House of Lords Journal Volume 63: 12 July 1831

Journal of the House of Lords: Volume 63, 1830-1831. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, [n.d.].

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Citation:

'House of Lords Journal Volume 63: 12 July 1831', in Journal of the House of Lords: Volume 63, 1830-1831( London, [n.d.]), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol63/pp807-813 [accessed 19 July 2024].

'House of Lords Journal Volume 63: 12 July 1831', in Journal of the House of Lords: Volume 63, 1830-1831( London, [n.d.]), British History Online, accessed July 19, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol63/pp807-813.

"House of Lords Journal Volume 63: 12 July 1831". Journal of the House of Lords: Volume 63, 1830-1831. (London, [n.d.]), , British History Online. Web. 19 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol63/pp807-813.

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In this section

Die Martis, 12° Julii 1831.

DOMINI tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Dux Cumberland.
Ds. Brougham &
Vaux,
Cancellarius.
Epus. Bristol.
Epus. Corcagen, &c.
-
Ds. Melbourne, Unus Primariorum
Secretariorum.
Ds. De Ros.
Ds. Dacre.
Ds. Teynham.
Ds. Stafford.
Ds. Gower.
Ds. Colville of Culross.
Ds. Belhaven & Stenton.
Ds. Boston.
Ds. Holland.
Ds. Sundridge & Hamilton.
Ds. Foley.
Ds. Kenyon.
Ds. Douglas of Douglas.
Ds. Auckland.
Ds. Mendip.
Ds. Saltersford.
Ds. Calthorpe.
Ds. Lilford.
Ds. Carbery.
Ds. Farnham.
Ds. Dunalley.
Ds. Mont Eagle.
Ds. Hill.
Ds. Ker.
Ds. Ormonde.
Ds. Glenlyon.
Ds. Seaford.
Ds. Fife.
Ds. Plunket.
Ds. Clanwilliam.
Ds. Skelmersdale.
Ds. Wallace.
Ds. Wynford.
Ds. Fingall.
Ds. Sefton.
Ds. Clements.
Ds. Rossie.
Ds. Dover.
March. Lansdowne,
Præses.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux Wellington.
March. Salisbury.
March. Cholmondeley.
March. Cleveland.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Essex.
Comes Doncaster.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Albemarle.
Comes Selkirk.
Comes Oxford & Mortimer.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Clarendon.
Comes Mansfield.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Charlemont.
Comes Wicklow.
Comes Rosslyn.
Comes Limerick.
Comes Gosford.
Comes Orford.
Comes Grey.
Comes Mulgrave.
Comes Brownlow.
Comes Howe.
Comes Vane.
Vicecom. Bolingbroke & St. John.
Vicecom. Sydney.
Vicecom. Duncan.
Vicecom. Lorton.
Vicecom. Combermere.
Vicecom. Goderich.

PRAYERS.

The Earl of Shaftesbury sat Speaker by virtue of a former Commission.

Morris v. Davies et al.

The Answer of Edward Davies and Harriot his Wife, to the Petition and Appeal of Evan Williams Morris otherwise Evan Williams, was this Day brought in.

Brown's Estate Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for enabling the Trustee under the Will of Henry Brown deceased to sell certain Shares in the Leeds and Liverpool Canal Navigation, and a Share in the Liverpool Theatre, and certain Bonds from the Liverpool Dock Trustees, and of a certain Sum due on Bond from the Corporation of Liverpool, and to apply the Money arising therefrom in repairing, pulling down and rebuilding certain Houses in Paradise Street, in the Town of Liverpool aforesaid; and for other the Purposes in this Act mentioned," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Tuckfield's Charity Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury also reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for enabling The Mayor, Bailiffs and Commonalty of the City of Exeter to sell Two Houses in the Parish of Saint Stephen's, Exeter, vested in them, and to purchase other Estates, for the Performance of the Charitable Purposes of the Will of Joan Tuckfield," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Cameron's Estate Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for vesting the Undivided Moieties of certain Estates of Nathaniel Cameron Esquire and Lætitia Pryce his Wife, in the County of Glamorgan, in Trustees, in Trust to sell, under the Directions of the High Court of Chancery, and to apply the Money to arise from such Sales in the Manner therein mentioned."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Bp. Cork & Ross.
L. Melbourne.
L. De Ros.
L. Dacre.
L. Teynham.
L. Stafford.
L. Gower.
L. Colville of Culross.
L. Belhaven & Stenton.
L. Boston.
L. Holland.
L. Sundridge & Hamilton.
L. Foley.
L. Kenyon.
L. Douglas of Douglas.
L. Auckland.
L. Mendip.
L. Saltersford.
L. Calthorpe.
L. Lilford.
L. Carbery.
L. Farnham.
L. Dunalley.
L. Mont Eagle.
L. Hill.
L. Ker.
L. Ormonde.
L. Glenlyon.
L. Seaford.
L. Fife.
L. Plunket.
L. Clanwilliam.
L. Skelmersdale.
L. Wallace.
L. Wynford.
L. Fingall.
L. Sefton.
L. Clements.
L. Rossie.
L. Dover.
D. Cumberland.
L. President.
D. Richmond.
D. Beaufort.
D. Wellington.
M. Salisbury.
M. Cholmondeley.
M. Cleveland.
E. Denbigh.
E. Westmorland.
E. Essex.
E. Doncaster.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Albemarle.
E. Selkirk.
E. Oxford & Mortimer.
E. Tankerville.
E. Clarendon.
E. Mansfield.
E. Carnarvon.
E. Charlemont.
E. Wicklow.
E. Rosslyn.
E. Limerick.
E. Gosford.
E. Orford.
E. Grey.
E. Mulgrave.
E. Brownlow.
E. Howe.
E. Vane.
V. Bolingbroke & St. John.
V. Sydney.
V. Duncan.
V. Lorton.
V. Combermere.
V. Goderich.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Wednesday the 20th of this instant July, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Glendonwyn & Kennedy v Goldie et al.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing the Cause wherein Mrs. Ismene Magdalina Glendonwyn or Scott and Robert Kennedy are Appellants, and Alexander Goldie, and others, are Respondents, ex-parte, the Respondents not having put in their Answer thereto, though peremptorily Ordered so to do:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Cause, ex-parte, by Counsel at the Bar, on the first vacant Day for Causes after those already appointed, unless the Respondents put in their Answer thereto in the mean time.

Earl Stanhope et al. Leave for a Bill:

After reading and considering the Report of the Judges, to whom was referred the Petition of Philip Henry Earl Stanhope, and others; praying Leave to bring in a Private Bill, for the Purposes therein mentioned:

It is Ordered, That Leave be given to bring in a Bill, pursuant to the said Petition and Report.

Bill read.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to effect a Partition of certain Freehold, Copyhold or Customary and Leasehold Estates in the County of Lincoln, late the Property of The Right Honorable Sir Joseph Banks Baronet, deceased."

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed by The Lord Chancellor.

Le Fevre's Divorce Bill:

The Order of the Day being read for the Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Samuel Le Fevre Esquire with Mary his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes;" and for hearing Counsel for and against the same; and for the Lords to be summoned;

The Lord Chancellor acquainted the House, "That the Clerk Assistant had laid on the Table of the House a Copy of the Minutes of Evidence taken on the Execution of the Writ of Enquiry in this Case, transmitted to him by the Under Sheriff of London, pursuant to the Standing Order of this House."

Ordered, That the said Minutes of Evidence do lie on the Table.

Then Counsel were called in:

And Mr. Serjeant Merewether appearing as Counsel on behalf of the Petitioner;

And no Counsel appearing for Mrs. Le Fevre;

Mr. Serjeant Merewether was heard to open the Allegations of the Bill.

Then David Lang was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Do you know Mr. Le Fevre?"

"Yes."

"And Mrs. Le Fevre?"

"Yes."

"Did you go to Mrs. Le Fevre in Thanet Place?"

"Yes."

"When was that?"

"The 30th of last Month, June."

"Did Mr. Henry Walker accompany you there?"

"Yes."

"Did you point out Mrs. Le Fevre to Mr. Henry Walker?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Henry Walker was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Did you, with the last Witness, call on Mrs. Le Fevre in Thanet Place in June last?"

"I did."

"Did you serve her with a Copy of this Bill?"

"I did."

"Did you give her Notice also of the Second Reading of the Bill?"

"I did."

(By a Lord.) "How do you know it was Mrs. Le Fevre?"

"She was pointed out to me by the last Witness."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then David Lang was again called in; and further examined as follows:

(By a Lord.) "How do you know Mrs. Le Fevre?"

"By her coming to my Parent's House; she lodged there."

"Who are your Parents?"

"Mrs. Lang."

"How do you know Mrs. Le Fevre?"

"She lodged there."

"How do you know it is Mrs. Le Fevre who is married to Mr. Le Fevre, Party to this Bill?"

"By her coming with him."

"Do you know Mr. Le Fevre?"

"Yes."

"Did he live in your House?"

"Yes."

"How long?"

"Several Times; I cannot say how long."

"What is he; what Profession is he?"

"He is in the Customs at Southampton."

"She lived with him?"

"Yes."

"Did they live as Man and Wife?"

"Yes."

"Did she pass by his Name?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Henry Walker was again called in, and further examined as follows:

(By a Lord.) "Who was living with Mrs. Le Fevre when you served her?"

"She was lodging in Thanet Place; not living with any one, apparently, to my Knowledge; living alone, as it appeared."

"There was no Gentleman living with her?"

"No one that I am aware of."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then James Longman Gawler was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Do you hold any Office in the Parish of St. Mary Lambeth?"

"I am the Clerk of the Parish."

"Do you produce the Parish Register?"

"I do."

"Will you read the Entry you have there of the Marriage of Mr. Le Fevre?"

The Witness read the same as follows:

"Page 276.

"Marriages solemnized in the Parish of St. Mary Lambeth, in the County of Surrey, in the Year 1819. Samuel Le Feuvre of this Parish, Bachelor, and Mary Roberts of this Parish, Spinster, were married in this Church, by Licence, with Consent of this 29th Day of June 1819.

"By me, Robert Clowes, Curate."

"This Marriage was solemnized between us,

Samuel Le Feuvre.

Mary Roberts."

"In the Presence of,

William Hayward.

James Longman Gawler."

"No. 828."

"Did you see that Marriage Ceremony performed?"

"Yes."

"Are those the Signatures of Mr. Le Fevre and Miss Roberts?"

"Yes."

(By a Lord.) "Did you know Mr. Le Fevre before?"

"No."

"How do you know it was he?"

"Because nobody else's Signature would appear in that Book but the Parties married."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Eleanor Allen was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Did you live in Southampton?"

"Yes."

"Were you, in Southampton, acquainted with Mr. and Mrs. Le Fevre?"

"Yes."

"Have you been in the habit of visiting them?"

"Yes."

"Did you become acquainted with Mrs. Le Fevre's Handwriting?"

"Yes, I did."

"Have the goodness to look at that Signature (the Register being shewn to the Witness), and inform the House whether that, to your Belief, is Mrs. Le Fevre's Handwriting?"

"Yes, it is."

"The Name, Mary Roberts, is Mrs. Le Fevre's Handwriting?"

"Yes."

"You stated that you were in the habit of visiting Mr. and Mrs. Le Fevre; did you observe the State in which they lived with each other?"

"Yes."

"Had you an Opportunity of observing Mr. Le Fevre's Conduct towards his Wife, Mrs. Le Fevre?"

"Yes, I had."

"Was his Conduct kind and affectionate to her?"

"Yes, very much so."

"Was her Conduct of a similar Description towards him?"

"Yes, it was."

(By a Lord.) "How long did you know them after their Marriage?"

"In the Year 1828."

"How many Months were you in the habit of visiting them?"

"During the whole of that Year."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Robert Allen was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Are you the Husband of the last Witness?"

"I am."

"Have you also been in the habit of visiting Mr. and Mrs. Le Fevre?"

"Continually, since the latter End of the Year 1827."

"How long did you continue in the habit of visiting them?"

"Until their ultimate Separation, from the Cause which is now before this House."

"Was that in the Year 1830?"

"Yes."

"Were you intimate with them?"

"Most intimate."

"Had you an Opportunity of seeing the Manner in which they lived with each other?"

"A continual Opportunity."

"Was the Conduct of Mr. Le Fevre kind and affectionate to Mrs. Le Fevre?"

"Always kind and affectionate; particularly so; as to be a Matter of Remark to all their Acquaintance."

"Was Mrs. Le Fevre's Conduct kind and affectionate also?"

"I always remarked that Circumstance."

(By a Lord.) "Do you remember Mr. Le Fevre going to London in February 1830?"

"Yes."

"Mrs. Le Fevre went after him?"

"Yes, she did."

"He came back without her?"

"Yes."

"How long did he remain in the Country, leaving her in London?"

"I think about Ten Days or a Fortnight."

"Recollect yourself, whether she was not absent much longer?"

"I am afraid I can hardly recall the Date; it struck me to be about a Fortnight; they were in the continual habit of visiting at my House, and consequently the Impression does not dwell on my Mind; it might be a Fortnight, or a little more."

"She never came back again?"

"No."

"Did not he come down in February?"

"He was obliged to come down, leaving her in London."

"When did you first hear of any improper Conduct on her Part; was it before May?"

"Not until after May."

"Was not he during all that Time in Southampton and she in London?"

"I think he was at Southampton, having left her in London; but proceeding backwards and forwards to see her, as she was at that Time understood to be particularly ill."

"You do not know that he saw her, do you?"

"I do not."

"You were examined as a Witness before the Under Sheriff?"

"I was."

"Recollect whether they were not separated Eight or Ten Weeks or more?"

"They were separated after some Time; Circumstances came to Mr. Le Fevre's Knowledge; of course he never saw her after that Circumstance."

"Did that take place about Ten Weeks after she left Southampton?"

"No; I should apprehend after they had been separated only a very few Days; the Impression upon my Mind is, about a Fortnight after the Circumstances came to his Knowledge."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then David Hill was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Have you an Office Copy of the Judgment in the Suit of Le Fevre against Winnington?"

"Yes."

"Have you examined it?"

"I have."

"Is it an accurate Copy?"

"It is."

"What was the Amount of Damages?"

"£600."

(By a Lord.) "Was there any Defence before the Sheriff's Jury?"

"No, I believe not."

The same was delivered in and read; being an Office Copy of a Record of a Judgment in the Court of King's Bench, in Easter Term in the Eleventh Year of the Reign of King George the Fourth, in an Action by Samuel Le Feuvre Esquire, sometimes called Samuel Le Fevre, against John Miles Winnington, for Trespass, Assault and Criminal Conversation with Mary the Wife of the said Samuel Le Feuvre, for £600, besides Costs of Suit.

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Mary Parkman was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Were you, in February 1830, in the Service of Mr. and Mrs. Le Fevre?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember Mr. and Mrs. Le Fevre going to London respecting a Trial?"

"Yes."

"Your Master is Collector of the Customs at Southampton, is he not?"

"Yes."

"At the Time your Master went to London was Mrs. Le Fevre unwell?"

"She had not been in very good Health."

"Did she follow Mr. Le Fevre to London a few Days after he had gone away?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember Mr. Le Fevre returning afterwards to Southampton?"

"Yes."

"Did he send you to London to Mrs. Le Fevre?"

"Yes."

"Did you go to her, in London, about the Beginning of March?"

"Yes."

"Did you find Mrs. Le Fevre lodging at the House of a Person of the Name of Lang, in Villiers Street?"

"Yes."

"Did she continue to lodge at Mrs. Lang's for some Time?"

"Yes."

"Till the End of March nearly?"

"Yes."

"Did she then remove to a Place called Canterbury Place, in the Kent Road?"

"Yes."

"Had she been unwell during her Stay at Mrs. Lang's, in Villiers Street?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember, while she was at Canterbury Place, any Gentleman coming there?"

"Yes."

"Do you know his Name?"

"Yes."

"What was his Name?"

"Sir John Miles Winnington."

"Did he come there often?"

"Yes."

"Have you at any Time carried Letters, directed to Sir John Miles Winnington, for Mrs. Le Fevre?"

"Yes."

"Did Sir John Miles Winnington ever remain in Canterbury Place all Night?"

"Yes."

"When he remained there all Night, where did he sleep?"

"With Mrs. Le Fevre."

"Did that happen only once, or repeatedly?"

"Regularly."

(By a Lord.) "Were you in her Service?"

"Yes."

(By Counsel.) "You say that he slept regularly with her?"

"Yes."

"Did you return to Southampton?"

"Yes."

"Did you tell Mr. Le Fevre what you had seen on your Return?"

"Yes."

"In consequence of that, did he send you to his professional Adviser, Mr. Bryant?"

"Yes."

"Were you there desired to state all you knew respecting that Transaction?"

"Yes."

(By a Lord.) "Was Mr. Le Fevre alone when you made this Communication to him?"

"Yes."

"What Effect did this Communication produce upon him?"

"A very great Effect indeed."

"Of what kind?"

"He cried very much."

"Do you know what Reason there was for Mrs. Le Fevre remaining in Town when Mr. Le Fevre left?"

"She remained on account of her Ill-health."

"Was she attended by any Medical Person?"

"Yes."

"Whom?"

"Mr. Furnival."

"Was she attended frequently by him?"

"Every Day."

"How long did she remain attended by him?"

"About Three Weeks."

"Do you know what was the Matter with her?"

"No, I do not."

"Did she keep her Bed?"

"Yes."

"During the whole of the Three Weeks?"

"Not the whole of the Three Weeks, but a great Part of it."

"How soon after the End of Three Weeks did she go out?"

"Directly."

"Did you return to her Service, or continue in Mr. Le Fevre's Service?"

"I continued in Canterbury Place."

"Are you in her Service now?"

"No."

"How long did you remain after you made the Communication to Mr. Le Fevre?"

"I suppose about Six Months."

"Did you continue with Mr. Le Fevre in the Country, or did you continue in her Service?"

"Some Time in her Service before this took place."

"After you made the Communication, did you return to your Mistress?"

"No, I did not; I never went back again."

"What made you go back to Mr. Le Fevre and leave your Mistress in London?"

"Because she would not receive me."

"Who would not receive you?"

"Mrs. Le Fevre."

"How long did this Intercourse with Sir John Winnington go on?"

"During the Time I was in London."

"How many Weeks?"

"Six or Seven Weeks."

"Did he live in the House, or come there?"

"He lived in the House."

"Did you know that the whole of the Six Weeks?"

"Yes."

"Why did not you go and tell your Master the first Week instead of the last?"

"Because I had no Chance of getting Home."

"What do you call Home?"

"Southampton."

"How did you get Home in the end?"

"I drew Money from Mr. Lang to get myself Home."

"Can you write?"

"Yes."

"When did you first write a Letter by the Post to tell him what you had seen going on with Sir John?"

"I did not write any Letter at all."

"How came you not to write?"

"Because I expected to go Home; I was only waiting for the Coach. I had not left Mrs. Le Fevre above Two Days before I went Home."

"Did Mrs. Le Fevre give you Warning, or did you give her Warning?"

"Mrs. Le Fevre gave me Warning."

"Why did she do that?"

"Because I did not chuse to hold with her Misconduct."

"Why did you take Six Weeks to hold with her Misconduct?"

"Because I could not get Home."

"You got the Money from Mr. Lang?"

"Yes."

"Did you communicate to Mr. Lang's Family what you had observed going on between your Mistress and Sir John?"

"No, I did not."

"You asked for the Money to take you Home?"

"Yes."

"Did you ask for the Money before Mrs. Le Fevre turned you off, or afterwards?"

"Afterwards."

"If Mrs. Le Fevre had not turned you off, should you have left her Service?"

"Yes."

"Why did not you ask for Money before; you say the only Reason for remaining there was the Want of Money; why did not you ask for Money before that?"

"Because I had not it in my Power; and I should not have done it but for Mr. Le Fevre authorizing me to do it. She did not receive me after my Return."

"What do you mean by your Return?"

"She sent me Home first, and Mr. Le Fevre sent me back again."

"Who gave you the Money to take you Home, when she sent you?"

"Mr. Lang."

"Then this was after she had sent you away?"

"Yes."

"Why did not you, before she sent you away, ask for Money?"

"I had no other Way of getting Home."

"Why did not you ask Mr. Lang for Money before Mrs. Le Fevre turned you away?"

"Mrs. Le Fevre did not turn me away 'till I returned, and she would not receive me; and I had spent the Money that I had in coming, and had not Money to take me back again."

"When Mrs. Le Fevre sent you Home - for what Purpose did she send you Home the first Time?"

"She told me to put myself into Mr. Le Fevre's Way, that she might have an Action to bring against him at Doctors Commons."

"Was any body by when she told you that?"

"No."

"How long had she been living with Sir John Winnington when she told you that?"

"A Month."

"Did you agree to go and put yourself in Mr. Le Fevre's Way for that Purpose?"

"No; I said I would not do any such thing."

"Then why did you do it, if you said so?"

"I did not do it."

"You went to Southampton; did you not?"

"Yes; I did go."

"Did not your Mistress then believe, when she sent you to Southampton, that you were going for that Purpose?"

"I do not know whether she believed it, or not."

"You must know what you told her?"

"I told her I would not do any such thing."

"When you told her that you would not do any such thing, what did she answer to that?"

"She told me to wait 'till she sent for me."

"To wait where; at Southampton?"

"Yes."

"When you told her that you would not be a Party to this Plot against Mr. Le Fevre, why did she send you down?"

"I do not know what she sent me for."

"You know why you went yourself; why did you go, if you did not go for that?"

"I have stated what I went for."

"What was it; state it again?"

"I have told that Gentleman what I went for; I have nothing more to say."

"What was the Purpose of your going to Southampton?"

"My own Purpose was no more than that I was sent by Mrs. Le Fevre."

"You say Mrs. Le Fevre sent you to throw yourself in Mr. Le Fevre's Way, and you refused?"

"Yes, I did."

"Then what did you go for?"

"I was obliged to go where my Business called me; I could not go into the Street."

"When you went to Mr. Le Fevre, did you see him alone?"

"Yes."

"Often?"

"As often as he came Home; he was seldom at Home much."

"How long did you stop there?"

"I should think as much as Four or Five Months."

"And left your Mistress in Town?"

"Yes."

"Did you take many Letters from Mr. Le Fevre to the Post Office during that Time?"

"No."

"Had you told Mr. Le Fevre nothing about what was going on in London?"

"Not 'till I came Home."

"Not 'till you came the second Time?"

"No."

"Why did not you tell him?"

"Because I did not like to do it."

"All the Time you remained there, what Work did you do in the House?"

"I did none, only to wait on Mr. Winnington and Mrs. Le Fevre."

"When you were at Southampton what did you do?"

"To do the Work of the House and to cook."

"Were you Four or Five Months doing the Work of the House, and leaving your Mistress in Town during that Time?"

"Yes."

"How long had you been in Town before you went down the first Time?"

"About Five or Six Weeks."

"When you came back the second Time, how long did you remain?"

"Not Three Days; she did not take me into her Service after my Return."

"While you were there, did any body speak to you except Mr. Le Fevre?"

"No."

"Was he at Home in the Evening?"

"Sometimes."

"What Servants were there in the House besides yourself?"

"Another Woman Servant and a Man."

"Did you sleep with the Woman?"

"No; I slept on the same Floor with her."

"In a Room by yourself?"

"Yes."

"On what Floor did Mr. Le Fevre sleep?"

"On the First Floor; the Floor beneath."

"Did any other Persons sleep in the House?"

"No."

"Did Mr. Le Fevre use to sit at Home in the Evening?"

"Never."

"Were you ever in the Room with him when he sate at Home in the Evening?"

"No."

"Then you swear that you never sate in the Room with him in the Evening."

"Yes, that I can swear."

"Did you ever sit down in his Presence?"

"No."

"Did you ever see Sir John Winnington in the House with Mrs. Le Fevre at the Time that Mr. Le Fevre was living with her?"

"No."

"Did you ever see Sir John and Mr. Le Fevre in the same Room together?"

"No."

"What made you stay so long at Southampton, when you were only sent down for a particular Purpose?"

"Because I was expecting her every Day to send for me again."

"Had she any Maid while you were there?"

"She had Mrs. Gibbons's Daughter."

"Who desired you to go back?"

"Mrs. Le Fevre wrote Word to Mr. Le Fevre that she was very ill, and Mr. Le Fevre wished me to go back again to her."

"Then you say she would not take you into the House?"

"Yes."

"Where did you go to?"

"I went to the Coburg Public House in the Old Kent Road."

"How long did you remain there?"

"One Night."

"Did she give any Reason for not taking you in?"

"No."

"Then you went down into the Country again?"

"Yes."

"Who gave you the Money?"

"Mr. Lang."

"Who had given you the Money before?"

"Mrs. Le Fevre."

"How long did you remain at Southampton then?"

"I remained there 'till within the last Three Months."

"What made you leave his Service?"

"Because I wished to get another Situation; I did not wish to remain any longer."

"Is he to take you back after this is over?"

"No; nothing to that Effect."

"In whose Service are you now?"

"Mrs. James's at Haughton near Romsey."

"She is a Lady of Fortune?"

"Yes."

"What made you so long, after Six or Seven Weeks seeing this, as Four or Five Months before you told him of it?"

"I told him as soon as I got Home."

"That was the second Time; why did you remain Four or Five Months at Home, and not tell him what you had seen?"

"It was not so long."

"What was the Time you first told your Master what you had seen passing in London?"

"I cannot fix the Day."

"How soon after you went down?"

"The Moment I arrived at the Place."

(By Counsel.) "Try and recollect in what Month it was?"

"It was in May."

(By a Lord.) "Was that the first or the second Time you went down?"

"The second Time."

"Do you remember the Time Mrs. Le Fevre desired you to go down and throw yourself in his Way?"

"That was in April."

"When she desired you to go down?"

"Yes."

"How long had you been in Town at that Time; Four or Five Weeks?"

"As much as Six Weeks, I think."

"That was in April that you went down, being desired to throw yourself in his Way?"

"Yes."

"In what Month was it you told him what you had seen?"

"In May."

"What do you mean by saying you were Four or Five Months in the House with Mr. Le Fevre without telling him?"

"I told him as soon as I arrived, and that was in May."

"Are there Four or Five Months between April and May?"

"That was a Mistake."

"How long were you living alone in the House with Mr. Le Fevre?"

"Four or Five Months after it was discovered to him."

"Fix your Mind on this:-When you went back from your Mistress the first Time, how long did you remain at Southampton with Mr. Le Fevre?"

"A Fortnight."

"Did you tell him when you went down the first Time or the second?"

"The second."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel was asked, "Whether he had in attendance the other Servants who were in the Service of Mr. Le Fevre at the Time the last Witness was at Southampton?"

The Counsel stated, "That he had not them in attendance."

The Counsel being asked, "Whether the Attendance of both or one of them could be procured on a future Day?" stated "That it could:" And it was intimated to the Counsel, that the Production of one or both of them, and of the Person at whose House Mrs Le Fevre lodged, or her Servant, was desirable.

The Counsel was directed to withdraw.

Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off to Tuesday next; and that the Lords be summoned.

Evidence to be printed.

Ordered, That the Evidence taken on the said Bill be printed.

Ackerley's Name Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Bernal and others;

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable Joseph Chamberlayne Wilkinson Ackerley otherwise Acherley, of the Town and County of the Town of Southampton, Esquire, to lay down and for ever cease to use the Surnames of Wilkinson and Ackerley otherwise Acherley, and to take the Name of Chamberlayne only, and bear the Arms of Chamberlayne quarterly with his own Family Arms, pursuant to the Will of his late Maternal Uncle Edmund John Chamberlayne Esquire, deceased;" and to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

Lunatics Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Bernal and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for regulating for Three Years, and from thence until the End of the then next Session of Parliament, the Care and Treatment of Insane Persons in England;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Ordered, That the said Bill be printed.

Grosvenor Chapel Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Bernal and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for the Establishment of a Chapel of Ease, to be called Grosvenor Chapel, in the Parish of Saint George Hanover Square, in the County of Middlesex, and for providing for the Maintenance of the said Chapel, and a Stipend for the Minister thereof;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Wolverhampton Roads Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir John Wrottesley and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for repairing and improving certain Roads in the Counties of Stafford and Salop, leading to and from the Town of Wolverhampton, in the County of Stafford;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Gorbals Statute Labour Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir John Wrottesley and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to alter and amend an Act passed in the Sixth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Fourth, for regulating the Conversion of the Statute Labour within the Barony of Gorbals, in the City of Glasgow and County of Lanark;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Three Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Slane Peerage, Butler to attend the Com ee.

Ordered, That James Butler of Kilmagar, in the County of Kilkenny, Esquire, do attend this House on Tuesday next, to be sworn, in order to his being examined as a Witness before the Committee for Privileges, to whom the Petition of George Bryan of Jenkinstown, in the County of Kilkenny, Esquire, to His Majesty; praying, "That his Claim to the Barony of Slane may be referred to the House of Peers, to report whether the said Title be or be not a Barony in Fee, by Writ of Summons, descendible to Heirs General, and whether the same is or is not now in Abeyancé between Edward Lord Dunsany and the Petitioner;" together with His Majesty's Reference thereof to this House, and the Report of The Attorney General thereunto annexed; and also the Petition of Henry Fleming of the City of Dublin, in relation to the before-mentioned Claim, stand referred; and do also attend on Wednesday the 20th of this instant July, in order to his being examined as a Witness before the said Committee.

Lord Lieutenants (Ireland) Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury (according to Order) reported the Amendments made by the Committee of the Whole House to the Bill, intituled, "An Act to provide for the better Order and Government of Ireland, by Lieutenants for the several Counties, Counties of Cities and Counties of Towns therein."

And the said Amendments, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Then several Amendments were made by the House to the said Bill.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be printed.

Customs, &c. Oaths Abolition Bill reported:

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to abolish certain Oaths and Affirmations taken and made in the Customs and Excise Departments of His Majesty's Revenue, and to substitute Declarations in lieu thereof."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Order for 3 a.

Ordered, That the said Bill be read the Third Time To-morrow.

Duchy of Cornwall Leases Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable His Majesty to make Leases, Copies and Grants of Offices, Lands and Hereditaments, Parcel of the Duchy of Cornwall, or annexed to the same."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Turnpike Acts Continuance Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for continuing, until the Thirtieth Day of June One thousand eight hundred and thirty-two, the several Acts for regulating the Turnpike Roads in Great Britain which will expire at the End of the present Session of Parliament."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Frauds on Creditors Bill reported:

The Order of the Day being read for the House to be put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to prevent Debtors from defrauding their Creditors by lying in Prison or absconding from England;" and for the Lords to be summoned;

It was moved, "That the House do now resolve itself into a Committee upon the said Bill."

Which being objected to;

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Then the House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the said Bill.

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Ordered, That the said Bill be ingrossed.

Order for 3 a.

Ordered, That the said Bill be read the Third Time on Thursday next; and that the Lords be summoned.

Galway Elective Franchise, Petitions from New Town Smith & Mechanics Institute, Galway, for Extension of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Roman Catholic Inhabitants of the Parish of New Town Smith, in the County of Galway, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Members of the Mechanics Institute of Galway, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; severally praying, "That their Lordships will be graciously pleased to equalize Civil Rights in Galway, by extending to the Roman Catholic Mercantile and Trading Classes the Elective Franchise in as full and ample a Manner as the same is now enjoyed by Protestants:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Mercurii, decimum tertium diem instantis Julii, horâ decimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.