House of Lords Journal Volume 18: 18 March 1708

Journal of the House of Lords: Volume 18, 1705-1709. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1767-1830.

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Citation:

'House of Lords Journal Volume 18: 18 March 1708', in Journal of the House of Lords: Volume 18, 1705-1709( London, 1767-1830), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol18/pp515-542 [accessed 16 July 2024].

'House of Lords Journal Volume 18: 18 March 1708', in Journal of the House of Lords: Volume 18, 1705-1709( London, 1767-1830), British History Online, accessed July 16, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol18/pp515-542.

"House of Lords Journal Volume 18: 18 March 1708". Journal of the House of Lords: Volume 18, 1705-1709. (London, 1767-1830), , British History Online. Web. 16 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol18/pp515-542.

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In this section

DIE Jovis, 18 Martii.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Dunel. & D. Crew.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Carliol.
Epus. Landaven.
Epus. Norwic.
Ds. Cancellarius.
Comes Pembroke, Præses.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Northumberland.
Dux Bolton.
Dux Schonburg.
Dux Shrewsbury.
Dux Bedford.
Dux Marlborough.
Dux Buckingham.
Dux Queensberry.
Dux Montrose.
Dux Roxburghe.
March. Kent, Camerarius.
March. Dorchester.
March. Tweeddale.
Comes Derby.
Comes Leicester.
Comes Rivers.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Winchilsea.
Comes Thanet.
Comes Sunderland.
Comes Anglesey.
Comes Sussex.
Comes Feversham.
Comes Berkeley.
Comes Rochester.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Holdernesse.
Comes Scarbrough.
Comes Warrington.
Comes Bradford.
Comes Orford.
Comes Jersey.
Comes Grantham.
Comes Greenwich.
Comes Wharton.
Comes Cholmondeley.
Comes Mar.
Comes Loudoun.
Comes Seafield.
Comes Stair.
Comes Glasgow.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Weymouth.
Ds. Howard Eff.
Ds. North & Grey.
Ds. Byron.
Ds. Rockingham.
Ds. Lexington.
Ds. Berkeley Str.
Ds. Cornwallis.
Ds. Ossulstone.
Ds. Dartmouth.
Ds. Guilford.
Ds. Herbert.
Ds. Haversham.
Ds. Sommers.
Ds. Barnard.
Ds. Hervey.

PRAYERS.

Cheeke's Bill:

Hodie 3 a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to vest the Estate late of Edward Cheeke Esquire, deceased, in Somersetshire, remaining unsold at his Death, in Trustees, to be sold, to satisfy the Demands of the Lady Russel his Mother, and Essex Cheeke his Sister; and to vest the Remainder of the Monies arising by Sale of the said Estate in the Purchase of other Lands, to be settled on Edward Cheeke an Infant, and his Heirs."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Pitt and Mr. Rogers:

To carry down the said Bill, and desire their Concurrence thereunto.

E. et Kilmarnock's Bill.

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for vesting several Messages, Houses, Lands, and Tenements, in the County of Dublin, in the Kingdom of Ireland, formerly the Estate of Thomas Boyd Esquire, in Trustees, to be sold, for the Payment of the Debts of Lettice late Countess of Kilmarnock, deceased, and for raising Portions for the Younger Children of the said Countess."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Pitt and Mr. Rogers:

To carry down the said Bill, and desire their Concurrence thereunto.

Message from thence, to return Bromley's Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Lord William Powlett and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act for making effectual the Provision intended by William Bromley, late of Holt Castle, in the County of Worcester Esquire, for Dorothy Bromley his Youngest Daughter;" and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

May versus Calthorpe & al.

The House taking into Consideration the Petition of Edward May, of the City of Dublin, Esquire, in relation to a Judgement of this House, of the Fifth of December last, on the Behalf of Reynolds Calthorpe Esquire, and Samuel Battely:

It is Ordered, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said Reynolds Calthorpe and Samuel Battely may have a Copy of the said Petition; and Time to answer thereunto, on Saturday the Seven and Twentieth Day of this Instant March, at Eleven a Clock.

English East India Company Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for assuring to the English Company trading to The East Indies, on Account of the United Stock, a longer Time in the Fund and Trade therein mentioned; and for raising thereby the Sum of Twelve Hundred Thousand Pounds, for carrying on the War, and other Her Majesty's Occasions."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House, To-morrow.

Markwick versus City of London, in Error;

After hearing Counsel to argue the Errors assigned upon the Writ of Error brought into this House, from Her Majesty's Court of Queen's Bench, the Six and Twentieth Day of February last, wherein James Markwick is Plaintiff, and the Mayor, Commonalty, and Citizens of the City of London, are Defendants; and due Consideration of what was offered thereupon:

It is Ordered and Adjudged, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Judgement given in Her Majesty's Court of Queen's Bench, for the Mayor, Commonalty, and Citizens of the City of London, against the said James Markwick, shall be, and is hereby, affirmed.

Judgement affirmed.

The Tenor of which Judgement to be affixed to the Transcript of the Record to be remitted, is as follows:

Postmodumque, scilicet, Die Jovis, Decimo Octavo Die Martii, Anno Regin dictæ Dominæ Reginæ nunc Septimo, visis et per Cur. Parliamenti præd. diligenter exa minat. et plenius intellectistam Record. et Process. præd. ac Judic. super eisdem reddit. quam præd. Causis pro Error. assign. et allegat. videtur Cur. Parliamenti præd. nunc hic, quod Record. ill. in nullo vitiosum aut defectivum existit; ac quod in Record. et Process. præd. in nullo est Errat.: Ideo consideratum est per eandem Cur. Parliament præd. quod Judic. præd. in omnibus affirmetur, ac in omni suo Robore stet et Effectu, dictis Causis superius pro Error. assign. in aliquo non obstan.; et quod præd. Major et Communitas ac Cives Civitatis London. præd. in Curia dictæ Dominæ Reginæ, coram ipsa Regina, habeant inde Executionem suam, versus præd. Jacobum Markwick, juxta Formam et Effectum Judic.; ac superinde Record. et Process. præd. Cur. dictæ Dominæ Reginæ hic Parliament. præd. per eandem Cur. Parliamenti præd. Cur. dictæ Dominæ Reginæ, coram ipsa Regina, ubicunque &c. remittantur, &c."

Address relating to Gregg and Clerk, alias Valiere.

The Duke of Bolton reported from the Lords Committees, appointed to draw an Address, to be presented to Her Majesty, upon the Reports relating to William Gregg and Alexander Clerk, alias Valiere, and the Resolutions thereupon, and Debate of the House, "That "they had accordingly drawn an Address."

Which, being read by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House, and is as follows; (videlicet,)

"We, Your Majesty's most dutiful and obedient Subjects, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, having been informed, that William Gregg, a Clerk in the Office of the late Secretary Mr. Harley, had been indicted for High Treason, in holding Correspondence with Your Majesty's Enemies, and betraying to them Secrets of the highest Importance; and that, upon his Trial, he had confessed the Indictment, and by that Means had prevented the Examinations, whereby the Public might have been truly informed of the particular Nature and Circumstances of his Crime: We thought ourselves indispensably obliged, in Duty to Your Majesty, and for the future Safety of the Kingdom, to do all that was in our Power, to find out the Rise and Progress of this dangerous Correspondence.

"In order thereto, we made our humble Address to Your Majesty, for all Papers relating to the Charge against William Gregg. And Your Majesty having been graciously pleased to give Orders, that the Papers should be laid before us; we referred those Papers to a Committee, and directed them to examine Gregg, and report the said Examination to the House; as also what they observed upon the Papers, together with such other Matters as they should think proper, upon their Inquiry into the said Affair. And the Report having been made, and taken into Consideration by the House; we humbly conceive it to be very highly for Your Service, to lay the same before Your Majesty.

Report concerning Gregg's Examination.

"The House having appointed a Committee, to examine William Gregg, who is a Prisoner in Newgate, convicted for High Treason; and having also been pleased to refer to the same Committee several Papers, which, upon the humble Address of the House, had been laid before your Lordships by Her Majesty's Command; do humbly take Leave to inform the House, that the Effect of the several Papers, referred to the Committee, is as follows;

1st, A Copy of Greg's Letter, which was intercepted, dated the 28th of November, 1707, O. S. sent to Monsieur Chamillard, enclosed in a Packet from Marshal Tallard, directed to Mr. Robineau, his Steward, at Paris.

"In this, Gregg sends to Monsieur Chamillard a Copy of the Queen's Letter, written with Her own Hand, to the Emperor.

"In the same Letter, Greg takes Notice of 2 Letters sent by him to Monsieur Chamillard, the one dated the 24th, the other the 28th of October last, which he understood Robineau had put into his Hands.

"That, perceiving by Robineau's Letter to his Master, that Mr. Chamillard desired to know the Mareschal's Sentiments of Greg, Greg had himself written to him.

"In Expectation of his Answer, Greg slattered himself, that the Paper then sent was of that Importance, that there could be no longer Doubt of the Devotedness of a Scottishman for France; not to speak of his Zeal for the Service of his Prince, who had found Refuge there.

"That the Lines, under which he had drawn a Stroke, were the Thoughts of the Lords Treasurer, which he had added with his own Hand to the First Draught of the Letter.

"The same Letter contained some other News.

2. There was a Copy of a Letter, dated the 25th November, O. S. in the same Packet, subscribed William Greg, in which Notice is taken of what Robineau writes to Mr. Tallard concerning him; and that he himself had written to the Mareschal, and desired Robineau to deliver the enclosed according to the Address, as being of great Consequence.

3. The Copy of a Letter from Mareschal Tallard to Robineau, dated the 10th December, N. S. in which Mr. Tallard says, "That as to the Letters, of which Robineau made Mention in his of the 25th and 28th of November, "that he had delivered them according to the Address;" Monsieur Tallard knew nothing of their Contents, but by the same Post which brought his Letters.

"That he was obliged for the Offers, but could make no Use of them while he was a Prisoner; when the Peace was made, he would give Proof of his Acknowledgement to him who made the Offers, and would endeavour to engage the Person, to whom the Letters were addressed, to do the same. In the Interim, Robineau was to tell the Person, to whom he delivered the Letters, for whom the Mareschal had the utmost Consideration, "That he was much obliged to him for desiring to know his Thoughts before he would determine what to do; that the Offers made did not suit with the present Time, at least as to him, &c."

4. An original Letter, of the 2d of December, 1707, to Mr. Robineau from Greg, to felicitate him for being delivered from an importunate Man, as would appear by Mareschal Tallard's Letter, unless his last to Monsieur Chamillard had not made him determine otherwise.

5. Copy of another Letter of Greg to Monsieur Chamillard, dated the 23d December, O. S. which was also taken in Mareschal Tallard's Packet, in which he pretends to give Monsieur Chamillard an Account of what passed in Parliament, with the Queen's Answer to the Address of the Two Houses, and his Excuse for not sending the Address itself.

6. A Letter of Robineau to M. Tallard, 26th December, N. S. from Paris (transcribed by Greg in his own Hand), in which he says, "He was going to Versailles, to deliver the Answer with which he was charged. That he received, every Post, Letters from the same Person; and that he took Care to deliver them according to the Address."

7. Another of the 30th December 1707, N. S. That he had been to deliver, as M. Tallard had charged him, the Answer which was desired of M. Tallard."

8. Another Letter, in Greg's Hand, dated the 30th December, 1707, found in Greg's Closet, written to Mr. Chamillard, giving an Account of the Intention to send Mr. Palmes to Savoy, and to take several other German Courts in his Way."

9. A Consession of Greg, delivered to the Lords of the Committee, and signed by him."

On Thursday the 12th of this Instant February, the Committee, appointed by your Lordships, went to Newgate, in order to examine William Greg.

"They acquainted him with your Lordships Order; and told him, "That as the Crime, of which he stood attainted, was of the most heinous Nature; so there were some Circumstances so extraordinary, which attended his Case, that the House of Lords thought it might be of Service to Her Majesty and the Kingdom, to have all the Beginning and Progress of his Treasonable Correspondence fully laid open; that Her Majesty, upon the Application of the House, had ordered all former Examinations and Papers concerning him to be laid before them."

They told him further, "That, if he, by a true, ingenuous, and full Consession, would deserve it, he might have Ground to hope the House of Lords would intercede in his Behalf, for Mercy from Her Majesty; which otherwise he had no Reason to look for."

He was also told, "That, being a Man of Understanding, he was not to expect to be asked Questions; but was to give an Account of himself, when and how he became first employed; when, and by what Instigation, he was drawn in to correspond with the Queen's Enemies; and how far it proceeded."

He said, "That one Mr. Greg, the late King's Resident at Copenhagen, was his Kinsman, and sent for him thither; and he continued with him about Three Years, till his Death, which happened about Two Months before the late King died.

That Mr. Vernon was sent Envoy to Denmark; and took him, whom he found there, into his Service, in which he continued about Two Years and a Half, and then he was discharged from his Service by Mr. Vernon.

Mr. Vernon coming for England about his private Affairs, while Greg was in his Service, and staying here some Time; in that Interval Greg received some Letters from Mr. Secretary Harley, which gave him Occasion after to apply to him.

The 9th of December, 1704, Greg came to England, and soon made Application to Mr. Secretary Harley for Employment; but was not recommended to him by any body.

The 3d of January, he saw him first at his Office, where he attended often.

The 5th of February, 170 4/5, Mr. Jones, the Secretary's First Clerk, came to him, and told him, "The Secretary would speak with him." He attended on the Secretary the same Day, who asked him, "If he would be willing to be employed in his own Country?" Greg said, "He was willing to be sent upon any good Errand." Mr. Secretary told him, "It was to give an Account of the Proceedings of the ensuing Parliament, which was to be held under the Duke of Argyle."

The 6th of February, he went to the Office; and Mr. Secretary told him; "He should be dispatched in few Days."

To make some Trial of him (as he supposed), Mr. Secretary asked him, "If he could give an Account of the Court of Denmark." Greg said, "He was willing to do it as well as he could;" and accordingly, in some Time, he drew up a State of that Court; and it was not disapproved.

He attended daily; and on the 20th of April Mr. Secretary Harley gave him a Note of Twenty Pounds, to be paid by his Steward in Scotland Yard.

On the 23d of May, 1705, he was ordered to go for Scotland, and about a Week after set forward on his Journey; when he was dispatched, a Note of £.30. was given to him.

Mr. Secretary always amused him, with telling him he should have Instructions for his Directions in Scotland; but at last ordered him to draw up some Queries himself, about the State of Affairs in Scotland; which he did, and they were approved.

Some of the Queries were, "What were the Designs of the several Parties? What Correspondence between The Highlands and St. Germans? How affected to the House of Hanover? &c."

He was also ordered to form a Cypher of Letters, whereby to design the great Men there.

The 2d of June, 1705, he arrived at Edinburgh; and wrote to Mr. Secretary the Thursday following; being ordered to direct all his Letters, "To Thomas Bateman, in Scotland Yard."

Mr. Secretary promised, the Receipt of his Letters should be acknowledged; and he pressed often for it, to know they came to Hand, fearing his Letters were intercepted, because he was suspected as a Spy in that Country. But, though he wrote Thrice a Week, he never heard One Word from Mr. Secretary, or by his Order, during his whole Stay in that Country."

Being asked by the Lords, "If he was recommended to any body in Scotland?" He answered, "No."

The 15th of October he arrived at London, and the next Day waited on Mr. Secretary; who thanked him for his Letters, and told him, "He had named him to the Queen, upon Occasion of a Paper he had sent." But Greg said, "He believed the Queen had never heard of his Name, till this last unhappy Accident."

"On the 29th of October, Mr. Secretary ordered him £.25. He attended daily, and pressed much to be sent Abroad, particularly to go with Mr. Methuen when he was sent to Savoy; but it was declined.

"On New Year's Day, Mr. Secretary dropt a Word, which startled him much; he told him, "he would fix him;" which Greg understood was bringing him into his Office.

"Upon this, he presented a Petition, "That he might not be in the Office, because the Salary was small; and, being in Debt, he could not live on it."

"He attended every Day. The Secretary inquired of him, "What he knew of Languages?" He said, "He knew some French and German, but knew Latin better than either."

"The 16th of April, 1706, he was admitted into the Office; and a Note was given upon Mr. Jones, as for One of the Clerks; and Mr. Secretary told him, "It was only to keep his Hand in Use, and that he would provide better for him."

"The 16th of May, copying a Letter sent to Mr. Vernon, "That he was to consider of Somebody fit to be left behind;" Greg thought it to be intended in his Favour; and wrote to Mr. Vernon on that Occasion, desiring his Countenance."

"But, the 28th of May, Mr. Secretary writing Word to Mr. Vernon, "That he had Leave to come at his own Time, but must leave Somebody behind;" and this being wrote before any Answer could come from thence, Greg saw nothing was meant for him in the former Letter.

Greg made Offers of Service to Mr. Pulteney, when he was to go; but he said, "he was provided."

"Then he told Mr. Secretary, "His Mind was depressed by his Debts, and desired to be thrown Abroad, and to go with Sir Philip Meadows;" but that was refused, and Strahan was sent.

"Then Mr. Secretary asked, "What would make him easy?" And he gave in a List of his Debts, amounting to about Thirty-five Pounds.

"Since that, Mr. Secretary has ordered him, at several Times, about 20 or £.25. in the Whole; the last Sum was £.7. in October last, Part of a Bill of £.14. for which Debt he was pressed at that Time.

"Being asked by the Lords, "If his Debts only made him so desirous to be gone?" He said, "At the Rate the Business was managed in the Office, it was a perfect Drudgery.

"Their Business seldom began till about Eleven or Twelve at Night; and they stayed till Two or Three, or later, though sometimes not above Two Letters to dispatch; and he thought himself happiest, who could get away soonest.

"The Method was, first, the Letters were taken in Short-hand, afterwards wrote fair, then sent to Mr. Secretary's House to be signed, and after returned to the Office to be entered; so that they were obliged sometimes to stay till Four a Clock in the Morning."

"He said, "That, in April last, when Hill the Messenger was sent to Turin, the Packet was left to him, though the youngest Clerk, to be made up and delivered to the Messenger.

"In that Packet there was a Letter to Sir John Norris, and another to Mr. Chetwind; most of the last Letter was in Cypher; Greg entered both those Letters. There was also another Letter to Sir Cloudesly Showell, and Letters from the Lord Treasurer. He put them all up in the Packet, and after gave them to Hill.

"Being asked, "If he knew by the Letters what the Design was?" Greg said, "He understood Thoulon was to be besieged; he could not read the Whole, but knew enough to find out that." He said "It was wrote in the Cypher of the other Office by Mr. Harley, the Earl of Sunderland being sick at that Time.

The Queen's Letters de Carbet are made up before they are brought to the Office; but the Clerks are trusted to make up other Letters."

"The Lords Committees required him to give the whole Relation of his Correspondence, when it began, and how long it had been carried on.

"Greg said, "The First Motive of his writing to France was, in order to get Money, by obtaining a Pass; and that his First Letter was the 24th of October last.

"From his first entering into the Office, he had always a great Hand in perusing the French Prisoners Letters; that convenient Opportunity and his Poverty gave him the Temptation.

"The French Prisoners Letters came under a general Cover, directed to Mr. Lewis; Mareschal Tallard's Letters are under a flying Seal, the rest of them came always sealed, but are opened at the Office.

"Generally Mr. Lewis threw them down on the Table, and left the perusing them to the Clerks, to Mr. Mann and Greg; and since Mr. Mann left the Office, they have been trusted wholly to Greg.

"If Greg observed any Thing that he thought material, he made an Extract of it, and shewed it to the Secretary, or Under Secretary; he mentioned a particular Extract he had made out of a Letter of Monsieur Chamillard's to Mareschal Tallard.

"Letters came from Nottingham every Post; sometimes Twenty Letters came to them in a Day from France, those came always sealed. From the Time he came into the Office, these Letters were never perused either by the Secretary or Under Secretary, which he is sure of, because they were sealed when he looked on them; he cannot for that Reason say but Mr. Lewis might sometimes look in Mareschal Talrd's Letter, because that had a flying Seal; but the rest were left sealed as they came by Mr. Lewis to the Clerks Perusal." Greg said, "He had a Dispute with Mr. Lewis upon the Account of these Letters; Greg declaring he thought it not to be a Business fit for the Under Clerks to be trusted with."

"Mr. Secretary Harley wrote a Letter, in Answer to one from Mr. Ponchartrain, thanking him for his Civility to one Middleton.

"In transcribing it, Greg found it so ill turned, and the French so bad, that he acquainted the Secretary with it at Eleven a Clock at Night, in October last. This Letter was stopped, and lay a Month in the Office; but after, Mr. Lewis sent it away as it was wrote at first.

The rough Draught of the Queen's Letter to the Emperor, as it was altered by the Lord Treasurer, was left in the public Book of the Office to be entered the same Night it was to be sent away; there, Greg said, he found it, and transcribed it; and any other Clerk of the Office might have done it as well as he.

All the Books in the Office lie in a Press; the Key is always in the Door, and not only the Clerks, but the Chamber-keepers, may have Access.

"All Letters, except those wrote to the Duke of Marlbrough, are entered in the Books; but those are only copied in loose Sheets. Greg said, he had copied many of those.

"The Draught of the Queen's Letter to the Emperor was prepared by Mr. Lewis; it was then written in the Hand of Mr. Thomas, Mr. Harley's Domestic Clerk; the Addition was in the Lord Treasurer's own Hand; Mr. Mann saw it as well as Greg. Mann said to Greg, "That what was added by the Lord Treasurer, was much the brightest Part of the Letter."

"Greg said, "He sent all his Letters to France, under the Cover, to Mr. Robineau. He owned he sent the Copy of the Queen's Letter to Monsieur Chamillard, the same Night the Queen's Letter was dispatched to the Emperor."

"Greg said further, "That the Letter in the Queen's own Hand was given to Greg by Mr. Secretary himself, about One a Clock at Night; and he was solely entrusted to put it up in Sir Philip Meadows' Packet, after every body had left the Office."

"Robineau, in his Letter to Greg, took Notice, "That he had delivered his Letters to Mr. Chamillard, and that Mr. Chamillard sent to advise with Mareschal Tallard upon Greg's Proposal."

"Upon this, Greg wrote a Letter to Mr. Tallard, of which, he said, he had no Copy; but pretended to repeat the Words of the Letter to the Lords Committees.

"The Lords Committees told Greg, "It would be expected by the House, that he should be very clear and particular, in declaring by what Advice or Encouragement he first began such a Correspondence." He said, "By none at all; he was tempted to it by the Devil, and the Hopes of getting Money."

"He said, "That, upon hearing a French Periwigmaker was committed to Newgate for High Treason, he had desired to be admitted again to the Lords of the Cabinet Council."

"But he would not own, that he knew the Man; but said, "He had since heard his Name was Valiere, or Clark; he was told so by a Gentlewoman, who came to see him since his Condemnation."

"He said, "He held no Correspondence in England, but only in sending the common Letter of the Office, with other printed News Papers, to some Gentlemen."

"Greg said, "He had been long acquainted with one Crookshanks; who promised him, "That, if he would procure a French Pass, he should have Two Hundred Guineas;" and Greg undertook to procure the Pass.

"The First Time he wrote to Mr. Chamillard was the 24th of October last.

Brown, a Merchant, Father in Law to Crooksbanks, and one Bollinger, a Merchant, were acquainted with this Agreement about the Pass; and they dined together at Brown's House; and Brown undertook for the Money, if the Pass could be procured.

"Greg said, "He acquainted Bollinger of his having sent a Copy of the Queen's Letter to Mr. Chamillard, at The Cross Keys Tavern, in Covent Garden; and shewed him Extracts of Mareschal Tallard's and Robineau's Letters." He said also, "That he read the Extracts of their Letters, at another Time, in English, to Brown and Crookshanks."

"The Lords Committees asked him, "To what End he told Bollinger of what he had done, in sending the Queen's Letter to Mr. Chamillard?" He only said, "It was downright Madness."

"The Lords Committees asked him, "If any body came to him?" He said, "One Mr. Arbuthnot came to him, and nobody else; and his Business was to bring him Charity."

"The Lords Committees asked Mr. Greg, "If he had no more to acquaint their Lordships with?" He said, "No." And being told by them, "That it concerned him very much to consider of it; that the Lords observed, he had told them nothing but what he knew they had Means in their Hands to be fully informed of, without his saying any Thing; and how hard it would be for the House of Lords to believe that he would venture upon such a Correspondence, without some Support or Encouragement;" he persisted in it, "That he had no more to say."

"As the Lords Committees were risen up, and had called for the Keeper to take Mr. Greg away, he took a Brown Paper out of his Pocket, which was sealed up, and took out of it a Paper, which, he said, he had prepared against the Queen's Birth-day, and desired the Lords to read it; it purported to be a Petition to the House of Commons; he pretended, he knew not how to get it delivered, because he concluded all the Papers sent by him would be delivered to Mr. Secretary Harley.

"The Lords, finding the Paper to be addressed to the House of Commons, told him, "It was not proper for them to receive it;" and delivered it immediately back to him again.

"The Lords Committees, as they went away, told Greg, "That, if he would recollect himself, and set down in Writing any Thing that he thought might be for his own Service, or of Use to the Queen and Her Government, he might send it to them; and the Keeper should have Directions to convey it safely."

"The next Morning, Greg sent a Letter to the Lords Committees; which, as soon as they had perused, they returned to him again, by a Gentleman, with the following Message:

"The Lords of the Committee have ordered me to return this Paper to you; they being of Opinion, that it is not material to the Examination for which they were sent to you by the House."

"The Lords Committees think themselves obliged to acquaint the House, That they did not observe Greg to be under any Disorder, or Terror, from the Apprehension or Sense of his Danger."

"The Indictment of Greg, for his Treasonable Correspondence with Her Majesty's Enemies, was brought before the Lords Committees; which Indictment he consessed upon his Trial, and Judgement was thereupon given against him.

"The Lords Committees do think it their Duty to acquaint the House, That they having been informed, by Means of the Keeper of Newgate, That one William Gregg had been formerly in Newgate, and indicted for counterfeiting the Coin of the Kingdom; and that it was talked, amongst the Turnkeys in the Prison, that this was the same Man;" they sent to search the Books in Newgate, and found there, that, in May 1697, William Greg and Elizabeth Greg were indicted, for counterfeiting the Coin. Thereupon they sent for Mr. Tanner, who has the Custody of those Records; he brought the Indictment before them; and it appeared that Elizabeth Greg was found guilty, and executed, but that William Greg was acquitted; and that Thomas Holloway and Simon Newport were the Witnesses at the Trial, who, as was said, are both dead since that Time.

"But one Thomas Kinserley and James Biddle declaring, "That they both knew that Greg, who was then indicted, very well, and believed they should know him again, if they saw him;" the Lords Committees sent them severally to see William Greg, now in Newgate, And they both of them did declare, "That they believed, and were confident, that the same Person, now in Newgate, was the same William Greg, who was then indicted, and whose supposed Wife was then found guilty, and burnt;" and they did both of them voluntarily make Oath to this Effect; and James Biddle swore, "That, after the Trial, the Discourse in the Neighbourhood was, that Elizabeth Greg took the whole Matter upon herself at the Trial."

"Their Two Affidavits are laid before your Lordships.

"After One of these Persons had been to see William Greg, William Greg wrote a Letter, directed to the Lords of the Committee; in which he did very positively deny that he was the Person who had been tried for coining, in May One Thousand Six Hundred Ninety-seven."

"May it please Your Majesty,

"We being also informed, That one Alexander Valiere, otherwise called John Clark, was in Custody, for holding Correspondence with Your Majesty's Enemies; we thought ourselves, in like Manner, obliged in Duty to direct the said Committee to examine Valiere, and to inquire into the Particulars and Circumstances of his Offence. This being accordingly performed by the said Committee, it was reported to us; but, the said Report consisting of very many Examinations, we thought it would be of Use to appoint a Committee, to digest and put the same into some Method, to the Intent we might be able to form a clearer and more distinct Judgement of the whole Affair; and that Report being made and approved by us, we conceive it will be of Importance to Your Majesty's Service, for us to present the same to Your Majesty. And for Your Majesty's more entire Satisfaction, we beg Leave to annex all the said Examinations at large to this our humble Address to Your Majesty."

Valiere alias Clarke's Examination.

"Your Lordships having been pleased to appoint this Committee to take into their Confidederation several Examinations, Letters, and Papers, referred to them, and to direct them to reduce the same into such Method as they should think most proper for the Service of the House; the Lords Committees have, in Obedience to Your Lordships Order, endeavoured to put the many Examinations and Papers relating to Alexander Valiere and John Bara into a natural and proper Method; and they do humbly lay the same before the House.

"Alexander Valiere, of late Years commonly called John Clark, is a Native of France, and went over into Ireland in the French Troops sent to assist King James; he deserted, or was taken Prisoner, about the Time of the Battle of The Boyn; he was not taken into the Regiment, but was a Footman to Mr. Doge, an Ensign in Captain Rochfort's Company, in Belcastel's Regiment, where he continued about Two Years, and then got a Discharge from his Master, but refused to list himself as a Soldier.

"He came over into England, and served some Time as a Drawer in a Tavern, and was afterwards a Servant to several Persons; and at last bound himself Apprentice to One Guyon a Periwig-maker; and when his Time was out, worked as a Journeyman in the City, and married a Midwife's Daughter behind The Exchange, and got his Living by making of Periwigs.

"He was looked upon to be a Papist, and his Discourse was generally for France and that Interest; and he talked against the Government in so insolent and public a Manner, that, for that Reason, at Jacob's Coffee-house, one Manteau threw a Glass of Beer in his Face.

Barbier.

"Barbier says, "That, on May-day last, he met Valiere in the Street; who told him, "He had now got a better Trade than Periwig-making."

"Clark himself pretends, "That, during the Peace, he entered into some Sort of Merchandizing; and that, upon the breaking out of the War, having some Share in a Ship that was stopt in France upon that Account, he applied to Mr. Secretary Hedges, to get a Pass for Holland, but was refused."

"One Wilmot, of Doctors Commons, being employed to negotiate the Exchange of Monsieur D'Alegre, Galissioniere, and some other French Prisoners, made Use of Valiere as an Interpreter; and afterwards Valiere gave some Account to the Secretaries, of a fraudulent Trade carried on between Ireland and France, by one Hannam, which might make Mr. Secretary Harley first think of employing him to get Intelligence.

"Mr. Harley proposed this to him in the Year 170 4/5 Valiere said, "He thought he might be able to procure Intelligence by the Means of one Bara, who was then in France, and was acquainted with Monsieur Chateauneus, the Commissary at Calais."

"In order to settle this Correspondence, Mr. Harley surnished him with One Hundred and Fifty Pounds in about a Month's Time, out of which Valiere pretended he gave Bara Seventy Pounds, and made a Present to the Commissary.

Valiere says, "All the Service Bara did was to come over Twice from France; first in a French Boat, with the News of the Prince of Darmstad's being killed; and next in Bland's Boat (which Valiere had sent to Calais), with the News of Barcelona's being taken."

Bara went back to France, in Three or Four Days, in the same Boat with Bland's Boy, and carried from Valiere to Chateauneus Satinette for a Bed, a Watch, Scarlet Stockings, and some Toys, which was the Present above mentioned. In a short Time after, Bara came back to England again, and brought with him a Frenchman, who had been a Sea-officer: Valiere acquainted Secretary Harley with this, who granted his Warrant for apprehending them both; but they made their Escape.

"In the Spring following, Valiere saw Bara at Deal, when he was just come out of the Custody of a Messenger; having been first apprehended by the Magistrates of Dover, for coming out of France. At that Time, he was informed, Bara had a Pass from the Secretary of State; though he had before told Mr. Harley, "he knew Mr. Bara had 500 Livres given him, in France, for Service to the King:" Valiere said, "He was sure this was Fact."

Bara's Examination.

"John Bara gives the following Account of himself, and of his Transaction with Valiere and with Mr. Secretary Harley:

"He says, "He is a Native of France, and was Surgeon Major to Dubart, during the late War, till the Two last Years; when he left him, upon a Dispute between them concerning a Prize.

"At Dunkirk, he had Opportunity of assisting several Officers and Soldiers in the English Service, who were Prisoners there; and they promised to help him in his Profession, if he would come into England; which he did, as soon as the Peace was made. He became first acquainted with Valiere by Means of the Master of a Ship of St. Valery; and this Acquaintance was continued by one Dormicour's coming into England from Dunkirk, upon Account of Debts he owed, who was known to both of them. Dormicour, being about to return to France, told Bara, "That Valiere proposed to him the sending over the Paris Gazette sooner than by the Way of Holland;" which Dormicour had promised to do, if he might have Leave on the other Side. Afterwards Valiere made the same Proposal to Bara; who said, "he would do it, if he had Protection for his Person." Valiere said, "He had a sufficient Authority for sending him to France;" and produced a Paper, sealed, with Mr. Harley's Name to it; and Valiere went with Bara to the Secretary's Office, and procured a Pass for him, to go to Holland.

Valiere gave him a Note for Three Pounds, which he never received; and also a Hook and Chain for a Watch, which was to be a Token to one Nerinx, a Merchant, at Rotterdam, to pay him £. 30; and the Money was answered accordingly.

From Rotterdam he got to Dunkirk, and from thence to Calais; between which Places he continued till October 1705, at which Time he had £. 30. more remitted him by Nerinx.

He wrote constantly to Valiere, by the Way of Holland, such News as he could pick up; till, about the 4th of October, he came over to England, in a Boat he had bought, and brought with him a Paris Gazette, which he delivered to Valiere.

In Nine or Ten Days Valiere sent him back to Calais, in Bland's Boat (who had been sent over by Valiere with Two Packs of Wool, consigned to Chateauneuf, while Bara was at Calais); but at this Time Bland carried over no Goods, but only an open Letter to Chateauneus for 17 Ankers of Brandy. They stayed at Calais Three Weeks, and the Commissary bore the whole Expence.

Bara returned to England, and stayed at Margate about a Week; and then went back for France, with Bland's Boy only. In their Passage they were driven to Newport, and made Prisoners: But Bara sending a Letter to Chateauneus, upon his writing to the Governor of Newport they were released, and proceeded to Calais.

At this Time Bara carried over with him 36 Yards of Sattin, 2 Pieces of Stuff, 2 Pair of Stockings, and 2 Cases of Knives: The Stockings only were a Present to Monsieur Chateauneus; the rest was for Bara's Subsistence, Valiere (as he then said) having no Money to give him.

Bara staid at Calais Two Months, and then came to Margate, and brought with him one Corselli, a Merchant; with whom he went to London, and acquainted Valiere with their being come over, and that Corselli was then at London. Valiere (as Bara has been since informed by Bland) sent this Corselli back to France, by the Way of Holland.

Bara durst not stay in London, finding there were Messengers out from Mr. Harley to seize him, which were procured by Valiere; and he then charged Valiere with it.

Bara went to Deal, where he stayed 7 Weeks, and at Dover 9 or 10 Days; from whence he found Means, by an exchanged Prisoner, to convey a Letter to Chateauneus, desiring a Boat might be sent over for him; which was done accordingly, and he went over in it to Calais.

Bara, drinking one Night with Chateauneus, complained of his Usage from Valiere: The Commissary advised him to return to England; saying, "He was sure Valiere had a Protection from Mr. Secretary Harley; and Bara acting by Valiere's Orders, it was impossible he should suffer by the Government; and that Valiere must be a great Rogue, if he did not protect him."

Bara returned about the 27th of April, and, upon his landing, wrote to Mr. Harley; but, before an Answer came, he was seized at Dover, and brought before the Mayor.

Capt. Whitehall's Examination.

This was done by the Means of Captain Whitehall; who gives the following Account of the Matter:

In April 1706, Carter informed him, "That Bara was returned;" whereupon he seized him, and had him examined before the Mayor of Dover, who took Affidavits of the Matter.

Mr. Whitehall sent an Account of this to the Commissioners of Customs, with Copies of the Affidavits, by a Letter of the 29th of April.

This Letter follows:

Custom-house, Deal, 29th April, 1706.

Honourable,

It is now about a Year since I laid before you the Depositions of Cook and others, relating to a Correspondence carried on by some French Refugees with France; in which one Carter, a Butcher of this Town, had a considerable Hand; but withdrew himself from his Family, to avoid being apprehended, as I acquainted you by my Letter of the 19th of April, 1705. About Two Months ago, Carter sent me Word, "That, if I would permit him to return to his Family, and suffer him to be quiet at Home, and obtain for him the Pardon of the Government for his past Faults, he would soon make a Discovery of some Practices of very dangerous Consequences to the Government:" And accordingly, about a Month ago, he gave me an Account, "That one Barra, a Frenchman, was lurking about these Parts, waiting the Opportunity of a French Boat, to come to fetch him to France;" and, in Pursuit of that Information, he discovered to me where the said Bara was concealed; but before I could get to the Place, he had got his Passage, by a French Boat, for France, about Half an Hour.

On Friday last Carter came to me again, and told me, "That Barr's Return was every Day expected." And was so diligent in the Prosecution of his Information, that Yesterday Morning he acquainted me where Barr, one Beverton a Shopkeeper of Canterbury, and the rest of Barr's Accomplices, were. Whereupon, with the Assistance of Mr. Forster (your Surveyor of Dover), I apprehended Barr, alias Renew, alias Barrault, alias Monminion, alias Julian, by all which Names he is known to several Persons who appeared against him. For the rest, I humbly refer you to the Copy of the several Depositions sent you herewith, which will give you further Information in this Matter: But I am sorry I must tell you, that though I have got the Man, yet he had Time to convey away a Packet, which I presume was Letters, before I could apprehend him; all the rest of the Goods that he brought over with him being only Two Ankers and a few Bottles of Brandy, which I seized at St. Margaret's, and have brought to the Custom-house at Dover, where also Barr is now in Gaol. Wherefore I humbly beseech your favourable Presentation of this Matter to the Secretaries of State, that Carter may be pardoned for his past Crimes; and that he may have such sitting Encouragement as may enable him to do further Services, which I believe he is capable of; for he is not yet discovered to be the Informer in this Case. I am

"Your Honours most obedient Servant,
L. Whitehall.

"To the Honourable Commissioners of Customs."

"This gave Occasion to Mr. Secretary Harley to send a Letter to Mr. Whitehall, dated the 29th of May, 1706; which follows:

"Whitehall, May 29th, 1706.

"SIR,

"I am very well satisfied of your Care and Vigilance for Her Majesty's Service, and the Performance of the Duty of your Office; and I both have already and shall also continue to commend your Diligence, where it may be of Use to you, in the Affair of seizing Bara: And I am willing to take it only for Inadvertency, when you saw or heard of a Warrant under my Hand, that you presumed to send Notice of it to any One but myself: I am willing to impute it to nothing but Want of Attention; because, I am sure, had you thought of it, you must consider, that, in this Juncture, it is of great Consequence to have Intelligence of what they are doing in France. I will not suppose you think yourself proper to judge who is to be employed upon such Occasions, nor to know what their Business is. As to the Business of Duties, or Customs, that certainly belongs to you to take Care of; and when any of those Things fall within your Notice, you will certainly do your best for the Queen's Interest. Therefore I must now inform you, that the Man named Clarke, and the other called Bara, are made Use of, upon a sudden Exigence, on Behalf of the Public: They were formerly Friends, but since fallen out, and therefore fit to watch each other; and I shall be glad you will have an Eye upon them both, and give me directly Notice of their Motions, whenever they appear there. I am,

"Sir, your humble Servant,

"Ro. Harley.

"It is very unfortunate, that none are taken but those who are to serve the Government; when, at the same Time, it is known that scarce a Week passes but the Enemies of the Government have their Emissaries land, without Observation; and it is more unfortunate that the stopping Clarke, some Weeks since, has hindered the Discovery of those Ships which took the Holland Convoy. You will acquaint Mr. Carter, that he need not apprehend any Thing from the Impertinence of Bara's Threatnings."

"To this Letter Mr. Whitehall wrote an Answer, of the 31st of May, 1706; of which the Copy followeth:

"May 31st, 1706.

"SIR,

"I cannot but think myself unfortunate, that the First Letter I have the Honour to receive from you should indicate any Doubt of my real Intentions so serve the Government.

"I am sorry that you can tell me, "That there are many Emissaries of France who can land without Observation:" I hope it is not within the District where I have to do. And as it is not easy for me to know what Persons have the Honour of your Countenance for the Public Service (especially when I am well informed, that they are wasted over, between England and France, at the Expence of the French); so I most humbly crave Leave to observe to you, that I can never make any Distinction of Persons coming from France, without the Directions of the Government (or from you) so to do. And therefore I do, with all Submission, pray, That you will be pleased to put a good Construction upon what I have or may do, on the like Occasions; and (that I may not, for the future, do any Thing which may cause ill Consequences to the Public) that I may have your Instructions (if you think it fit for me) to stop or take up Strangers and suspected Persons (lurking in these Parts), of whom I may have Information, since you are pleased to acquaint me, "That, (fn. 1) by stopping Clarke, some Weeks past, has hindered the Discovery of those Ships which took the Holland Convoy."

"I beseech your Pardon, for writing to Captain Baker, and not directly to yourself. But the Commissioners of the Customs having acquainted me, "That they had directed Captain Baker to lay those Papers relating to Bara before you, and that I was to correspond with him in such Cases; led me to do it, not knowing then that it was any Fault in me. And therefore, since you are pleased to pass it off as Inadvertency, and to give me Liberty of writing to you; I dare, with all Respect, assure you, that I will behave myself with more Caution for the future.

"In Obedience to your Commands, I take this Occasion to acquaint you, that I have of late had a very watchful Eye on both Clarke and Bara; but cannot find that there is any Disagreement between 'em; for they have, within this Week, been frequently together at Deal, in a friendly corresponding Manner (particularly last Sunday and Monday, as also Yesterday, when Clerk rid from Deal); and seem to be very well acquainted with each other's Purposes, according to the Information I have received of them, which I have good Reason to give Credit to. I am, with all dutiful Respect, Sir,

"Your most humble and most obedient Servant."

"The same Day, after he had sent away his Letter, Bara applied to Whitehall, to help him to a Boat to go for France; which he refused to do, without an Order from the Secretary; and thereupon, the same Day, Mr. Whitehall sent away another Letter to Mr. Secretary Harley; of which this is a Copy:

"31 May, 1706.

"SIR,

"I think it my Duty to acquaint you, that; since the Dispatch of my Letter of this Date, Mr. Bara came to me at Deal, and told me, "That he could not carry on his Purposes he was sent hither for, without I would assist him in getting a Boat to carry him to France;" which, I confess, startled me, that he should make so free Application to me, who had so lately taken him up; but, persisting in his Desires, I was obliged to let him know, that I could not give him any Aid of that Sort without your Authority for so doing; which, he said, he wanted; but would write to you this Post for it. So, waiting your Commands, which I shall endeavour to execute with the greatest Diligence, Fidelity, and Secrecy, I am, &c."

"Mr. Harley returned an Answer, dated the 1st of June, 1706; of which this is a Copy:

"Whitehall, June 1st, 1706.

"SIR,

"I have this Day received Two Letters from you, which give me fresh Instances of your great Care in every Thing that may be for Her Majesty's Service. You will easily believe, it is of the greatest Consequence to have early Advice of what the Enemy is doing; and, in order to it, I should be very glad you would furnish Bara with what he wants, provided you can do it without giving any Cause of Suspicion, or being observed by any body. I am, Sir,

"Your most humble Servant,

"Ro. Harley."

"But Mr. Whitehall did nothing upon the Letter, not thinking it contained Orders which were full and clear enough to justify him.

Bara.

"But Bara says, "That, Four Days after his Examination before the Mayor of Dover, he was carried to London by Mr. Harley's Warrant; and owned to the Secretary, he had been in France; and that he had been sent thither by Valiere."

"Bara continued in Custody 21 Days; after which, Mr. Harley sent for him, and told him, "He had prevailed with the Queen to pardon him; but he must go away immediately to Dunkirk, and see what Naval Preparations were there; and bid him say nothing, and he would make Use of him."

"Bara performed this Voyage in an open Boat, and returned in Seven Days; and brought Word, "That there were but Two Men of War, both unrigged; and that Fourbin was gone Northwards, after the Russia Fleet."

W. Mason.

"This was the Time he was carried over by William Mason, Waterman; who says, "That, as soon as they landed, Bara and he went directly to the Governor's House: Mason stayed below till Bara came down to him. Bara was well known and well received in that Town. They stayed there Two Days, and then returned.

"Bara was set ashore near Sanddown Castle: He was very fearful of being seen, being well known on the Coast."

Bara.

"Bara says, "In the same Year he was sent over by Mr. Harley for the Paris Gazette, and brought it accordingly."

I. Howard.

"It appears, by the Examination of Isaac Howard, "That this Year he carried Bara over to Calais; that, when they landed, a File of Musketeers took them into Custody; and, as they were going along, a Man speaking to Bara, he struck him a Blow upon the Face with his Hand: That they were carried before the Commissary, where Bara was kindly entertained. He stayed with the Commissary Two Hours; was entirely at Liberty, during Two Days that he stayed: After which, Howard brought him back to The Downes."

Bara.

"Bara says, "He was arrested at Deal, which he thought was by Valiere's Means, who hindered him to have a Boat. He sent Word of this to Mr. Secretary Harley; who wrote to Captain Whitehall, to help Bara to a Boat, but he would not do it; so Bara went back to London, and complained to the Secretary of him."

"Bara says, "He was at Calais, with Chateauneus, about Six Weeks before The Hampton-Court and Grafton were taken. The Commissary told him, "There was a great Fleet in The Downes; which were to be convoyed by some Men of War; and that they were equipping at Dunkirk Nine Men of War, to intercept that Convoy; and he had received most pressing Orders to speed away the Seamen to mann those Ships:" He said, "He hoped this Year they should have their Revenge, and Ships should not go out of The Downes so easily as they had done." At this Time Chateauneus told him, "Valiere played him a Trick;" and shewed him Part of a Letter from Valiere (but would not let him read the Whole), wherein Valiere bid Chateauneus "have a Care of Bara; for that he was employed by the Government in England."

"Bara stayed but Three Days at Calais; and came directly to Mr. Harley, and told him what he had heard about the Dunkirk Squadron; but did not then mention what had been shewn him in Valiere's Letter; having several Times before acquainted Mr. Secretary, "That he trusted Valiere too much; and that he was not the Man he took him to be." But Mr. Harley never answered him any Thing to that Matter.

When Bara told Mr. Harley about the Dunkirk Squadron, he seemed not to believe it; but when those Ships were taken, Bara went to him, and asked him, "If he did not believe it now?" To which he replied, "He did remember Bara had told him of it."

Carter.

"John Carter says, "That, about the 27th of March, 1706, he came first acquainted with Bara, who used to go over from England to Calais, and return in French Boats. He was seized at Dover by Mr. Whitehall, which Bara suspected to be by Carter's Means: He was examined before the Magistrates; but was soon after sent for to London, by Mr. Harley's Orders; and in a short Time after returned to Deal, and, pulling out of his Pocket a Handful of Guineas, shewed them to Carter, and told him, "See what I have got, by being seized at Dover, by your Means."

"Valiere spoke very ill of Bara to Carter; and persuaded him not to have any Thing more to do with him: But though both of them railed at each other, when asunder; yet, when they met, they appeared to be very good Friends.

Vallere.

Bara doing little Service for Valiere, as he pretends, he broke with him; and then sent one Green, of Gravesend, to Monsieur Chateauneus; but he also did little Service, and was no more employed.

"He after engaged one Stephen Barry, a Druggist, in London, who was then lately broke. He was sent over to Calais, by the Way of Holland; and was directed to tell Chateauneus, "That Valiere's Meaning was, only to get such News as he thought fit to send, and to desire him to convey it to Valiere."

"The First Boat which Valiere owns to have sent over to France was Bland's, a Waterman, of St. Catherine's, near The Tower.

Bland.

"The Account which Bland gives of his Voyage is as follows: "That, in August 1705, Valiere, telling him he had a sufficient Authority to protect him from any Mischief might arise upon Account of his going to France, sent him to Calais, with some Wool, consigned to Chateauneus, and a Letter. As soon as he landed at Calais, he was seized, and carried to the Governor, and after to the Commissary, to whom he delivered the Letter: Then he was carried to an Inn, and Provision made for him; and, falling sick there, a Physician was sent to take Care of him. He was used with much Civility, and the Commissary defrayed all Charges; and also, his Boat being much out of Repair, the Commissary took Care of having it put in very good Order, out of the King's Stores, without any Expence to him.

"He brought back Brandy, and a Letter for Valiere, which Bland delivered to him.

"In September following, he made a Second Voyage, upon Clark's Account, when he carried over Bara. Clark wrote a Letter, which he gave to Bara when they landed. Bara left him, and went directly into the Town. Bland was carried to the former Inn, and his Charges were paid, as before. He went often to the Commissary's House, and was much made of; and, after about Ten Days Stay, brought back Bara, and 17 Ankers of Brandy, and a Letter from the Commissary, which he delivered to Valiere.

Carter. Weaver. Wathing.

"About Midsummer 1706, Valiere employed John Carter to buy Wool, and procure Men to go over for him to France. Carter brought John Weaver and Philip Wathing to Valiere, who told them, "He would bear them out for going to France; for he was employed by Mr. Secretary Harley;" and shewed them a Paper, with his Name and a Seal; which they the rather gave Credit to, because Valiere had before been examined by the Magistrates, and set at Liberty: And thereupon Weaver, Wathing, and John Hartley (Apprentice to Weaver), went over to Calais, with some Wool, and a Letter to the Commissary, and another to one Camus a Merchant. They were all seized, at their landing, by a Guard, and carried before the Governor; who inquired of them, "What News in England, and what Ships there were in The Downes, and whither bound, and what Strength the English had in The Streights?" They told the Governor, "They had a Letter for the Commissary." The Governor sent them to him, and they delivered him the Letter. After Three or Four Days, the Commissary himself came to them, and brought them a Packet for Valiere; upon which, they returned for England, and delivered the Packet to him; who thereupon went immediately to London.

Hartley.

"Soon after, the same Crew went over again, with Wool, and a Letter to the Commissary. In their Passage they met with a small French Privateer, who inquired of them what Men of War and Merchant-men were then in The Downes. And, as Hartley says, Weaver and Wathing told them all they knew of the Men of War and Merchant Ships, whither they were designed, and when they were to sail; and, having given this Account, the Privateer suffered them to go on.

As soon as they landed, they were seized, and carried first to the Governor, and afterwards by the Guard to the Commissary, to whom they delivered their Letter, and then were carried to the Inn; where they were kept 10 or 12 Days under a Guard, and not suffered to go out, because the Dunkirk Galleys were then in the Road. When the Galleys were failed, the Commissary gave them a Packet for Valiere; and they returned, and delivered it to him.

"At this Time Valiere told them, "He could have other Men to go for less Money;" but they refused to take less, and so they parted.

Morillion, Verge.

"In July 1706, Valiere proposed to Daniel Morrillion and Joseph Verge to go to France; and bid them take in what Goods they pleased, and he would give them a Letter which should protect them. Upon the Credit of this, they provided Wool, and had Two Letters from Valiere; one to the Commissary, and the other to Camus, a Merchant, who was to furnish them with Brandy for their Wool; and then they Two, together with one Bailly, went over to Calais; where, upon their Arrival, they were seized by the Guard, and carried to the Governor; who examined them about the Number and Rates of the Men of War in The Downes, and particularly about the Dutch Transports, and if they knew to what Place they were bound, and if they were intended

Mr Bowles.

for a Descent upon any Part of France; what Frigates were cruizing off of Beachy, Dungeness, and The North Foreland, and what Merchant Ships there were in The Downes. They shewed the Governor the Letter they had for the Commissary; and he returned it to them, to carry to him. The Commissary sent them to Marvell's House; and told them, "They must not stir from Calais till they had his Packet;" which in Two or Three Days after he sent to them; directed, "To John Clarke, Merchant in Bristol," together with a Pass to secure them against Privateers; and they brought back Brandy with them.

In August they went over again; and upon their landing were carried to the Governor, and were again examined about what Ships were in The Downes. They told them, "The Dutch Transports were failed." They brought back Brandy, and a Packet for Valiere from the Commissary; and the Custom-house Boat coming up with them, they threw the Packet overboard."

Morillion. Wathing. Carter.

Valiere's general Directions to those he employed to go over to France were, "That, if they thought themselves in Danger of being taken by English or Dutch Vessels, they were to throw their Letters overboard; but if they met with French Ships, they should shew their Letters, which would help them to get to France."

Moriliion Verge.

Morillion and Verge, upon their Return, were brought before the Mayor of Deal. Verge denied they had been in France, but Morillion confessed it: Soon after both of them were sent for by Messengers to London, and carried before the Two Secretaries of State; where being examined, they acquainted them with all that passed at Calais, and with their throwing the Packet into the Sea, according to Valiere's Orders. Upon this, they were remanded into the Custody of the Messengers, where they remained Four Months, and then were discharged without any farther Examination.

Verge says, "That, whilst he was in Prison at Deal, Valiere came to him, and bid him not fear, he would take Care he should come to no Harm." And says, "That, the very same Night he came out of Custody, Valiere came to him, and proposed to him to go over again to France; but he refused to go, being sick at that Time."

Thomas Hatton.

"In August 1706, Valiere employed Thomas Gosby and Steed, both of Walmer, and Tho. Hatton, who carried over Wool, and a Packet for the Commissary. Upon their landing, they were immediately carried to the Governor, who received them very well; and asked them, "What News in. England? and what Ships of War, or Merchants, were then in The Downes?" The Commissary shewed his Letter to the Governor, and then carried them to Marvell's House, the Inn; and they had not Leave to return in Five or Six Days, till Letters came from Paris; and then were dispatched with Brandy, and a Letter to Valiere, which were delivered to him.

Carter.

Gosby and Steed refused to go a Second Time, because (as they told Carter) they were examined very strictly by the Commissary, what News was in England, and what Ships were in The Downs? And the Commissary took Notes of all they said; and detained them there till they sent to Paris, and had a Return: And for these Reasons, they were afraid to go any more."

R. Hatton.

"In September 1706, Valiere sent over Ralph and Thomas Hatton. He pressed them to go over immediately, though they had no Goods; which they refused to do; whereupon some Wool was provided, which the Two Hattons carried to Calais, with a Letter to the Commissary. R. Hatton believes the Letter did not relate to Trade, because the Wool was sold to another Person. They were seized upon landing, and carried with the Letter to the Commissary; who went with them to the Governor, and did not open his Letter till he came to the Governor's House.

"They were received very kindly by the Governor, who made them drink, a Thing very unusual. The Governor opened the Letter, and shewed it to several Gentlemen who were there, who all seemed very well pleased with it. The Commissary carried them, by the Governor's Orders, to the best Inn in Calais, where they were very well treated at his Costs.

Johanna Riches.

"The next Day the Commissary brought a French Gentleman to them, and said, "The Governor had ordered that they should carry him to England;" which they did. They brought no Letters or Goods; and apprehending they should be forced to land in the Day-time, they desired the Gentleman, "If he had any Papers, he would throw them over-board;" but he replied, "He carried all in his Head." The Gentleman spoke good English. The Hattons brought him to Valiere, at Mrs. Richie's House, at Midnight; who procured a Horse for him; and he went away to London that Night, without a Guide; and Valiere followed the next Morning."

"Valiere says, in his Examination, "This Man was Stephen Barry, who brought the News of the Relief of Turin." But Mrs. Riches says, "He told her, that it was his Brother-in-law, who lived at Calais." And she also says, "He brought divers Papers with him, which he gave Valiere to read."

Carter.

About a Week after, Valiere returned to Deal; and within a Week after that, the French Gentleman came back, and brought with him Three other Frenchmen, who were shut up privately with Valiere for some Time. Afterward they all rode out together with Valiere; who, by some Means or other, got them over to France. Mrs. Riches says, "That Valiere told her, "That the Father of One of those Three Frenchmen was as great a Man as any in France."

2 Hattons Reven.

In October 1706, Valiere sent the Two Hattons, and William Reven, over to Calais, with Wool, and a Letter to Chateauneuf. Upon landing, they were seized, and carried before the Governor; after that, they were taken before a Judge, and were accused of having carried a Spy into England.

Marvelles desired them, by Order of the Commissary, to deny they carried any body; which they did. They were kept in Custody 14 or 15 Days, till Orders came from Court to discharge them; and then the Commissary sent them away to England, with One Letter to Valiere.

Riches.

"About a Month after, Valiere employed Reven, Tho. Finnes, and Francis Baker, of Dover, to go over to Calais, with some Wool, and a Sack, in which was a Box and other Things; but their Boat was seized at Sandwich by the Custom-house Officers, who took away the Wool, but over-looked the Sack, which they brought back to Valiere. And about a Week after, he sent Reven, Barker, and R. Hatton, with the same Sack, some Wool, and a Letter to the Commissary at Calais, together with a young Man whom they carried to France. They were seized, and taken to the Governor's House, as usual; and the Commissary came to them, and opened his Letters there. They were in a short Time dismissed, with Brandy, and a Letter from the Commissary to Valiere.

Valiere.

"Hitherto Valiere had employed other People to go to France upon his Account; but, about June 1707, he went himself to Bulloigne, with Weaver and Wathing, and they carried over One Pack of Wool. They went off from Hyth. As soon as they landed, they were all seized, and kept in Custody, with a Centinel upon them: But Valiere had Leave to speak with one Strike, a Merchant; who in Two Days got him released. Valiere told Strike, "His Business was to get News, in order to lay Wagers; and that he had a Friend at Paris, who would send the News, if Strike would receive it, and transmit it to him." He pretends he neither wrote nor spoke to the Commissary, or Governor of Bullogne, at this Time; but was only encouraged by Strike; and that he then discovered the Dunkirk Squadron was ready to fail, and sent the News of it to Mr. Secretary Harley.

Wathing.

"But Wathing, in his Account of this Voyage, says, "That Valiere, upon writing to the Governor, was set at Liberty;" and that he afterwards told them, "He had waited upon the Governor, and done the Business."

R. Hatton.

This is confirmed by R. Hatton; who says, "That Valiere, upon his Return, told him, "He had been the longer, because he was kept under a Guard till he could get a Letter delivered to the Governor; and then he was set at Liberty, and waited upon the Governor."

Valiere.

Valiere went over a Second Time in July, with Weaver, Wathing, and Le More, and One Pack of Wool. The Duke D'Aumont was then at Bullogne. He pretends, that at their Landing they were more strictly confined than before; but, after some Days, the Duke sent for them all before him, and asked them many Questions concerning their Business; and how they ventured over with so small a Quantity of Wool? Valiere said, "He was employed by Merchants concerned in Wagers; and his chief Business was, to get The Gazette early over." The Duke was satisfied with this, and promised he should have Intelligence; so he did not attempt to get it but from the Commissary Collanson. The Duke said, "He was going to Paris; and would take Care Collanson should have Intelligence, to furnish Valiere with it.

"There were several Gentlemen in Company with the Duke when this was talked of. The Duke said, "It would do no Hurt to them, to have the public News sent; for their Government was so wise, as to suffer no News to come abroad that would hurt them; whereas they could have Intelligence of the greatest Matters of Importance from England; and gave for an Instance, That they had lately certain Advice from thence, that the Duke of Savoy's Design was against Thoulon."

"When Valiere told this to Mr. Harley, he seemed to start, and said, "He wondered they should talk so."

"The Duke D'Aumont proposed to Valiere, to buy a Couple of Horses for him, and upon that Condition he should have Liberty to come when he would: Valiere agreed to do it; and the Duke sent his Groom along with him. These Horses were to be sent by The Bologne Sloop, which was to come to a certain Place for that Purpose.

"Valiere said, "He acquainted Mr. Secretary afterwards with this; who approved it, and gave him a Pass for the Groom, by the Name of Tho. Strick."

"Valiere adds, "That, while he was at Bologne, Mr. Strike gave him privately a Letter from his Friend at Paris, which told him, "That Monsieur Fourbin, with his Squadron of Nine Men of War, had Orders to pursue the Russia Fleet, though never so far Northward or Eastward, and to fall on them if possible;" and advised Valiere to insure upon them." He told this News to Mr. Harley as soon as possibly he could; who answered thereupon, "We have Twelve Men of War; we fear them not."

"He says, "When he was at Bullogne this Time, he saw Two Letters at the Commissary's; one, directed, "To Sir John Parsons;" and another, "To Mr. Caille." And Strike told him, "That the Duke D'Aumont held a constant Correspondence with them."

"He acquainted Mr. Harley, "That Caille held a Correspondence with France, and paid Money by Orders from thence."

Weaver Wathing.

R. Hatton.

P. Wathing. Jordan.

"This is Valiere's Account of his Second Voyage to Bologne; but Weaver and Wathing say, "That, when they were all carried to the Governor, he took Valiere aside, and had him in private several Hours: When they returned for England, Valiere put on-board Brandy and Champagne; and a Man whom they did not know was sent back with them; who, upon landing, went with Valiere to London. Le More was left behind, left he should betray the Groom when he came to England; but Le More was put on board a French Sloop afterwards, and set on Shore in England."

"Mr. Jordan says, "That, when Valiere was sick at Folkstone, in September 1707, he told him, "That the Governor of Bullogne was very rough with them at first, and told them, "They came over for something else than to bring such a small Parcel of Wool, which would not bear their Charges; threatening them, unless they told the Truth." Then Valiere desired to speak with the Duke privately; and told him, "He came to learn News;" which Expression much surprized the Duke: But Valiere told him, "That, if he could serve his Excellency in England, he would serve him faithfully." Valiere told Jordan, "That Le More was threatened with Death, being a Frenchman, and one who formerly had a Commission in an English Privateer; so he fell upon his Knees, and begged for his Life; and upon Valiere's Interest and pleading for him, he was pardoned." Le More told Jordan, "That he verily believed Valiere shewed Mr. Harley's Pass to the Duke at that Time."

"Tho. Hatton says, "That he lay about Fourteen Days to watch for The Bologne Sloop, by Valiere's Orders, to put on Board Two Horses, to be carried to Bologne." The Signal whereby he was to know the Sloop, was her hoisting Dutch Colours on her Maintop. Valiere gave him a Letter, which was to be delivered to the Captain of the Sloop; but, she not coming, he returned the Letter to Valiere."

Valiere.

"Valiere gives the following Account of his Third Voyage to Bologne: "That then he took over no Wool; that the Duke was then at Paris; but he told the Commissary, "The Horses were bought." He was then supplied with the News without Trouble; which at his Return, he told Mr. Harley; who was pleased with it, and ordered him Money; and directed him to go away immediately, and, at his Return, to come to him at Windsor."

Wathing. Verge.

"Wathing and Verge, who went with him this Voyage, give this Account: "That they were seized at landing; but Valiere was at Liberty, and went into the Town for Two or Three Hours; and then came to them, and told them, "They must get ready to go away that Night." He was in very good Humour, and said, "He had now catched the Old One:" By which they understood, he had heard some good News. They brought back Brandy; and landed Valiere at Dimchurch, who immediately went to London."

"The next Voyage, which (as Valiere says) was at the latter End of August, Valiere did not go over himself; but sent Verge, Wathing, and Weaver, who brought him the News of the Raising the Siege of Thoulon, and a Packet to Caille, the Merchant, in Aldermary Church Yard, which Valiere pretends he burnt, without opening it.

Wathing. Weaver. Verge.

"Wathing, Weaver, and Verge, speak of this Voyage in this Manner: They say, "They carried Letters from Valiere to the Commissary at Bologne, and some Wool. When they landed, they were seized, and carried to the Governor, and examined about the Ships in The Downes, and were asked several Questions as usual. The Commissary took them to his own House, and they dined at his own Table: The Captain of The Bologne Sloop dined with them; and boasted of his having robbed some English Gentlemen in Kent. They brought back Letters to Valiere, which they delivered to him."

"Joseph Verge says, "He believes Valiere to be disaffected to the Government; and gave this Reason for it: "That, being about to go over to Bologne, he said to Valiere, "Master, if we should bring back the good News that Thoulon was taken, he hoped Valiere would give them a Guinea or Two:" He made Answer, "That, if he would bring the News that the Siege was raised, he should be better pleased, and would give them Ten Guineas."

Valiere.

"In September 1707, Valiere sent over Le More, Wathing, and Verge, with a Letter to Collanson; but, they being seized as they came back, what they brought did not come to his Hands.

Verge, Wathing.

"Say, "They were taken by an Ostender in their Passage to Bologne, who took their Letters and every Thing from them. They came almost naked to Bologne; and the Commissary being absent, his Clerk refused to give them Credit; but Le More got Credit for about Five Pounds. After about 14 Days Stay, the Commissary's Clerk gave them Two Letters for Valiere. They landed at Dover, where their Boat was seized; and in their going to Deal, they were taken by Messengers, to whom they delivered the Letters directed to Valiere."

"Valiere says, "That what Letters he had, he used to send to Mr. Harley; and that, in the Three Years Time he has been employed, he believes he has sent him Half a Score."

Valiere.

"He also says, "That one Fitzgerald made a Proposition to him, to join with him and Two other Persons, to carry off Monsieur Huguetan." He did not acquaint Mr. Harley with this; the Reason whereof was, that Mr. Harley told him, "He was not to meddle with any Business but what he employed him in."

"He says, "That one Pope and Charles Coxill, both of Lid, received and returned Letters to and from France; that he saw Coxill at Bologne, and that he bought Horses for the Duke; that Pope was employed to supply The Bologne Sloop with Wool and Intelligence." He told Mr. Harley of it; who bid him mind the Business he employed him in, and not trouble himself with other Matters.

"Johanna Riches says, "That, towards the latter End of April last, Valiere came to her House at Deal, in the Night, and desired a private Lodging; and soon after sent her out, to learn what Men of War were then in The Downes. She went to the Packetmaster; who told her, "There were only Three Men of War there," and named them to her. She brought the Account to Valiere presently: She has forgot the Names of Two of them; but verily believes The Royal Oak was One of them, because a Midshipman belonging to The Royal Oak was at that Time at her House, and borrowed a Bottle of Sal Armoniac of her for his Wife, who was then on Board The Royal Oak.

"Upon her naming the Ships to Valiere, he set down the Names of them in his Book; and soon after went out, and stayed so late that no Lodgings could be got for him; so she sat up all Night, and he lay in her Bed."

"She further says, "That she believes Bland went over to France about that Time."

"For which she gives this Reason: That, Bland and Mrs. Atwood being together at her House, Bland said, "He hoped he should soon bring them better Liquor; and desired her to buy for him some Casks for Brandy." She says, "That Bland went into The Downes, and went aboard several Ships there. Bland told her, "It was only to get some of the Ships to take off his Brandy when he came back;" but she looked on that as a Pretence only; and that his true Business was, to observe what Ships were there, and of what Value they were. The same Thing is affirmed by Mr. Bowles, who gives a very particular Account what an impudent and dangerous Fellow this Bland is.

"Mrs. Riches says, "Bland owned to her, he had been Four Times in France since the Beginning of the War." Whereas Bland denies that he has been there more than Twice.

Carter.

"Carter says, "That he was intimately acquainted with Clarke, and always took him to be in the French Interest; he believed him to be a Papist, for he would never go to Church, and always talked favourably of the Papists." Carter often advised Clarke to be more cautious in managing his corresponding with France; for, if he continued to act in so public a Manner, the Mob would knock him on the Head. Carter said, "The Mob had several Times come about them, and called them French Dogs and Rogues, and reproached them, for betraying our Ships, and giving Intelligence to the Enemy."

"Valiere would often speak contemptuously of the great Men above; and said, "It was easier to put upon them, than such Men as Carter." He said, "He knew his Master Harley very well, and almost any Thing would serve him." Once, as Carter and "Clarke were riding together upon The Beach, they saw 18 Ships at Sea. Thereupon Clarke said, "Here is News for my Master Harley: I will send him Word, here is seen a Squadron of French Ships." Carter said, "What! before you know whether they are so or no?" To which Clarke replied, "It is all one for that; it will serve my Turn as well."

Mr. Whitehall.

"In the latter End of the Year 1706, Carter brought to Mr. Whitehall Three Letters, which he had received from Valiere, with Directions to put them into the Hands of the Men who were going to France; One of the Letters was directed to Camus, a Merchant at Calais; the Second, to the Commissary at Calais; the Third, to the Governor or Commissary of Bologne, he is not certain to which of them.

"Upon this, he wrote to Secretary Harley, and gave him an Account of those Three Letters; telling him, "That, the Wind being now out of the Way, he had Opportunity, if he pleased, of seeing them, and judging if Valiere dealt honestly or not:" But to this Letter he never received any Answer. Mr. Whitehall did neither open nor stop these Letters, having been before reprimanded by Mr. Secretary for what he had done.

"Mr. Whitehall says, "That Valiere and Bara were generally known upon the Coast by the Distinction of Mr. Harley's Spies; especially Valiere, who bragged of his being employed, on all Occasions, and in all Companies. Bara was more cautious, and seldom appeared by Day.

"Mr. Whitehall said, "It was his Opinion, and the general Opinion upon the Coast, that they carried more Intelligence to France, than they brought from thence." He says, "The Trade to France was much suppressed, till this Encouragement was given by employing so great a Number of Men; for Clarke did not confine himself to certain Persons, but employed every Body he could get; by which Practice, the whole Coast is corrupted: So that now a much greater Number of Officers will be wanting, to prevent the pernicious Intercourse with France, than have ever yet been employed."

Bowles.

"Mr. Bowles gives several Reasons, which made him think it necessary to examine Valiere; as, his public boasting of his Power to protect any one for going to France; his declaring in Coffee-houses, before the Magistrates, "That it was not Treason to trade with France, unless one carried Warlike Stores thither;" and his sending over Boats, when his License to remain unmolested on the Coast was expired. These and many other Reasons made Mr. Bowles conclude, That Valiere was indeed a Spy upon us; and that, by his Means, for these Two Years last past, France has had Intelligence to their Advantage, and are like still to have so: For Clark having sent over so many Sets of Boats, the same Gangs will be like to continue to go over on their own Accounts.

"And he believes that this may have been the principal Occasion of the Loss of several of our Frigates upon their Cruizing Stations; as also of the Loss of The Hampton Court and Graston, and so many of our Merchant Ships."

"May it please your most Excellent Majesty,

"We, Your Majesty's most dutiful Subjects, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, having entered into a serious Consideration of the said several Reports, have unanimously come to the following Resolutions thereupon:

"That it is our Opinion, That the Crime of which William Gregg stands attainted is of so heinous a Nature, and attended with such extraordinary Circumstances, that it may prove of very pernicious Consequence, if he should not be made an Example.

"And also, That it does plainly appear to us, as well by what Alexander Valiere and John Bara have informed against each other, as by the many Examinations taken concerning them, that they were both in the French Interest, and unfit to be trusted or employed by any Persons in Your Majesty's Service: And that the open and public Manner of the Correspondence managed by them with the Governers and Commissaries of Calais and Bologne could tend only to carry on an Intelligence to the Advantage of Your Majesty's Enemies; and that it is highly probable thereby the Stations of our Cruizers, the Strength of our Convoys, and the Times of falling of our Merchant Ships, have been betrayed to the French.

"May it please Your Majesty,

"It is Your Majesty's Glory, and the Happiness of Europe, that You are at the Head of One of the greatest Confederacies that ever was known in History; and it is the common Concern of the whole Alliance, that Your Councils should be kept with the strictest Secrecy: But, in the Papers now laid before You, Your Majesty will be pleased to observe, that some of Your Resolutions of the greatest Moment, and that required the utmost Secrecy, have been sent to Your Enemies by the same Post they were dispatched to the Allies; that all the Papers in Mr. Secretary Harley's Office have, for a considerable Time, been exposed to the View even of the meanest Clerks in that Office; and that the Perusal of all the Letters to and from the French Prisoners was chiefly trusted to Gregg, a Person of a very suspicious Character, and known to be extremely indigent. It is not easily to be known what ill Consequences may have attended such Negligence. But we depend upon it, that, these Matters being thus plainly laid open to Your Majesty, we shall be secured against any Dangers of this Nature for the future.

"We are further in Duty bound to beseech Your Majesty, that all possible Methods may be used, to put a Stop to that dangerous, and which may soon prove fatal, Intercourse between Your Majesty's Subjects and France, which has of late received so great an Encouragement by the Countenance and Protection given to Valiere and Bara; since, unless that be effectually done, Your Majesty's Enemies will continue to have what Intelligence they please, Your Majesty's Men of War and Merchant Ships will be in Danger of being betrayed to the French, and that most destructive Trade of sending Wool to France, which has been with much Charge and Trouble interrupted, and in good Measure suppressed, will be revived to a greater Degree than ever."

"Here follows the Examinations of Valiere, &c. (videlicet,)

Valiere's Examination.

"Alexander Valiere, alias John Clark, being examined, faith, "That he is a Native of France, and came over into Ireland in the French Regiments sent thither with King James." He pretends he deserted 14 Days before the Battle of The Boyne; he was hired as a Servant by an Ensign in Belcastel's Regiment.

"After the War of Ireland was over, he came into England; and, after having served several Persons, he bound himself Apprentice to a Peruke-maker; and when his Time was out, he went to live in the City, and followed that Trade.

"He pretended, that he entered into Merchandizing while the Peace lasted, and that he had a Part in a Ship that was stopped in France; and upon that Account, he applied to Secretary Hedges, to get a Pass for Holland; but it was refused.

"One Wilmot of Doctors Commons was employed upon Occasion of treating about the Exchange of Prisoners, he named D'Allegre, Gallisioniere, &c.; and Valiere said, "He was made Use of as an Interpreter on those Occasions."

"He said, "He gave some Account about one Hanam, who carried on a fraudulent Trade between Ireland and France; and he does not know but that might be the Occasion that Mr. Secretary Harley might first think of him to procure Intelligence."

"That, in the Year 170 4/5, Mr. Secretary Harley proposed to him to be employed in getting Intelligence. Valiere said, "He could do it, by the Means of one John Bara, who was then in France, and was acquainted with Monsieur Chateauncus, Commissary at Calais."

"He had about £.150. from Mr. Harley in about a Month's Time, upon account of settling this Correspondence, which enabled him to furnish Bara with about £70. and to make a Present to Chateauneus. All the Service Bara did was to come over from Calais Twice, Once in a French Boat which Bara hired, and brought only the News of the Prince of D'Armstadt's being killed; and Once in Bland's Boat, which Valiere hired, and then brought the News of Barcelona's being taken.

"Bara went back to France, in 3 or 4 Days, in the same Boat, with only Bland's Boy, and (as Valiere pretended) carried from him to Chateauneus, Sattinette for making a Bed, a Watch, Scarlet Stockings, and several Toys, which was the Present afore mentioned. Bara doing little Service, Valiere soon broke with him.

"In a short Time after, Bara came to England again, and brought over with him a Frenchman, who had been a Sea Officer. Valiere acquainted the Secretary with this, in September, or October, 1705; who granted his Warrant for apprehending of them, but they both made their Escape.

"In the Spring following, Valiere saw Bara at Deal, when he was just come out of the Custody of a Messenger, having been first apprehended by the Magistrates of Dover for coming from France. At that Time, he was informed, Bara had got a Pass from the Secretary of State.

"Valicre sent one Green, of Gravesend, over to Monsieur Chateauneus; but he also did little Service, and was no more employed.

"Valiere said, "He then engaged one Stephen Barry, a Druggist in London, who had lately broke; he was sent over to Calais by the Way of Holland:" He was directed to tell Mr. Chateauneus. "That Valiere's Meaning was only to get such News as he thought fit to send, and desire him to convey it to him."

"Once, at the Beginning of the Year 1706, there was some News sent to Valiere by a French Boat; but they sent him Word, "That, if he expected any more, he must send a Boat for it, for they would not be at the Troubleor Charge of sending it over." Thereupon, about Midsummer 1706, Valiere employed one John Carter, of Deal, to buy some Wool, in order to send an English Boat; and then P. Wathing, J. Weaver, and Weaver's Apprentice, were sent over, with a Pack of Wool and a Letter, and returned with News, "That Philip was like to lose Spain." This he sent to Mr. Secretary.

"About a Fortnight after, the same Boat went over again, with the like Quantity of Wool, and a Letter to the Commissary of Calais.

"The next Time, Valiere sent Thomas Gosby, Tho. Hatton, and one Steed of Walmer, with Wool, and a Letter to the Commissary; but the Commissary stopt out of their Cargo One Hundred Livres, for the Charge of settling the Intelligence.

"Then Valiere sent over the Two Hattons, with 80 Pounds of Wool, and a Letter to Chateauneus. They brought over Stephen Barry, who came Express to Valiere, with the News of the Relief of Turin, and this Express caused Rejoicings in London the same Day.

"Next he sent over William Reven, with the Two Hattons, and some Wool, with a Letter; but they were detained Prisoners, and Chateauneus stopt Valiere's Wool, and he had nothing for it.

"Valiere sent Once more to Calais, F. Baker, W. Reven, and R. Hatton; but they brought no News, only an Order from Chateauneus, "that he should send thither no more."

"About Midsummer 1707, he went himself to Bologne, with Weaver and Wathing, and One Pack of Wool. They were all seized at landing, and all kept in a Room, and a Centinel upon them; but Valicre had Leave to speak with his Merchant, Mr. Strike, who in Two Days Time got Valicre released. Valicre told Strike of his Business in getting News, in order to lay Wagers, and "that he had a Friend at Paris, would send the News to Strike, if he would transmit it to England." Valiere pretended he did not write or speak either to the Commissary or Governor this Time, but had only Encouragement from Strike. Valicre said, "That he then discovered that the Dunkirk Squadron was ready to fail, and sent the News to Mr. Harley."

"Valiere went over a Second Time to Bologne, with Weaver, Wathing, and Le More, and One Pack of Wool. The Duke D'Aumont was then at Bologne. At their landing, they were then more strictly confined than before; but after some Days the Duke sent for them all before him, and asked them many Questions concerning their Business, and how Valiere ventured over with so small a Quantity of Wool. Valiere told him, "He was employed by Merchants concerned in Wagers, and his chief Business was to get The Gazette early over." The Duke was satisfied with it, and promised he should have Intelligence; so he did not attempt to get any but from the Commissary Collanson.

"The Duke said, "He was going to Paris, but would take Care that Colanson should have the Intelligence, to furnish Valiere with the same." There were several Gentlemen in Company with the Duke D'Aumont, when this was talked of. The Duke said, "It would do no Hurt to them to have the public News sent; for their Government was so wise, as to suffer no News to come abroad that would do them Hurt;" whereas they have Intelligence of Matters of the greatest Importance from England; for Instance, "That they had lately certain Advice from England, that the Duke of Savoy's Design was upon Thoulon." When Valiere told this to Mr. Harley, he seemed to start, and said, "He wondered they should talk so."

"The Duke D'Aumont proposed to him, "That he should buy a Couple of fine Horses for him; and upon that Condition, Valiere should have Liberty to come when he would."

"Valiere agreed to do it; and the Duke sent his Groom along with him. These Horses were to be sent by The Bologne Sloop, which was to come to a certain Place for that Purpose. Valiere said, "He acquainted Mr. Secretary afterwards with this; who approved it, and gave him a Pass for the Groom, by the Name of Thomas Strick."

"Valiere said, "That Mr. Strike gave him privately a Letter from his Friend at Paris, which told him, "That Monsieur Fourbin, with his Squadron of 9 Men of War, had Orders to pursue the Russia Fleet, though never so far Northward or Eastward, and to fall on them if possible; and advised Valiere to insure upon them." He said, "He told Mr. Harley this News as soon as possible he could;" who made Answer thereupon, "We have Twelve Men of War; we fear them not."

"The Horses being bought, Valiere went over the next Time without Wool, with Verge and Wathing. The Duke was then gone to Paris; but Valiere told the Commissary, "The Horses were bought." He was then supplied with the News without any Trouble; which he told Mr. Harley at his Return; who was pleased with it, and ordered him Money; and directed him to go away immediately, and upon his Return to come to him at Windsor.

Towards the latter End of August last, he sent over Verge, Wathing, and Weaver; and they brought him the News of the raising the Siege of Thoulon, and a Packet to one Caille, a Merchant in Aldermary ChurchYard. Valiere pretended he burnt the Packet without opening it.

"In September last, he sent over Le More, Wathing, and Verge, with a Letter to Monsieur Colanson; but, they being seized as they came back, what they brought for him did not come to his Hands.

"Valiere said, "What Letters he had he used to send to the Secretary; and that he believes he has sent Half a Score in the Three Years Time he has been employed."

"Valiere said, "There is one Fitzgerald, who made a Proposition to him, to join with him and Two other Persons to carry off Huguctan." He did not acquaint Mr. Secretary Harley with this. The Reason, he said, was, that Mr. Secretary told him, "He was not to meddle with any Business but what he employed him in."

"Valiere says, "When he was at Bologne the Second Time, he saw Two Letters at the Commissary's, one directed to Sir John Parsons, the other to Mr. Caille; and Strike told him, "The Duke D'Aumont held a constant Correspondence with them."

"He acquainted Mr. Secretary, "That Caille had a Correspondence with France, and paid Money by Orders from thence."

"He said, "That one Pope and Charles Coxhill, both of Lydd, received and returned their Letters." He said, "He had seen Coxhill at Bologne; and that he brought Horses for the Duke, that Pope was employed to supply The Bologne Sloop with Wool and Intelligence." He says, "He told Mr. Secretary Harley of it, who bid him mind the Business he employed him in, and not trouble himself with other Matters."

Valiere said, "That he told Mr. Harley, That he knew that Bara had 500 Livres given him in France, for Service to the King." He said, "He knew this to be Fact.

Barbier's Examination.

"Daniel Barbier, living at the Mug-house in LongAcre, being examined, faith, "That he has known Alexander Valiere, now commonly called John Clerk, ever since the Year 1690; he deserted from the French about the Time of the Battle of The Boyne, or was then taken Prisoner, he knows not which.

"He had on his French Regimental Cloaths, when the Examinant first saw him; he came over with the 7000 Men sent from France to assist King James; he was not taken into the Regiment, but was a Servant to Mr. Doge, an Ensign in Captain Rochfort's Company in Belcastel's Regiment, where he continued about Two Years.

"After Ireland was reduced, he came over with the Examinant's Brother into England, and served some Time as a Drawer in a Tavern, and afterwards served several Persons, and at last put himself Apprentice to one Guyon, a Peruke-maker in Long Acre; and after his Time was out, worked as a Journeyman in the City, and married a Midwife's Daughter behind The Exchange, and there lived by making Periwigs. He was looked upon as a Papist, and, in his Discourse with this Examinant and others, he always seemed to talk for France and that Interest.

"The last Time the Examinant saw him was the last Thanksgiving-day, when the Queen went to St. Paul's. He told the Examinant, "He was just come out of the Messenger's Hands, and that he had now got a better Trade than Peruke-making."

"The Examinant said to him, "Have a Care; you have not been in Custody for your good Deeds. Beware of Tyburn."

February the 26th, 1707/8

"Daniel Barbier."

Guerrier's Examination.

"Mathew Guerrier, Peruke-maker in Birchin Lane, being examined, faith, "That he first came to know Alexander Valiere immediately after the Battle at The Boyne, at which Time Valiere deserted from the French Service; he did not list himself, but was Footman to Mr. Doge, an Ensign in Captain Rochefort's Company, in Belcastel's Regiment.

"After the War was ended, the Regiment quartered at Kingsale; and Mr. Doge, at his Request, gave him Leave to quit his Service; at which Time the Lieutenant Colonel of the same Regiment offered to take him into his Company, and proffered him 5 or 6 Guineas; but Valiere refused it, by which the Examinant and others were more confirmed in their Opinion, that he was a Coward.

"The Examinant did not fee Valiere any more till about Twelve Years ago; and some while after that, they lodged and worked together at Jacob's Coffeehouse in Threadneedle Street, for about Two Months; and then parted, upon a Suspicion that the said Valiere was a Papist, and not an honest Man either in his Dealings or Conversation; and one Dubellier, who is a Roman Catholic himself, did since tell him, that Valiere is a Papist; for which Reasons, the Examinant has not kept up any Acquaintance with him ever since.

"After Valiere was taken into Custody, one Monteau, a Weaver in Spittle Fields, told the Examinant, "That the said Valiere was by all his Acquaintance suspected to be a Person disaffected to the Government, and would be often talking against it in public Company; upon which Account he once quarrelled with Valiere, at Jacob's Coffee-house, some Time ago, and threw a Glass of Beer in his Face.

February the 26th, 170 7/8

"M. Guerrier."

Bara's Examination.

"John Bara, of Stepney, in the County of Middlesex, Surgeon, faith, "That he is a Native of France, was Surgeon-major to Du Bart during the last War, except the Two last Years, when he left Du Bart upon a Dispute between them concerning a Prize.

"He came back to Dunkirk; and upon Examination of the Quarrel between him and Du Bart, he was acquitted; and while he continued at Dunkirk, had the Opportunity of assisting several French Officers and Soldiers in the English Service, who were brought Prisoners to Dunkirk, who promised to help him in his Profession, if he would come over to England, which he did as soon as the Peace was made.

"He became first acquainted with Valiere by the Means of a Master of a Ship belonging to St. Valery.

"This Acquaintance was continued by the Means of one Dormicour, who was come over from Dunkirk for Debt, and was a Friend to both of them.

"Dormicour being about to return to France, Valiere proposed to him (as he told Bara) the sending over The Paris Gazette sooner than by the Way of Holland; which Dormicour promised, if he could have Leave on the other Side.

"Afterwards Valiere made the same Proposal to Bara; and Bara answered, "That, if he could get a Protection for his Person, he would do it." Valiere told him, "He had a sufficient Authority for him to go to France; and he produced a Paper, sealed, with Secretary Harley's Name to it; and he and Bara went to Mr. Secretary Harley's Office, where Valiere obtained a Pass for him to go to Holland."

"He likewise gave him a Note for £.3. which was never paid, and also a Hook and Chain for a Watch, which was to be a Token to Nerinx at Rotterdam, to pay him £30. which he paid him.

"From Rotterdam he found Means to get to Dunkirk, and from thence to Calais, and continued between those Two Places till October 1705. He wrote constantly to Valiere, by the Name of Clerk, by the Way of Holland, during this Time.

"Being asked, "What News he sent?" He answered, "What he could pick up." He received £30. more about the 4th of October.

"While he was at Calais, Bland came over, with Two Packs of Wool consigned to Chateauneus, from Valiere; he stayed there Nine or Ten Days.

About the 4th of October, Bara came over in the Boat he had bought, and brought with him a Paris Gazette, which he delivered to Valiere.

"In 9 or 10 Days, Valiere sent Bara back to Calais, with Bland and his Boy, without any Goods, only with an open Letter to Chateauneus, for 17 Ankers of Brandy; they staid there 3 Weeks, and the Commissary bore their whole Expence.

"He continued at Margate about a Week, and went back with Bland's Boy, and they were driven to Newport; where being taken into Custody, they were released upon Bara's Writing to Chateauneus, and his writing to the Governor of Newport in their Behalf.

"At this Time Bara carried with him 36 Yards of Sattin, 2 Pieces of Stuff, 2 Pair of Stockings, and 2 Cases of Knives; the Stockings only were a Present to Mr. Chateauneus: the rest of the Things were for Bara's Subsistence, Valiere having, as he then said, no Money to give him.

"He stayed at Calais Two Months; and then came to Margate, and brought with him one Corselli, a Merchant, with whom he went to London, and told Valiere, "That he was come over with him;" and he has been since informed by Bland, that Corselli was sent back by Valiere by the Way of Holland.

Bara durst not stay in London, finding there were Messengers out from Mr. Harley to seize him, which were procured by Valiere, and with which he charged Valiere.

He stayed at Deal 7 Weeks, and at Dover 9 or 10 Days; from whence he found Means, by an exchanged Prisoner, to send a Letter to Chateauneus, to desire him to send over a Boat for him; which he did accordingly, and he went to Calais.

"Bara drinking One Night with Chateauneus, and complaining of his Usage from Valiere; the Commissary advised him to return to England, telling him, "He was sure Valiere had a Protection from Mr. Harley; and therefore, Bara acting by Valiere's Orders, it was impossible he should suffer by the Government; and Valiere was a great Rogue, if he did not protect him."

"Bara returned about the 27th April, and wrote to Mr. Harley; but, before he had an Answer, he was seized at Dover by the Magistrates; but after Four Days he was carried to London by Mr. Harley's Warrant; and Bara owned to him, that he had been in France, and that he was sent by Valiere. He continued in Custody 21 Days. After that Time, Mr. Harley sent for him, and told him, "That he had prevailed with the Queen to pardon him; but that he must go immediately to Dunkirk, and see what Naval Preparations were there; and bid him say nothing, and he should make Use of him."

"He performed this Voyage in an open Boat from London, and returned in 7 Days; and brought Word, "there were but Two Men of War, and they both unrigged; and that Fourbin was gone after the Russia Fleet Northwards."

"He called to Mind also, that, in October 1706, he was sent by Mr. Harley for The Paris Gazette; and he brought it accordingly.

"Bara says, "He was arrested at Deal (as he thought) by Valiere's Means, who hindered him to have a Boat. He sent Word of this to Secretary Harley, who wrote to Captain Whitehall, desiring him to help Bara to a Boat; but Mr. Whitehall would not do it; so Bara came back, and complained to the Secretary of it."

"Bara said, "He was at Calais, with Chateauneus, about Six Weeks before The Hampton Court and Grafton were taken." The Commissary told him, "There was a great Fleet in The Downes, which were to be convoyed by some Men of War; and that they were equipping at Dunkirk Nine Men of War, to intercept that Convoy; and that he had received the most pressing Orders to speed away the Seamen to Dunkirk." Chateauneus said, "He hoped this Year they should have their Revenge, and that the Ships should not get out of The Downs so easily as they had done."

"At this Time Chateauneus told him, "Valiere had played him a Trick;" and then shewed him a Letter of Valiere's; Part of which he read (but he would not let him see it all), wherein Valiere told Chateauneus, "That he should have a Care of Bara, for that he was employed by the Government in England." He stayed but Three Days at Calais, and came directly to Mr. Harley, and told him what he had heard about the Dunkirk Squadron; but did not at that Time take any Notice to him of what had been shewed him in Valiere's Letter; having several Times before acquainted him, "That he trusted Valiere too much, and that Valiere was not the Man he took him to be;" but Mr. Harley never answered him any Thing to that Matter.

"When he told Mr. Harley about the Dunkirk Squadron, he seemed not to believe it; but when those Ships were taken, Bara went to Mr. Harley, and asked him, "If he did not believe it now?" To which Mr. Harley replied, "He remembered Bara had told him of it."

Mercurii, 28 die Aprilis, 1708, hitherto examined by us,

Stamford.
Herbert.
Somers.

Bland's Examination.

"William Bland, of St. Katherines near The Tower, Waterman, faith, "That, in August 1705, being at Margate, he met with one Clerk (whose true Name he has been since informed is Valiere); and after some Time drinking together, Clark proposed to him to go to France; and told him, "He need not fear; for he had a sufficient Authority to protect him from any Mischief might arise from his going over."

"Bland agreed with him to go over for £.15. to Calais; which he did. He carried over Two Bags of Wool, which was consigned to Chateauneus, the Commissary at Calais, and a Letter to him. When he landed at Calais, he was seized, and carried to the Governor, and also to the Commissary, to whom he gave the Letter.

"He was after carried to the Inn, and had a Dinner provided for him and the Boy he had with him; and falling sick there, a Doctor was sent to him, and Care taken of him, and used with much Civility, and the Commissary paid all the Charges. He returned, and took with him 8 or 10 Ankers of Brandy, and a Letter for Clerke, and delivered the Letter and Brandy to Clerk."

"He said farther, "That, when he came to Calais, his Boat was much out of Repair; and the Commissary took Care to have it put in very good Repair, out of the King's Stores, without any Expence to him."

The next Time, which was the September following, he went over to Calais, which was also upon Clark's Account.

He carried nothing over, but Bara, and a small which he gave to Bara. When they landed, Bara less him, and went directly into the Town. Bland went to the former Inn; his Charges were paid as before. He went often to the Commissary's House, and was made much of. After about a Week or Ten Days Stay, he brought back Bara, and 17 Ankers of Brandy, and a Letter from the Commissary for Clark, which he delivered to Clark at Margate.

"Bland went himself to London, leaving his Boat and his Boy at Margate; and Bara took the Boat and Boy, and went to Ostend. He pretended that he was not at Mrs. Riches' in April last, but was there the latter End of May. He denied also that he went into France at any other Times since the Two Voyages above-mentioned. He appeared to be a Man of a very ill Repute."

Morilion's Examination.

Daniel Morilion, of Deal, being examined, faith, "That he first became acquainted with Clark at one Baillie's House in Deal, about July 1706. Clark then proposed to him to go to France, and bid him take in what Goods he pleased to carry thither; and Clark would give him a Letter, which should protect him.

"Upon the Credit of this, he and one Verge went over, and carried with them about 114lb. of combed Wool; and also a Letter directed to Mr. Chateauneus the Commissary of Calais, and another to one Camus a Merchant there, who was to furnish them with Brandy in Exchange for the Wool.

"Upon their Arrival at Calais, they were seized by the Guard, and carried to the Governor, who examined them about the Dutch Transport Ships, and to what Place they were bound. The Governor returned them the Letter, to carry to the Commissary; who sent them to Marveille's House, an Inn; and told them, "They must not depart from Calais till they had his Packet;" which he afterwards sent to them, directed, "To John Clark, Merchant, of Bristol;" together with a Pass, to secure them against Privateers.

Upon their Return, and Delivery of the Packet to Clark, he bid them get more Goods as fast as they could, and go over as often as they could, though he should be out of the Way, so that they could not have Letters from him. Accordingly, in August, they went over the Second Time with Wool; but had no Letter. When they came to Calais, they were carried to the Governor, who asked them several Questions, and in particular, "How they durst venture without a Letter?" The Commissary gave them a Packet for Clark; but the Custom-house Boat meeting them in their Return, they threw the Packet over-board, according to Clark's general Direction; which was, "Whenever they thought themselves in Danger of being taken by any English Vessels, they should throw their Letters over-board." When they saw Clerk, they told him, "They had thrown the Packet into the Sea." He said, "He was sorry they were forced to do it."

Morillion, upon his Return, discovered all those Particulars to the Mayor of Deal; and soon after he and Verge were sent for by Messengers, and carried before the Two Secretaries of State, where, being examined, they acquainted them with all the Particulars that passed at Calais, and of their throwing the Packet into the Sea according to Clerk's Order. Upon this, they were remanded to the Custody of the Messengers, where they remained Four Months; and at last were discharged out of Custody without any further Examination.

"Clark used to brag, in all Companies, "that he feared no Man;" and talked very boastingly of his Protection and Power from Mr. Secretary Harley.

"February the 25th, 1707/8 "Daniel + Morillion, his Mark."

Verge's Examination.

"Joseph Verge, of Deal, being examined, faith, "That he became first acquainted with John Clark at one Baylie's House at Deale." He told them, "That they might go to France as often as they could get Goods; and he would give them a Letter, which would protect them." Verge went to Canterbury, to buy Goods; and then he, Morillion, and Bayly, went to Calais, in July 1706. As soon as they landed, they were carried to the Governor, who asked them, "What Men of War and Merchant Ships were in The Downes; and particularly inquired about the Dutch Transport Ships, if they knew to what Place they were bound, and if they were intended for a Descent upon any Part of France."

"The Governor sent them, with the Letter from Clark (which they had shewed to him), to the Commissary, to whom it was directed; who stopped them Two or Three Days, and then sent them back with a Packet, directed, "To John Clerk, Merchant of Bristol." They sold their Goods to one Camus, to whom they brought a Letter from Clark, but had no Letter from him for Clerk. They landed the Goods near Birchington, about Midnight, and carried the Packet to Clerk, at Margate. Clerk asked them, "If they would go again?" They said, "They could not till their Goods were sold." Upon that, Clerk disposed of the Goods for them, and gave them the Money in Ten Days. Then they went to Calais again, without any Letter; but with such Goods as they could get upon their own Account. They were carried to the Governor, and examined as to what Ships were in The Downes; and the Commissary asked them, "If they brought a Letter from Clerk?" They said, "The Dutch Transports were failed, and that they had no Letter." They said, "Clerk told them, they might go, though they had no Letter." They brought back Brandy, and a Packet for Clerk from the Commissary; and the Custom-house Boat coming up with them, they threw their Packet over-board.

"Verge was carried before the Mayor of Deal, where he denied he had been in France; but Morillion confessed it. The Examinant and Morillion were both sent for, by Messengers, and examined by the Two Secretaries of State, and told them the whole Matter. The Examinant was remanded to the Messengers, where he lay 4 Months, and then, without further Examination, was discharged.

"When he was in Prison at Deal, Clark came to him, and bid him not fear, he would take Care he should come to no Harm.

"The very same Night he came Home to Deal, Clark came to him, and proposed to him to go over to France again; but he refused to go, being sick at that Time.

"In July, or August, 1707, Clerk sent for him again, and proposed to him to go to France; and shewed him, at several Times, Letters subscribed R. Harley. The same Night John Clark himself, Ph. Watton, and Verge the Examinant, went off from Deal Beach, and landed at Bologne the next Morning. They were seized when they landed; but Clark went to the Governor, and about Two Hours after returned, and bid the Men refresh themselves, for he would go back that Night. They brought back Brandy, and landed Clark at Dimchurch; and he went away immediately for London.

"In September they went over again from Hyth to Bologne, with about 240 lb. of Wool, and a very large Packet of Letters, directed to the Commissary. Upon their Arrival, they were seized, and carried to the Governor, and examined about the Ships in The Downes. The Commissary took them to his own House, and treated them at his own Table, where the Captain of The Bologne Sloop dined with them, and boasted of his having robbed some English Gentlemen in Kent.

"They brought back Letters for Clark, and landed at Dimchurch, and gave the Packet to Clerk.

"Some Time after, Clerk sent for Verge and Watton to Dover, and there they took in La More and about 30 lb. of Wool, and had Letters from Clerk, and intended to go for Bologne; but were taken by an Ostender, who took from them all their Cloaths, and all they had. In Verge's Hat was Clerk's Packet, which the Ostenders took from him. They could not get back to England, because of the Wind. They went to Bologne in a Manner naked; but, the Commissary being gone to Paris, they could not get Credit from his Clerk; but La More prevailed with One Mr. Strick, a Merchant, to give him Credit for £ 5. The Commissary's Clerk delivered Two Letters to them for Clerk. They put into Dover Peer, where their Boat was taken; and they being taken by Messengers, delivered to them the Two Letters directed to Clerk, which they had from the Commissary's Servant.

"He said, "he believed Clerk to be disaffected to the Government, and gave this Reason for it; that, being about to go over to Bologne, he said to Clerk, "If we should bring back the good News that Thoulon was taken, he hoped he would give them a Guinea or Two." Clerk made Answer, "That if he would bring News that the Siege was raised, he would be better pleased, and would give them Ten Guineas."

"February the 25th, 1707/8.

"Joseph Verge."

Weaver's Examination.

"John Weaver, of Deal, Mariner, being examined, said, "That John Carter, of Deal, brought him first acquainted with John Clark, about June, or July, 1706." Clark shewed him a Paper, with a Seal, and the Name of Mr. Secretary Harley, and said, "he was employed by him;" which Weaver believed the rather because Clark had been before examined by the Magistrates, and was set at Liberty.

"Clark proposed to him to go to France; and Philip Watton and he went in a small Deal Yawl to Calais, with a Parcel of Wool, and Letters to the Commissary Monsieur Chateauneus, and one Camus, a Merchant. As they landed, they were seized by a Guard, and carried immediately to the Governor; from thence to a House, whither the Commissary of Calais came to them, to whom they gave the Letter which they brought from Clark.

"They stayed there 4 or 5 Days, and then came back, and brought with them Brandy, and a Letter from the Commissary to Clerk; which, upon their Return, they delivered to him.

In a few Days after, they were sent over again to Calais, by Clark, with a Letter to the Commissary, and also some Wool; and they were treated as before. And when they returned, were charged with Letters to Clark, which they delivered to him. After this, Clark and they disagreed for some Time.

But, in June 1707, Clark proposed to Weaver and Watton, to go over again into France; and Clark and they went over to Bologne. Upon their landing, they were all Three made Prisoners; Clark had his Liberty in Two Days, the others were detained Prisoners 8 or 9 Days; and then they all returned for England.

In Six Weeks after, Weaver, Watton, Clerk, and La More, went over again to Bologne. They were confined all, except Clark; afterwards they were all carried to the Governor, who treated them civilly; Clark was taken by the Governor into another Room, and stayed with him privately about Two Hours. When they returned for England, Clark put on Board Brandy and Champagne Wine; and a Man whom they did not know was sent back with them.

In September 1707, Weaver, Watton, and Verge, made another Voyage to Bologne, and carried Wool, consigned to the Commissary.

They were not made Prisoners at this Time, but were carried to the Commissary's House, and dined with him; and that Afternoon they returned, with a Packet of Letters from the Commissary to Clark, and landed at Hythe.

February the 25th, 1707/8.

"John Weaver."

Wathing's Examination.

"Philip Wathing, of Deal, Mariner, being examined, saith, "That, in June 1706, he became first acquainted with John Clark; the said Wathing being then lately returned from France, where he had been a Prisoner.

Clark proposed to him to go to France again; and said, "he had Authority to bear him out; for he was used to send People to France, upon the Account of the Government."

After taking some Time for Consideration, the Examinant and one John Weaver agreed to go over; whereupon Clark and John Carter met them at an Alehouse. Clark was to give them Five Pounds apiece. Weaver desired to know, "What they were to carry?" Clark said, "Some small Matter of Wool, and such Letters as he should send to the Commissary of Calais, and to bring back whatever the Commissary should deliver to them."

The Examinant faith, "That Clark and Corter put Two Bags of Wool on Board a small Deal Yawl, and Clerk gave him a Letter to Chateauneus; and they went from Hythe, and they arrived at Calais in about Four Hours. They were seized at their landing, and carried before the Governor, who inquired what News in England, and about the Ships in The Downes; and asked several Questions, what Strength the English had in The Streights. They told the Governor, "They had a Letter for the Commissary;" the Governor sent them to him, and they delivered the Letter; and about Three or Four Days after, the Commissary came to them himself, and brought them a Packet of Letters to be delivered to Clerk; which Weaver delivered to Clerk upon their Return, and he went away immediately to London.

In July, Clark told the Examinant, "they must go again;" and ordered them to Hythe, where they took in Three Packs of Wool, and had a Letter to the Commissary. They were seized at landing, and carried first to the Governor, and after, by a Guard, to the Commissary's, to whom they delivered the Letter.

But, the Dunkirk Galleys being then in the Road, they were kept under a Guard for 10 or 12 Days, and not suffered to return till they were gone; then they returned to Margate, and gave the Packet to Clark.

The Examinant faith, That Clark told them, "he could have other Men for less Money;" and they refusing to go for less, Clark and they parted for that Time."

The Examinant said farther, "That, about June 1707, he and Weaver went to Clark, for some Money he owed them; and then they agreed with Clark to go for France again, and Clark went with them himself." They went off from Hythe, and failed to Bologne, where they were all taken into Custody. But Clark, upon writing to the Governor, was immediately set at Liberty, and afterwards told them, "That he had waited on the Governor, and had done the Business;" and then they were all set at Liberty, and returned to Margate, and brought with them Seven or Eight Ankers of Brandy.

Philip Wathing faith, "That, in July following, he and Weaver went over again from Hythe, and carried Clark and one La More." When they arrived at Bologne, they were seized; but Clark writing to the Commissary, he was released; and afterwards all of them were carried to the Governor, who took Clark from them, and was alone with Clark 3 or 4 Hours. The next Day they came away, and brought one James, a Scottishman, with them, and landed them at Hythe. They scrupled to take in this Man; but Clark said, "he would bear them out."

In August, Clark went with the Examinant and one Verge from Deal to Bologne; they then carried with them nothing but Provisions. When they landed, Clark was at Liberty, and went into the Town for 2 or 3 Hours; and then came to them, and told them, "They must get ready to go away that Night." He was in very good Humour, and said, "he had now catched the Old One;" by which the Examinant and Verge understood he had heard some good News. They landed at Hythe the same Night.

"The Examinant says, "That, in September, he, Weaver, and Verge, went again, by Clark's Order, and carried Letters to the Commissary of Bologne, and Four Bags of Wool." When they landed, they were carried to the Governor; and being asked several Questions, as usual, they were sent to the Commissary's, and dined with him at his own Table. In 3 or 4 Days after, they were dispatched with Letters to Clark, which they delivered to him.

Clark's general Directions to them was, "That, if they met with English or Dutch Ships, they were to throw their Letters over-board; but if they met French Ships, they might shew their Letters."

"The Examinant farther says, "That, in the latter End of September, he, and Verge, and La More, went over again; but near the French Coast, they were taken by an Ostender, who stripped them, and plundered them of every Thing. However, they went on to Bologne; but, the Commissary being gone to Paris, his Clerk would give them no Credit; but La More got some Credit in the Town. They were kept at Bologne about 14 Days; and then the Commissary's Clerk brought them Two Packets for Clark, with which they set out, and landed at Dover; but, in their going from thence to Deal, they were seized by the Messengers, and their Letters taken.

"Whilst they were at Bologne, they were shewed an Englishman, who came from Rumney Marsh."

"The Examinant further says, "That, the Second Time he went to Calais, their Boat was taken by The Bologn Sloop, and carried before the Governor; who released them as soon as they told him they were employed by Clark.

"The Examinant further says, "That, the First Time they carried La More over, they did not bring him back with them; because (as Clark said) he might not see the said James.

February the 25th, 1707/8.

"Philip Wathing."

R. Hatton's Examination.

"Ralph Hatton, of the Port of Hythe, says, "He was first brought acquainted with one John Clark by the Means of John Carter, of Deale; who told him, "Clark was employed by the Government to get News, which he was to have from the Commissary of Calais."

"The First Voyage he made upon Clark's Account was about September 1706, when Clark pressed him to go over immediately, though he had at that Time no Goods; but Ralph Hatton refused to go without Goods; whereupon, about Eighty Pounds of Wool was provided, which he and his Brother Tho. Hatton carried to Calais, together with a Letter for the Commissary of Calais, Monsieur Chateauneuf; he believes the Letter did not relate to Trade, because the Wool was sold to another Person.

"He landed at Calais, and was seized by the Soldiers, and after carried to the Commissary, to whom he delivered the Letter.

"The Commissary carried Hatton to the Governor, and he did not open his Letter till he came to the Governor. Hatton was received very kindly by the Governor, who made him drink, which was a Thing very unusual.

"The Governor opened the Letter, and shewed it to several Gentlemen then present, who seemed pleased with it.

"The Governor ordered the Commissary to carry him to Merveille's, The Golden Lyon, the best Inn in Calais; where the Commissary treated his Brother and him very well, all the while they stayed, at his own Cost.

"The next Morning the Commissary brought a French Gentleman to them, and said, "the Governor had ordered, that he should be carried over to England in their Boat." They did accordingly take on Board the Gentleman; but no Letter or Goods were sent by them.

"The Gentleman spoke good English; he did not own what his Name was. During the blowing Weather, Hatton said to him, "If he had any Papers about him that would do himself or them Hurt, it was best to throw them over-board, because they might be forced on Shore in the Day-time." The Gentleman said, "he had none, but what he had was in his Head."

"They carried the Gentleman to Clark, who was then at Mrs. Riches', not well; and Clark sent him to London that Night, and followed himself the next Day.

"This Gentleman came back to Deal in Three Weeks, and would have had Hatton carry him over to France; but he refused.

"This Gentleman said, "he came in 14 Hours from Paris to Bologne, and went aboard The Bologne Sloop; but the Sloop was forced to Calais by the Weather, and so he came in Hatton's Boat."

"About the Middle of October, Clark sent to Calais Ralph Hatton, Tho. Hatton, and William Reven, with One Pack of Wool, and a Letter directed to the Commissary Chateauneuf.

"When they came to Calais, they were seized, and taken before a Judge, and were accused for having carried over to England a Spy.

"Merveille, by Order of the Commissary, desired them to deny the Fact; which they did. They were kept in Custody Ten Days, or more, till they could hear from Court, and by Order from thence they were discharged; but forbid to carry over any Persons whatsoever.

"At this Time, they brought over from the Commissary Letters for Clark, which they delivered to him.

"About the Middle of December, he, and William Reven, and one Francis Baker, were sent over to Calais by Clark, with a Pack of Wool and a Letter to the Commissary. They were received there as usual, and carried to the Governor; and the Commissary did not open his Letter till they came to the Governor. Upon their Return, they brought a Packet of Letters for Clark, which was carried to him by Reven.

"Hatton had no further Dealings with Clark till about June last, when Clark hired a Boat of Hatton; and Clark, Weaver, and Warphin, went over in that Boat to Bologne with Wool, and returned about Ten Days after.

"Upon his Return, Clark told Hatton, "He had been out the longer, because he was kept under a Guard till he could get a Letter delivered to the Governor, and then he was set at Liberty; and then waited on the Governor."

"When Clark came from Bologne, he brought Papers along with him, and went away immediately for London.

"In July, Clark came to Hythe, and lay private there till the Boat came. As soon as the Boat came, Clark, Wharphin, and Weaver, and William La More, went on Board for Bologne; they returned in about a Week's Time, and brought with them a Man, called James, who, they said, was the Duke at Bologne's Groom, who went away with Clark to London.

"Before Clark went, he gave a Letter to Hatton, with Orders to watch at a certain Place on the Coast for The Bologne Sloop, which he was to know by the Signal of hoisting Dutch Colours on her Main-top; and he was to give the Letter to the Captain of the Sloop. But the Sloop did not come; so when Clark came from London, in August, he had his Letter again.

"He sent his Boat Twice (lie believes) to Bologne, to inquire after the Sloop, there being Two Horses kept privately to be put on Board her.

"This Examinant further faith, "That, when the Groom was brought over in July, La More was left behind." Clark told the Examinant, "he had him detained there, left he should betray the Groom when he came to England."

February the 25th, 1707/8

"Ralph Hatton."

Tho. Hatton's Examination.

"Thomas Hatton, being examined, declared, "That he had been acquainted with John Clarke about a Year and a Half." Clark said, "He was employed by the Government, and might send to France when he pleased."

"In June 1706, he helped to get Wool into the Boat.

He said, Clark made his Business very public.

"In August 1706, he was employed by Clark, and sent over to Calais with Steed and Gosby; and carried Two Hundred Pounds Weight of Wool, together with a Letter for Monsieur Chateauneuf.

"Upon landing, they were carried to the Governor, and well received. He asked them, "What News in England, and what Ships of War and Merchant-men were in The Downes?"

"The Commissary shewed his Letter to the Governor, and then carried them to Marveille's House. They had not Leave to go till Letters from Paris came (as he was told), so their Stay there was about 5 or 6 Days. They brought back Brandy, and a Packet of Letters for Clark.

"Thomas Hatton said further, "That, in September, at Clark's Request, he and his Brother made a Second Voyage to Calais, and carried Letters for the Commissary; and they were carried to the Governor as before; and when they came away, the Commissary gave them a Letter for Clerk; and Marveille told them, "That the Commissary said, They must take a Gentleman aboard, and carry him to England;" which they did accordingly."

"The Examinant further says, "That, in October 1706, he went over with Revens and his Brother Ralph Hatton to Calais; where they were seized, and carried before a Judge, upon Account of a Man brought from France to England, in a former Voyage, by his Brother and himself."

"Marveilles told them, as from the Commissary, "That they must deny to the Judge, that they carried over any body," though the Man was put on Board by the Commissary's Order.

After an Imprisonment of several Days, they were discharged, and sent away for England, with a Letter to Clark only.

"This Examinant says, "He helped about 8 several Time to put Wool on Board divers Boats for Clark; and he lay about 14 Days to watch for The Bologne Sloop, in order to put Two Horses on Board, to be sent thither.

February 25th, 1707/8.

"Thomas Hatton."

Reven's Examination.

"William Reven, of Deal, Mariner, being examined, declareth, "That, in October 1706, when John Clark lay at Mrs. Riches' House, she engaged him to go over to France for Clark. Clark shewed him the Secretary's Pass, and said, "he had a License to send any body to France."

"The Examinant went over first with the Two Hattons. When they landed, they were seized, and carried before the Governor; and after that, they were examined before the Admiral, or the Judge, at Calais, for having carried over a Man for England. They were kept in Custody 14 or 15 Days, till Orders came from Paris to discharge them. Then the Commissary dispatched them away, without any Thing but One Letter to Clark, which they sent to him.

"The Examinant further says, "That, about a Month after, Mr. Clark ordered him, Thomas Finnis, and Francis Baker, of Dover, to bring their Boat to him to Margate; which they did; and there they took in some Wool, and a Sack with some Things in it.

"They were seized at Sandwich by the Customhouse Officers, and their Wool taken; but they did not meddle with the Sack, which they brought back to Clark at Deal. And about a Week after, the Examinant, Baker, and Ralph Hatton, were ordered to take in some Wool, the same Sack, and a Letter, and to carry them to Calais; which they did, and delivered the Sack and Letter to the Commissary.

"At the same Time they took in their Wool, they also took in a young Man, whom they carried to France.

"In a short Time they were dismissed from Calais, with Brandy, and a Packet of Letters from the Commissary to Clark.

"The Examinant says, "They were usually carried first to the Governor's House, and the Commissary came to them there."

February the 25th, 1707/8.

"Wm. Reven."

Johanna Riches' Examination.

Johanna Riches, of Deal, Victualler, being examined, declared, "That John Clark did much frequent her House;" he lodged there about Six Months. The First Time he came to her was, to inquire how he might vend his Brandy to the best Advantage; he proposed to her, to make a Venture with him; and told her, "That, for Fifty Shillings laid out in Wool, she should have Four Pounds in Brandy, without any Risque; for the Government, by whom he was employed, had agreed to pay the prime Costs." She ventured once with him; but never had any Return from him.

"There was a Frenchman brought to Clark at her House, late in the Night, who had divers Papers with him; and he gave them to Clark to read. Clark pretended it was his Sister's Husband; and that he lived at Calais.

"Clark sent the Examinant to get a Horse for the Frenchman immediately; and, about One a Clock, the Frenchman began his Journey for London, without a Guide. Next Morning Clark went after him."

"Johanna Riches further said, "That about a Week afterward Clark returned to her House; and about a Week after that, the Frenchman returned to her House, and brought a Box with him, which Clark opened; and after he had viewed and perused what was in it, being Three or Four Papers and a Parchment with a Seal to it, and other Things, he fastened the Box, and sealing it in several Places with his own Seal, then gave it her to lock up in some safe Place.

"Some Time after, the said Clark sent one Revens and another with some Wool, and with this Box, for France; but the Boat was taken, and the Wool was seized by the Custom-house Officers: But, the Boatmen having put their Victuals into the same Sack where the Box was, no Notice was taken of the Box; and Revens brought it back again to Clark; who gave it to the Examinant, requiring her to lock herself up, that nobody might see what she did; and then to open the Box, and dry what was in it: Which she did; and afterwards Clark sent Reven to Calais, and gave him the Box: And, upon his Return, he told the Examinant, "He had delivered it at Calais."

"When the Frenchman was at her House, he brought thither Three other Frenchmen; and they were some Time together privately with Clark in his Chamber; and afterwards they rode out all together; and the next Day Clark came back. But she never saw the Frenchmen after.

"Clark was often in Drink, and was then very foolish; and used to boast, "He had the Heads of the Nation on his Side; and that nobody was capable of the Business he was engaged in but himself; and nobody durst meddle with him."

"Johannah Riches further says, "That, about Three Quarters of a Year ago, towards the latter End of April (the same Night he agreed with Weaver and Waffin to go to Calais), he came to her House in the Night, and desired a private Lodging; and then sent her out, to learn what Men of War were in The Downs. And she went to the Packet-master, who told her, "There were only Three Men of War there," and named them to her. She brought this Account to Clark presently. She has forgot the other Names; but she verily believes The Royal Oak was One of the Ships; because a Midshipman belonging to that Ship was at that Time in her House, who borrowed a Bottle of Sal Armoniac of her for his Wife, who was then on Board The Royal Oak.

"Upon her naming the Ships to Clark, he set them down immediately in his Book; and soon after went out, and stayed so late, that he could get no Lodging, but lay in her Bed, and she sat up all Night."

"The Examinant said, "She believed that one Bland went over to France about that Time: For, Bland and one Mrs. Atwood being together at the Examinant's House, he said, "He hoped he should soon bring them better Liquor;" and then ordered the Examinant to buy for him Two Half Ankers and Three Runlets. She says, "That Bland told her, "He had been Four Times in France since the War." The Examinant said further, "That Bland went into The Downes, and went aboard several Ships in The Downes. He told the Examinant, "It was only to get some of the Ships to take off his Brandy when he came back:" But she looked upon that as a Pretence only; and that his true Business was, to observe what Ships were there, and of what Value they were."

"The Examinant further says, "That Clark told her, "That the Father of One of the Three Frenchmen, which he brought to her House, was as great a Man as any in France."

February the 25th, 1707/8.

"Johana Riches."

Hartley's Examination.

"John Hartley, about 15 Years old, Apprentice to John Weaver, being examined, faith, "That he went over Twice, with his Master and one Waffing, to Calais, upon Clark's Account. When they brought them to the Governor of Calais, he asked them, "What Ships were in The Downes; and whither they were bound?"

"In the Second Voyage, they met with a small French Privateer; who inquired of them, "What Men of War and Merchant Ships were in The Downes?" And Waffing and Weaver (as the Examinant believes) told them, as well as they could, all they knew of the Men of War and Merchant Ships, where they were designed, and when they were to sail; and, having given this Account to the Privateer, he suffered them to go on for Calais.

February 25th, 1707/8.

"John Hartley."

Carter's Examination.

"John Carter, of Deal, Butcher, being examined, declared, "That he became acquainted with one John Bara about the 27th of March 1706, who did use to go over from England to Calais, and return in French Boats. About that Time he was desired to provide a Boat to carry over Bara; but afterwards, the French Sloop coming, Bara went over in that. Bara stayed about a Month, and then returned in a French Boat (as Carter believed); and, as Weller told the Examinant, brought Brandy and Letters over with him. He was seized at Dover by Mr. Whitehall, and examined before the Magistrates: but soon after was sent for to London by Mr. Secretary Harley's Order (as the Examinant was informed); and in about 4 or 5 Days Bara returned to Deal; and, pulling out of his Pocket a Handful of Guineas, shewed them to the Examinant, and told him, "See what I have got by being seized at Dover, which was by your Means."

Clark spoke very ill of Bara to the Examinant; and persuaded him not to have more to do with him, but only with Clark himself.

"The said Carter declared, "That he acquainted Mr. Whitehall with Clark's Proceedings; who bid him take Notice of all that Clark did, and for that Purpose to go on with him. After that, he assisted Clark in getting Wool for him, and procuring Men for him to go over to France; and also received Clark's Letters for him.

The said Carter declared, "He saw a Packet of Letters, that came from London, directed to Clark; and saw Clark open the Packet, which, Clark said, came from Secretary Harley; and he shewed him the Name of R. Harley at the Bottom of the Letter. In the Packet were several Letters sealed up."

This Examinant said, "He procured Jo. Weaver and Wm. Watton, who went Twice to Calais for Clark, and carried Letters from him, and brought back Packets of Letters from the Commissary of Calais for Clark.

He said also, "That Clark employed one Gosby and one Steed, both of Walmer, to go for him to Calais; but they would not go a Second Time, because, as they told the said Carter, they were examined very strictly by the Commissary of Calais, what Ships were in The Downs; and what other News was in England. And the Commissary took Notes of all they said; and detained them at Calais, whilst they sent to Paris, and had a Return. And for these Reasons, they were afraid to go any more."

The Examinant Carter further said, "That, in the next Voyage which was made by the Two Hattons, in the Beginning of September 1706, they brought with them a Frenchman from Calais; who, immediately upon his Landing, went with Clark for London. When Clark returned to Deal, he brought with him Three Frenchmen, who by some Means or other got over to France.

"The said Carter further said, "That he often advised Clark to be more private than he had used to be, in managing his Correspondence with France; for, if he continued to act in so public a Manner, the Mob would knock him on the Head."

Carter said, "He told Clark, "He wondered how such great Persons as Clark said employed him, could be so put upon by him." Clark replied, "He knew what he had to do; for, said Clark, it is easier dealing with them than with you," meaning the said Carter. Clark said, "He knew his Master Harley very well, and almost any Thing would serve him." The said Carter further said, "That, he and Clark being riding together upon the Beach, they saw 18 Ships at Sea. Thereupon Clark said, "Here is News for my Master Harley: I will send him Word, here is seen a Squadron of French Ships." Carter said, "What! before you know whether they are French?" To which Clark replied, "It is all one for that; it will serve my Turn as well."

Clark would often speak contemptuously of the great Men above.

Carter further says, "That Clark's Manner was, to give Orders to the Men who went over, "That, if they were taken by the French, they should shew their Letters, and they would help them to get to France; but if they met with Englishmen, they were then ordered to throw their Letters overboard."

The said Carter also said, "That at last he broke off Correspondence with Clark. He had known him drunk and sober; and always thought him to be in the French Interest. He would several Times send over Boats without Goods. Clark pretended he was a Protestant; but Carter said, "He never believed it." He would never go to Church, and always talked favourably of the Papists: He was a lewd, drunken Fellow, and talked very extravagantly and foolishly."

This Examinant being asked, "Why he gave Clark Warning of the Danger he run, in keeping this Correspondence so openly?" He said, "That the Mob had several Times come about them, and called them French Dogs and Rogues; and reproached them, for betraying our Ships, and giving Intelligence to the Enemy."

And he further says, That though Clark railed at Bara, yet he seemed very great with him when they met.

February the 25th, 1707/8.

"John Carter."

Jordan's Examination.

Captain John Jordan, a Riding Officer of Her Majesty's Customs at Folkestone, in Kent, faith, "That, for some Time last past, he hath heard of one Clark on their Coast, who held a Correspondence with France; but had no personal Knowledge of him till the 24th December last was 12 Months, at which Time he seized his Boat, as it came from France, at Dimchurch.

On the 30th of December following, the said Clark came to him at Hythe, and demanded the Reason why he seized the said Boat? And Captain Jordan replied, "For carrying Wool to France." Then Clark told him, "He was employed by the Government, to learn News from France; and he could not go over unless he carried some Wool, and that he had done several Times." Whereupon the said Captain Jordan laid his Hand on Clark's Shoulder, and said, "I have therefore a great Mind to seize you." Then the said Clark seemed concerned, saying, "If you do, I shall and will deny all I have said," (there being nobody but them Two in the Room.)

Then the said Clark took out of his Pocket a Paper-writing, signed Harley, with a great Seal at One Side; which the said Captain Jordan read; and it was a Pass for him and his Servant, &c. And the said Jordan having heard that this said Clark had been took up at Dover and Deal for the like Practices, and again discharged, he let him go.

And he further told the said Captain Jordan, "That he should have an Order from the Secretary of State, for to have his said Boat returned." Who answered him, "That, when he saw such an Order, he knew how to obey it." But, no such Order being ever produced to him, he condemned his said Boat the following Term."

And the said Captain Jordan further faith, "That Clark soon after procured another Boat, which went to and from France as before; which, he faith, landed at Dover about the 23d of July last, and Part of the Goods seized that she brought from France.

August 2d, 1707, Clark's Boat came from France, and landed at Shoren Cliff, near Hythe.

August 14th, 1707, she came from Bologne, and landed at Dimchurch.

"August 28th, 1707, Clark's Boat went off for Bologne, from Hythe Stade.

"September 20th, 1707, Clark's Boat went over again, and returned to Dover on the 5th of October, where it was seized.

"On the 4th of October, 1707, the said Captain Jordan, by Order of Mr. Baker, seized Two fine Horses at Hythe, belonging to the Duke (fn. 2) at Bologne, under the Care of Mr. Clark, and one James Gordain the Duke's Groom: Which Groom then got away; and he has not heard of him since.

"On the Sixth of October following, the said Clark sent a Letter to the said Jordain, relling him, "He was informed he had took away his Horses out of Monger's Stable; that the Horses were his, and for his own Use; and if he pleased to return them to the said Stable, it would oblige him; otherwise he must take his Measures in London." Signed John Clark, and ready to produce.

"On the 17th September, 1707, Clark was sick at The King's Arms, at Folkestone, where the said Jordain sometimes visited him. And the said Clark did then tell the said Jordan, "That the First Time he went over to Bologne, having then but a small Parcel of Wool with him, the King's Commissary Collanson met him at the Water-side, and asked him, "What he came there for?" and looked very sour upon him; and then carried him and one Le More (One of the Boatmen) up to the Governor; who was very rough with them, telling them, "They came there for something else than to bring such a small Parcel of Wool, which would not bear their Charges, threatening them, to tell the Truth." Then Clark desired to speak with the Duke privately. Then Clark told the Duke, "He came to learn News;" which Expression much surprized him: But Clark told him (as he the said Clark informed the said Jordain), "That if he could serve his Excellency on the other Side (meaning England), he would serve him faithfully.

"But the said La More was threatened with Death, as being a Frenchman, and had had formerly a Commission in an English Privateer against his King; so he fell on his Knees, and begged for his Life; and Clark told Jordan, "That, upon his Interest and pleading for him, he was pardoned."

"And La More himself has told the said Jordan, "That the Duke (fn. 3) at Bologne asked them, "Whether the English were not in some Apprehension of Fear, when their Gallies appeared off of the Kentish Coast?" Clark replied, "He believed they were." The Duke answered, "They need not; for that Coast is under my Protection." Clark asked his Excellency, "Whether or no he might have the Liberty to mention it when he came Home?" He answered him, "That he might." Then Clark asked the Duke, "When he came over to Bologne again, what if his Excellency should be at Paris?" He replied, "That he would give Directions, that he should be well used." And that the said La More was not permitted to come over in Clark's Boat; but was put on Board One of their Shallops, and so set on Shore by them in England."

"And La More further told the said Jordan, "That he verily believed, that the said Clark shewed the Secretary of State's Pass to the Duke (fn. 2) at Bullogne."

February 23d, 170 7/3;.
John Jordan."

Whitehall's Examination.

"Lancelot Whitehall, Collector of the Customs at Deal, being examined, said, "That, about Christmas 1705, he had Notice of some Persons lurking to carry on the French Trade. In order to discover them, he thought at last of one Carter, who had been an Offender; who, in Hopes of Pardon, might be willing to help to discover them. John Carter said, "If he might have Time, he would undertake to do it."

"About March, Carter discovered Clark; but, he being out of his District, he gave Notice to the Officers of Sandwich, who took him: And afterwards he was sent for, by Messengers, to London; and in a little Time was discharged, as Mr. Whitehall has been informed.

"Some Time after, Carter informed him of one Bara, who was lying concealed, in order to go over to France; and he had liked to have surprized him; but a French Sloop came in the mean while, and carried him off, about a Quarter of an Hour before the Persons employed by him came.

"Mr. Whitehall said, That, in April, Carter informed him, "That Bara was returned;" and he seized him at Dover, and had him examined before the Mayor of Dover, who took Affidavits of the Matter. Mr. Whitehall sent an Account of this to the Commissioners of the Customs (with Copies of the said Affidavits, now in the Hands of Mr. Baker), by his Letter, dated the the 29th of April, 1706, now produced, and to which Mr. Whitehall refers.

"This gave Occasion to Mr. Secretary Harley to send a Letter to Mr. Whitehall, dated the 29th May, 1706. The original Letter being produced by Mr. Whitehall, he refers to it. To this Letter he wrote an Answer, of the 31st May, 1706; he produced a Copy of that Letter, which he transcribed from a soul Draught, and therefore could not be positive as to to every Word in the same; but he is sure it was to the Effect and Sense of the Letter.

"After he had sent that Letter away, the same Day, Bara applied to Mr. Whitehall, to help him to a Boat, to go to France. Mr. Whitehall said, "He would not do it, without an Order from the Secretary." And thereupon he sent away another Letter to Mr. Secretary Harley the same Day; to the Copy of which he likewise refers.

"Mr. Secretary Harley returned an Answer to this last Letter, by a Letter dated the 1st of June, 1706, to which he refers: But Mr. Whitehall did nothing upon the Letter; not thinking this Letter to contain Orders which were full and clear enough.

"Some Time after, Carter brought to Mr. Whitehall Three Letters, which he had received from Clark, with Directions to put them into the Hands of the Men who were going for France. One of the Letters was directed to Camue (or such like Name), a Merchant at Calais; the Second to the Commissary at Calais; and the Third to the Governor or Commissary of Bologne; he is not certain to which of them. Upon which, he wrote to Mr. Secretary Harley, to give him an Account of these Three Letters; and told him, "That, the Wind being now out of the Way, he had now an Opportunity, if he pleased, of seeing them, and judging if Clark dealt honestly or not." To this Letter he never received any Answer. Mr. Whitehall had no Copy of this Letter with him; his Clerk, who kept his Books, being here in Town, when Mr. Whitehall came to the Lords Committees upon the Summons.

"Mr. Whitehall being asked, "Why he did not open those Letters, or stop them?" He said, "He would not do it, having been reprimanded for what he had done before."

"Clark and Bara were generally known on the Coast by the Distinction of Mr. Harley's Spies, èspecially Clark, who bragged of his being employed, on all Occasions, and in all Companies; but Bara was more cautious, and seldom appeared by Day."

"Mr. Whitehall said, "That it was his Opinion, and the general Opinion of People upon the Coast, that they carried more Intelligence to France than they brought from thence."

"He said, "The Trade of France was much suppressed till this Encouragement was given by employing so great a Number of Men. Clark did not confine himself to particular People; but employed any body he could get, by which Practice the whole Coast is corrupted; so that now a much greater Number of Officers will be wanting, to prevent the pernicious Intercourse with France, than have ever yet been employed.

February 23d, 1707/8.

L. Whitehall."

Bowles's Reasons for examining Verge and Morillion, &c.

"Reasons for apprehending Jos. Verge and Dan'l Morillion, and examining Valiere, alias Clark, together with some Remarks, and my Opinion thereon, and my Letters.

"The Cause of my writing to Sir Cha. Hedges, 22d August, 1706, was grounded,

"1. Upon Clark's corrupting so many Seamen on our Coast, in going for France, as appears by First Paragraph of said Letter.

"2. Clark's voluntary boasting of his Power, and shewing his Licence to Ste. Colledge and Ball, and frequently to many others.

"3. His Presumption, in expressing himself at Walmer Castle to Jos. Wildbore, and others then in Company; saying, "He would protect any one's going to France, for Five Shillings.

"About a Day after, I saying in a Coffee-house, "How pernicious it might prove for a Boat's Crew going to Calais, at a Time the Dutch Transports was at Sail:" Clark answers, in the Mayor's and my Presence, "That that was not Treason: That Treason was only to those that carried Warlike Stores and Implements, and such as held traiterous Correspondence, and not such Men as went over to trade on their own Accounts.

"Considering said Expressions, and finding by Morillion's Affidavit, &c. "That said Clark had, the First Voyage, in July 1706, sent him, with Bayly and Verge, with a Letter to the Commissary of Calais, who asked him, "Concerning the Dutch Transports in The Downes; the Number of Men of War, Rates; what Merchant Ships? when they were to sail? Likewise, what Frigates cruizing off Beachy, Dungeness, North Foreland, and Margate, &c.?" And then brought Clark an Answer of same Letter at Return; Said Reasons did cause me to examine Clark, who shewed me Two Licences for his being on our Coast of Deal and Dover unmolested, under the Hand of Mr. Secretary Harley, the one dated in May, the other in June, 1706, for Fourteen Days; and I observing at the Time of his sending over the First Boat, the last Licence was expired some Weeks.

"What gave me the further Jealousy was, in observing that Clark lodged and frequented little Houses of ill Fame, and kept scandalous and frippery Company, and frequently was disguised with strong Drink; at which Times he was full of Talk and of his Power, whereby he was known by the Name of Clark the Spy, by Men, Women, and Children, from Margate all along the Sea-coast to Rumney Marsh.

"And as it was generally said, he was a Person poor and needy, and but a Journeyman Wig-maker; and withal he seeming, to my Opinion, an open, leeky Fellow, and of a shallow Capacity; it was not consistent with my Reason to believe, that such a Person could come at the Secrets or Knowledge of the Councils of France, so as to gather from thence any Point of Importance by corresponding with the Governor or Commissary of Calais; but I concluded the contrary, and I believed him a Spy upon us: And it is my Opinion, through his Means, the Seamen of our Coast for Two Years last past has been so corrupted, that France has had Intelligence to their Advantage thereby.

"As also it appears to me to believe, through Clark's sending over so many Sets of Boats and Men to France, the same Gangs has, on their own Accounts and Will, gone afterwards so oft as they please; by which Means, it is my Thoughts, France has had often Intelligence from said Persons, all they knew or was capable of telling, and very possible, through said Means, may have been the Cause of not only the taking the sundry Frigates as was cruizing off Dungeness, &c. about them Times as they was cruizing off their Stations; but I fear also might since be the Occasion of the Loss of The Grafton and Hampton Court, with Twenty Sail of Merchant Ships, in May last.

Northumberland-house, February 23d, 1707.

"Tob. Bowles."

Rasbury's Examination.

"James Rasbury, Waterman, being examined, says, That, about June last was Twelve Months, a Man, whose Name he knew afterwards to be Bara, came to him at Whitehall Stairs, and asked for a large Boat, pretending he was to go to look after a Ship that was fallen down the River. The Examinant made some Difficulty at first, not knowing whither he was to go; but afterwards he was prevailed upon, and did provide a Boat, and carried him as far as Margate; into which Place he was in a Manner forced by the Weather; but positively refused to go any further with him."

Howard's Examination.

"Isaac Howard, then Servant to the said Rasbury, being examined, faith, "That he went over to Calais with the said Bara, in the Boat provided by James Rasbury, from Margate: That, when they landed at Calais, a File of Musqueteers took them into Custody; and as they were going along, a Man speaking something to Bara, Bara struck him a Blow in the Face with his Hand: That they were carried before the Commissary of Calais, where he was kindly entertained, and stayed with him about Two Hours; and, after that, Bara was at Liberty all the while he stayed there; and, after Two Days, the Examinant brought Bara back to The Downs." The Examinant farther says, "That, about a Month or 6 Weeks after, Bara asked the Examinant to go over with him again to France; but he refused."

W. Mason's Examination.

"William Mason, Waterman, being examined, says, "That, at the same Time when Isaac Howard refused to go with Bara, the Examinant agreed with him, and carried him to Dunkirk. As soon as they landed, Bara went directly to the Governor's House; and the Examinant stayed below, till Bara came down to him. He found Bara to be well known, and well received there. He stayed there Two Days; and then the Examinant took him into his Boat, and set him down near Sandown Castle. This was in the latter End of July or Beginning of August last was Twelve Months." The Examinant farther faith, "That Bara was very fearful of being seen any where upon the Coast, because he was known every where."

"The Information of John Carter.

Carter's Information.

"This Informant faith, "That, upon Thursday the 26th of this Instant February, about Six in the Evening, being passing into The Park, a Gentleman, that he had often seen at Mr. Baker's Office, who, he has been since told, is called Mr. Hind, came to him, and invited him to drink; which he refused. Then Hind asked him, "if he would take a Walk in The Park;" and he agreed to it: And then Hind asked him, "What the Lords did with Bara and Clark?" He replied, "He did not know what." Then Hind said, "He heard Bara had squeaked;" and he answered, "He believed he had." Then he asked, "What Captain Whitehall, Mr. Bowles, and Jordain, could say in the Matter?" He replied, "He could not tell; but believed they knew a great deal relating to that Affair." Then said Hind, "I suppose they have got Mr. Harley's Letters to shew." And further inquired, "If any Letters were or could be produced, relating to the Ships that were taken: and bid him learn that, if possible:" Carter replied, "He knew not." Then the said Hind told him, "That, if he would discover what he knew, and pick out and learn what others had said, relating to these Matters now depending before the Lords Committees (with Words to that Effect), and go with him to Mr. Harley to inform him the same, he said he should have 100 Guineas." Then further said, "He should have 200 Guineas; out of which he would give the said Hind a good Pair of Gloves: And, for the said Carter's further Encouragement, the said Mr. Harley would give him a good Ship: And then bid the said Carter spend what Money he pleased, and that freely, where he could get Intelligence; and particularly amongst those People now under Examination before the Lords."

"And Hind further said, "That Captain Baker was the chief Promoter of those Matters; and that he should be turned out of his Business, when Mr. Harley's Trouble was over." And further said, "That Captain Whitehall was a great Rogue;" and was very inquisitive who Mr. Bowles was: Carter replied, "A Gentleman of a good Estate, and a great Merchant in their Country." After this Discourse, they parted, with a Promise to meet again in the Morning, which they did in Whitehall; and then the said Hind and he went aside; and Hind then told him, "He had been with Mr. Harley; and that he directed him not to bring the said Carter to him yet; for the Matter was to go before the Queen as this Day; and would see him again To-morrow; and he should go before Mr. Harley." And then told him also, "That Mr. Harley inquired if he was an honest Man, and thought he might confide in him; for otherwise, said he, it might do me a Mischief." To which Hind replied to the Secretary Harley (as he told Carter), "He verily believed he might." And afterwards spoke some reflecting and unbecoming Words of the Lord Sunderland, and others.

"John Carter.

"Jurat. coram me,

"Jos. Addison,

"Feb'ry 28th, 1707/8."

"Mr. Bowles' Account of Bland.

Bowles's Account of Bland.

"About October last, Bland, a Waterman of London, had been hovering about The Downes, to and fro, for near Three Weeks, in a large Wherry, with the Addition of a Streak higher built, to make her the more bold in the Sea. And, after he had been about said Time on our Coast, in the Night, at High Water, he, with his Two other Crew, put his Wherry to the Shore, and took in the same Five Bags Wool. At which Time came to the Boat Four Persons, that got hold of the Land-rope, and hauled her in; on which, Bland comes forward with a Knife in his Hand, in order to cut the Rope. But One of the Four Persons up with a Club, and said, "If he offered to cut the Rope, he'd knock him down:" Whereupon Bland stept ast; then (fn. 3) hope heave out the Five Bags Wool in the Sea. Soon after, the Boat fell along the Shore; out jumps Bland, and runs away: Soon he and his Two Fellows were seized by the Constables. Next Morning I had both Parties before me.

"On Examination, the 4 Persons, Bland and his 2 Watermen, all proved Bland in the Boat. At same Time that he went forward with a Knife to cut the Land-rope, he hove the Wool out the Boat; then jumpt out of her, and run away. He denied the Whole, and all; and said, "he was at another Place."

"It appearing plain he was in the Boat also by other Evidence, I set him by, and examined again his 2 Watermen; the oldest of which said, "They designed to cross the Water, which he reckoned Ostend:" The other said, "They were bound to the other Side, with the Wool; and that Bland said, he would make of it as short a Trip * of it as he could."

"Then I asked Bland his Business on Board the Merchant Ships in The Downes the Two Days past, and particularly on Board of 5 Ships last Afternoon: He owned that Part; and said, "Twas to ask if they would buy of him some Brandy, if he should bring them some on Board."

"Bland denied e'er being at Calais; saying, "Was ne'er there in his Life."

"I orders him to Prison, where he remained about 9 Days. Then he was sent to Dover Prison: Soon after, I heard he was bailed thence.

"My Opinion, on the foregoing Reasons, is, That Bland designed for Calais; that his going on Board the several Merchant Ships in The Downs, I believe, was in order to take Notice, and give Account thereof, and their Value; as also, whatsoever Intelligence he knew, or was sensible of giving, to our Enemies at Calais, &c.

Northumberland House, February 23d, 1707.

"Tob. Bowles."

Barker's Representation, concerning Bland's Correspondence with France sent from the Admiralty.

"Admiralty-office, 2d Jan. 1707/8.

"Gentlemen,

"By Command of the Prince, I send you the enclosed Copy of a Petition of John Barker, giving an Account of one Bland's corresponding with France, to be laid before the Right Honourable the Earl of Sunderland, Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State. I am, Gentlemen,

"Your most humble Servant,

"J. Burchett.

"Secretaries to the Earl of Sunderland."

"To his Royal Highness Prince George of Denmark, &c. Lord High Admiral of Great Britain, &c.

"The humble Representation of John Barker, of Kingston upon Hull, late Master of the Ship Isabella;

"Sheweth,

"That, on or about the Month of August 1705, your Petitioner was taken Prisoner into France, in the said Ship, and confined in Calaris Prison till the Month of August 1706; in the Course of which Time, one James Fauset, Servant to Mr. Bland, a Waterman at Billingsgate, came often to see your Petitioner; and (amongst other Discourse) told your Petitioner, "That his said Master Bland had brought him thither, and caused him to be confined in that Town, for Fear he should lay open to the Ministry of this Government his illegal Practices, of carrying and conveying the News, and other secret Affairs and Transactions of his own Nation, to the French Court." And the said James Fauset did then also declare to your Petitioner, "That, to his certain Knowledge, his said Master held a constant Correspondence with several Merchants in Calais, and from Time to Time brought them the News Papers, and other private Intelligence, to the Detriment of this Nation." And the said Fauset, as his Mother (who lives in Weaver-Lane, in Southwark) alledges, made his Escape from Calais by swimming to the Packet-boat, who is since gone a Voyage to The West Indies, for Fear of Harm from his said Master.

"Your Petitioner therefore thought it is his Duty, humbly to acquaint your Highness of this Matter, for the Service of the Nation, and the better to prevent further Disappointments; which will unavoidably happen, whilst such Persons remain undetected.

"John Barker."

House to go with the Address:

Ordered, That the whole House shall attend Her Majesty, with the Address agreed to this Day.

Lords with White Staves to attend the Queen.

Ordered, That the Lords with White Staves do wait on Her Majesty, humbly to know, when Her Majesty will please to be attended, with the said Address.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Veneris, decimum nonum diem instantis Martii, hora undecima Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Footnotes

  • 1. Sic.
  • 2. Origin. of; vide p. 536. a.—It appears frequently, in the Course of these Examinations, that the Duke D'Aumont was at Boulogne at the Time.
  • 3. Sic.