Venice: April 1598

Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 9, 1592-1603. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1897.

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'Venice: April 1598', in Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 9, 1592-1603, ed. Horatio F Brown( London, 1897), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/venice/vol9/pp317-319 [accessed 19 July 2024].

'Venice: April 1598', in Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 9, 1592-1603. Edited by Horatio F Brown( London, 1897), British History Online, accessed July 19, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/venice/vol9/pp317-319.

"Venice: April 1598". Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 9, 1592-1603. Ed. Horatio F Brown(London, 1897), , British History Online. Web. 19 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/venice/vol9/pp317-319.

April 1598

April 2. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 675. Agostino Nani, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The Ministers declare that the Cardinal has ample powers to negotiate, the difficulty lies in the conditions. Here they would raise no objection to the inclusion of the Queen of England and the States in either a truce or a peace, but she must give up all the strong places she holds on this side of the Channel. The Queen will very likely object to this, as she has no confidence in the Spaniards, and these places are the doors through which England might be attacked.
As to Calais the Spaniards insist that the decision should be left to the Pope. To this the French will not consent, chiefly at the instigation of the Queen. Orders are issued to try a middle course.
Madrid, 2nd April 1598.
[Italian; deciphered.]
April 4. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 676. Agostino Nani, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The Duke of Medina Sidonia told me that there was news from England that one hundred and fifty ships, including forty Dutch, were going to put out to sea, and that in order to raise troops the Queen was pressing every fifth man. The departure from here of the eighteen ships for Brazil has been suspended. A great ship with eight hundred troops has been made ready to go to Malacca. They fear this year that the English designs are directed against the Indies.
Madrid, 4th April 1598.
[Italian.]
April 8. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 677. Francesco Contarini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The courier with the answer from Spain has passed through Paris on his way to Vervins. The Commissioners can now resume their deliberations.
Paris, 8th April 1598.
[Italian.]
April 10. Original Rubricario, Venetian Archives. 678. Girolamo Capello, Venetian Ambassador in Constantinople, to the Doge and Senate.
Hassan, Grand Vizir, has been suddenly deposed and sent to the Seven Towers. His house and goods have been sealed up. The cause was his tyrannical nature, and the fact that he concealed from the Grand Signor the events in Hungary. Mehmet has been made Grand Vizir in his place.
The Ambassador was for some time in doubt whether Sciavus Pasha would not return to his post of Grand Vizir.
[Italian.]
April 18. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 679. Agostino Nani, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The fleet for Brazil had hardly passed St. Catherine's when news came that the Earl of Cumberland (Tamurlan) was at hand with twenty-three sail, lying-in-wait to plunder the ships whose cargoes were worth two millions. Orders from his Majesty were awaited.
Madrid, 18th April 1598.
[Italian.]
April 20. Original Rubricario, Venetian Archives. 680. Girolamo Capello, Venetian Ambassador in Constantinople, to the Doge and Senate.
Hassan Pasha, late Grand Vizir, has been put to death at the Seven Towers by order of the Sultan.
Mehmet, the present Grand Vizir, gives out that he will not accept presents.
The French Ambassador has begged the Venetian Ambassador to write to the Republic requesting it to obtain pardon for M. de Lancome from the King of France.
[Italian.]
April 22. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 681. Francesco Contarini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Tassis and the Marquess of Lulleri, envoy of the Duke of Savoy, have returned to Vervins. The Cardinal Legate has sent a messenger to Brittany to urge the King to come to the conclusion of peace now that he has heard all that the English and Flemish envoys have to advance in their own interests.
They were presented by the Marshal de Bouillon, and have had several interviews with the King separately and also with the Council. No one knows what the King's intentions are.
Paris, 22nd April 1598.
[Italian.]
April 24. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 682. Agostino Nani, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The East India fleet is blockaded in the port of Lisbon, and we are informed that the Dutch have given a large present to the Earl of Cumberland on condition that he prevents it from leaving that port, in order that their ships, which are already despatched to the East Indies, may meet with fewer obstacles to the completion of their designs. The merchants who had put their money on board ship have now withdrawn it in despair of the fleet sailing this season.
The English ships are lying three leagues off Lisbon, towards Cape St. Vincent. They capture all the shipping that passes, and have just seized some hulks (urche) from Flanders, and four Aragonese, laden for the most part with grain. On board these Aragonese were one hundred bales of Venetian goods which had been transhipped at Cadiz from a Ragusan which was placed under embargo.
In Lisbon the cries of the people rise to heaven at the sight of their trade hampered and their city, so to speak, blockaded, and in straits for corn; besides, worse is expected unless vigorous steps are taken.
News has been received that about twelve English ships have been to Evizza and have seized a quantity of salt, so it seems that the English, not content with piracy on the high seas, are thinking of the Mediterranean too, where they have begun to make themselves felt.
Madrid, 24th April 1598.
[Italian.]