BHO

House of Commons Journal Volume 12: 6 April 1698

Pages 193-195

Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 12, 1697-1699. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1803.

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In this section

Mercurii, 6 die Aprilis;

Decimo Gulielmi Tertii.

Prayers.

Jenkin's Estate.

A BILL to enable John Jenkin Merchant to sell some Part of his Estate, for Payment of his Debts, was read a Second time.

Resolved, That the Bill be committed to Mr. Brewer, Sir John Backnall, Mr. White, Mr. Mountague, Mr. Gery, Lord Fairfax, Sir Tho. Roberts, Mr. Mountstevens, Sir Fra. Masham, Mr. Bickerstaffe, Mr. Brotherton, Mr. Gardner, Mr. Blofeild, Sir John Kay, Mr. Manley, Mr. Campion, Mr. Hedger, Mr. Thompson, Mr. Blake, Lord Castleton, Mr. Ashby, Sir William Lowther, Mr. Lowther, Sir John Phillips, Sir Jacob Ashley, Sir Robert Cotton, Mr. Yard, Mr. Phillipps, Mr. Lampton; and all the Members that serve for Kent and Sussex: And they are to meet at Five a Clock this Afternoon, in the Speaker's Chamber.

J. Smith's Estate.

A Bill for the Sale of Three Houses in Swan-alley in Coleman-street, late of Joseph Smith, deceased, for Payment of his Debts, with which the same Houses are chargeable, was read a Second time.

Resolved, That the Bill be committed to Mr. Gery, Sir Charles Windham, Colonel Perry, Mr. Hedger, Sir Robert Clayton, Sir Wm. Lowther, Mr. Monson, Sir Geo. Hungerford, Colonel Granville, Mr. Frewen, Mr. Bertie, Mr. Lowther, Mr. Yates, Mr. Mawdit, Mr. Freeman, Mr. England, Mr. Moor, Mr. Fuller, Mr. Dolben, Mr. Gardner, Sir John Bolles, Mr. Ashby, Mr. Vivian, Mr. Blofeild, Mr. Evelyn, Mr. Stevens, Mr. Foley, Mr. Bickerstaffe, Sir Fra. Masham, Mr. Mountstevens, Mr. Manly, Mr. Brotherton, Sir Robert Cotton, Mr. Flemming; and all that serve for London and Middlesex; And they are to meet at Five a Clock this Afternoon, in the Speaker's Chamber.

Private Bills.

Ordered, That no private Bill be read the Third time before Eleven a Clock.

Copper Coinage.

A Petition of the Mercers, Ironmongers, Skinners, Shoemakers, Smiths, Bakers, Innkeepers, and other Tradesmen, of and within the City of Litchfeild, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That by the great Quantity of Copper Halfpence and Farthings, not worth above a Fourth Part of the intrinsick Value, the Currency of the Silver Coin is much obstructed, and Trade much discouraged thereby: And praying, That Care may be taken to redress the said Grievance.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committees, to whom the Petition of the Grocers, Cheesemongers, Mealmen, Bakers, Victuallers, Market-people, and Retailers in general, of the Borough of Southwark, is referred: And that they do examine the Matter thereof; and report the same, with their Opinion therein, to the House.

Ditto.

A Petition of the Grocers, Cheesemongers, Mealmen, Bakers, Victuallers, Market-people, and Retailers in general, of the ancient Borough of Great Marlow, in the County of Bucks, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That the Proprietors for coining Copper Halfpence and Farthings have not only, contrary to their Obligation, refused to exchange the Petitioners white Farthings, but have coined such great Quantities of Copper Farthings, that they are become a greater Clog to Trade, and the Petitioners, than the said White Farthings were: And praying, That the Increase of the Copper Coinage may be prevented.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the Petition of the Grocers, Cheesemongers, Mealmen, Bakers, Victuallers, Market-people, and Retailers in general, of the Borough of Southwark is referred: And that they do examine the Matter thereof; and report the same, with their Opinion therein, to the House.

Resumption of Grants.

A Petition of Charles Throgmorton Esquire was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That, after his Majesty's Landing in Ireland in 1690, the Petitioner submitted to his Majesty, who ordered the Outlawry of High Treason against the Petitioner, had on Account of the Rebellion in Ireland, to be reversed; which was accordingly done, and the Petitioner restored to his little Estate in that Kingdom, not above 200l. per Annum: That by the Bill now in the House, for vacating all Grants of Estates, and other Interests, forfeited in Ireland, since the 13th Day of February 1688; and for appropriating the same to the Use of the Publick; the Petitioner is like to lose the Benefit of the said Reversal: And praying, That a saving Clause for the Petitioner may be inserted in the said Bill.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the said Bill is committed.

Buying and selling Offices.

A Petition of several Officers in the City of London, in behalf of themselves, and others holding and exercising Offices or Places in the said City, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That, by ancient Usage, the Petitioners Predecessors have disposed of their Offices to fit Persons, by Approbation of the Lord Mayor and Aldermen; and, for that Reason, the Petitioners were encouraged to purchase them, with all, or the greatest Part of, their Fortunes: That by a Bill depending in the House, for preventing the buying and selling of Offices, and Places of Trust, the Petitioners conceive they shall be hindered from disposing of their Places, and be greatly prejudiced thereby, if it should pass into an Act: And praying to be heard by Counsel, before the said Bill do pass.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee, to whom the said Bill is committed.

Petition of Dutch Guards.

A Petition of several Soldiers, in behalf of themselves, and the rest of the Regiment of Dutch Guards of Foot, commanded by his Grace the Duke of Wirtembergh, was offered to the House:

And the Question being put, That the Petition be received;

It passed in the Negative.

Hudson's Bay Company.

Ordered, That the Report from the Committee, to whom the Bill for the Continuance of a former Act, for confirming to the Governor and Company of Hudson's Bay their Privileges and Trade, was committed, be now received.

Mr. Edward Harley reported from the said Committee, That they had heard the Petitioners touching the said Bill: and had made several Amendments to the Bill; which, and also the Matter upon the Petition of several Persons concerned in the Ship Charles, Captain Lucas Commander, they had directed him to report specially to the House; which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were read; and are as follow; viz.

That William Jennings, being asked, What he knew of the taking the Ship Charles? said, That one Walker, Commander of a Ship belonging to the Hudson's Bay Company, took the said Ship Charles, about Twelve Years since, in Hudson's Streights: That the said Commander threatened to put him in Gaol, because he was an Interloper in those Parts: That she was taken Fifty or Sixty Leagues from the Shore, within the Streights: That she was in a good Condition, and had sufficient Provision when she was taken.

Being asked, Where she was bound? said, We were bound for Hudson's Bay.

And being further asked, What became of the Ship? made Answer, That, after he was taken, he was put into the Company's Ship; and that some time after, she was lost, having run against the Rocks; but could not tell, Whether she was lost by Stress of Weather.

Being asked, If the Men were changed? said, Yes; and that he believed they left not one Man of her own Crew in her.

And being further asked, If the Ship was lost for want of Hands? said, He could not tell: He believed they had Hands enough: And said, He further believed, That the Loss of the Ship was through Ignorance: That he was entertained by the Company as a Warehouse-keeper Six or Seven Years; but had been several Years out of their Service.

Matth. Hallery, being asked, If he knew any thing of the taking the Ship Charles? said, He was in her when she was taken: That she was taken at Sea, before she came into Hudson's Bay, by a Ship commanded by one Captain Walker: That they were 15 or 20 Leagues without the Streights: That they were boarded; and that the said Captain Walker took out all her Men, and put other Men into her; and that the said Ship was after cast away upon the Rocks: That the greatest Part of her Cargo was lost.

And further said, That it was good Weather when she was cast away; and believed she was lost through Ignorance: He said, He was never in those Seas before.

And being asked, If he knew where the Mouth of the Streights lay? said, It lies at the Cape's Mouth:

And said, That the Ship was taken about 12 Years ago: That there was some Trial at Doctors Commons about the said Ship; but that he was not concerned in the Tryal, and did not know the Event of it.

Jennings and Hallery being confronted;

Jennings said, That the Ship was taken about 50 or 60 Leagues within the Streights: That the Streights lay betwixt Farewell and Cape Resolution.

Hallery said, As far as he could remember, They passed the Streights after the Ship was taken.

Geo. Gane said, He believed the Ship Charles was taken by Captain Walker: And said, That there was but Seven or Eight Men on board her when she was cast away, and not a Man lost.

And being asked, How many Years it was since? said, It was about the Years 1682, or 1683. And said, It was a bitter Storm, and no lying with a Boat when the Ship was lost; and that she was not cast away by Negligence, but by Stress of Weather.

He further said, He knew nothing of any Goods that were brought on Shore; and there was no Boats went out but for saving the Men: Said, He had formerly been in the Company's Service; but was now out of it, and had been so for several Years.

The Company alleged, This Matter had been determined in the Court of Admiralty, and in the King'sBench, about 12 Years since, and adjudged for them; and they were never questioned about it since that time.

And the First Amendment being read a Second time;

Resolved, That the Bill be re-committed.

Resolved, That the Bill be . . committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Resolved, That this House will, upon Saturday Sevennight, resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider of the said Bill; and nothing to intervene.

Ordered, That the Hudson's Bay Company do lay their Charter before this House.

Leave of Absence.

Ordered, That Sir Thomas Tipping have Leave to go into the Country, his Mother being very ill.

Ordered, That Mr. Stevens have Leave to go into the Country, upon extraordinary Occasions.

Ordered, That Colonel Wallpole have Leave to go into the Country for a Fortnight, for Recovery of his Health.

Qualifying for Offices.

A Bill for giving further Time to divers Persons to qualify themselves for their Employments and Trusts was, according to Order, read a Second time.

Resolved, That the Bill be committed to Sir John Manwaring, Sir Walter Yonge, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Champnyes, Sir John Bucknall, Mr. Traverse, Sir Richard Onslow, Mr. White, Mr. Blofeild, Sir Tho. Travell, Mr. Culliford, Mr. Rowney, Mr. Serjeant Bond, Mr. Mountstevens, Mr. Lowndes, Sir Scroop How, Sir Fra. Masham, Mr. Colt, Sir Tho. Littleton, Mr. Manly, Mr. Dolben, Sir Rowland Gwyn, Mr. Boyle, Sir Robert Davers, Mr. Neale, Mr. Denz. Onslow, Mr. Beake, Sir Wm. Lowther, Mr. Thornhagh, Mr. Bulkly, Mr. Whitaker, Mr. Travers, Sir Wm. Honywood, Mr. Palmes, Sir Wm. Ashurst, Mr. Ogle, Sir Jos. Tily, Mr. Morgan, Sir John Elwell, Mr. Farrer, Mr. Aislaby: And all that come are to have Voices: And they are to meet this Afternoon at Five a Clock, in the Speaker's Chamber: And it is to be an Instruction to the said Committee, That they do insert a Clause in the said Bill, to give the like Time to all others to qualify themselves, who, through Inadvertency, or other Hindrance, have neglected the same.

Ayre and Calder Navigation.

Ordered, That the Report from the Committee, to whom the Bill for making the Rivers Air and Calder, in the County of York, navigable, . . . . be received upon Friday Morning next, after Eleven a Clock.

Punishing Knight for false indorsing Exchequer Bills.

A Petition of Elizabeth Knight, Wife of John Knight, Prisoner in the Tower, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioner, and her Three small Children, are likely to be reduced to great Necessities, if some Provision be not made for them, before the Bill for punishing John Knight Esquire, for false Indorsing of several Bills, made forth at the Receipt of Exchequer, commonly called Exchequer-Bills, do pass; a great Part of the Petitioner's Fortune being laid out, in the Purchase of Annuities, for her and her Three Childrens Lives, on the 12 and 14 per Cent. and the Survivorship, with Intent to make some Provision for them; but the same are made payable to the Petitioner's Husband: And praying, That the said Purchases may be exempt from all Forfeiture, and reserved for her and her Childrens Benefit.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table until the said Bill be read the Third time.

Ditto.

The Bill was read the Third time.

An ingrossed Clause was offered as a Rider, for reserving to the said Eliz. and her Children, 266l. per Annum, purchased on the Acts for Annuities of 12 and 14l. per Cent. with Part of Mrs. Knight's Fortune, though taken in her Husband's Name, and intended for the Benefit of Mrs. Knight and her Children:

And the same was twice read.

And the Question being put, That the Clause be read the Third time;

It passed in the Negative.

Then several Amendments were proposed to be made to the Bill, by leaving out "August," and inserting, instead thereof, "January," in several Places:

And the same were, upon the Question severally put thereupon, agreed unto by the House; and the Bill amended at the Table accordingly.

Resolved, That the Bill do pass: And that the Title be, An Act for punishing John Knight Esquire, for false indorsing several Bills, made forth at the Receipt of Exchequer, commonly called Exchequer-Bills.

Ordered, That the Lord Marquis of Hartington do carry the Bill to the Lords, and desire their Concurrence thereunto.

Punishing Burton for false indorsing Exchequer Bills.

An ingrossed Bill, for punishing Bartholomew Burton Gentleman, for false Indorsing several Bills, made forth at the Receipt of Exchequer, commonly called ExchequerBills, was, according to Order, read the Third time.

And several Amendments was proposed to be made, to the Bill, by leaving out "June," and inserting, instead thereof, "January," in several Places:

And the same were, upon the Question severally put thereupon, agreed unto by the House; and the Bill amended at the Table accordingly.

Resolved, That the Bill do pass: And that the Title be, An Act for punishing Bartholomew Burton Gentleman, for false indorsing several Bills, made forth at the Receipt of Exchequer, commonly called Exchequer-Bills.

Ordered, That the Lord Marquis of Hartington do carry the Bill to the Lords, and desire their Concurrence thereunto.

Ways and Means.

Ordered, That the Report from the Committee of the whole House, to whom it was referred to consider of Ways and Means for raising the Supply granted to his Majesty, be adjourned until To-morrow Morning.

And then the House adjourned till To-morrow Morning, Nine a Clock.