BHO

House of Commons Journal Volume 85: 21 June 1830

Pages 569-576

Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 85, 1830. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, [n.d.].

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In this section

Lunæ, 21 die Junii; Anno 11° Georgii IV ti Regis, 1830.

Prayers.

Ireland-Returns, &c. presented: Freeholders. No. 556.

The House being informed that Mr. Johnson, from the Office of the Chief Secretary for Ireland, attended at the door, he was called in; and at the bar presented to the House, pursuant to their Orders,-A Return of the number of Freeholders who stood registered and qualified to vote, in each county in Ireland, on 1st January 1829 and 1st January 1830; distinguishing, in each County, the number registered in each case at each rate.

Printing and Stationery. No. 567.

A detailed Account of the nine items contained in an Estimate of the Charge of Printing, Stationery, and other Disbursements of the Chief and Under Secretaries' Offices and Apartments, and other Public Offices, in Dublin Castle, &c.; and also, for Riding Charges and other Expenses of the Deputy Pursuivants and Messengers attending the said Offices; also, Superannuation Allowances in the Chief Secretary's Office, from 5th January 1830 to 5th January 1831:-And then he withdrew.

Ordered, That the said Return and Account do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Returns from Court of Chancery, presented. No. 557.

The House being informed that Mr. Bird, from the Register Office of the Court of Chancery, attended at the door, he was called in; and at the bar presented to the House, pursuant to their Orders,-Return of the number of Re-hearings and Appeals, Pleas and Demurrers, Causes and Exceptions, and Further Directions, standing for hearing before the Lord Chancellor and the Vice-Chancellor on the last day of Sittings after each Term, from Easter Term 1826 to Easter Term 1830 inclusive.

Return of the number of Re-hearings, Causes and Exceptions, and Further Directions, standing for hearing before the Master of the Rolls on the last day of Sittings after each Term, from Easter Term 1826 to Easter Term 1830 inclusive:-And then he withdrew.

Ordered, That the said Returns do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Accounts, &c presented: Londonderry Corporation. No. 558.

The House being informed that Mr. Crafer, from the Treasury, attended at the door, he was called in; and at the bar presented to the House, pursuant to their Orders, -An Account of all Sums advanced from the Consolidated Fund of Ireland to the Corporation of Londonderry, for the purpose of repairing the Bridge, and putting the same into a complete state of repair in and since 1814; stating the date and conditions on which the same was advanced, the dates of re-payment of the same, and the balance now remaining due by the Corporation.

Hemp. No. 559.

An Account of the total quantities of Hemp imported during each of the last five years, the rates of Duty on such Hemp, and the total annual produce of the Duties; specifying the countries whence the Hemp was imported, and the quantities brought from each.

Cheese, Butter and Eggs. No. 560.

An Account of the quantity of Cheese, Butter and Eggs imported during each of the last seven years, the rates of Duty on each, the total annual produce of such Duties, the Countries whence the Butter, Cheese and Eggs were imported; specifying the quantities brought from each.

Pensions. No. 561.

Return to an Order of the House, dated the 8th day of this instant June, for an Account, showing the amount of Payments made on account of the Salaries and Pensions created by the Act 6 Geo. 4, c. 88, in the years ending 5th April 1829 and 5th April 1830 respectively; specifying the nature of the Instruments under which such Payments were made, and the Funds from which they were provided.

Mr. Alexander. No. 562.

An Account, in detail, of the Expenses incurred in the several Prosecutions for Libel on the part of His Majesty's Attorney General against Mr. Alexander; stating the number of Counsel engaged in each Prosecution, and the separate expense of each Prosecution.

Pamphlet Duty Prosecutions. No. 563.

An Account of all Law Expenses incurred for all the Prosecutions against Printers, Publishers and Booksellers in 1829 and 1830, under that Clause of the present Stamp Act which relates to the entering of Books, Pamphlets, &c. at the Pamphlet Duty department of the Stamp Office; stating the amount in each case, and whether paid in whole or in part, and how much, by the Persons against whom the Prosecutions were instituted, or by the Stamp Department, in those years.

Land Tax. No. 564.

Mr. Crafer also presented to the House, pursuant to the directions of an Act of Parliament,-A Statement of the Expenses incurred under the Acts for the Redemption and Sale of the Land Tax, and for discharging the incidental Expenses attending the execution of those Acts, from the 5th April 1829 (the period to which the last Account was made up) to the 5th April 1830:-And then he withdrew.

Ordered, That the said Accounts and Papers do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Benson's Estate Bill, passed, with Amendments.

An ingrossed Bill from the Lords, intituled, An Act for vesting an Estate at Liverpool, in the County of Lancaster, devised and settled by the Will of Moses Benson, Esquire, deceased, in Trustees, to be sold; and for laying out the Monies arising from such Sale in the purchase of Estates, to be settled to the same uses, was read the third time.

Resolved, That the Bill, with the Amendments, do pass.

Ordered, That Mr. Charles Pallmer do carry the Bill to the Lords; and acquaint them, that this House hath agreed to the same, with some Amendments; to which Amendments this House doth desire the concurrence of their Lordships.

Holyhead Roads Bill, reported.

Sir John Wrottesley reported from the Committee on the Bill to alter and amend several Acts for the improvement of the Roads from London to Holyhead, and from London to Liverpool, and for the further improvement of the said Roads; That they had examined the allegations of the Bill, and found the same to be true; and had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereunto; and the Report was brought up, and read.

re-committed.

And the House being informed that other Amendments are necessary to be made to the Bill:-The Bill was recommitted to a Committee of the whole House for Monday next.

Petition against Duty on Rum.

A Petition of West India Planters and Merchants, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners have heard with feelings of astonishment and regret, that, by a Resolution of the House, an additional Duty of 6d. per gallon is proposed to be levied upon Rum; and praying, That, before any increase of Duty be made in the article of Rum, the pledge of His Majesty's Ministers for inquiry into the situation of the Petitioners, as to the comparative Duties of British and Colonial Spirits, may be redeemed, and that labouring, as the West India colonies are, under a state of unparalleled distress, the House will not adopt a measure so calculated to hasten the ruin of the Petitioners as an increase of taxation upon any article of West India produce.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Petitions against Assimilation of Stamp Duties (Ireland.)

A Petition of Inhabitants of Carrigeen, in the county of Kilkenny;-of Moncoin, in the county of Kilkenny;- of the barony of West Carbery, and of the town of Skibbereen, in the county of Cork;-of Clonagowes, district of Rahana, in the county of Carlow;-and, of Proprietors, Landholders, and Individuals in Trade, of the Union of Midleton, in the diocese of Cloyne, and county of Cork, -were presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners have heard with sincere regret, mingled with surprise, the perseverance of His Majesty's Ministers in inflicting on that already over-burthened and impoverished country taxes of an oppressive and ruinous nature; that the Petitioners conceive such intention of His Majesty's Ministers as unjust and impolitic, and that the assimilation of taxation with England appears to them partial and oppressive, and fraught with danger to the well-being of Ireland; and praying the House not to sanction the imposition of any new taxes upon Ireland.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table; and, except the two first, to be printed.

Petitions against increase of Duties on Spirits and Stamps (Ireland.)

A Petition of Gentlemen inhabiting the barony of Lower Connelloe East, in the county of Limerick;-of the town and parish of Askeaton, in the county of Limerick;-of the barony of Kenry, in the county of Limerick;-of Saint John's Parish, in the city of Limerick;-of Noblemen, Gentlemen, Clergy, Freeholders and Landholders in the county of Meath;-and, of Landholders, inhabitants of the parish of Kilconly, in the county of Galway,-were presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners cannot but consider with alarm the intention of His Majesty's Government to impose an additional taxation on Spirits and Stamps in Ireland to a corresponding amount in England, as if the circumstances of both countries could be weighed in the same scale, or Ireland had all at once attained to that exalted pitch of sudden prosperity diffused among her commercial, agricultural and manufacturing interests, as might afford a plausible pretext for the introduction of such a measure; and praying the House not to inflict on that already too unhappy country so direful a calamity as the imposition of Duties so unjust in principle and ruinous in effects.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table; and that the two last be printed.

Petitions against Duties on Stamps, &c. (Ireland.)

A Petition of Inhabitants of Cove, and of the Great Island, in the county of Cork;-and, of Noblemen, Gentry, Clergy, Freeholders and Landholders of the county of Kildare,-were presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners observe with the utmost alarm the declared intention of the Chancellor of the Exchequer to persevere in inflicting new and additional taxes on that wretched and impoverished country at the very moment that a reduction of taxes to a great amount has taken place in England-England, where industry and trade flourish, and are fostered by a resident and rich aristocracy, while the humble and limited commerce of Ireland receives additional pressure by the expenditure of her absentees in other countries, and sad experience has proved that she is already taxed beyond her means; and praying the House not to give their sanction to an increase of the Stamp Duties, which would extinguish that source of useful knowledge, that guardian of their rights and interests, the Irish Press, nor to sanction an alteration in the scale of Spirit Duties, to the ruin of their agriculture, much less to allow such a rate of Duty to be imposed on Irish-grown Tobacco as will deprive that country of the benefit of her soil and climate to the advantage of the American cultivator.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table; and to be printed.

Power to Committee on Tobacco cultivation.

Ordered, That the Select Committee appointed to consider the Laws which relate to the growth and cultivation of Tobacco within the several parts of the United Kingdom, and to report their observations and opinion thereupon to the House; and to whom several Petitions on the subject were referred, have power to report the Minutes of the Evidence taken before them.

Report. No. 565.

Sir Henry Parnell accordingly reported from the said Committee, That they had considered the matters referred to them, and had come to several Resolutions, which they had directed him to report to the House; together with the Minutes of the Evidence taken before them; and the Report was brought up, and read; and the Resolutions of the Committee are as followeth;

1. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that by the Statute 12 Car. 2, c. 31, the cultivation of Tobacco was prohibited in Great Britain and Ireland; that by the 19 Geo. 3, c. 35 (British Act) this prohibition was repealed with regard to Ireland, and Tobacco grown in Ireland was allowed to be imported into Great Britain under the same regulations as Plantation Tobacco.

2. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that from the year 1779 to about the year 1824 no advantage appears to have been taken in Ireland of the permission to grow Tobacco for home consumption; at that period, the trade with Great Britain having recently become a coasting trade, the cultivation appears to have first attracted notice; in the year 1829, five hundred Irish acres are said to have been applied to the growth of Tobacco.

3. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that it appears from the evidence, that the Tobacco at present raised in Ireland is, to a great degree, inferior to that of American growth, though a hope is entertained by the cultivators that its quality might be hereafter improved; and that from this inferiority, and from the disadvantages attending the cultivation of Tobacco, arising from the humidity and uncertainty of the climate, the proposed Duty of 1 s. 8d. on the pound would be a higher Duty than it could afford to pay in competition with the Customs' Duty of 3 s. on the pound on Foreign Tobacco.

4. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that to levy a high Excise Duty upon Tobacco grown in the United Kingdom would be attended with a very great expense, and necessarily create a large increase of the Excise Establishment; that even under the strictest regulations and the most unremitting vigilance the greatest fraud and abuse would be likely to prevail, from the great temptation to smuggling created by high import Duty, and the facility of evading any Excise law which could be enacted; whereby the amount of revenue which would be derived from such an Excise Duty would fall very far short of making good the loss of revenue on Foreign Tobacco, and, consequently, that a necessity would arise of imposing new taxes to make good the deficiency.

5. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that heavy Duties of Customs have been imposed upon the importation of Foreign Tobacco, upon which a much higher rate ad valorem is now levied than upon any other imported commodity.

6. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that upon all Foreign Tobacco manufactured in Great Britain and Ireland a drawback is allowed, estimated to be equal in amount to the Duty which has been paid upon it; that if a lower rate of Duty should be imposed upon Home-grown Tobacco, the drawback upon its exportation in a manufactured state should be apportioned to the reduced Duty, this could only be done as to such articles as were made of Home-grown Tobacco only: as to all Snuff and Tobacco manufactured, in which the Foreign and Home-grown were mixed, as no means could be devised of ascertaining their respective proportions, it must happen either that the trader must be injured, or the revenue defrauded, in the amount of drawback actually allowed.

7. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, That the Act of Union having placed each part of the United Kingdom on an equal footing as to all matters of trade, if the cultivation of Tobacco be continued in Ireland, it must be allowed in Great Britain, and in that event it appears to be probable that the cultivation would be extensively introduced in the southern counties of England.

8. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that as the value of all the Tobacco (exclusive of any portion which may be smuggled) annually consumed in the United Kingdom does not exceed three hundred and fifty thousand pounds, there does not seem to be any foundation for the opinion, that a considerable public benefit would be derived from allowing the cultivation of Tobacco in the United Kingdom: That the large profit which has hitherto attended the growing Tobacco in Ireland, and the employment which it has afforded to a part of the labouring population, have been the result of its being free of Duty; that these advantages, if continued in their present degree, must speedily produce the sacrifice of a considerable part of the revenue now derived from Foreign Tobacco, amounting to Two million eight hundred thousand pounds a year; that, on the other hand, the cultivation of Tobacco in Ireland would cease altogether without a high bounty, were Foreign Tobacco untaxed, or, (what comes to the same thing,) without a very large discriminating Duty, so long as the supply from abroad shall continue to be taxed for the purpose of revenue; that therefore it does not appear to be advisable to divert labour and capital from other branches of industry, more especially when the required protection to be thus afforded cannot be attained without the sacrifice of a very considerable amount of public revenue.

9. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that it further appears from the evidence, that smuggling of Foreign Tobacco is at present carried on to a great extent; and that all the measures now adopted, at great expense to the country, are and will be ineffectual to repress it, so long as the temptation of evading a Duty equal to twelve times the value of the article on which it is imposed, remains.

10. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that the reduction of the present Duty, whenever the circumstances of the country will admit it, will be the most effectual remedy to preserve the revenue from fraud; and that a reduction to such a rate as would be effectual to that object, would necessarily be regarded by the home grower of Tobacco as being destructive of his interests, and as no longer affording sufficient protection to the cultivation of that plant: That this consequence of allowing the home cultivation of Tobacco forms a very strong objection, in addition to those already suggested.

11. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, upon a full consideration of the case, that it is expedient to extend to Ireland the prohibition of growing Tobacco, which has so long existed in England and Scotland; and that the prohibition should take place from the 1st January 1831.

Ordered, That the Report do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Lords' Message, considered.

The House proceeded to take into consideration that part of the Message from the Lords of Monday last, wherein their Lordships request that this House will give leave to Sir Marcus Somerville, Baronet, a Member of this House, to attend their Lordships, in order to his being examined as a Witness before the Lords' Committees for Privileges, to whom the Petition of Viscount Boyne, claiming a right to vote at the Elections of Peers for Ireland to sit in the Parliament of the United Kingdom, stands referred.

And Sir Marcus Somerville being present, stood up in his place, and declared that he was willing, with the leave of the House, to go to the House of Lords, as is desired by their Lordships in their said Message.

Resolved, That Sir Marcus Somerville, Baronet, have leave to go to the House of Lords, as is desired by their Lordships in their said Message, if he think fit.

Ordered, That a Message be sent to the Lords to acquaint them, that this House hath given leave to Sir Marcus Somerville, Baronet, to go to the House of Lords, as is desired by their Lordships in their Message of Monday last, if he think fit; and that Sir Alexander Grant do carry the said Message.

Petitions in favour of Northern Roads Bill.

A Petition of James B. Scott, Senior Magistrate of the Four Incorporations of Leith;-of the Incorporation of Traffickers, or Merchant Company of Leith;-of the Chamber of Commerce and Manufactures of the city of Edinburgh;-and, of Noblemen, Freeholders, Justices of the Peace, and Commissioners of Supply for the county of Mid Lothian,-were presented, and read; taking notice of the Bill for the improvement of the Roads from London to Edinburgh, and from London to Portpatrick; and for the further improvement of the Roads from London to Holyhead, and from London to Liverpool; and praying, That the same may pass into a law.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table.

Petition against Duties on Coals.

A Petition of Inhabitants of the city of Bristol, was presented, and read; setting forth, That a comparatively high price is maintained for Coal in Bristol and its neighbourhood, from the want of a sufficient competition in water-borne Coal, inasmuch as there are numerous districts on the line of the River Severn, abounding with rich mines of Coal, which can be raised and brought to market on very moderate terms, but on which, with the exception of that imported from Newport, the coastwise Duties operate as a prohibition, by reason whereof the Newport Coal Masters enjoy a monopoly of supply, and obtain from the public a price equivalent to this Duty from the payment of which they are so exempt; and praying the House to inquire into and consider the partial and injurious operation of the Coastwise Duty on Coal, as it affects the consumers of the city of Bristol and its neighbourhood, to the end that such alterations may be made, and such relief afforded, as to the House may seem meet.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Petition against hawking Meat.

A Petition of Butchers resident in the city of Bristol, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners are established as Butchers, and bear those public burthens, and pay those rates, which men settled in business are obliged to bear and to pay; that the object of the Petitioners presenting themselves before the House on the present occasion is, to entreat the protection of the House against the injurious traffic of a body of men who hawk meat from house to house in that city, and who bear no proportionate share of those public burthens to which the Petitioners have just alluded; that these are times, according to the humble opinion of the Petitioners, in which the trading interest, considering the overwhelming taxation, high rents, and oppressive poor rates, require more than usual protection; and without wishing to interfere with, or detract from, the system of free trade which some advocate, they merely respectfully stand forward to claim that protection which may enable them to meet those local and other demands which are exacted with so much punctuality and rigour.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table.

Petition respecting Grand Juries (Ireland.)

A Petition of Gerald Dillon, of Moate, in the county of Westmeath, Esquire, was presented, and read; complaining of the partial conduct of the Grand Jury of the county of Westmeath against him; stating the particulars of his case; and praying the House to take the same into their consideration, and either to abolish Grand Juries in Ireland altogether, and leave their duties to be done in the face of the public in open court, or, if the House do not feel disposed to go such lengths, to repeal so much of the powers as are given Grand Juries with respect to presentments generally, by having the same discussed before and under the direction of the going Judge of Assize, and a Jury of twelve men, sworn in the usual manner, to abide by the evidence adduced before them.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table.

Petitions for repeal of Union with Ireland.

A Petition of Freeholders, Householders, and other Inhabitants of the parish Bunratty;-of Kilshanny;-of Kilfinaghty;-of Kilconry and Newmarket-on-Fergus, in the county of Clare;-and, of Annadown, in the county of Galway,-were presented, and read; praying, That not a partial, but a total repeal of the Act of Union may take place, and that their Parliament, of which Ireland has been unjustly deprived, may be restored to the Petitioners' country.

And the said Petitions were ordered to lie upon the Table; and that the last be printed.

Petition for Election by Ballot.

A Petition of Inhabitants of London and Westminster, and the borough of Southwark, Members of the Metropolitan Political Union, was presented, and read; praying, That the House will take such measures as shall, from time to time, seem meet for establishing the practice of voting by ballot in the elections of members to serve in Parliament.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Petition for expediting Strand Improvements.

A Petition of Inhabitant Householders of the city of Westminster, residing in the vicinity of the improvements of Charing Cross and the Strand, west of Southamptonstreet, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners beg respectfully to approach the House, and present a statement of the grievances under which they are suffering, with the confident conviction that the House will grant them that relief which the nature of their case requires; that they are not only labouring under the general depression of trade and commerce which unfortunately presses on the country at large, but that much of their distress arises from local circumstances connected with the improvements which are going on in their neighbourhood; that they are paying heavy rent and taxes for the occupation of their houses, while the neighbourhood, from which they have hitherto derived their support, is removed from them, and that, in consequence, the Petitioners entertain the most fearful apprehensions as to the result; that they are aware, that those persons who had houses, the sites of which were wanted for public improvements, were remunerated by the Commissioners of Woods and Forests; that the Petitioners conceive, that the House will see they are without such advantage, and without a neighbourhood from which they can derive a subsistence for themselves and families, while their burthens press most grievous on them; that the Petitioners, in consequence of the projected improvements, are not now, in many instances, doing even a tenth part of the business they were accustomed to do previous to the commencement of these contemplated improvements; that they respectfully submit, that their case is extremely hard, and is one that deserves the sympathy and attention of the House; that the Petitioners respectfully submit that some remedy should be afforded them for the severe losses that they are now and have been sustaining in consequence of these improvements; that the Petitioners respectfully submit, while the Act of Parliament, under the authority of which the Commissioners of Woods and Forests act, provides an indemnification to those whose houses are required for these improvements, it ought in fairness to have extended to those who have been deprived of their business by the removal of the neighbourhood, and the very great length of time the operations of the Act have been carrying into effect, as upwards of four years have elapsed without even plans being arranged for the erection of the new buildings, a delay, the Petitioners presume, the House never could have contemplated; that by the Acts of Parliament, under the authority of which the Commissioners of Woods and Forests act, they have no power to grant any relief to the Petitioners; that, while they cannot but view with pleasure the vast and beautiful improvements that are making, they humbly conceive that these improvements might have been carried on with much less inconvenience and loss to them; that the Petitioners beg to state to the House, that the free passage of many streets and public ways are obstructed by the removal of the old, and will be by the re-building of new houses, much longer than necessity required, and that the dilapidated state of the neighbourhood in consequence, is highly destructive to the interests of the Petitioners; that they beg respectfully to submit to the House, where any improvements are necessary, that such improvements should be made and finished with greater expedition than has been used in their case; the Petitioners therefore humbly pray, That the House will take their case into serious consideration, and grant them some remedy for the severe grievances they are sustaining, or grant such other relief as the House may deem necessary.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Petition for equalization of Duties on Sugar.

A Petition of David Gladstone, Chairman of the Liverpool East India Association, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the said Association consider they have just reason to feel the utmost alarm for the consequences likely to arise to the trade with India, from the proposed alterations in the Duty on Sugar now under the consideration of Parliament, for while a considerable reduction is proposed to be made in the Duty on the lower qualities of West India, no reduction whatever is proposed to be made on East India, thus placing the latter relatively in a much worse position than before; and praying, That the House, in making any reduction of the Duty on West India Sugar, will be pleased to make a corresponding reduction in the Duty on East India (without which, if the alterations proposed are made, the said Association contemplate nothing less than a total annihilation of that branch of the East India Trade), or that, instead of the proposed alterations, an ad valorem Duty may be imposed on Sugar the produce of all the British possessions, being a tax in principle the most equitable, and which would at the same time greatly conduce to a general increase in the consumption.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table; and be printed.

Rye Harbour Bill, committed.

A Bill to amend an Act passed in the 41st year of his late Majesty King George the Third, intituled, "An Act for more effectually improving and maintaining the old Harbour of Rye, in the County of Sussex," and to appoint new Commissioners, and to enable the Commissioners to raise additional Funds on the Tolls by way of Mortgage or otherwise, was read a second time; and committed to Sir George Cockburn, &c.: And they are to meet this Afternoon, in the Speaker's Chamber.

Buckle's Estate Bill, committed.

An ingrossed Bill from the Lords, intituled, An Act to enable John Buckle, Esquire, or other Committee of the Estate of William Buckle, a Lunatic, for and in the name and on behalf of the said William Buckle, to consent to the exercise of a Power of Sale over Estates settled on the said William Buckle for his life, and which Power is exercisable with the consent of the said William Buckle, was read a second time; and committed to Mr. Curteis, &c.: And they are to meet this Afternoon, in the Speaker's Chamber.

Accounts of Spirits, ordered.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House, an Account of the total number of proof gallons of Spirits made from Malt only by every Distiller in Ireland and Scotland (specifying the entered Firm and Name of the several Distilleries, and the Collections in which they are severally situated) on which the Drawback of 1 s. to the 5th January 1826, and of 1s. 2d. thereafter, has been allowed, paid, or can be claimed; the total bushels of Malt used by each Distiller in making the same; and showing how much the same was under or over the statutory proportion of two gallons of proof Spirits from every bushel of Malt, with the amount of charge on each Distiller (distinguishing the rate of Duty, and number of bushels on each) for the Malt used being deficient of the required proportion of one bushel for every two gallons of proof Spirits, by each Distiller, all upon the average working, for the years ending 10th October 1826 and 10th October 1827 respectively, and likewise for the half year ending 5th April 1828.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House, an Account of the total number of gallons of Wash distilled by each of the Distillers in Great Britain and Ireland (specifying the entered Firm and Name of the Distilleries respectively, and the Collections in which they are severally situated), exhibiting the total number of degrees of gravity contained in such Wash, according to the noticed gravity thereof, with the total number of degrees actually attenuated at each work; the total proof gallons of Spirits chargeable in respect of the quantity and noticed gravity of the Wash, being a gallon for every five degrees; the proof gallons of Spirits chargeable in respect of the attenuation of the Wash, being a gallon for every five degrees the proof gallons of Spirits actually produced, and what was the produce of proof Spirits for every five degrees of attenuation, and what that produce was, under or over, in proof Spirits; the legal proportions of the noticed gravity for every one hundred gallons of Wash distilled by each Distiller, all upon the workings, for the years ending 10th October 1826 and 10th October 1827 respectively, and for the half year ending 5th April 1828.

Labourers Wages Bill, deferred.

Ordered, That the Order of the day, for taking into further consideration the Report from the Committee of the whole House, on the Bill to amend and render more effectual the Provisions of divers Acts for securing to certain Artificers, Workmen and Labourers, in such Acts mentioned, the due Payment of their Wages in Money, be now read; and the same being read;

Ordered, That the Report be taken into further consideration upon Wednesday next.

The Lords have agreed to

A Message from the Lords, by Mr. Stratford and Mr. Harvey:

Mr. Speaker,

The Lords have agreed to the several Bills following, without any Amendment; viz.

Consolidated Fund (£. 4,000,000.) Bill.

A Bill, intituled, An Act to apply a certain sum of Money out of the Consolidated Fund to the Service of the year One thousand eight hundred and thirty:

Beverley and Molescroft Roads Bill.

A Bill, intituled, An Act for repairing and otherwise improving the Road from Beverley, by Molescroft, to Kendell House, and the Road from Molescroft to Bainton Balk, in the County of York:-And then the Messengers withdrew.

Petition for exemption from Office of Churchwarden.

A Petition of Members of the Presbyterian Congregation of Fethard, in the county of Tipperary, was presented, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners, being Presbyterians, feel it an oppressive grievance to be liable to be compelled to discharge the duties of Churchwarden or Wardens in an Episcopal church, from whose discipline they, on principle, dissent; that some of their brethren, notwithstanding their strong conscientious objections, have already been under the necessity of acting in that capacity in the church by law established in that country; that the Petitioners, while they pay without compulsion their own respective portions of the cess annually levied in aid of the establishment, deem it totally inconsistent with the mild and tolerant spirit of the Christian religion, to be made instruments in exacting from Roman Catholics and other Dissenters a tax for the support of a church in which they have no immediate or personal concern, and the more so, as the payment of it is now usually resisted by a great proportion of the landholders until enforced by some law processes; and praying, That the House may, at as early an opportunity as possible, take into consideration the grievance of which they complain, and make such an amendment in the Act of 7 Geo. 4, c. 72, commonly called the Vestry Act, as will relieve them, and all others who have conscientious scruples, from being liable to be appointed Churchwarden or Wardens in the church of England and Ireland, and place them, in this respect, on a footing with their Roman Catholic brethren.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table.

Petition against Graziers' Steam Company (Ireland) Bill.

A Petition of Owners and Proprietors of the Nora Creina and City-of-Waterford Steam Vessels, sailing from Waterford to Bristol, was presented, and read; taking notice of the Bill for regulating and incorporating a Company in Ireland, to be called "The Irish Graziers' Steam Marine Company;" and praying, That the same may not pass into a law as it now stands.

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie upon the Table.

Committee of Ways and Means.

Ordered, That the Order of the day, for the House to resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider further of Ways and Means for raising the Supply granted to His Majesty, be now read; and the same being read:-The House resolved itself into the Committee.

(In the Committee.)

And the Question being again proposed, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that, towards raising the Supply granted to His Majesty, there shall be charged the following Duties upon Sugar imported into the United Kingdom; (that is to say)

Upon all Brown, or Muscovado, or Clayed Sugar, being the produce of, and imported from the British Possessions in America, or the Island of Mauritius, according to the average price of Brown or Muscovado Sugar, published in the manner directed by law: £. s. d.
If the value of such Sugar shall exceed such average price by more than One Shilling the cwt.
1 7 If such Sugar shall not exceed in value such average price by more than One Shilling the cwt. 1 5 6
If such Sugar shall be of less value than such average price by Two Shillings the cwt.
1 4 If such Sugar shall be of less value than such average price by Four Shillings the cwt. 1 2 6
If such Sugar shall be of less value than such average price by Five Shillings the cwt.
1 - Upon all Brown, Muscovado, or Clayed Sugar, the produce of, and imported from the British Possessions in the East Indies, the cwt. 1 17 Upon all other such Sugar, the produce of, or imported from any other places, the cwt. 3 3

Whereupon a Motion was made, and the Question being put, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that, towards raising the Supply granted to His Majesty, there shall be charged upon all Brown, or Muscovado, or Clayed Sugar, being the produce of, and imported from the British Possessions in America, or the Island of Mauritius, into the United Kingdom, the cwt. - - - £.1.;

The Committee divided.

Teller for the Yeas, Mr. Charles Grant - 144.

Teller for the Noes, Mr. George Dawson - 182.

Then the Original Question being again proposed;

An Amendment was proposed to be made to the Schedule (If such Sugar shall be less than such average price by Four Shillings the cwt. £.1. 2. 6.;)

To leave out "6d."

Question put, That "6d." stand part of the Schedule:- It passed in the Negative.

Another Amendment was proposed to be made thereunto: To leave out "Upon all Brown, Muscovado, or Clayed Sugar, the produce of, and imported from the British Possessions in the East Indies, the cwt. £.1. 17.; and insert the words,

"Upon all Brown, or Muscovado, or Clayed Sugar, the produce of, and imported from the British Possessions in the East Indies; viz. £. s. d.
If the value of such Sugar shall exceed such average price by more than One Shilling the cwt.
1 17 If such Sugar shall not exceed in value such average price by more than One Shilling the cwt. 1 15 6
If such Sugar shall be of less value than such average price by Two Shillings the cwt.
1 14 If such Sugar shall be of less value than such average price by Four Shillings the cwt. 1 12 If such Sugar shall be of less value than such average price by Five Shillings the cwt. 1 10 -"

instead thereof.

And the Question being put, That the words proposed to be left out stand part of the Schedule; it passed in the Negative.

And the Question being put, That the proposed words be there inserted; it was resolved in the Affirmative.

Then the main Question, so amended, being put;

The Committee divided.

Teller for the Yeas, Mr. George Dawson - 161.

Teller for the Noes, Mr. Poulett Thomson - 144.

Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Committee, that, towards raising the Supply granted to His Majesty, there shall be charged the following Duties upon Sugar imported into the United Kingdom; (that is to say)

Upon all Brown, or Muscovado, or Clayed Sugar, being the produce of, and imported from the British Possessions in America, or the Island of Mauritius, according to the average price of Brown or Muscovado Sugar, published in the manner directed by law; viz. £. s. d.
br/>If the value of such Sugar shall exceed such average price by more than One Shilling the cwt. 1 7 If such Sugar shall not exceed in value such average price by more than One Shilling the cwt. 1 5 6
If such Sugar shall be of less value than such average price by Two Shillings the cwt.
1 4 If such Sugar shall be of less value than such average price by Four Shillings the cwt. 1 2 If such Sugar shall be of less value than such average price by Five Shillings the cwt. 1 - Upon all Brown, or Muscovado, or Clayed Sugar, the produce of, and imported from the British Possessions in the East Indies; viz. If the value of such Sugar shall exceed such average price by more than One Shilling the cwt. 1 17 £. s. d.
If such Sugar shall not exceed in value such average price by more than One Shilling the cwt.
1 15 6
If such Sugar shall be of less value than such average price by Two Shillings the cwt.
1 14 If such Sugar shall be of less value than such average price by Four Shillings the cwt. 1 12 If such Sugar shall be of less value than such average price by Five Shillings the cwt. 1 10 Upon all other such Sugar, the produce of, or imported from any other places, the cwt. 3 3

Resolution to be reported.

And the House having continued to sit till after twelve of the clock on Tuesday morning;

Martis, 22° die Junii, 1830:

Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair; and Sir Alexander Grant reported from the Committee, That they had come to a Resolution, which they had directed him to report to the House.

Ordered, That the Report be received this day.

Sir Alexander Grant also acquainted the House, that he was directed by the Committee to move, That they may have leave to sit again.

Resolved, That this House will, To-morrow, again resolve itself into the said Committee.

The Lords have agreed to

A Message from the Lords, by Mr. Stratford and Mr. Harvey:

Mr. Speaker,

Fees Abolition Bill, with Amendments.

The Lords have agreed to the Bill, intituled, An Act to abolish all Fees and Stamp Duties chargeable on the renewal of all Appointments, Commissions, Grants, Pensions and Patents consequent on the demise of the Crown, with some Amendments; to which Amendments the Lords desire the concurrence of this House:-And then the Messengers withdrew.

Report on Sale of Beer Bill, considered.

Ordered, That the Order of the day, for taking into further consideration the Report from the Committee of the whole House, on the Bill to permit the general Sale of Beer by Retail in England, be now read; and the same being read:-The House proceeded to take the Report into further consideration; and the Amendments made by the Committee to the Bill, being read a second time, were agreed to by the House.

A Clause was offered to be added to the Bill, for prohabiting Persons licensed under the Act from Selling Beer to be consumed on the premises.