Examinations, 1733-1750: nos 161-180

Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766. Originally published by London Record Society, London, 1999.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:

'Examinations, 1733-1750: nos 161-180', in Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, ed. Tim Hitchcock, John Black( London, 1999), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp51-57 [accessed 22 July 2024].

'Examinations, 1733-1750: nos 161-180', in Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766. Edited by Tim Hitchcock, John Black( London, 1999), British History Online, accessed July 22, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp51-57.

"Examinations, 1733-1750: nos 161-180". Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766. Ed. Tim Hitchcock, John Black(London, 1999), , British History Online. Web. 22 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp51-57.

Examinations, 1733-1750: nos 161-180

161. [n.p.] Middlesex. Jane Scott, single woman, aged about 22 years, born at Stortford in Hertfordshire, upon oath says that about six years ago she, this examinant, became a servant hired by the year to one Captain Hogan at Chelsea in the said county of Middlesex, with whom she continued and served for the space of two years and received her full wages for the said time at the rate of 50s. for the first year, and £3 for the last year. And that soon after she quitted the said service this examinant was hired to one Joseph Batts of Chelsea aforesaid, where she also continued about two years and received her full wages of her said master for the said time, at the rate of £3, meat, drink, washing and lodging. And says that since she quitted the said Mr Batt's service [she] has not lived a year in any place, or done any act, to the best of her knowledge, to gain a settlement. The mark of Jane Scott. Sworn at Chelsea, 27 Dec. 1745, before me, Peter Elers. [See 162, 169].

162. [n.p.] The voluntary examination of Jane Scott, single woman, taken before me, Peter Elers esq. . . . Middlesex. This examinant on her oath says that she is pregnant of a bastard child or children, which was unlawfully begotten on her body by one George Adlam, who lives with one Mr Giles, a potter at Chelsea in the said county, and who had carnal knowledge of this examinant's body the first time on or about 28 Mar. last in the dwelling house of Robert Hopperton (where this examinant lived a hired servant), and several times after in the said house and other places. And this examinant says that the said George Adlam is the true father of the said bastard child or children (when born). And further saith not. The mark of Jane Scott. Sworn at Chelsea, 27 Dec. 1745, before me, Peter Elers. [See 161, 169].

163. [n.p.] Middlesex. James Townsend, constable of the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, came this 2 Jan. 1745/6 before me, one of His Majesty's justices of the peace for the said county, and made oath that he, this deponent, did this day apprehend Alice Furnivall with two small children wandering and begging and committing the act of vagrancy in the said parish of Chelsea. James Townsend, constable.

The examination of Alice Furnivall taken upon oath the said 2 Jan. 1745/6. Who saith that her husband, Ralph Furnivall, was late a soldier of Beauclerk's Regiment of Foot and is now absconded and left this deponent without any subsistence. And says, that she was married to her said husband about five years ago at Chester in the county of Cheshire, by whom she hath two children now living, vizt, Ralph, aged about 4 years, and Mary, an infant aged about 6 months. And this deponent further says that her said husband was born at Sandbach in the county of Cheshire aforesaid, and served his apprenticeship there for the term of seven years to a shoemaker. And also says that her said husband since the time of his apprenticeship as aforesaid has not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or done any act or thing (to her knowledge) to gain a legal settlement. The mark of Alice Furnivall. Sworn at Chelsea before me, Peter Elers.

164. [n.p.] Middlesex. Edward Preston, watchmaker, upon oath says that his late brother, Samuel Preston, deceased, about the year 1707 was bound an apprentice for seven years to his father, Samuel Preston, carpenter, deceased, who at that time lived in Green Arbour Court, in the parish of St Sepulchres, London. And with whom he continued and served about five years of his apprenticeship, and from that time was a soldier in the late Queen Ann's wars, and was ordered over to Ireland, where he continued about the space of thirteen years. And this deponent says that his said brother since the time of his serving his apprenticeship as aforesaid has never rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or done any act or thing (to the best of his knowledge) to gain a legal settlement. Edward Preston. Sworn at Chelsea, 5 Jan. 1745/6, before me, Peter Elers.

165. [n.p.] Middlesex. Catherine Preston, widow, aged about 60 years, upon oath says that she was married soon after the great eclipse of the sun (which was in the year 1715) to Samuel Preston, carpenter, deceased, at the parish Church of St Brides in Dublin. And this examinant says that she is well informed by Edward Preston, her said late husband's brother, that her said late husband was bound an apprentice to his father, Samuel Preston, carpenter, deceased, who then lived in Green Arbour Court in the parish of St Sepulchres, London, and served about five years of his apprenticeship. And then he was entered a soldier in the late Queen Ann's wars and was ordered to Ireland. And [he] continued there for about thirteen years. And this examinant says that since the time of her husband serving his apprenticeship as aforesaid, he did not rent a house of £10 a year, or done any act or thing (to her knowledge) to gain a settlement. The mark of Catherine Preston. Sworn, 9 Jan. 1745/6, before me, Peter Elers, Richard Farwell. Sent to St Sepulchres, London.

166. [n.p.] Middlesex. James Pope, by trade a baker, aged about 68 years, born at Hempstead in Hertfordshire, upon oath says that he was married to Mary, his present wife (who is of the age of about 53 years), in May last in the liberty of the Fleet, London. And that in the years 1692–3 he, this examinant, was bound apprentice to one James Ward, a baker, who then lived in German Street in the parish of St James Westminster in the said county of Middlesex, where he continued and served his full apprenticeship for the term of seven years, meat, drink, washing and lodging. And says that his said master (James Ward) died when he had served about three years of his time. And that his widow afterwards married one Thomas Brown. And this examinant further says that since the time of his serving his apprenticeship as aforesaid [he] has not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any taxes, or done any other act or thing, to the best of his knowledge, to gain a settlement. And also says that his wife being lame, is not capable to help herself. And this examinant being but an in pensioner in Chelsea College is not able to support his said wife. Signed by James Pope. Sworn, 11 Mar. 1745/6, before us, Peter Elers, Edward Impey. Mary Pope sent to St James.

167. [n.p.] Middlesex. Elizabeth Roson, widow, aged about 30 years, upon oath says that last New Years Day, was twelve month, she, this examinant, was married to her late husband, William Roson, shoemaker, deceased, in the liberty of the Fleet, London. By whom she hath one child living, named James who is of the age of about 15 months. And says that she never heard or can give an account of her said late husband's settlement, he being only a journeyman shoemaker at the time she married him. And as to her own settlement, before her marriage she says as follows, that about seven years ago she lived a servant hired by the year with one Mr Guerin in Henrietta Street in the parish of St Pauls Covent Garden in the county of Middlesex, with whom she continued and served two years as cook, and received her full wages of her said master at the rate of £5 a year, meat, drink, washing and lodging. And further says that she has not been a yearly hired servant or housekeeper since she quitted the said Mr Guerin's. Elizabeth Roson, her mark. Sworn, 12 Mar. 1745/6, before us. Peter Elers, J. Bromfield. Sent to St Paul Covent Garden.

168. [n.p.] William Rose, shoemaker, aged about 37 years, born in the parish of St Giles in the Fields in the county of Middlesex, upon oath says that about the year 1722 he, this examinant, was bound an apprentice for seven years to one Mr Jonas LeBatt, shoemaker, who at that time lodged in Lloyd's Court in the parish of St Giles in the Fields aforesaid, with whom he continued and served his full term of his apprenticeship. And says that his said master lived the last year of his apprenticeship in Lloyd's Court aforesaid. And also says that since the time of serving his apprenticeship as aforesaid he, this examinant, has not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or done any act or thing whereby to gain a settlement (to the best of his knowledge). William Rose. Sworn, 20 Mar. 1745/6, before us, Peter Elers.

169. [n.p.] The examination of Jane Scott, single woman, taken upon oath before us, [blank] . . . Middlesex. Who saith that on 14 Feb. last she, this examinant, was delivered of a female bastard child (baptised and named Jane) in the workhouse in the parish of Chelsea in the said county of Middlesex. And was unlawfully begotten on her body by one George Adlam, who at that time lived with one Mr Giles, a potter in Chelsea aforesaid, who had carnal knowledge of her body the first time on or about 28 Mar. last, in the dwelling house of Robert Hopperton at Chelsea (where this examinant lived a servant), and several times after in the said house and other places. And this examinant says that the said George Adlam is the true father of the said female bastard child. And further says not. [Blank]. Sworn at Chelsea, [blank], before us, [blank]. [See 161, 162].

170. [n.p.] The voluntary examination of Mary Hughes, single woman, taken before me, Peter Elers esq. . . . Middlesex. This examinant on her oath says that she is pregnant of a bastard child or children which was unlawfully begotten on her body by one James Clayton, a chairman, who lodges at the sign of the Marlborough Head in Great Marlborough Street. Who had carnal knowledge of her body the first time at a house known by the sign of the Bunch of Grapes in a lane [Hartshorne Lane] almost opposite the Star Inn in the Strand near Hungerford Market, on or about 14 or 15 Aug. last, and at no other time. And this examinant says that the said James Clayton is the true father of the said bastard child or children (when born). And further saith not. Mary Hughes. Sworn at Chelsea, 12 Apr. 1746, before me, Peter Elers. [See 178].

171. [n.p.] Middlesex. Thomas Fairbrother, shoemaker, upon oath says that in the year 1723 he, this examinant, was bound an apprentice for seven years to his uncle John Fairbrother, shoemaker, who at that time lived in White Harte Yard in Brook's Market in the parish of St Andrews Holborn above the Bars in the county of Middlesex. With whom he continued and served his full term of apprenticeship. And says that for the last two years of his time his said master lived in Spread Eagle Court in Gray's Inn Lane, which is in the said parish of St Andrews Holborn above the Bars. And says that his said master paid parochial taxes in the said parish of St Andrews Holborn. And this examinant further says that since the time of serving his said apprenticeship [he] has not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or done any act or thing (to the best of his knowledge) to gain a legal settlement. And also says that he was married about twelve years since to Mary, his present wife, aged about 27 years, in the liberty of the Fleet, London, but has not any children by her living. Thomas Fairbrother. Sworn, 2 June 1746, before us, Peter Elers, Thomas DeVeil.

172. [n.p.] Middlesex. James Brown, shoemaker, aged about 57 years, upon oath says that he was born in Hungerford Market in the parish of St Martin in the Fields in the county of Middlesex. And that he was bound apprentice for seven years to one William Honnor of the parish [of] Lambeth in the county of Surrey, shoemaker, with whom he continued and served about three years of his said time, and was then turned over to one Mr Killway, a shoemaker who lived in Cloth Fair in the parish of St Bartholomew [blank], London, where he continued about half a year. And was again turned over to one Jacob Webb, shoemaker, who lived at Charing Cross in the said parish of St Martin in the Fields, where he continued and served the remainder and full term of his apprenticeship. And says that since the serving his apprenticeship as aforesaid he has not paid any parochial taxes, or done any act or thing, to his knowledge, to gain a settlement. James Brown. Sworn, 22 July 1746, before us, Peter Elers, Henry Villiers.

173. [n.p.] Middlesex. George Alexander, aged about 70 years, an in pensioner of Chelsea Hospital, upon oath says that he, this examinant, by indenture bearing date 12 July 1734 bound his son David Alexander (who is about 25 years of age) to one William Darlington of the parish of St Giles in the Fields in the said county, barber surgeon, for the term of seven years. With whom he continued and served till 18 October 1737 when the said David Alexander was again bound an apprentice for four years (as appears by the said respective recited indentures) to one John Nisson of the parish of St Paul Covent Garden in the said county, peruke maker, with him he continued and served the said term of four years (wanting about twelve days or there[abouts]). And this examinant also says that his said son David Alexander since the time of his serving his apprentice[ship] in manner as aforesaid has not lived a year a hired servant in any place, or rented a house of £10 a year, or done any act or thing (to his knowledge) to gain a settlement. And further says that his said son being lame and at present not in his reason is not capable to support and maintain himself without relief. George Alexander. Sworn, 4 Aug. 1746, before us, Peter Elers, Henry Villiers.

174. [n.p.] Middlesex. Thomas Coules, carpenter, aged about 51 years, upon oath says that he was born at Binstead in Hampshire and that about 30 years ago he was bound apprentice for seven years to one Henry Hammond of the parish of Alton in Hampshire aforesaid, carpenter. With whom he continued and served about five years and half of his said time and was then turned over to one John Watts of the parish or town of Farnham in the county of Surrey, carpenter. With whom he served the remainder and full term of his said apprenticeship. And this examinant says that since the time of serving his term of apprenticeship as aforesaid he has not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or done any act (to his knowledge) to gain a settlement. And also says that he has four children living by Mary his late wife; vizt, Elizabeth, aged about 22 years, Allieueser, aged about 19 years, Thomas, aged about 13 years, and James, aged about 10 years. The mark of Thomas Coules. Sworn at Chelsea, 13 Sept. 1746, before me, Peter Elers.

175. [n.p.] Middlesex. William Stapleton, husbandman, aged about 60 years, born in the parish of St Anns in the liberty of Westminster in the county of Middlesex, upon oath says that about 30 years ago he, this examinant, became a servant hired by the year to Mr George Burr of Chelsea, gardener, with whom he continued and served about the space of three years and received his full wages for the said time at the rate of £5 per annum, meat, drink, washing and lodging. And says that since he lived with Mr Burr as aforesaid he, this examinant, has not lived a hired servant a year or rented a house of £10 per annum, or paid any parochial taxes, or done any act (to his knowledge) to gain a settlement. The mark of William Stapleton. Sworn this, 11 Oct. 1746, before me, Peter Elers.

176. [n.p.] Middlesex, to wit. The voluntary examination of Martha Kemp, widow, taken upon oath before us, King Gould and Peter Elers, esqs . . . Who saith that on Sunday 9 Nov. last past she, this examinant, was delivered of a male bastard child in the dwelling House of Mrs Jane Dawson in Lordship Yard in Chelsea in the county of Middlesex (which is baptised and named John). And was unlawfully begotten on her body by one Mr John Hamilton a dealer in Scotch linen, now living at one Mr Youngs, a Broker, in High Holborn. Who had carnal knowledge of her body the first time the day after Michaelmas day last, was twelve month, in the room where the said John Hamilton then lodged at Mrs [blank] Ogelby's in Cecil Court in St Martin's Lane and where this examinant lived a hired servant, and had carnal knowledge several times after in the said house, and this examinant further saith that the said John Hamilton is the true father of the said child. And further saith not. The mark of Martha Kemp. Sworn at Chelsea, 9 Jan. 1746/7, before us, Peter Elers, King Gould.

177. [n.p.] Middlesex. Anne Sprew, aged about 45 years, the wife of Thomas Sprew, mariner, upon oath says that about 27 years ago she, this examinant, was married to her said husband in the liberty of the Fleet, London, by whom she has a daughter named Mary, a single woman aged about 24 years, who has always lived with this examinant ever since she was born. And says that her said husband, before her marriage with him served his apprenticeship to one Thomas Clark, a green grocer, who than lived in Eagle and Child Yard near the church in the parish of St Giles in the Field in the said county of Middlesex. And also says that her husband from the time of her said marriage has not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or done any act or thing (to the best of her knowledge) to gain a settlement. And further says that her said husband, about 22 years since, went to sea and that she has not seen him since. The mark of Anne Sprew. Sworn, 20 Feb. 1746/7, before us, Thomas Burdus, Peter Elers.

178. [n.p.] Middlesex. The voluntary examination of Mary Hughes, single woman, taken upon oath before us, Thomas Burdus and Peter Elers, esqs . . . Who saith that 7 May last past she, this examinant, was delivered of a female bastard child (baptised and named Frances) in the dwelling house of one Mr Harris in a place called Jew's Row in the parish of Chelsea in the said county of Middlesex. And was unlawfully begotten on her body by one James Clayton, a chairman, who then lodged at the sign of the Marlborough Head in Great Marlborough Street. Who had carnal knowledge of her body at a house then known by the sign of the Bunch of Grapes in Hartshorne Lane in the parish of St Martin in the Fields in the said county on or about 14 Aug. last, was twelve month, and at no other time. And this examinant saith that the said James Clayton is the true father of the said child. And further saith not. Mary Hughes. Sworn, 28 Feb. 1746/7, before us, Thomas Burdus, Peter Elers. [See 170].

179. [n.p.] Middlesex. William Swaine, gardener, upon oath saith that Jane Allcock, spinster, aged about 40 years, lived a servant hired by the year with Mrs Sarah Horton in that part of the parish of St George Hanover Square in the said county of Middlesex next Chelsea. With whom she continued and served a year and half, and received her full wages for the said time, meat, drink, washing and lodging. And this examinant says that the said Jane Allcock left the service of the said Mrs Horton about three weeks ago, and has not gained a settlement since. And further says that the said Jane Allcock is not capable to provide for herself, she being a lunatic. [Blank]. Sworn, [blank] June 1747, before us, [blank].

180. [n.p.] Middlesex. Elizabeth Brittain (the wife of Richard Brittain, an out pensioner of Chelsea Hospital, and late of the late Colonel Anthony Lowther's Regiment of Marines), upon oath saith that her husband and family lodges at one Mrs Harris's in Jew's Row in the parish of Chelsea. And that she had a child (named Dinah) [that] died there last Saturday. And says that her said husband being but an out pensioner of the said hospital is in very mean and poor circumstances and not able to pay the charges of the burial of the child, which obliges her to apply to the parish officers for relief. And further saith that she has two children living by her said husband; vizt, Elizabeth, aged about 3 years and Susanna, an infant aged 11 weeks. And that she is so much distressed that she has pawned most of her cloths for the present support of her family, her husband having taken up his pension money of the said Mrs Harris, where he now lodges to Christmas next. Elizabeth Brittain, her mark. Sworn at Chelsea, before me, Peter Elers.