House of Commons Journal Volume 11: 22 February 1694

Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 11, 1693-1697. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1803.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. Public Domain.

Citation:

'House of Commons Journal Volume 11: 22 February 1694', in Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 11, 1693-1697( London, 1803), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/commons-jrnl/vol11/pp102-105 [accessed 20 July 2024].

'House of Commons Journal Volume 11: 22 February 1694', in Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 11, 1693-1697( London, 1803), British History Online, accessed July 20, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/commons-jrnl/vol11/pp102-105.

"House of Commons Journal Volume 11: 22 February 1694". Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 11, 1693-1697. (London, 1803), , British History Online. Web. 20 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/commons-jrnl/vol11/pp102-105.

Image
Image
Image
Image

In this section

Jovis, 22 die Februarii;

6° Gulielmi et Mariæ.

Prayers.

Merchants insurers Creditors.

MR. Waller reported from the Committee, to whom the Bill to enable divers Merchants, that have sustained many Losses by the present War with France, the better to satisfy their several Creditors, was committed, That they had examined and considered the same, and the several Petitions to them referred; and had made several Amendments to the Bill; which they had directed him to report to the House; and which he read in his Place, with the Coherence; and afterwards delivered in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were once read throughout; and then a Second time, one by one; and, upon the Question severally put thereupon, agreed unto by the House.

And an Amendment being proposed, by inserting the Name of Daniel Foe into the Bill;

The same was, upon the Question put thereupon, agreed unto by the House.

Ordered, That the Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Edwards' Estate.

Sir Robert Cotton reported from the Committee, to whom the ingrossed Bill, from the Lords, intituled, An Act to enable Thomas Edwards to sell Part of his Estate, for the Payment of Debts; and to restrain and disable him to commit Waste upon the Residue of the said Estate; was committed; That they had examined and considered the same; and had directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment: And he delivered the same in at the Clerk's Table.

London Orphans Fund.

Colonel Goldwell, according to Order, presented to the House a Bill for Relief of the Orphans of the City of London: And the same was received, and read the First time.

Resolved, That the Bill be read a Second time.

A Message from the Lords, by Sir Miles Cook and Sir Lacon William Child:

Mr. Speaker,

Earl of Thanet's Estate.

The Lords have passed a Bill, intituled, An Act to enable the Earl of Thanet, and the Honourable Sackvile Tuston his Brother, to make a Lease for Sixty Years of Thanet-House, in the Parish of St. Buttolph's, Aldersgate, to commence after the Remainder of a Term of 31 Years, now in being: To which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

And then the Messengers withdrew.

London Orphans Fund.

A Petition of Edward Northey Esquire, and Ann his Wife, one of the Daughters of John Jolliffe, of the City of London, Merchant, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That the said Ann, being an Orphan of the said City, did put the Sum of 2,000l. into the Chamber of London; and the City gave her a Bond of 3,000l. Penalty, for her Security: That there is now due to the Petitioners, for Principal and Interest, above 2,700l.: And praying, That their Names may be inserted in the Bill for the Relief of the Orphans of the said City of London.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table until the said Bill be read a Second time.

Ditto.

A Petition of Martha Hall, Widow, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioner's Husband, dying about 1674, left her, and Three Children; and his whole Estate not worth above 1,200l.; That the Petitioner was advised to put 1,000l. into the Chamber of London, as the securest Fund: That this House hath now a Bill under their Consideration for the Relief of the Orphans of the City of London: And praying, That she may be equally relieved with the said Orphans.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table until the said Bill be read a Second time.

Duty on Salt.

A Petition of Thomas Warburton Esquire was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That about a Year since, there was found in the Petitioner's Ground, a Rock of Fossile Salt; which, being dissolved in Water, may be refined, and again boiled up into useful Salt; but, before it is so refined, it is wholly useless: That the Petitioner is charged by the Act for raising 4s. in the Pound, with 4s. per Pound for all the Profit he makes of the said Fossile Salt: And praying, That such Provision may be made, that the Petitioner's Salt may pay no greater Duty than other Salt made in England.

Ordered, That the Examination and Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill for granting to their Majesties certain Rates and Duties upon Salt, and upon Beer, Ale, and other Liquors, for securing certain Recompences and Advantages, in the said Bill mentioned, to such Persons as shall voluntarily advance the Sum of Ten hundred thousand Pounds, towards carrying on the War against France, is committed.

Arundell Election.

Mr. Bowyer reported from the Committee of Elections and Privileges, the Matter touching the Election for the Borough of Arundell in the County of Sussex, as it appeared to the said Committee; the which he delivered in, in Writing, at the Clerk's Table: Where the same was read; and is as followeth; viz.

Upon the Petition of John Cook Esquire, complaining of an undue Return of the Lord Walden to serve for the Borough of Arundell, in the County of Sussex.

The Committee have examined the Merits of that Election.

That, for the Petitioner, it was alleged, That, in the Poll, the Petitioner and Sitting Member had equal Votes, 76 apiece; and the Mayor, having the casting Voice, gave it for the Sitting Member; so that they had but a Majority of One: But, in the Poll given in by them, the Sitting Member has 78 with the Mayor, and the Petitioner 77; but the Petitioner excepted against 21.

That to make out this, it was alleged, That the Right of Election was in the Housekeepers that paid Scot and Lot; and they were examined by the Poors Book.

That this was testified by Tho. Peckham junior, who had lived in the Town 33 Years, and had known all Elections for Parliament-men and Mayors in that time: And there was a Poll in Mr. Garrawaye's Election; and this was the Manner then, and the Poors Book produced for that Purpose.

That Anthony Morley testified the same for 41 Years: And That, in that time, there were two Polls in that Manner.

Dr. Morris and Thomas Oliver testified the same; one, for 48 Years; the other, for 34 Years.

That Thomas Peckham senior testified, That Quakers had Votes, if in the Poors Book: He gave in the Poll, and said, It was compared with that of the Mayor's; and differed only in the Five last but one, which were not in the Mayor's Poll, but voted as set down.

That Thomas Peckham junior, testified, That he had the Poors Book in his Hand when the Poll began: But taking Exception to one the Mayor polled, that was not in the Book, the Book was taken away; and the Mayor declared, He would poll whom he pleased, though not in that Book.

That he likewise testified of Four; viz. Richard Bishop, Thomas Knight, John Rose, and Robert Stoner; That they were not in the Poors Book at all: And of Two others; viz. John Carpenter, and William Gibbs; That though they were in the Poors Book, they paid nothing, having a Cypher put to their Names: And of all Six, That they were set down, as having received Alms; viz. Rose 1 s.; Bishop, and Stoner, 2s. a piece; Knight 8s.; Carpenter 10s.; and Gibbs 12s. 9d.: And that this appeared by the Accounts concerning the Poor.

He likewise testified of Three others; viz. Thomas Hills, Sam. Keen, and John Young; That they were not in the Poors Book: And the same of Samuel Booker; and, That this last was a Vagrant, and his Children begged.

That he testified likewise of Edward Masters, That he was not in the Book, but warned out, as one likely to be chargeable to the Parish.

That Bryan Haywood, his Grace the Duke of Norfolk's Bailiff, was not in the Book: The same of George Symonds, and, That he lived in Hampshire: Of John Mitchener, That he was not in the Book; nor Tho. Lisle, a Dragoon: The same likewise for William Christopher, Henry Speciall, and Nehemiah Pellett, who lived with his Father: Of Richard Ford, That he is not in the Book, and is but a Boarder.

That John Hester testified, That Samuel Smith was not in the Poors Book; nor William Martin, so as to be charged, having only a Cypher put to his Name.

He confirmed also Peckham's Testimony, as to 15 of the Persons he testified to; and, That he demanded a Copy of the Poors Book, according to Order; but could not have it.

That William Ketteridge testified, That this present Mayor was in the Year before; and that it was unusual to hold Two Years; and gave the Reason, Because no Court was held at the time, when he used to be chosen; viz. on the Tuesday after Michaelmas-Day; but this was before Mr. Morley, the former Member, died.

That Humphry Duke testified, That the Dragoons that quartered in Arundell, being about Twelve in Number, were drawn up on the Day of Election: And some Persons demanding the Reason of it of the Officer, it was answered, It was at the Desire of the Duke of Norffolke.

That Henry Garroway testified, That he believes the Petitioner lost 20 Voices by the Dragoons: And that the Duke's Servants threatened People, if they would not vote for the sitting Member; and, in particular, he himself was threatened, and Mr. Morley, to cut down an ancient Tree, that grew by his House, if he voted for the Petitioner: And that, Mr. Morley voting for the Petitioner, the said Tree, after the Election, was cut down, and distributed to the Voters for the Sitting Member: The Tree grew in the Waste of the Manor, whereof he believes the Duke to be Lord.

Arundell Election:

That William Bartholomew the Constable testified, That the Dragoons had their Guns loaded with Powder and Ball, by Order of their Quarter-Master; and that he was threatened, and knocked down, by one of them, the Day after the Election.

That James Gold testified, Their being threatened to raise their Rents, if they would not vote for the Sitting Member.

That James Hobbs testified, His being threatened by the Mayor to be arrested by him, and put out of his Work; if he did not vote for the Sitting Member, and was put out of his Work accordingly, after the Election.

That John Ockendon testified, against the Mayor, That he threatened him, and Thomas Cotton, that he would blow them up, and turn them out of their Houses, if they did not vote for the Sitting Member.

That Lawrence Alcock testified; The taking away the Poors Book by Heywood; and that the Duke of Norfolk was at the Poll.

That; for the Sitting Member, was produced the authentick Poll; whereby he had a Majority of Five more than the Petitioner.

That William Tayler testified, That a Messenger came to the Duke of Norffolk; while he was dressing himself, as from the Petitioner, to desire, That the Dragoons might be drawn out, to assist the Constables; but does not know the Messenger.

That Robert Nosmith testified, That, being at the Duke's, he heard of such a Message.

That George Moor testified, That the Dragoons were peaceable, and did not at all obstruct the Election, but were drawn up at the lower end of the Town: That the Petitioner had above Forty Horse come with him, besides above a Hundred Foot in Town before; and no Soldiers by, when the Precept was read.

That Joseph Fugar, the Mayor, testified, He had known the Town Twenty-three Years, and had been present at all Elections ever since; and that all Inhabitants were admitted to vote, that were Housekeepers, and did not receive Alms, though not in the Poors Book; and so it was at all former Elections; At Mr. Morlye's; At that when he was chose Mayor; without regard to the Poors Book: That John Carpenter, and all the rest, excepted against by the Petitioner, were good Voters, except Pellet, who was no Housekeeper; but Thomas Lisle, Corporal of the Dragoons, was; and Haywood, though he lived in the Castle, yet was within the Borough.

That Thomas Humphry testified The Right of Election to be as the Mayor said; and was so practised at Mr. Garrowaye's Election, and at the Election of Mayor Three times: Had known the Town Twenty Years: That this was the fairest Election he ever saw: That the Dragoons were no Trouble: And that the Petitioner had Threescore Horse in his Company, when he came to Town, besides the Foot.

That Thomas Pankhurst testified the same, as to the Right of Election; and, That he has known the Town Forty-five Years; and so practised at all Elections, both for Members to serve in Parliament, and Mayors.

That the same was likewise testified by Robert Russell, That knew the Town Twenty-six Years; Antony Wetson, that knew it Thirty Years; and John Coote, that knew it Thirty-five Years.

And so did Robert Collins, who instanced in the Convention-Parliament, That it was so done then: He testified likewise, That the Alms that Knight received, was only when sick of the Small Pox, and received none before or since.

That Bishop does not receive Alms constantly, nor Rose, nor Gibbs: That Gibbs did once pawn his Bed, but has not received Charity lately; nor Stoner: That Hill and Keene were Housekeepers at the time of the Election:

And Fugar the Mayor testified the same for Christopher.

That the Counsel for the Sitting Member offered to produce more Evidence to prove the Right of Election as before; but it was said, It was enough.

Arundell Election.

That William Gibbs testified for himself, That he never received Alms but once, when the Town was visited with the Small-Pox; and that he voted at Mr. Morlye's Election, though not in the Poors Book.

That William Vincent testified, He was an Inhabitant, and lived in an House of 10l. per Annum; and yet was not in the Poors Book.

That then Exceptions were taken at Six that voted for the Petitioner, as Inmates, and not Housekeepers.

That Moore testified against Nicholas Richmond, That he was no Housekeeper, but lived with his Son: And the same of Samuel Vaux, That he lived with his Uncle: Of Nath. Dowmer, That he was but a Boarder: Of Joshua and John Painter, Father and Son, That they lived in one House, and both voted for the Petitioner: The same for William Slyder, and James Easton: That William Levis is no Inhabitant in Arundell, and yet polled for the Petitioner.

That Collins testified, That Adrian Collis rents but Part of an House, and not in the Poors Book; and yet voted for the Petitioner.

That Humphryes testified for all excepted against but Slyder, That they were no Housekeepers.

That Nicholas Rogers testified, That 5l. was offered to be sent to him by Captain Chele, to pay when he would, if he would vote for the Petitioner: That the Petitioner was in the Room when this was offered, and the Captain the Petitioner's Friend: but Rogers did not accept of it, but voted for the Sitting Member.

That George Randoll testified, That James Miles threatened to lay him in East-Gate for 4 or 5s. he owed him, if he voted not for the Petitioner: And that Duffield confessed, He had 2s. given him to vote for the Petitioner, but said not by whom.

That Tho. Penycod testified, That a Kinsman of his offered him 5l. if he would vote for the Petitioner; and proffered his Brother 5s. to be out of Town at the Election, that he might not vote for the Sitting Member.

That Thomas Fuller testified, That Bartholomew proffered to restore him his two Guns, taken away half a Year before, if he would vote for the Petitioner.

That Gibbs testified, One Mr. Butler, a Manager for the Petitioner, threatened to impress him, if he did not vote for the Petitioner.

That, after this, a Witness was called for the Petitioner, Tho. Wilmer, who testified, That, at Mr. Butler's Election, this very Mayor refused a Voter, for not being in the Poors Book.

That, and after the Counsel, &c. were withdrawn, Mr. Butler, the other Member for this Borough, testified, That he had known Two Elections of Members of Parliament in this Borough, his own, and another; and that, at both those Elections, none but those in the Poors Book voted; and that was the Rule they went by.

That, upon the whole Matter, the Committee came to several Resolutions; which they had directed him to report to the House; and which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were read; and are as follow; viz.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the Right of Election of Burgesses to serve in Parliament for the Borough of Arundell in the County of Sussex, is only in the Inhabitants of the said Borough, paying Scot and Lot.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the Lord Walden is not duly elected a Burgess to serve in this present Parliament for the Borough of Arundell.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That John Cook Esquire is duly elected a Burgess to serve in this present Parliament for the Borough of Arundell.

The First of the said Resolutions being read a Second time;

And the Question being put, That the House do agree with the Committee in the said Resolution, That the Right of Election of Burgesses to serve in Parliament for the Borough of Arundell in the County of Sussex is only in the Inhabitants of the said Borough, paying Scot and Lot;

The House divided.

The Noes go forth.

Tellers for the Yeas, Mr. Clarke,
Mr. Machell:
155.
Tellers for the Noes, Mr. Goldwell,
Mr. Fownes:
106.

So it was resolved in the Affirmative.

The Second Resolution being read a Second time;

Resolved, That the House do agree with the Committee in the said Resolution, That the Lord Walden is not duly elected a Burgess to serve in this present Parliament for the Borough of Arundell.

The Third Resolution being read a Second time;

And the Question being put, That the House do agree with the Committee in the said Resolution, That John Cook Esquire is duly elected a Burgess to serve in this present Parliament for the Borough of Arundell;

The House divided.

The Noes go forth.

Tellers for the Yeas, Mr. Boyle,
Mr. Butler:
156.
Tellers for the Noes, Mr. Shackerly,
Sir Jo. Packington:
122.

So it was resolved in the Affirmative.

Ordered, That the Clerk of the Crown do attend this House To-morrow Morning, with the Return for the said Borough of Arundell, in order to amend the same.

A Motion being made, and the Question being put, That Joseph Fugar, Mayor of the said Borough of Arundell, be sent for in Custody of the Serjeant at Arms attending this House;

It passed in the Negative.

Irish Forfeitures.

A Petition of several Persons, in behalf of themselves, and the British Protestants in Ireland, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That, in the Reign of several Kings of England; many Irish Persons, for their Rebellions, have been outlawed, and their Estates forfeited; which have been purchased from the Crown by most of the English, who planted there, for valuable Considerations: That many of the Heirs of those forfeiting Persons do now intend to bring Writs of Error, to reverse the said Outlawries; and several have already reversed them; by which means, the Irish will be restored to their former Estates, and Privileges, and the English Interest much weakened; which may be of dangerous Consequence to the Crown of England, unless timely prevented: And praying, That such Methods may be taken for the Security of the Protestant Interest of that Kingdom, as shall be thought necessary.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill for vesting the forfeited Estates in Ireland in their Majesties, to be applied to the Use of the War, is committed.

Ditto.

Resolved, That this House will, upon Tuesday Morning next, at Eleven a Clock, resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider of the said Bill.

Ways and Means.

Sir Thomas Littleton, according to the Order of the Day, reported from the Committee of the whole House, to whom it was referred, to consider further of Ways and Means for raising the Supplies to be granted to their Majesties, for the Maintenance of the Fleet, and LandForces, for the Service of the Year 1694, the Resolutions of the said Committee; which they had directed him to report to the House; and which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were once read throughout; and are as follow; viz.

1. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That, towards the raising the Supplies to be granted to their Majesties, for the Maintenance of the Fleet, and Land-Forces, for the Service of the Year 1694, a Duty be laid upon Leather.

2. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of One Peny per Pound Weight be laid upon all Tanned Leather.

3. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Twelve-pence per Dozen be laid upon all Kid-Skins dressed in Salt, Alum, or otherwise.

4. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Six-pence per Dozen be laid upon all Goat-Skins dressed into white Leather.

5. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Two Shillings per Dozen be laid upon all Goat-Skins dressed after the Way of Spanish Leather.

6. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Six-pence per Dozen be laid upon all broken Doe and Beaver-Skins dressed into white AlumLeather.

7. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Twelve-pence per Skin be laid upon all Buck-Skins dressed in Oil, Alum, or otherwise.

8. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Eight-pence per Skin be laid upon all Doe-Skins dressed in Oil, Alum, or otherwise.

9. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of One Peny Halfpeny per Pound be laid upon all Goat-Skins and Calve-Skins dressed in Oil, or Alum.

10. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of One Peny per Pound be laid upon all Sheep-Skins dressed in Oil, Alum, or otherwise.

11. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, Thnt a Duty of Six-pence per Dozen be laid upon all Lamb-Skins dressed in Oil, and in white Leather fit for Gloves.

12. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Two-pence per Pound be laid upon all Elk-Hides, commonly called Buffalo-Hides, imported raw, and dressed in Oil, Alum, or otherwise, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

13. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Two-pence per Pound be laid upon all Elk-Hides, commonly called Drumble-Hides, imported raw, and dressed in Oil, Alum, or otherwise, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

14. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Four-pence per Skin be laid upon all Calve-Skins made into Vellom.

15. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Three-pence per Pound be laid upon all Calve, Sheep, and other Skins made into Parchment.

16. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Sixpence per Skin be laid upon all HogSkins dressed in Oil, Alum, or otherwise.

17. Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of One Peny per Pound Weight be laid upon all foreign Tanned Leather imported, over and above the Duties payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Twelve-pence per Dozen he laid upon all foreign Kid-Skins imported, dressed in Salt, Alum, or otherwise, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Six-pence per Dozen be laid upon all Goat-Skins imported, dressed into white Leather, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of One Shilling per Skin be laid upon all Goat-Skins imported, dressed after the Way of Spanish Leather, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Ways and Means.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Eight-pence per Dozen be laid upon all broken Doe and Beaver-Skins imported dressed into white Alum-Leather, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Twelve-pence per Skin be laid upon all Buck-Skins imported, dressed in Oil, Alum, or otherwise, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Twelve-pence per Skin be laid upon all Doe-Skins imported, dressed in Oil, Alum, or otherwise, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of One Peny Halfpeny per Pound be laid upon all Goat-Skins and Calve-Skins imported, dressed in Oil, or Alum, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of One Peny per Pound be laid upon all Sheep-Skins imported, dressed in Oil, or Alum, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Six-pence per Dozen be laid upon all Lamb-Skins imported, dressed in Oil, or Alum, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Two-pence per Pound be laid upon all Elk-Hides, commonly called Buffalo-Hides, imported, dressed up to Buff, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Two-pence per Pound be laid upon all Ox and Cow-Hides, commonly called Drumble-Hides, imported, dressed up to Buff, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Four-pence per Skin be laid upon all Vellom imported, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Three-pence per Pound be laid upon all Parchment imported, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Six-pence per Skin be laid upon all HogSkins imported, dressed in Oil, Alum, or otherwise, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of Three-pence per Skin be laid upon all Seal-Skins imported, over and above the Duties now payable for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the said Duties upon Tanned and other Leather be collected at the Tan-Yards, or other Places, where the same is dressed; to be paid by the Tanner, or other Manufacturer thereof.

The First Resolution being read a Second time;

Resolved, That the Consideration of the said Resolution be adjourned till To-morrow Morning, Eleven a Clock.

East India Trade.

Resolved, That this House will, upon Tuesday Morning next, resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider further of the East-India Trade.

And then the House adjourned till To-morrow Morning, Nine a Clock.