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House of Commons Journal Volume 85: 13 May 1830

Pages 413-420

Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 85, 1830. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, [n.d.].

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In this section

Jovis, 13 die Maii, 1830:

The House divided.
The Yeas went forth.
Tellers for the Yeas, Mr. O'Connell, 12.
Mr. Hume:
Tellers for the Noes, Lord Francis Levenson Gower, 75.
Sir George Hill:

So it passed in the Negative.

A Motion was made, and the Question being put, That there be laid before this House, Copies of the Notes of the learned Judges who presided at the Special Commission in the County of Cork, in the month of October last, of the Evidence given at the several Trials at that Commission:-It passed in the Negative.

Supply, deferred.

The Order of the day being read, for the House to resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider further of the Supply granted to His Majesty;

Resolved, That this House will, To-morrow, resolve itself into the said Committee.

Ways and Means, deferred.

The Order of the day being read, for the House to resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider further of Ways and Means for raising the Supply granted to His Majesty; Resolved, That this House will, To-morrow, resolve itself into the said Committee.

Committee on Australian Company Bill.

The House, according to Order, resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House, upon the Bill to amend an Act for granting certain powers and authorities to a Company to be incorporated by Charter, to be called The Australian Agricultural Company, for the cultivation and improvement of the waste lands in the Colony of New South Wales, and for other purposes relating thereto; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair; and Sir Alexander Grant reported from the Committee, That they had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereunto.

Ordered, That the Report be received this day.

Committee on Insolvent Debtors Bill; No. 392.

The House, according to Order, resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House, upon the Bill to continue and amend the Laws for Relief of Insolvent Debtors in England; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair; and Sir Alexander Grant reported from the Committee, That they had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereunto.

reported

Ordered, That the Report be now received. Sir Alexander Grant accordingly from the Committee, the Amendments which they had made to the Bill; and the Report was brought up, and read.

Ordered, That the Report be taken into further consideration To-morrow. Ordered, That the Bill, as amended, be printed.

Committee on Law Officers (Scotland) Compensation.

The House, according to Order, resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider of granting Compensation to any Judges and Officers of the Courts of Law in Scotland, whose Salaries or lawful Fees and Emoluments may be terminated or reduced by the effect of any Act of this Session, for making alterations in the Judicial Establishments of Scotland; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair; and Sir Alexander Grant reported from the Committee, That they had come to a Resolution, which they had directed him to report to the House.

Ordered, That the Report be received To-morrow.

Petition against Beverley Road Bill.

A Petition of Thomas Scotchburn, of Great Driffield, in the county of York, carrying on business at Bell Mills, in the parish of Skerne, as a Miller and Merchant, was presented, and read; taking notice of the Bill for more effectually repairing and otherwise improving the Road from Beverley, by Molescroft, to Kendell House, and from Molescroft to Bainton Balk, in the County of York; and praying, That he may be heard by himself, his counsel or agent, against certain parts thereof.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee on the Bill; and that the Petitioner be heard by himself, his counsel or agent upon his Petition, if he think fit.

Ordered, That counsel be admitted to be heard in favour of the Bill, against the said Petition.

Hungerford (Westminster) Market Bill, passed.

An ingrossed Bill to incorporate certain Persons, to be called "The Hungerford Market Company," for the establishment of a Market for the Sale of Fish, Poultry and Meat, and other articles of general consumption and use, and for other purposes, was read the third time.

Resolved, That the Bill do pass: And that the Title be, An Act to incorporate certain Persons, to be called "The Hungerford Market Company," for the re-establishment of a Market for the Sale of Fish, Poultry and Meat, and other articles of general consumption and use, and for other purposes.

Ordered, That Mr. Hobhouse do carry the Bill to the Lords, and desire their concurrence.

Bishop of London's Estate Bill, read.

An ingrossed Bill from the Lords, intituled, An Act for enabling the Bishop of London to grant building Leases of certain Estates belonging to the said See, was read the first time; and ordered to be read a second time.

And then the House, having continued to sit till near one of the clock on Thursday morning, adjourned till this day.

Jovis, 13 die Maii; Anno 11 Georgii IV ti Regis, 1830.

PRAYERS.

Account from Greenwich Hospital, presented. No. 395.

THE House being informed that Mr. Hooper, Secretary of Greenwich Hospital, attended at the door, he was called in; and at the bar presented to the House, pursuant to their Order,-An Account of the Money deducted out of the Wages of Seamen employed in the Merchant Service of the country for the years 1828 and 1829; showing the gross amount collected, the net money paid to Greenwich Hospital, and the amount and rate per cent. paid for collecting the same in each year, and for what purposes employed:-And then he withdrew.

Ordered, That the said Account do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Ideridgehay Roads Bill, passed.

An ingrossed Bill for improving and maintaining the Turnpike Roads from the Wirksworth Turnpike Road, in the Hamlet of Ideridgehay, to the Town of Duffield, and from the Market-place in Wirksworth to the Turnpike Road leading from Derby to Brassington, and from the said Market-place to the Turnpike Road leading from Wirksworth Moor to Matlock Bath, all in the County of Derby, was read the third time; and several Amendments were made to the Bill.

Resolved, That the Bill do pass.

Ordered, That Mr. Mundy do carry the Bill to the Lords, and desire their concurrence.

Addington Inclosure Bill, passed.

An ingrossed Bill for inclosing Lands in the Parish of Little Addington, in the County of Northampton, was read the third time.

Resolved, That the Bill do pass.

Ordered, That Lord Viscount Althorp do carry the Bill to the Lords, and desire their concurrence.

Kidwelly Inclosure Bill, reported.

Mr. Rice Trevor reported from the Committee on the Bill for inclosing Lands within the several Parishes of Kidwelly, Saint Mary in Kidwelly, Saint Ishmael and Pembrey, in the County of Carmarthen, and to whom the petitions of the Right honourable George Earl of Ashburnham; and, of the Proprietors of land to which is attached a right of intercommoning on the waste land called Pinged Marsh, in the parishes of Pembrey and Kidwelly, in the county of Carmarthen, were referred; That the Standing Orders relative to Bills of Inclosure, had been complied with; and that no person appeared on behalf of the first mentioned Petition; and that they had considered the second mentioned Petition; and that they had examined the allegations of the Bill, and found the same to be true; and that the parties concerned had given their consent to the Bill, to the satisfaction of the Committee (except the proprietors of land assessed to the land tax at 29l. 15s. 2½d. who refused to sign the Bill, and also except such as are assessed at 9l. 0s. 5½d. who are neuter, and that the whole property is assessed at 167 l. 18s. 10¼d.); and that they had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereunto; and the Amendments were read, and agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Perth Navigation Bill, reported.

Mr. Home Drummond reported from the Committee on the Bill for enlarging, improving and maintaining the Port and Harbour of Perth; for improving the Navigation of the River Tay to the said City; and for other purposes therewith connected; and to whom the Petitions of Ship-owners, Merchants and Inhabitants of the city of Perth; of the Guildry Incorporation of the city of Perth; of Thomas Bruce, Deacon of the Baker Incorporation of Perth; of Thomas Rutherford, Deacon of the Flesher Incorporation of Perth; of Sir David Moncrieffe of Moncrieffe, Baronet, Proprietor of the Salmon Fishings situated at the Friarton Hole, the Weel Ford, and at the Willow Gate, in the River Tay, on the estate of Moncrieffe, and of Sir John Hope, of Craighall, Baronet, Sir Francis Walker Drummond, of Hawthornden, Baronet, Thomas Richardson, Writer to the Signet, and James Moncrieffe Melville, Writer to the Signet, Trustees of the said Sir David Moncrieffe, and also, of Matthew Bell, Tacksman of the said Fishings; and, of John Graham, Deacon of the Shoemaker Incorporation of Perth, were referred; That the Standing Orders relative to Navigation Bills, had been complied with; and that they had considered the first mentioned Petition, and that no person appeared on behalf of the second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth mentioned Petitions; and that they had examined the allegations of the Bill, and found the same to be true; and had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereunto; and the Report was brought up, and read.

Ordered, That the Report do lie upon the Table.

Committee on D'Oyly's Divorce Bill.

The House, according to Order, resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House, upon the ingrossed Bill from the Lords, intituled, An Act to dissolve the Marriage of John Hadley D'Oyly, Esquire, with Charlotte, his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again, and for other purposes; and, after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair; and Sir Thomas Baring reported from the Committee, That they had heard counsel and examined witnesses for the Bill; and that no counsel or party appeared before the Committee to oppose the Bill; and that they had gone through the Bill, and made an Amendment thereunto.

Ordered, That the Report be received To-morrow.

Garnkirk Railway Bill, reported.

Sir Michael Stewart reported from the Committee on the Bill for amending certain Acts for making the Glasgow and Garnkirk Railway, and for improving, maintaining and rendering Turnpike the Road leading from the said Railway near Broomhill, by Keppoch Bridge to the Town Head of Glasgow; and to whom the Petitions of the Company of Pròprietors of the Forth and Clyde Navigation; of the Company of Proprietors of the Monkland Navigation; of Archibald Stirling, Esquire, of Renmuir, Tutor at Law, named and appointed by the Court of Session to William Stuart Crawford Stirling, Esquire, of Milton; and, of Archibald Wallace and Thomas Grahame, of Glasgow, Proprietors of shares in the Glasgow and Garnkirk Railway, were referred; That no person appeared on behalf of the said Petitions; and that they had examined the allegations of the Bill, and found the same to be true; and had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereunto; and the Report was brought up, and read.

Ordered, That the Report do lie upon the Table.

Petitions in favour of Glasgow and Kilmarnock Road Bill.

A Petition of Heritors, Tacksmen and Inhabitants of Pollok or Eastwood;-of Mearns;-of Cathcart;-of Owners and Occupiers of public works in Eastwood or Pollok, Mearns and Neilston;-of Heritors and Inhabitants of Hutchesontown and Lauriestown, in the barony of Gorbals;-and, of Tradeston and Kingston, in the barony of Gorbals,-were presented, and read; taking notice of the Bill for amending and continuing an Act for repairing Roads in the County of Renfrew, and for altering the Line of Road between Glasgow and Kilmarnock, in the said County; and praying, That the same may pass into a law.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table.

Sunderland Haven Bill, committed.

Ordered, That the Order of the day, for the second reading of the Bill for enlarging the Powers of several Acts relating to the Improvement of the River Wear, and of the Port and Haven of Sunderland, in the County Palatine of Durham, be now read; and the same being read:

-The Bill was read a second time; and committed to Lord William Powlett, &c.: And they are to meet this Afternoon, in the Speaker's Chamber; and have leave to sit and proceed, and to make their Report on or before Monday next.

Carlisle and Penrith Road Bill, passed.

An ingrossed Bill for more effectually repairing the Road from Carlisle to Penrith, and from Penrith to Eamont Bridge, in the County of Cumberland, was read the third time.

Resolved, That the Bill do pass.

Ordered, That Sir James Graham do carry the Bill to the Lords, and desire their concurrence.

Sheffield Waterworks Bill, passed.

An ingrossed Bill for better supplying with Water the Town and Parish of Sheffield, in the County of York, was read the third time; and several Amendments were made to the Bill.

Resolved, That the Bill do pass. Ordered, That Mr. Marshall do carry the Bill to the Lords, and desire their concurrence.

Petitions in favour of Jews Relief Bill.

A Petition of British-born Jews residing at Brighton; -of Freeholders and Inhabitants of Brighton;-of Worksop;-and, of Freeholders, Citizens and Inhabitants of Norwich,-were presented, and read; taking notice of the Bill for the Relief of His Majesty's Subjects professing the Jewish Religion; and praying, That the same may pass into a law.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table; and to be printed.

Petition for establishing Poor Laws in Ireland.

A Petition of John Lawless, residing in the city of Dublin, was presented, and read; praying the House to take into its most deliberate consideration the present state of the Poor of Ireland, and to extend to that country the blessings of the principles of the Poor Laws of England, administered as they have long been by the religious, moral and enlightened people of Scotland. Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Select Committee on Irish Poor.

Petition for abolishing Slavery.

A Petition of Minister and Members of the Congregation of Protestant Dissenters of the Independent denomination assembling at Great Driffield, was presented, and read; praying for the abolition of Slavery in all parts of His Majesty's dominions.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table.

Petitions against Sale of Beer Bill.

A Petition of Inhabitants of New and Old Sleaford;- of Proprietors and Occupiers of public-houses in the hundred of Eynsford, and adjoining hundreds in the county of Norfolk;-of Brewers and Proprietors of public-houses at Diss;-of Proprietors and Occupiers of public-houses in the hundred of Grimshoe, in the county of Norfolk;- and, in East Dereham,-were presented, and read; taking notice of the Bill to permit the general Sale of Beer by Retail in England; and praying, That the same may not pass into a law.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table.

Petitions in favour of Sale of Beer Bill.

A Petition of Inhabitants of Frome Selwood;-of Clergy, Merchants, Bankers and Inhabitants of Birmingham;- of Proprietors and Occupiers of public-houses and other Inhabitants of Walling ford;-of Churchwardens, Overseers of the Poor, and other Inhabitants of the parish of Saint Paul, Covent Garden, in the city and liberty of Westminster;-and, of Inhabitants of Marlborough,-were also presented, and read; taking notice of the said Bill; and praying, That the same may pass into a law, but that Beer be not consumed in the house or premises where sold by retail.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table; and, except the first, to be printed.

Petition against Duty of Two Pennies Scots on Spirits (Scotland.)

A Petition of John Harvey, Statutory Clerk of the Commissioners of Police of Leith, was presented, and read; praying the House to give no countenance to the attempts now making by the Scotch burghs to transfer the local Duty of two pennies Scots on Ale and Beer to the article of Spirits or other commodities, or to any measures tending towards the renewal of this or any other local tax of any description.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Petitions against Assimilation of Stamp Duties (Ireland.)

A Petition of Proprietors of newspapers in Belfast; -and, of the Letter-press Printers Apprentices of the city of Dublin,-were presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners have seen, with mingled emotions of alarm and astonishment, the new scale of Duties proposed to be levied off the already deeply-burthened and struggling newspaper press of Ireland, a measure which, if carried into effect, will, they doubt not, prove ruinous to many worthy and useful members of society, who, with themselves and families, depend entirely upon it for support; and praying the House to refrain from laying any new imposts on the newspaper press of Ireland, and to lighten the burthen of taxation under which it already labours.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table; and to be printed.

Petition respecting Apprentices in the Silk Trade.

A Petition of the Ribbon Weavers' Committee of the city of Coventry, was presented, and read; complaining of the practice of taking Apprentices for a short time, and retaining half their earnings, without becoming responsible for the supply of any of their necessary wants, or the cultivation of their morals; and praying the House to take the allegations of their Petition into consideration, and enact a law to forbid the taking any Apprentice into the Silk Trade for any shorter period than seven years, or upon any other condition than to provide for such Apprentice, food, clothing, lodging and employment, on the premises of the master during the whole period of apprenticeship.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Petition against Cultivation of Tobacco in this Kingdom.

A Petition of Tobacco Manufacturers of Newcastleupon-Tyne, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners view, with considerable anxiety and just alarm, a proposed measure to allow the growth of Tobacco in this Kingdom, as it will afford the unprincipled the fullest opportunity ever offered of defrauding the revenue to an unlimited extent, in a variety of ways; and praying the abandonment of a measure which appears to them prejudicial to the revenue, demoralizing to the people, and injurious to the fair trader.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Petition for amending the Law respecting Landlord and Tenant.

A Petition of Owners of houses within the town and county of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners are owners of houses situate within the town of Newcastle-upon-Tyne; that a capital to a very large amount hath been invested in property of this description, not only in Newcastle-uponTyne, but in various other places, and particularly in commercial and manufacturing towns; that the owners of such property suffer continually great loss and expense, and experience much hardship and inconvenience, by reason of the present defective state of the law as regards landlord and tenant, and the delay and expense that attend proceedings to recover possession by action of ejectment; and praying the House to take the same into their consideration, with a view to such amendment thereof as to the House shall seem meet.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Petition complaining of the conduct of the Governor of Ceylon.

A Petition of John Whitchurch Bennett, late an Assistant Collector of Revenue, Sitting and Revenue Magistrate, and one of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace in the island of Ceylon, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioner, actuated by an earnest desire that the grievances which now oppress the natives of the island of Ceylon should be remedied, respectfully prays the House will be pleased to command that the Commissioners now employed in the investigation of the affairs of Ceylon may, in addition to other matters, be specially directed to make inquiry as to his Excellency Sir Edward Barnes's commands, whether written or verbal, to James Nicholas Mooyaart, Esquire, Magistrate of Colombo, in the years 1826-7, with regard to punishment without trial of certain Cingalese or Malabars or Moors, as the case may be, Coolies or labourers at Colombo, "to cause the said natives to be flogged" (notwithstanding the oath directed to be administered by the government of Ceylon to all magistrates on entering office), and for threatening to depose the said Magistrate from his office for having refused to comply with such illegal orders; and further, that the House will be pleased to cause copies of the correspondence between the Government or Governor of Ceylon and the aforesaid James Nicholas Mooyaart, Esquire, Magistrate of Colombo, in the years 1826-7, on the said subject, to be laid before the House, together with a copy of the oath administered to the said James Nicholas Mooyaart, Esquire, late Magistrate of Colombo, in order that the necessity of some relief to the native inhabitants from military despotism may be taken into consideration; and he further prays, that the House will, in justice both to the public and to the Petitioner, be pleased to direct, that copies of the correspondence between the Colonial Office and the Petitioner (including therein a transcript of the Petitioner's charges against the said Governor his Excellency Sir Edward Barnes), from the 1st day of January 1825 to that of April 1830, both inclusive, be laid before the House; for, by letter dated 27th July 1829, it was intimated to the Petitioner from the Colonial Office that "such charges had been forwarded to the island of Ceylon, for the purpose of being there investigated," in opposition to the Petitioner's formal protests against any inquiry but the most public one, in presence of the accuser and accused, and where he might be allowed an opportunity of establishing his charges against the said Governor, by witnesses to the several facts set forth in the said charges.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table.

Petition against additional Duty on Corn Spirits.

A Petition of Landholders of the parishes united to Skryne, in the county of Meath, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the Bill for imposing an increase of Duties on Irish Corn Spirit is fraught with mischief to Ireland, by inflicting a vital injury on the agricultural interests, which are its principal resources; and praying, That no additional Tax be laid on Irish Corn Spirit beyond what was imposed in the year 1825.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table.

Labourers Wages Bill, reported, and re-committed. No. 401.

Mr. Littleton reported from the Committee on the Bill to amend and render more effectual the Provisions of divers Acts for securing to certain Artificers, Workmen and Labourers, in such Acts mentioned, the due Payment of their Wages in Money; That they had examined the allegations of the Bill, and found the same to be true; and had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereunto; and the Report was brought up, and read.

And the House being informed that other Amendments are necessary to be made to the Bill:-The Bill was recommitted to a Committee of the whole House for Monday the 24th day of this instant May.

Ordered, That the Bill, as amended, be printed.

Report from Committee on East India Affairs. No. 396.

Mr. Ward reported from the Select Committe appointed to inquire into the present State of the Affairs of the East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China; and to report their observations thereupon to the House; and who were empowered to report the Minutes of Evidence taken before them from time to time to the House; That they had made a further progress in the matters to them referred, and examined several other witnesses, the Minutes of whose Evidence they had agreed to report to the House up to the 13th day of this instant May inclusive; and the Report was brought up, and read.

Ordered, That the Report do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Petition for alteration of Laws respecting Tithes.

A Petition of Inhabitants of the parishes of Wycliffe and Hutton, and the townships of Ovington and Scargill, in the north riding of the county of York, being all either owners of land or payers or receivers of tithes, was presented, and read; praying, That the House will, at as early a period in the present Session of Parliament as the business of the nation will allow, take into their most serious consideration the present state of the Tithe Laws, and the effects now resulting from them; also, the changes which have occurred since they were framed; and that, after a strict and mature investigation of the question in all its relative bearings, they will be pleased to adopt such measures and make such arrangements as shall appear to them to be consistent with justice to the payers and receivers of Tithes, and most beneficial to the general interests of religion, and those of the community at large.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table.

Petitions against Renewal of East India Charter.

A Petition of Inhabitants of Preston, was presented, and read; praying, That the Charter of the East India Company may not be so renewed as to continue their monopoly of commercial intercourse with any part of the eastern world.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Select Committee on East India Company's Affairs. A Petition of Inhabitants of Tavistock, was also presented, and read; praying, That the monopoly of trade at present enjoyed by the East India Company be entirely and for ever abolished.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Petition to be printed.

Ordered, That the Petition of Owners and Occupiers of land and Inhabitants of the soke and city of Peterborough, praying for the Repeal of the Duties on Malt and Beer, which was yesterday presented to the House, be printed.

Petitions in favour of Liability of Landlords Bill.

A Petition of Charles Girdlestone, Vicar of Sedgley, and Chairman of the Vestry;-and, of Churchwardens and Overseers and Select Vestry of Preston,-were presented, and read; taking notice of the Bill for the better rating Tenements under a certain Annual Value; and praying the House to grant them relief, either upon the principle of this Bill, authorizing rates to be levied on the owners, or such other relief as the House may deem efficient.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table; and that the last be printed.

Petition against appointment of Board of Commissioners of Northern Roads.

A Petition of Inhabitants, Owners and Occupiers of lands and tenements in the town of Bedford, was presented, and read; setting forth, That, by a Report of the Select Committee appointed by the House to inquire into the State of the Roads between London and Edinburgh, it appears, that a Commission is recommended, with authority to divert the present line of the North Road, to create additional Tolls, and to do other acts, which will be manifestly unnecessary, partial and oppressive to the Petitioners and the inhabitants of the town of Bedford; that the operations of such a Commission are likely to prove ruinous and burthensome to a great mass of property as well as to a large population now embarked and settled upon the present line, and to be wholly unproductive of any public advantage adequate to the immense cost and sacrifices at which alone they can be carried on; and praying, That the said Commission may not receive the sanction of the House, and that they may be heard by themselves, their counsel, agents and witnesses against the appointment of the same.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table.

Petitions for mitigating Punishment for Forgery.

A Petition of Inhabitants of South Brent;-of the Vicar, Churchwarden, Overseers of the Poor and others, Inhabitants of Winscombe;-of Inhabitants of Moretonhampstead;-of Collumpton;-of Persons resident in Edinburgh and Leith;-of the Local Directors and Manager of the Provincial Bank of Ireland at Belfast;- and, of Bankers, Traders and other Inhabitants of Tavistock,-were presented, and read; praying the House to pass a law by which the punishment of death shall be abolished in all cases of Forgery, substituting such penalty commensurate to the offence as shall commend itself to the conscientious feeling of the community.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table; and, except the four first, to be printed.

Petition against Administration of Justice Bill.

A Petition of Residents of Warwick and its neighbourhood, was presented, and read; taking notice of the Bill for the more effectul Administration of Justice in England and Wales, in which is inserted a clause to the following effect: that no person shall be liable to be arrested for any debt or demand under the sum or value of 100£. except upon the special order of a Judge of one of the Superior Courts, to be made upon sufficient cause shown to him by affidavit; and praying the House to take into consideration the statement of the Petitioners, and expunge the above-mentioned clause from the said Bill.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Accounts, ordered: Military and Naval Pensions.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House, an Account of the amount of Money now due to the Bank of England, on the Annuity purchased under the Act of 4 Geo. 4, c. 22.

Joint Stock Banks.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House, an Account of places where United or Joint Stock Banks have been established under the Act 7 Geo. 4. c. 46.

Petitions for repeal of Parish Vestries Act (Ireland.)

A Petition of Roman Catholic Inhabitants of Garrocloyne;-of Occupiers of land in Hook, Fethard and Templetown, in the county of Wexford;-of Roman Catholic Inhabitants of Saint Peter, in the city of Cork;-of Middleton;-and, of Whitechurch, in the county of Cork,- were presented, and read; reciting the Act 7 Geo. 4, c. 72, for the regulation of Parish Vestries in Ireland; and praying, That the same may be repealed.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table; and that the three last be printed.

Petition against Assimilation of Duties (Ireland.)

A Petition of Merchants, Manufacturers, Traders, Householders and other Inhabitants of the city of Dublin, and of places adjoining, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners observe, with astonishment and apprehension, that an intention is avowed by His Majesty's Government, which has been already in various instances sanctioned by Parliament, that the rates of taxation levied in Ireland shall be assimilated to those in Great Britain, and that it is proposed, in the present Session of Parliament, to carry this measure into effect in regard to all Stamp Duties; and praying the House, that any measure introduced to it for the further assimilation of the Taxes in Ireland to those of Great Britain may be rejected, and that the House will take such measures as to them shall seem meet for securing to the Petitioners those exemptions and abatements in taxation which the Act of Union expressly guaranteed to them, and which, in the opinion of the Petitioners, ought, under the present circumstances of Ireland, to be rather extended than diminished, so as more reasonably to proportion the weight of the burthens imposed upon the people of Ireland to the means which they possess of sustaining them.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

The Lords have agreed to

A Message from the Lords, by Mr. Farrer and Sir Giffin Wilson:

Mr. Speaker,

Werneth and Littleborough Roads Bill.

The Lords have agreed to the Bill, intituled, An Act for improving and maintaining the Road from Werneth to Littleborough, and other Roads communicating therewith, in the County of Lancaster, without any Amendment: And also,

The Lords have passed Marshall's Estate Bill.

The Lords have passed a Bill, intituled, An Act to enable the Trustees under the Marriage Settlement of Bourchier Marshall, Clerk, deceased, and Elizabeth his Wife, also deceased, to effect a Sale of the Advowson of the Church of Bow, otherwise Nymet Tracey, in the County of Devon; to which the Lords desire the concurrence of this House: And also,

Shakerley's Divorce Bill.

The Lords have passed a Bill, intituled, An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Charles Peter Shakerley, Esquire, of the Parish of Egham, in the County of Surrey, with Laure Angelique Rosalbe Shakerley, his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again, and for other purposes therein mentioned; to which the Lords desire the concurrence of this House:-And then the Messengers withdrew.

Petition of Sir Jonah Barrington.

A Petition of Sir Jonah Barrington, Judge of the High Court of Admiralty of Ireland, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioner being, for nearly twenty years past, incapable of acting, removed himself from the personal discharge of his official duties, and he has never since interfered therein, but appointed Surrogates (Doctors of Civil Law, to officiate for him during his absence, as by law he was entitled to do, namely, Doctor Duignan, His Majesty's Advocate of Admiralty, Doctors Ridgway, Vavasour, Mahaffy, and afterwards Doctor Jemmeson, one of the King's Counsel, and Accountant General of the Court of Chancery, all of whom are now deceased; that the Petitioner was for many years in habits of close intimacy and friendship with Doctor Duignan, His Majesty's Advocate, and with respect to all official concerns, and especially any proceedings in the Admiralty Court, and their incidents, confidentially communicated with him, from the first day the Petitioner came into office until the last day he remained; that he was also, during the same period, in habits of private friendship and intimacy with Mr. Hamilton, His Majesty's Proctor of Admiralty, who was confidentially employed by Government, both in England and Ireland, and had constant communication with them, and who, after the Petitioner withdrew from Ireland, acted as the agent and adviser of his family, down to the day of his death; that, after Mr. Pineau's appointment as Registrar in 1805, the practice and proceedings of the Court, by his inexperience (he never having been a Proctor), became irregular and confused; the salary of the Judge, only 500 l. per annum, being also totally inadequate to its duties, they could not be duly attended to without being ruinous to his professional practice as a Barrister; that the Petitioner did, in consultation with Dr. Duignan, Lord Chief Baron Yelverton, and the principal civilians of Ireland, and with the previous knowledge of the Right honourable Sir William Scott, prepare a Petition to His Majesty, as to the state of the Court and of the Judge, and the details of the same, of which the following is an extract: "That, while circumstanced as the Court now stands, the delay, impracticability, and inefficiency of its proceedings are irremediable, inasmuch as the present establishment of that Court is so totally inadequate to its duties and its rank, that no gentleman of sufficient experience, standing, and character at the bar, who may be placed in that office, can possibly devote any adequate portion of his public time to the regular and necessary sittings of that Court, without absolutely sacrificing professionally much more than the whole of his judicial emoluments, and risking the total loss of professional practice at the bar, by the consequent absence from its immediate duties; that Memoralist further begs permission pointedly to state, that the practitioners in the Court of Admiralty in Ireland are not as in England, and in the Ecclesiastical Court, exclusively so the Proctors of Admiralty also practise as Attornies and Solicitors in all the other Courts of Ireland, and the Judge of the Admiralty, in his capacity as Barrister, receives in fees from his own Proctors, in the capacity of Attornies, and more than the emoluments of his judicial office; this circumstance, equally disgusting to the feeling of a Judge, and injurious to the credit of the jurisdiction, seems to be consistent neither with the principle of independence, or purity of any court of general and permanent jurisdiction; the due distance of Judge and Proctor is lost in the relation of Barrister and Attorney, and it not unfrequently occurs, that in the midst of a serious argument or solemn judgment that the Judge is called down from the Bench to make a motion in another Court, or perhaps handed a brief for a Court of Law, by one of his Proctors, as an Attorney, at the very time that Proctor's conduct is under investigation, or perhaps about to be punished in the Court of Admiralty, and this did occur; that the due decorum of a Court, the weight of its decision, and the character of its jurisdiction, must of course be more or less affected by this alternate and hourly change of capacities; and though the present Judge trusts that he is far removed beyond the reach of these impressions, the general principle of independence in the Court cannot gain ground by the observation, nor the office be tenable with any satisfaction by a Judge so improperly circumstanced; that the present Judge, therefore, desirous so far as in him lies, to render the Court in which he has so long had the honour to preside, permanent, independent, respectable and efficient, though he cannot be expected to sacrifice the whole emoluments of a very extensive practice at the bar, yet has the honour of stating to Your Majesty, that his private fortune enables him to devote his time exclusively to his judicial duties, if it may please Your Majesty to order such augmentation to the establishment, as, on an abstract consideration of the jurisdiction itself, without any reference to mere personal claims of Memorialist, may seem to Your Majesty, upon general principles, a due and appropriate establishment for that jurisdiction, to secure its weight and independence in whatever hands it may hereafter fall into;" the substance of the foregoing statement having been referred officially to Sir William Scott, by the Right honourable the Lord Lieutenant's Chief Secretary, Sir William Scott made the following Report: "I am strongly impressed with the reasonableness of Doctor Barrington's application, and think a compliance with it essentially connected with the purity and reputation of administration of justice, in an imperial branch of its jurisprudence, to an increase of the salary to 2,000£. per annum, I have no objection. I observe Mr. Foster speaks of its being done by Act of Parliament, my opinion should have pointed out another mode; namely, the same that was practised when my salary was fixed; however, if an Act of Parliament should be deemed necessary, it will have my hearty support, &c. &c. "May 1806. William Scott."

The Petitioner respectfully begs to state, that the prayer of such Petition was approved of by Mr. Pitt, and the English Ministers of that day, but referred in Ireland to the Chief Judge, and disapproved of by Lord Redesdale, who considered, that a practising Barrister was an advantage to the office, as by the said Petition and Report, on reference thereto, will appear; that after the said Petition to His Majesty had been reconsidered, the salary was increased to 1,000£. and a remuneration of 750£. ordered to be paid to the Petitioner, and he saith, that on all these applications, a detailed account of all the causes then existing in Court, and of their state, was made to the Lord Chancellor and Chief Judges of Ireland by Mr. Hamilton, the King's Proctor and Registrar, under the direction of the King's Advocate; and the Petitioner expressly saith, that every order whatsoever in the case of "the Nancy," was of course, during these transactions, open and on record, and in the Rule Books by Mr. Pineau, before the eye of the Chancellor and Judges, and never was secret or clandestine; the Petitioner further saith, that he was twice (pending these transactions) introduced at Councils by Lord Hawkesbury, and received the honour of knighthood from the King, and was admitted by special grace to the English bar, and every part of his public conduct was open and undisguised, and the whole business of the Court before the King's Advocate and the King's Proctor, in the Petitioner's absence, yet no error in his conduct was ever even suggested, either in these causes or in any other cause, whilst he continued to officiate as Judge of the Admiralty, or for twenty years after; the Petitioner further saith, that in 1800, one million and a half was voted to be distributed by Commissioners, as compensation for losses sustained by the Union, and Doctors Duignan and Jemmeson, being two of such Commissioners, and in communication with Lord Castlereagh and Mr. Cooke, the entire managers on that affair, a compensation was decided on between them, and engaged to Petitioner for the loss of the prize jurisdiction, and on other grounds, which he will, (if necessary,) produce high evidence to prove, but which engagements, for reasons which will appear, could not be carried into execution; the only available fund for compensation agreed upon for the Petitioner, was found to be from accruing droits of the Crown, if any could be collected, which in Ireland was not frequent; and every case where claims of the Crown arose was daily, and always under the eye of the King's officers, nor has the Petitioner ever since been compensated one shilling, but, on the contrary, lost many thousands, as he can fully and unequivocally prove; the Petitioner humbly begs leave to state, that he did (conscious of the false representations, and his entire innocence) request to be examined in the most searching manner, and, believing that the examination of Mr. Pineau would have been open, and in the presence of the Petitioner and the public, he did, with great risk to his health, voluntarily come over from the Continent for the express purpose of appearing and confronting the said Mr. Pineau; the Petitioner humbly showeth, that, after being examined before the Select Committee, he did give in his resignation to Lord Francis Leveson Gower, as originally required, with a letter, of which the following is an extract, and did signify the same to the Duke of Wellington:

"My Lord, 15 May 1829.

A sense of public duty, founded on my precarious health, and consequent incapacity to execute my judicial functions in person, the extraordinary inconvenience which I now find has arisen in the Irish Admiralty, as well as myself individually by officiating solely through Surrogates connected with the circumstances stated in my note of this date to Sir Charles Flint, accompanying this letter, induce me to retire from office on the Statutable retirement;"

And the Petitioner humbly submits to the House, that, by the British laws, no man's abstract acts are to be primâ facie adjudged as culpable; that, where grievous punishment is the result of conviction, every man is entitled to a full, open trial, the animus and qualifications of his acts, the nature of his objects, authorities, motives, and all explanatory or favourable circumstances, are open and available to every accused person, and that none but credible witnesses and concurring documents can establish culpability; the Petitioner therefore unequivocally and conscientiously avers, that every charge which imputes to him any dishonest or dishonourable intention, or corrupt and malicious act, is untrue; that the Petitioner, on the contrary, can show, that he has been first the voluntary victim of his public principle, and afterwards the sacrifice of his private honour; the man who rejected high office, rank, and any emolument upon conscientious motives, was not likely to become the reverse; secrecy and concealment are the attendants of crime, but no symptom of such can be discovered in any part of the Petitioner's conduct; in thirty-three years a charge of irregular orders (twenty-five years before) of sums alleged to be paid by the Registrar out of his own private funds (for that is the present charge) for the Petitioner, but never after mentioned or demanded, those alleged charges to be supported by oral and documentary evidence, which the Petitioner humbly submits should be publicly proved against him, and that, as to any alleged or confused admissions, he should have full public opportunity of explaining such deliberately and openly, and supporting them by testimony and with the aid of legal advisers; before the Select Committee the Petitioner had neither counsel, adviser, friend, nor acquaintance; to him it was a novel situation indeed; strong, but very natural, emotions interfered altogether with his collectedness and prudence, or perhaps his coherency; but the Petitioner respectfully urges that he is able to account for his conduct most honourably and satisfactorily; the Petitioner therefore begs to be considered as by no means presuming to insinuate the most remote doubts of the jurisdiction of Parliament as legislators, or any disapprobation of the conduct of the Select Committee, but the Petitioner, on the contrary, believes they acted honourably, conscientiously, and strictly in precedent; but, as a subject of high public and general interest, arising out of the Petitioner's case, (admitted to be without precedent), the Petitioner humbly submits, that, in a proceeding intrinsically of a criminal nature, and pronouncing a judicial sentence of criminality, in the absence of the accused, without any public open evidence or trial, the Petitioner should have the same legal rights and advantage as is accorded to every person charged with any offence whatever before any Court of Justice, and the Petitioner humbly ventures to hope, that the Reports of a very limited delegation of the House will not be held conclusive against the Petitioner; the Petitioner saith that his situation, in every possible point of view, compels him to pray for a public and open investigation of his conduct, against imputations of which he is innocent, and to appeal against a sentence which would be considered severe, after open trial, on the greatest offender; the Petitioner therefore humbly submits, that every British subject is entitled, before he can be found guilty of any offence, to a full, free, and open investigation of the charges in the face of day, to confront and examine his accusers to the benefit of the municipal law, to the aid of counsel to hear and examine the evidence against him before he is called on to rebut it; but the Petitioner submits to the House, that he has not as yet had any of these advantages; he never saw the evidence against him, or the Report or Minutes of the Select Committee, nor ever knew such had been printed, until the 15th of March last, since which day he has been generally incapable of any business through his severe illness; the Petitioner saith, he hath heard that a reference to and report had been made by the Law Officers in Ireland in his favour; having long determined, and repeatedly expressed his wish to retire, the Petitioner had no idea that any further proceedings would be taken against him, and therefore made no preparation for any defence; but on the 15th of March last, the Petitioner, to his great surprise, received, for the first time, the Report of the Select Committee, with notice that it would be moved in preliminary on the 18th March, from which time to the present he has, owing to illness, been able to apply to any species of business only at short intervals; that, when the Petitioner was required by the Irish Commissioners to explain the circumstances, he was at the same time refused all documents by which to explain them, and, after twenty years repose, he was called on, at the age of more than threescore and thirteen, to account for transactions which were alleged to have occurred in his comparative youth, and of which he had never afterwards heard, which lapse of time might have well obliterated, even from young and vigorous recollections, and still more naturally (as it truly did), by his endeavours to excite it, totally confused and deranged the Petitioner's recollections, especially as he had no document whatever to refresh his memory; and the Petitioner saith, that, however well justified he should have been in pleading his age, the unparalleled staleness of the charge, where any thing like accurate recollection was impossible, he voluntarily preferred and chose investigation; and, relying as he then did, and still does, on his total freedom from corrupt, dishonest, or dishonourable acts or motives, he could not suppose that the efforts of his wish to prove his innocence by public trial, and the confusion of his recollections, which he need not have resorted to, should be considered as a reason conclusive against him, or to impede a further and open investigation; that much of the documentary evidence produced to the Petitioner he had never seen before, and the detached observations, private acts and miscellaneous papers, had been selected by the private friends of Mr. Pineau, from a ton of papers of twenty-five years past, and of a man many years in his grave; that, on the production at the last day of the sittings of the Committee, the Petitioner was asked if he chose to explain them at once; that the Petitioner had no documents to collate them with, nor had he any deliberate opportunity then or since to examine the originals, or to deliberately explain them; a confused memory was his sole aid of long past transactions, and the Petitioner never saw those papers afterwards, nor any copies thereof, until he received printed copies on the 15th March last; that the Petitioner now per ceives, that many of them are totally private dealings with Mr. Hamilton, and all of them can now be accounted for without any culpability attaching to the Petitioner, either in act or intention; the Petitioner humbly saith, that no public act of his, no decree nor order, no proceeding ever was secret or clandestine; that the whole and entire was, from first to last, under the eye of the King's Advocate, the King's Proctor, and the Registrar himself, and if any culpability existed, or any error occurred, it was through their own acts; that the Rule Books were open to the public, to all parties and suitors, all which could affect any party who conceived themselves injured, could appeal legally or complain, all the proceedings being entered by Mr. Pineau himself, in his own hand-writing, yet no party or suitor, or the Crown, or any body or individual, for nearly the fourth of a century, ever made any complaint whatsoever of the Petitioner's conduct; the Petitioner therefore urges, that it is a case of unprecedented hardship in all its points and bearings; that, after so great a portion of a century, the deaths of the Petitioner's Surrogates, of the King's Proctor, the Chief Marshal, and most of the Advocates and Proctors of the Admiralty, the Irish Ministers, Lord Castlereagh and Mr. Cooke, all the Commissioners of Compensation, and others who were respectively more or less cognizant of the true state of the Court, and the transactions of 1800, and could individually explain and authenticate the Petitioner's statement, he was charged, for the first time, that Mr. Pineau had paid a sum of money to the Petitioner's credit out of his own funds, though under no compliment to him whatever, and even forgot the subject for twenty-five years, or how much it amounted to, though in the intermediate time he had sold the registry for 900£. and given up all the documents to Mr. Robinson, without alluding to the Petitioner, and had himself been sued, after long indulgence, and ran to execution, and absented himself for a great length of time, for so small a sum as 32£. by Mr. Charles Lyons, the Petitioner's well-known agent, and during such process and distress, never mentioned to him any demand upon the Petitioner in either case; that the Petitioner has, since he saw the Minutes of the Evidence before the Select Committee, which was not until the 15th day of March last, procured evidence to explain and show that what was then considered as relating to these charges, were exclusively private transactions, and which he will be able to prove before the House; and the Petitioner saith he has oral testimony also to bring forward, not hitherto produced, to account for all his public conduct, and to remove all imputations of corrupt malversation, or any dishonest act; and the Petitioner saith, that he perceives, on reading over his printed examination before the Select Committee, that there are numerous inaccuracies, and from the confused and unaided manner of his examination, inconsistencies apparent therein, which he seeks an open opportunity to amend or explain; and the Petitioner saith, that on Thursday last he was attended by his physicians, and had certificates from them of his total incapacity to attend to any business, and that they attended the House to be examined to that effect, but were not called in; and the Petitioner saith, that the two cases of "the Nancy" and "the Redstrand derelict"

being the only ones made the medium of charges by Mr.Pineau, it does appear that several official papers, which Pineau had previously declined furnishing copies of to the Petitioner, was produced by him before the Select Committee, but which, on the Rule Books of the Court, the Petitioner had no deliberate opportunity of inspecting or collating, and particularly the Rule Books for 1810 to 1814, which the Petitioner has never yet seen and the Petitioner saith, that an inspection of these documents is essential to his defence, and to account for any irregularity of the proceedings or others in those causes; the Petitioner therefore humbly prays, That the evidence and proofs against him may be openly examined at the Bar of the House, and that he may be heard, and have the benefit of counsel to aid him in such investigation, to rebut and refute every kind of charge against him, and that the Petitioner and his counsel may be permitted to examine the original documents produced before the Committee, for the purpose of explaining the same, and also of the Rule Books for the year 1805 to 1815 inclusive, and that the Petitioner may have the testimony of such evidence as he may be legally advised, or as may be found necessary for his defence, and particularly that an opportunity may be afforded to the Petitioner to examine witnesses, and that he may have the same advantages of investigation which have heretofore been granted by the House to public officers whose public conduct has been questioned.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Petitions against Duty on Coals.

A Petition of Inhabitants of Newport and Bishops Tawton;-of Newton Abbott and Newton Bushell;-and, of Chudleigh,-were presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners being subject to a heavy and partial Duty on Coals and Culm, carried coastwise, are thereby grievously burthened, operating as they conceive this tax does most injuriously on the trade and agriculture of the west of England, being oppressive on the lower orders of society, and highly detrimental to the interests of the community at large; and praying, that the same may be repealed.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table; and to be printed.

Registrar at Madras Bill, deferred.

Ordered, That the Order of the day, for the second reading of the Bill for the Relief of the Representatives of Persons who have died intestate in the Presidency of Madras in the East Indies, and for the Relief of the Suitors of the Supreme Court of Judicature at Madras aforesaid, be now read; and the same being read;

Ordered, That the Bill be read a second time upon Friday the 21st day of this instant May.

Ordered, That the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies be heard by their counsel upon the second reading of the said Bill.

Address respecting New Churches.

Resolved, That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, that He will be graciously pleased to give directions, that there be laid before this House, a List of the number of applications made to the Commissioners under the Church Building Act, for the building of any Chapels, under the third section of the Act 7 & 8 Geo. 4, c. 72; and also, of the instances in which any such applications have been acceded to.

Ordered, That the said Address be presented to His Majesty by such Members of this House as are of His Majesty's most honourable Privy Council.

Petition for a National Cemetery.

A Petition of George Frederick Carden, of the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, Barrister at Law, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioner, in the year 1824, proposed a plan for an extensive Burial Ground similar to that of the celebrated Cemetery of Père la Chaise, one of the four places of interment of the city of Paris; that the Petitioner, being desirous of bringing about his plan as a measure of public utility, zealously exerted himself in obtaining the most correct information upon the subject of the provision made in London for the interment of the dead; that the Petitioner has calculated, and firmly believes, that the number of interments annually in the metropolis is not less than forty thousand; that the Petitioner found the state and condition of the parochial places of sepulture offensive to public decency and dangerous to the public health, and recommending the building of a National Cemetery; stating the particulars of his plan; and praying, that the House will take the subject into their consideration, and that a Committee may be appointed to inquire into the evils of the present system of interment within this metropolis, and the plan now proposed by the Petitioner, for providing a remedy for the same.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Committee on Manufacturing Employment, appointed.

Ordered, That a Select Committee be appointed to consider the means of lessening the evils arising from the fluctuation of Employment in Manufacturing Districts, and to report their observations thereupon to the House:- And a Committee was appointed of Mr. Slaney, Sir Robert Peel, Mr. Wilmot Horton, Mr. Courtenay, Lord Viscount Althorp, Mr. Bingham Baring, Mr. Sturges Bourne, Mr. William Marshall, Mr. Dugdale, Sir John Wrottesley, Mr. Warburton, Mr. Guest, Lord Stanley, Mr. John Wood, Mr. William Smith, Mr. Fowell Buxton, Lord Viscount Clements: And they are to meet To-morrow in the Speaker's Chamber; and have Power to send for persons papers and records.

Ordered, That Five be the Quorum of the Committee.

Petition for repeal of Duty on Coals (Ireland.)

A Petition of Merchants, Manufacturers, Traders, Householders and other Inhabitants of the parish of Saint Mary, in the city of Dublin, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners are greatly aggrieved by the existing Duty on the importation of Coals into Ireland; and praying, That all Duties, whether local or general, on the importation of that article into Ireland may be forthwith repealed.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table.

Motion respecting Coal Duties (Ireland.)

The House was moved, That the Act 40 Geo. 3, c. 4, (Irish S.) for granting for one year the several Duties therein mentioned, in lieu of all other Duties payable upon the articles therein specified, during the said term; and for regulating the Trade between this Kingdom and his Majesty's Colonies, and for other purposes therein mentioned, might be read; and the same was read. The House was also moved, That the Act 41 Geo. 3, c. 33, for repealing certain Duties upon Tea imported into Ireland, and for granting other Duties in lieu thereof; and for granting additional Duties on Sugar and Coals imported into Ireland, might be read; and the same being read;

A Motion was made, and the Question being put, That the House do resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider the said Acts, with a view to a repeal of the Duties now payable on the importation of Coals into Ireland;

The House divided.
The Yeas went forth.
Tellers for the Yeas, Mr. Spring Rice, 120.
Mr. Warburton:
Tellers for the Noes, Mr. Planta, 182.
Mr. Frankland Lewis:

So it passed in the Negative.

And the House, having continued to sit till after twelve of the clock on Friday morning;

Veneris, 14 die Maii, 1830:

Committee on Hackney Coach Office appointed.

Ordered, That a Select Committee be appointed to inquire into the Duties, Salaries and Emoluments of the Commissioners for regulating Hackney Coaches within the Bills of Mortality, and the several Officers under their control; the present state of Public Carriages within the said Bills of Mortality, and the Laws affecting the same; and to report their observations thereupon, together with the Minutes of the Evidence taken before them, to the House:-And a Committee was appointed of Sir John Wrottesley, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer, Lord John Russell, Mr. Poulett Thomson, Mr. George Dawson, Mr. Denison, Sir Robert Wilson, Sir Edward Knatchbull, Mr. Alderman Thompson, Mr. Hobhouse, Mr. Charles Wood, Mr. William Peel, Mr. Nicolson Calvert, Mr. Bramston, Mr. Hume, Sir Thomas Fremantle, Mr. Robert Gordon, Mr. Ridley Colborne, Mr. Lamb, Lord Viscount Lowther, Mr. Warburton, Mr. Samuel Whitbread, Lord Viscount Howick, Mr. Maberly: And they are to meet To-morrow, in the Speaker's Chamber; and have Power to send for persons papers and records.

Ordered, That Five be the Quorum of the Committee.

Half-Pay Apprentices Bill, ordered.

Ordered, That leave be given to bring in a Bill to prevent the taking and employment of Apprentices usually denominated Half-pay Apprentices: And that Mr. Fyler and Mr. Edensor Heathcote do prepare, and bring it in.

Returns respecting Land Revenue, ordered.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House, a Return of the amount of Fees received during the last Seven years in the Office of His Majesty's Auditor of Crown Property; distinguishing the amount received in each year; the scale of charge; and how applied.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House, a Return of the amount of Fees received during the last Seven years in the Office of His Majesty's Surveyor General of the Land Revenue; distinguishing the amount received in each year; the scale of charges; and how applied.

Sale of Beer Bill, deferred.

The Order of the day being read, for the House to resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, upon the Bill to permit the general Sale of Beer by Retail in England;

Resolved, That this House will, upon Monday next, resolve itself into the said Committee.

Embankments (Ireland) Bill, deferred.

The Order of the day being read, for the House to resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, upon the Bill for making and preserving Embankments on the sides of Rivers in Ireland;

Resolved, That this House will, upon Thursday next, resolve itself into the said Committee.

Usury Laws Bill, deferred.

The Order of the day being read, for taking into further consideration the Report from the Committee of the whole House, on the Bill to alter several Acts relating to Contracts for the Loan of Money at Interest;

Ordered, That the Report be taken into further consideration this day.

Report of Galway Franchise Bill, deferred.

The Order of the day being read, for receiving the Report from the Committee of the whole House, on the Bill to repeal so much of an Act passed in Ireland, in the fourth year of the reign of King George the First, for the better regulating the Town of Galway, and for strengthening the Protestant Interest therein, as limits the Franchise created by the said Act to Protestants only;

Ordered, That the Report be received this day.

Ordered, That James Hardiman Burke, Esquire, the Mayor of Galway, be heard by his counsel on the Report of the said Bill.

Australian Company Bill, reported.

Mr. Hume reported from the Committee of the whole House, on the Bill to amend an Act for granting certain powers and authorities to a Company to be incorporated by Charter, to be called The Australian Agricultural Company, for the cultivation and improvement of the waste lands in the Colony of New South Wales, and for other purposes relating thereto, the Amendments which they had made to the Bill; and the Amendments were read, and agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed; and read the third time this day.

Labouring Poor Bill, reported. No. 304.

Lord Nugent reported from the Committee on the Bill to promote the Employment of the Labouring Poor by free hiring at fair and adequate Wages; That they had examined the allegations of the Bill, and found the same to be true; and had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereunto; and the Report was brought up, and read.

Ordered, That the Report be taken into further consideration upon Monday next.

Ordered, That the Bill, as amended, be printed.

Marshall's Estate Bill, read.

An ingrossed Bill from the Lords, intituled, An Act to enable the Trustees under the Marriage Settlement of Bourchier Marshall, Clerk, deceased, and Elizabeth his Wife, also deceased, to effect a Sale of the Advowson of the Church of Bow, otherwise Nymet Tracey, in the County of Devon, was read the first time; and ordered to be read a second time.

Shakerley's Divorce Bill, read.

An ingrossed Bill from the Lords, intituled, An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Charles Peter Shakerley, Esquire, of the Parish of Egham, in the County of Surrey, with Laure Angelique Rosalbe Shakerley, his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again, and for other purposes therein mentioned, was read the first time; and ordered to be read a second time.

Report of Waterford Roads Bill, considered.

The House proceeded to take into further consideration the Report from the Committee on the Bill for more effectually repairing several Roads leading from the Bounds of the County of Cork to the City of Waterford; and the Amendments made by the Committee to the Bill being read a second time, were agreed to the House.

Ordered, That the Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Return respecting Artillery, Sappers and Miners, ordered.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House, a Return of the number of each Class of Non-Commissioned Officers and Privates of the Artillery, Sappers and Miners, and others belonging to, and pensioned by, the Ordnance Department; stating the rate of Pension of each Class, the aggregate amount of their Pensions in 1829, and the amount of charge for paying the same, and by whom such expense is paid.

And then the House, having continued to sit till near one of the clock on Friday morning, adjourned till this day.