BHO

Venice: March 1602

Pages 497-499

Calendar of State Papers Relating To English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 9, 1592-1603. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1897.

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March 1602

March 4. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 1059. Marin Cavalli, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Agent for the Grand Duke of Tuscany remarked to me that France had the men but not the money, Italy the money but not the men; and if the Republic would join the Grand Duke in an alliance with France, England, and the States, it would be of great service to the quiet of Christendom.
Paris, 4th March 1602.
[Italian; deciphered.]
March 4. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 1060. Marin Cavalli, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The King of France shows a greater inclination to keep well with England and the States on account of the Spanish. The Spanish continually complain that the States receive help from France and are allowed to trade freely with France, which they say should be forbidden under the terms of the peace of Vervins.
Paris, 4th March 1602.
[Italian; deciphered.]
March 9. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 1061. Francesco Vendramin, Venetian Ambassador in Rome, to the Doge and Senate.
Some affirm and some deny that the Spanish have entirely abandoned Ireland after their defeat. The Duke of Sessa, Spanish Ambassador here, shows letters which declare that they are still there.
Four Englishmen are said to be in Rome on the following business. Two years ago a Jesuit Father secretly published a book dealing with the succession to the English throne. (fn. 1) The conclusion was, that on the death of the Queen the King of Spain was the lawful sovereign. The Archpriest of England, (fn. 2) a friend of the Jesuits, made people swear that, in the event of the Queen's death they would hold for Spain. This went on for some time unobserved as long as it was confined to the lower classes, but when people of birth were approached, the Archpriest came across a gentleman who was hostile to Spain and who, although converted to the Catholic faith, refused to take such an oath, blamed the seditious proceeding, and informed the Queen. The Queen at once informed the King of France, and sent these four Englishmen here to inform the Pope, both that he might be made aware of the truth and also might punish the Archpriest; they were to beg for the recall of the Jesuits from England in return for which the Queen would not forbid the exercise of the Roman rite provided there was no sedition and no secrecy.
When the English reached Rome they thought they could keep quite secret. But the Duke of Sessa was aware of their presence and took steps with the Jesuits to have the Englishmen imprisoned as calumniators, or at least to prevent them from obtaining an audience of the Pope. The Duke of Sessa admits the publication of the book but denies the operation of the Archpriest. The matter is suspended.
Rome, 9th March 1602.
[Italian.]
March 11 Copy of Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 1062. Piero Duodo, Venetian Ambassador in Germany, to the Doge and Senate.
The Protestants are much alarmed at the rumour of a league against themselves, the Queen of England, and the States, on the part of the Pope and Spain.
Prague, 11th March 1602.
[Italian.]
March 18. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 1063. Marin Cavalli, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Fresh troops are always coming into Ostend. The Archduke is afraid of a sortie in force, and as his troops are greatly diminished he is raising fresh troops from among the natives; all the more so as he cannot trust the Spanish after the punishment he was obliged to inflict on the mutineers. Count Maurice is collecting his forces to attack some strong place. Bois-le-Duc is named as likely.
Paris, 18th March 1602.
[Italian.]
March 18. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 1064. Marin Cavalli, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Duke of Nevers (fn. 3) has obtained leave to visit England. He has left with a large and noble suite, and within a month he may be back.
Paris, 18th March 1602.
[Italian.]
March 21. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 1065. Ottaviano Bon and Simon Contarini, Venetian Ambassadors in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
Although it has for long been rumoured that His Majesty will go to Burgos and thence to Portugal after Easter, it seems that this plan is dying away for the present on account of the fleet which the Queen of England is mustering. It is not fitting for the King to be so close to his enemy unless he is better provided than he is at present to repel their forces. Besides this journey would be very costly, given the extravagant nature of this people. The King cannot make a moderate expense without damaging his prestige, and his last journey cost him one hundred and fifty thousand crowns in three weeks. But I am told that the real reason is the growing disaffection of the Portuguese; especially because the King is thinking of habilitating the “new Christians” (Jews) and placing them on a footing with the old Catholic subjects; they have published a libel full of abuse of the King, whom they expressly call Philippus Tertius Rex Judæorum.
The King has called out the feudal light horse. This shows an alarm about the Turkish and English fleets.
Valladolid, 21st March 1602.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
March 23. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 1066. Francesco Vendramin, Venetian Ambassador in Rome, to the Doge and Senate.
The four English have already had more than one audience with His Holiness. They are openly favoured by the French Ambassador in His Most Christian Majesty's name, though with a general statement that he has no desire to injure the Jesuits. The English continue to insist on the recall of the Jesuits who are living secretly in England. The Pope is taking mature consideration on the subject.
Rome, 23rd March 1602.
[Italian.]
March 24. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 1067. Agostino Nani, Venetian Ambassador in Constantinople, to the Doge and Senate.
The King of France has written to console his Ambassador for Cicala's calumny that he was in the pay of Spain. He declares that even if he saw letters in the Ambassadors own hands he would not believe it. Both the French and English Ambassadors are resolved to lodge vigorous complaints of Cicala on account of certain vessels seized in Barbary, but they will name him verbally not in writing.
The French Ambassador with the consent of the English Ambassador has presented a memorial on account of the French vessel seized by an English Corsair and carried into Algiers. He begs that the ship may be set at liberty and the corsairs sent here to be punished by the English Ambassador.
Dalle Vigne di Pera, 24th March 1602.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
March 28. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives. 1068. Ottaviano Bon and Simon Contarini, Venetian Ambassadors in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
They now insist that Don Juan d'Aquila made a mistake in coming to terms with the English, and surrendering to them three places which he held in the name of His Catholic Majesty, and some prophesy ill for him, declaring that he has escaped an honourable death in Ireland to meet with a shameful one in Spain. The Ambassadors from Ireland call out loudly to his Majesty, and the Nuncio in His Holiness's name shows the greatest disgust. His Holiness had just named as Nuncio in Ireland the Father Manloni (Maloney ?) a Jesuit who is residing at this Court and is in doubt what to do.
Valladolid, 28th March 1602.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

  • 1. By Robert Parsons. Cf. Calendar of State Papers. Domestic. 1601–1603, p. 170.
  • 2. George Blackwell. Calendar of State Papers, ut sup. p. 228.
  • 3. Cf. Calendar of State Papers, 1601–1603, p. 179.