivate popularity in England, 336; he offered York's daughter to, 346.
-, 1675:
-,-, claims debt from England, 339; reply about marriage, 342.
-,-, England anxious to win, 340; French overtures to,.345; scant trust in English Court, 362.
-,-, refuses to suspend hostilities at sea, 340; extolled for achievements, 341.
-,-, power and authority of, 341; unlikely to favour peace and risk losing authority, 342.
-,-, nonconformists suspicious of king's negotiations with, 342; attitude of Charles to, 345.
-,-, prevails on Dutch to maintain army, 345; authority well secured, 380.
-,-, offer of Gelderland to, 350, 361, 365, 370; opposition to, 361; suspicion of grows, 378.
-,-, pressing for payment of debt from England, 351; English opinion of policy, 352.
-,-, Spain shows every civility to, 352; Spain favours designs in Provinces, 356.
-,-, taxed with ingratitude to Charles, 355; misunderstandings with continue, 360; talk of assisting uncle to asert authority, 361; Charles strengthening friendly relations with, 365, 384; troops reach, from England, 379.
-,-, suggests places for congress, 365; accepts Nijmegen, 376.
-,-, Borgomanero has high opinion of, 373; unlikely to retire, 379.
-,-, movement in country against, 378–9; parties for and against, 382–3.
-,-, proposed alliance of Anglicans and Presbyterians with, 381.
-,-, confers with Brandenburg at Cleves, 382; Spaniards ill pleased with course taken by, 435.
-,-, relations with France, 383.
-,-, ill of smallpox, 387; congratulations on recovery, 388–9, 400.
-,-, rumours of plot against, 388; internal difficulties hamper military efficiency, 400.
-,-, jealousy of, fomented by Lowenstein faction, 416; fear that losing popularity, 433.
-,-, Temple to try and dispose to closer understanding with uncle, 432; Temple to go to with commissions, 439, 446; but holds back from, 446, 448.
-,-, proposed concessions to, for peace, 451; supposed peace negotiations with, 453.
-,-, urged to have greater confidence, 460; English interests with incline them to favour France, 493.

-, William Adrian of, heer van Odijk, Odik, Dutch ambassador to England.

arrival, 286; shows tendency to comply with English wishes, 293.

suspected by other ambassadors, 293; privy to project from Orange, 295; tries to convince Charles of Orange's good faith, 300; gets proclamation restricting privateering, 302.

assumes role of serving Orange, 305; recalled, 307; sails, 311.

sent to Zeeland, 342.

-, William Frederick of, count of Nassau Dietz, 341n.

Nassau Hadamar, Prince Maurice Henry of, 302.

Navagero, Bernardo, Proveditore of Zante:
-, despatch to the Senate, 479.
-, reception of Narborough, 480.

Navagne, attack on, 261.

navy, the royal, fleet:
-, Buckingham embarrassed Charles I by expenditure upon, 35.
-, 1673:
-,-, York wishes to go with, 1; likely to be divided into squadrons, 3; Rupert to command, 14, 17, 26, 29; command not settled, 23.
-,-, Spragge to make arrangements with France about, 5, 10; arrangements discussed, 18; arrangements made, 20; arrangements give every advantage to, 29.
-,-, being fitted out, 20; ships drop down to Sheerness, 26, 32, 38.
-,-, equipment delayed by parliament crisis, 29, 32; in a forward state, 32; king advances equipment out of own funds, 35; heavy cost of, 38.
-,-, Rupert to have freer hand with, 36; he means to put French in the middle, 38.
-,-, king sends eighty companies to, to avoid test, 37; Rupert tries to avoid crowd of volunteers for, 42.
-,-, great efforts to get speedily to sea, 38; waiting for French squadron, which backward, 40–1; junction with French, 50.
-,-, king could use to get money from Commons, 41.
-,-, ready for sea, king and York go to inspect, 42; king visits again for final instructions, 47.
-,-, from number of troops on board, a landing expected, 42; ordered to engage enemy, 51.
-,-, constitution of, 47; king and York visit, 51–2; general confidence in success, 54.
-,-, sails, but not complete, 52; sailors supplied by merchantmen, 55, 199.
-,-, reports in France of battle, 57; account of first battle of Schoneveldt, 57–8.
-,-, reinforcements for, 58; news of fresh engagement, 60; engagements not severe, 64.
-,-, pamphlet on glory of, 58; losses at Schoneveldt, 58.
-,-, Rupert brings back to Thames, king hastens sailing, 64; delayed by criticism of command, 67.
-,-, Council decides that shall put to sea, 72; king goes to and orders infantry to embark, 75; stationed at mouth of Thames, 78.
-,-, Louis bears cost of, 75; Charles inspects, 79; puts to sea, rumours of battle, 83.
-,-, Monmouth may command, Rupert not popular with, 78.
-,-, goes to intercept fleet from E. Indies, 90; effect of ill success on king, 91.
-,-, Dutch will come out to prevent chasing E. Indiamen, 96.
-,-, in Texel battle, 98; account of, 99, 100, 103–4; Louis resents imputation of having hindered, 224.
-,-, Rupert ordered to assemble off English coast, 100; largest ships brought into the Thames, 106.
-,-, cannot keep at sea, for lack of supplies, 114; sent to sea, 120; puts to sea under Ossery, 124.
-,-, Ossery to command assisted by Harman, 120; Harman to command alone, 121.
-,-, thrice worsted by Dutch, 194; no one claims that last fights were victories, 196.
-, 1674:
-,-, king asks parliament for money for, 198; king asks money to build ships for, 220.
-,-, king making provision for, 199; troops to reinforce from Ireland sent back, 220.
-,-, Dutch spared in last war, 271; expected agitation about, 292.
-,-, treasurer succeeds in paying, 291; officers of desire war, 301.
-,-, expedition fitting out for Mediterranean, 300; six frigates no longer to go to Algiers, 326.
-, 1675:
-,-, more ships being equipped, 344, 347; difficulty of paying for, 344.
-,-, Danby accused of neglecting, 347; need for York as head, 384–5.
-,-, Pepys' statement to Commons about, 402; Commons consider appropriation of money granted for, 404.
-,-, consultations about arming new ships, 426; impossible for lack of money, 428.
-,-, convoy asked, for Swedish ships, 446.
-,-, success against Tripoli, 460.
-,-, king asks money for building ships, 467; Commons discuss, appropriation proposed, 471, 489; money for ships voted, 473–4, 478; debate on quality and cost, 481; amount for limited, 485; need of money for, 495.

Nayburg, Neoburg. See Philip William, duke of Neuburg.

Negrelli. See Nigrelli.

negro slaves, importation suggested in parliament, 230; conveyed to America, 324.

Nelthorp, Edward, merchant, purchased Dutch prize goods, 441n.

Nerli, Francesco, papal nuncio in France, later Cardinal, 134n.

-, -, secretary of state, 149, 150, at conference, about dispensation, 157.

Netherlands, Dutch, Holland, States, United Provinces:
-, van Beuningen rendered mistrustful of England, 336.
-, 1673:
-,-, consternation in, inclined to adjustment, 1, 8; dissatisfied at meagre results of alliances, 5.
-,-, Venetian glass polished in, 2.
-,-, terrified by successes of Luxemburg, 5; reject armistice, will only treat jointly with allies, 9, 11, 20.
-,-, Colbert wants Charles to prevent Spain helping, 6n.
-,-, suspicious of Spain, over Charleroi, 8; Monterey repeats declarations for, 20.
-,-, Louis sanguine of humbling if Charles supplied with funds, 18; aims of allied kings in war with, 42, 48.
-,-, will get little advantage from spies, 20; benefit by parliamentary crisis, 32, 35.
-,-, threaten peace if Spain will not make war on France, 29; urge suspension of hostilities, 40; French offer good terms to, 51.
-,-, York may command landing in, 47; reason to expect a landing, 51.
-,-, expected to have to buy peace, 47; may throw selves into arms of France, 50.
-,-, views about French attack on, 50; not backward in preparing for conflict, 51.
-,-, demands of allies from, 52; business of congress likely to be difficult for, 55.
-,-, Danish league with, 58; Danish apology for, 65.
-,-, expect to resist successfully if emperor acts, 65; will be at mercy of allies if imperialists stopped, 71.
-,-, English and Spaniards ready to demand spoils of, 68; French and English demands of, 70.
-,-, negotiations set on foot by English in, 68; unlikely to trust to fair words, 73.
-,-, England's peace terms for, 74; strong places overseas would not bridle, 75.
-,-, proposed to attack from Dunkirk, 76; English dislike of successes gained by France over, 79.
-,-, unwilling to surrender any territory, 79, 80; Rupert to attempt landing in, 83.
-,-, troops march into, apprehension of Condé, 80.
-,-, response to English peace offer, 83; English will not listen to proposals without French, 85.
-,-, seized with panic on approach of English fleet, 85; vigilant to resist attacks, 87.
-,-, would prosecute war if England detached from France, 87; internal situation compels England to continue war with, 88; Charles advised to accept terms of, 101.
-,-, Spaniards try to keep up hopes of recovering the lost, 88; not inclined for peace, Spain declares for, 97.
-,-, Arlington complains of Venice favouring, 92; now refuse salute to English flag, 101.
-,-, peace with urged in Privy Council, 101; peace offers to England, 106.
-,-, heavy losses of, at sea, 108; exhausted by war effort, 170.
-,-, mirrors imported from, 116.
-,-, Spain hopes that England will make peace with, 117; try to force Spain to break with England, 127; Spanish aid costs dear, 128.
-,-, treaty made with Spain, terms, 127; Fresno recommends peace with, 138; Charles overlooked Spanish support for, 154.
-,-, want peace to tax king with French alliance, 170; Commons demand proof that not averse from peace, 173.
-,-, concession about flag unsatisfactory, 170; French fear effect of offers on Charles, 179.
-,-, York's plan to compel to make peace, 175; Shaftesbury offers king peace with, 183.
-,-, influence with parliament, 185; Arlington accused of corresponding with, 204.
-,-, Arlington says would easily break with Spain, 185; Spain may weary of demands of, 188.
-,-, peace with may come unexpectedly, 185; king hopes to saddle parliament with onus of, 187; will listen to peace on compulsion, 188.
-,-, Fresno hints to king Spain's obligation to, 188; Arlington's complaint of Spanish alliance with, 190–1.
-,-, hold back answer to king's reply, 188, 194.
-,-, expect to give law to England, 191; king wishes to saddle with continuation of war, 192.
-,-, Fresno fears will urge Spain to war, 192; Fresno considers offers advantageous, 194.
-, 1674:
-,-, people bent on peace with, 196; parliament means to force king to make peace with, 198.
-,-, Finch says averse from peace, 198; expect to humble France, 200.
-,-, Spain shows Charles need for joining, 199; Fresno urges peace with, 200.
-,-, English demands of, concerning India trade, 203; offers made by, for peace, 205, 209, 210.
-,-, purchasing peace with England out of regard for Spain, 207; opinion about peace offer of, 210.
-,-, separate negotiations of France with, 208; constantly raising difficulties at Cologne, 211.
-,-, hope to convince parliament that continuation of war due to obstinacy of, 209; attitude of parliament to peace offer, 211.
-,-, slander French alliance, 210; French view of negotiations with, 212.
-,-, Spaar to forward peace with, 212; many do not approve of offers, 215.
-,-, origin and manner of king's negotiations with, 214; Temple sent to, desire to treat without intervention of others, 215.
-,-, Ruvigny threatens to publish-list of those in pay of, 215.
-,-, French fear effect of peace on, 217; terms arranged by Spain for, 218; Orange not inclined to peace till internal affairs settled, 234.
-,-, king announces peace with to parliament, 218; king made peace, to live in quiet, 232.
-,-, not a particle of trust in, 218; party being formed in favour of, 228.
-,-, arrangements left for peace with France, 219; interest of Orange to continue at war, 225; English interest in continuation of war with France, 235, 242.
-,-, France urged rupture with, for two years, 227; York's advice brought about war with, 228.
-,-, France may resume confidential relations with, to detriment of England, 229; Venetian interest in policy of, 234.
-,-, strange that England averse from war with such a rival, 236; Arlington alone favours, 236.
-,-, France much less dangerous than, 236; animosity continues, complain that king still French at heart, 241.
-,-, prudent conduct of, in the war, 236; decision for peace does not seem sincere, 236, 238.
-,-, government aware of strength and wisdom of, 236; efforts to conciliate Charles, 241; increasing distrust of Charles, 243; Charles says without honour or faith, 246.
-,-, Ruvigny says will not listen to peace, 243; aims of against France, 245; France indifferent about giving up conquests in, 259.
-,-, Spaar asked about negotiations in, 245; Fresno says sole reliance on Spain, 258.
-,-, cavalier treatment of England, 246; suspicion of efforts to detach from Spain, 248–9.
-,-, England hopes to monopolise trade of, 246; negotiations with about India trade, 270.
-,-, Skelton suspected of intention to transfer troops to service of, 248n; English levies for permitted, 252.
-,-, defer sending ambassadors to England, because of auxiliaries, 251; strict instructions to ambassadors about India trade, 252.
-,-, England preparing to maintain and improve correspondence with, 252; Charles made Spain arbiter with, 259.
-,-, English interest to support against France, 266; might be forced to come to terms, 267; pressing for fresh negotiations for peace, 268.
-,-, delay in sending ambassadors, 207; commissioners expected from, 275.
-,-, Spain realises selfish policy of, 269; Monterey blamed for relying too much on, id.
-,-, urging peace between France and Spain, 269; thinking of peace for themselves alone, 270.
-,-, Orange's struggle against enemies in, 269; find pay for imperial troops, 276.
-,-, reasons for moderation in war with England, 271; Scotch Presbyterians supplied with money and arms by, 277.
-,-, Charles intent on preventing French alliance with, 275; English suspect of considering reconciliation with France, 290.
-,-, England competing with, for good will of Spain, 275; English interests sacrificed to, out of partiality for Spain, 277.
-,-, representations to about mediation, 278–9; have not accepted English, 284; have no confidence in Rome, 286.
-,-, Orange prefers to rely on, 281; dissensions in reviving opposition to Orange, 295, 303–4.
-,-, unlikely to relinquish advantages in India trade, 286.
-,-, will not act apart from allies, 290, 293, 303; Sylvius reports attitude to peace, 295.
-,-, growing feeling in England against, 291; jealousy of prestige at sea, 292, 302.
-,-, expedition against Martinique repulsed, 295.
-,-, failure in campaign may incline to peace, 297; listening to projects of mediation, 289.
-,-, Charles wants France to leave affairs of with him, 297; Louis suspected of listening to, 299.
-,-, profit by internal discords in England, 297; question of Orange's power in, 300.
-,-, prohibition of French wines and brandies repealed in, 300, 306; French products allowed to enter, 303.
-,-, English ministers chafe at policy of, 300; English fear of trade rivalry, 310.
-,-, suspicion that turning to France, 303; union with France would stir England against, 306.
-,-, ambassadors ask queen's offices for good relations with, 305; recall ambassadors in England, 307.
-,-, said to be hastening peace, 305; representations to Spain about, 308.
-,-, fear that may resume alliance with France, 309, 310–1; suspicion of secret intelligence with France, 322.
-,-, new project for countermining intrigues of, 310; minister expresses feeling against, 318.
-,-, bound to help Brandenburg against Sweden, 315, 320; declare in favour of Brandenburg, 330.
-,-, acceptation of English mediation, 323; hopes of peace missions to Germany, 325; Spain will not favour mediation unless want peace, 335.
-,-, Arlington could not soften obduracy about trade, 323; commercial treaty concluded with, 324–6; satisfaction over, 325.
-,-, good progress of peace negotiations with France, 325; Spain not fearful of alliance with France, 335.
-, 1675:
-,-, aware of weakness of England, 336; England anxious to soothe, 340.
-,-, nonconformists threaten to migrate to, 337; improved condition of Catholics in, 342.
-,-, will accept English mediation, 339; ready to accept pope's, 340.
-,-, not England's interest to reconcile with France, 340; distrust of Venetian mediation, 346.
-,-, power and authority of Orange in, 341; Orange induces to maintain army, 345.
-,-, Spain counts on to defend Flanders, 344; Spain favours Orange's designs in, 356.
-,-, English attitude to peace negotiations of, 347; English opinion of policy, 352.
-,-, suggestion to make a circle of the empire, 350; government commended in England, 353.
-,-, England resents claim to back Indian princes, 351; renew maritime treaty, 370.
-,-, declaration against Sweden, 351, 395; merely to gain time, 352; adjustment likely, 374.
-,-, suggest Switzerland for conference, 355; place to be submitted to, 365.
-,-, Orange accused of causing to hate Charles, 355; representations to Tromp about interests, 356.
-,-, Court represents Orange's designs on liberty of, 361; Court glad of friction in over Guelders offer, 362; Orange warned not to trust to devotion of, 365.
-,-, malcontents deceived in reliance on, 362; they still hope for support from, 376.
-,-, Charles grants Orange indemnity from, 305; reported suspicion of Orange, 388.
-,-, divided by factions, 368, 378; Orange aims at ruling, 373; his position in, 380.
-,-, difficulty of settlement with in E. Indies, 370; release English at Surinam, 371.
-,-, Danish subsidy unpaid by, 374; Leyonberg asks king's intervention with, 377–8.
-,-, settlement with about E. Indies, 377; privateers of, active, 453.
-,-, defence of Bremen against, 379; treaty with Denmark, 389, 432; subsidy to Denmark, 395.
-,-, desire for peace, 380; pressure on Spain to accept English mediation, 388.
-,-, Ruvigny on French policy to, 383; French concern about relations with Denmark, 400.
-,-, in close confidence with English Court, 384; intrigues with parliament, 385, 413.
-,-, internal jealousies hamper Orange, 400; fomented by Lowenstein faction, 416.
-,-, favour Venetian mediation, 425; place for congress to be in jurisdiction of, 460.
-,-, parliament expected to further interests, 426.
-,-, peace likely if forced to come to terms with France, 428; would not welcome English association with Spain in defence of Flanders, 430.
-,-, fear of separate agreement with France, 436; unlikely to take steps for peace, 438; desire for peace, 468.
-,-, confusion and stringency in may cause change in aspect of affairs, 440; wish to avoid commitments against Sweden, 446.
-,-, Charles incites to make peace with France, 450; report of peace proposals to, 453; Charles mediated commercial treaty for, with enemies, 470.
-,-, proposed concessions to Orange by, 451.
-,-, interest with emperor desired, 459; try to induce emperor and Spain to accept English mediation, 493.
-,-, ready to grant passports for congress and to send ministers, 464; passports sent, 482.
-,-, parliament considers sea power of, 471; interest of England that not too strong in Baltic, 479.
-,-, great floods in, 483; ships from stopped by weather, 498.
-,-, misgivings about falling away, but likely to fall into line, 484; talk of separate peace with France and Sweden, 488.
-,-, Sylvius sent to get to make representations to emperor, 494.

-, army of, 250, 261, 379.

Schelde bridged for passage of troops, 124; decision to give battle to Condé, 282; in battle of Seneffe, 295–7.

Orange secures maintenance of, 345; force promised to allies, 373.

English envoys criticise efficiency, 400; in Flanders, 435.

-, fleet of:

attack on English merchantmen at Hamburg, 1.

not being prepared for next campaign, 3; knowledge of existence will make enemies hesitate to attack, 19.

English hope will not be first to put to sea, 32; off the Thames, 49.

Rupert means to attack, 49; guarding coasts of Zeeland, 51; reported retreat, 54.

losses at Schoneveldt, 57–8, 60; English expect easy victory over, 67.

York thinks it impossible to force to fight, 72; Rupert means to compel to fight in the open, 75.

avoids battle, withdraws to shoals of Zeeland, 85; keeps vigilant watch to guard shores, 89; avoided encounter because of large numbers of sick, 90.

need of victory over, to secure landing, 89; Rupert expected he could defeat singlehanded, 91.

stationed at the Texel, 90; leaves the shoals, Rupert means to fight, 96.

in Texel battle, 98; account of, 99, 100, 103–4; left masters of the field, 104, 108; reported at sea and off Isle of Wight, 114.

returns to port for winter, 127.

France unequal to engaging alone, 208; has larger shins than English, 402.

three ships at Cadiz, 231.

passage at Sheerness would have meant defeat to, 259n; could have blockaded English ports, 271; English fear of blockade by, 336.

proposal to allow to cruise off English ports, 347–8; to send squadron to threaten English coast, 385.

squadron for the Sound, 352, 389; plating for, 382.

squadron (for Sicily) sheltering in Downs, 453–4.

-, merchants of. See merchants, Dutch.

-, ships of.See ships, Dutch.

-, States General:

letters from, 179, 199.

forbid Ruyter to risk a battle, 90.

trumpet brings letter from, to Charles, 169; reply to king, Fresno refuses to present, but gets into print, 199.

Orange may need uncle in struggle with, 281; ministers ready to favour Orange against, 306; van Beuningen revives jealousy of Orange, 336.

-, the Spanish. See Flanders.

Neuburg, German Empire, possible alliance with Sweden at, 207.

-, duke of. See Philip William.

-, palatine of. See John William; Wolfgang William.

-, princess of. See Eleanora Magdalen.

Neufchätel, Castelnovo in Normandy [Seine Inferieure, France], rendezvous for English troops, 180.

Newerburg. See Nieuwerbrugge.

New Guinea Company, ships of arrive safely, 97.

New Jerusalem, merchantman, at Leghorn, 18.

Newcastle, royal navy, with Narborough, 480.

Newmarket, co. Cambridge, 290, 301, 383–4, 386, 456.
-, king going to, 241, 246, 299, 371, 377, 454; Court at, 246, 379; king leaves, 250; Odijk only ambassador at, 302.
-, king at solely for his pleasure, 303.

Nicolosi, secretary to Bailo at Constantinople, 247, 260.

Nieuwerbrugge, Newerburg [Prov. S. Holland, Netherlands], 5.

Nigrelli, Negrelli, Count, a Modenese, 194.
-, brings message from duchesses, 174.

Nijmegen, Nimega, Nimegen, Nimegna, Nimuegen [Prov. Gelderland, Netherlands], 464.
-, agreed on, for congress, 374, 376; reasons for objections to, 388, 485.
-, appointment of ministers for, 377; delay in preparations for, 383, 395.
-, Ronquillo's desire to act at, 394; alternative for accepted, 460.
-, reason for Austrians' objection to, 465; Ronquillo prepares to cut a figure at, 485.
-, French attitude to, 470; seems only place possible, 477; French insist on, 482.
-, Charles means to send ministers to soon, 482; Berkeley will work for, 484.
-, Spaar anxious to get to, 485; despatch of plenipotentiaries to, 492, 495, 497.

Nithard, Nitardo, John Everard, cardinal, interview with, 451.

Nonconformists, sectaries:
-, offer to king to dissolve parliament, 243.
-, Dutch intrigues with can be prevented in war, 300; bishops opposed to understanding with, 312; Cornbury encourages bishops against, 318.
-, factions of, 319; bishops more opposed to than ever, 330, 337.
-, general pardon for discussed, 324; increasing importance of negotiations with, 326; progress of, 346, 348.
-, York's negotiations with, 330–1, 337, 353–4; form of pardon for presented to him, 331.
-, threaten to migrate to Holland, 337; representations against penal laws, 342–3.
-, upset by French victory, 342; reasons for opposition to indulgence, 367.
-, enforcement of laws against recommended, 354, 357; causes surprise, 357; effort to counteract, 363; outcry against, 381.
-, acts of severity against unpopular, 366; three-fourths of population, 367, 416.
-, oath proposed by Lindsey would embarrass, 394; suspect bishops over, 398; blame York's attitude upon, 401; want him to declare against, 402.
-, may make sudden change in disposition of parliament, 402; persist in project for liberty of conscience, 413, 478.
-, bishops fear will win seats in new parliament, 416; promote request for summons to parliament by proclamation, 478.

Nore, Nort, the, 83.
-, fleet off, 42, 64; fleet brought back to, 106.

Norfolk, address from, demanding maintenance of Protestant religion, 84.

-, duke of. See Howard, Thomas.

-, earl of. See Howard, Henry Frederick.

Northampton, co. Northampton, destructive fire at, 460; bill for rebuilding, 486.

-, earl of. See Compton, James.

Norway, 235.

Norwich, earl of. See Howard, Henry.

nuncios:
-, appointed by pope for congress, 465, 497; French attitude to new, 477.
-, Geldern suggested for residence, 460.

-, See also under ambassadors, papal nuncios.

Nurnberg, Nuremberg [Bavaria, German Empire], 373.