Surnames beginning 'J'

The Cromwell Association Online Directory of Parliamentarian Army Officers . Originally published by British History Online, , 2017.

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Surnames beginning 'J'

Jacie, William William Jacie
By spring 1645, and probably succeeding Lieutenant Benedict Clutterbuck in that position in 1644-5, lieutenant in Samuel Gardiner troop in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 65.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Jackson, Andrew Andrew Jackson
A major in Sir Thomas Myddelton’s Army in North Wales. A surviving pay warrant and acquittances of 3 Apr. 1644 directed payment of £100 to the bearer, Major Andrew Jackson £100, who signed for receipt of the money in several instalments during Apr.
References: TNA, SP28/346, no. 70.
Armies: North Wales
Jackson, Edward Edward Jackson
Son of Edward Jackson of Wall, Shenstone parish, Staffordshire.
A captain in Staffordshire, Jackson raised a troop of horse for parliament in early 1643.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 2.498-9.
Armies: Staffordshire
Jackson, Henry Henry Jackson
Probably of Wall, Staffordshire, a captain in Staffordshire who raised a troop of horse there early in 1643 and, still a captain, probably supported Brereton’s operation against Chester during winter 1645-6 but was ordered back to Newcastle in Jan. 1646.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1.112, 2.498.
Armies: Staffordshire
Jackson, John John Jackson

References:
Armies: Cheshire
Jackson, John John Jackson
Major of horse in Ralph Assheton’s Lancashire regiment of horse and foot; he became major and (by order of the county committee of 11 Dec. 1645) Adjutant of the Lancashire regiment of horse commanded by Nicholas Shuttleworth. In Aug. 1645 he marched out of Yorkshire with eight troops of Lancashire horse. In Oct. he was sent with the regiment to the siege of Chester. Captain-Lieutenant of the colonel’s company of Henry Bradshaw’s regiment of foot in the Cheshire militia at the battle of Worcester, 3 Sept. 1651.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 168, 171-2; Gratton, Lancs. war effort, 197, 281-2, 296; Earwaker, East Cheshire, 2.64-8..
Armies: Lancashire; Cheshire
Jackson, Joseph Joseph Jackson (c. 1605-1662)
Captain. Son of Miles Jackson of Bristol and Mary, daughter of William Byrd of Bristol. Apprentice to his father in 1620. Member of the Bristol Common Council, 1638-62; alderman 1646-62; sheriff, 1642-3; mayor 1651-2; master of the Merchant Venturers, 1647-8. MP for Bristol 1659. ‘He was a zealous Parliamentarian, and Richard Elsworth called him a factious Anabaptist who fined a man 6s. 8d. for drinking the King’s health’ (Merchants and Merchandise, 58).
1 Sept. 1642: chosen fourth captain of the City of Bristol, and assigned 100 men. References to him as Trained Band captain, 23 Oct. 1642-15 July 1643.
References: Merchants and Merchandise, 58-63, 147; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.603-5; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Bristol
Jackson, Philip Philip Jackson (c. 1602-1675)
Of Stanshope, Alstonfield parish, Staffordshire. Eldest son of Henry Jackson (1559-1632) and his first wife Anne, eldest daughter of the puritan and iconoclast John Bruen of Bruen Stapleford, Cheshire (for whom see Oxford DNB), and elder brother of Henry Jackson. He married (1) Dorothy, daughter of George Alsop of Castlehey, Staffordshire and widow of Thomas Hurt of Castern, Staffordshire and (2) Joan, daughter of Henry Beresford of Gateham Grange, Yorkshire.
Captain of a foot company in Staffordshire, 29 Nov. 1642-17 Sept. 1644; lieutenant-colonel of a Staffordshire regiment of foot, 18 Sept. 1644-20 Jan. 1645; colonel of a Staffordshire regiment of foot, 20 Jan. 1645-20 Nov. 1646.
Jackson has been identified as ‘the Grand Juryman’, the leader of the Moorlanders of north-west Staffordshire, who provided the first serious parliamentarian challenge in the county in early 1643, attacking Stafford in Feb. and appealing for help to Sir William Brereton in Cheshire and Sir John Gell in Derbyshire: ‘a great rabble of all sorts of people…some with birding guns, others with only clubs, others with pieces of scythes, very few with muskets’ (Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, lxii).
A county committeeman in Staffordshire from 7 June 1643. In the battles in the committee between the supporters of Sir William Brereton and the earl of Denbigh, Jackson sided with the latter. In Oct. 1645 Brereton saw Jackson more as one of the ‘Civil Power’ who were misusing their authority to distract ‘the Military Powre’ (Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, 346), and the records of the county committee present Jackson, for all his military rank, more as a civil administrator.
He continued as a militia and assessment commissioner in 1647-8, but thereafter withdrew until the eve of the Restoration.
In the survey of the Staffordshire gentry drawn up in 1662/3 he was recorded as worth £300 per annum and characterized as ‘a very bad man, prisbiterian. Indifferent parts’. Presented by the constable of Alstonfield in 1662 as a former active parliamentarian.
References: Staffs. Pedigrees, 138; Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, xx, lxii, lxxiv, lxxviii, lxxxiii, 346, 352; Dore, Brereton letter books, 1.365-6, 2.127-9; TNA, SP28/134, part 2: account of Colonel Philip Jacks. (esp. f. 35r. for his ranks); ‘Staffs. Gentry’, 19; ‘Active Parliamentarians, 1662’, 46.
Armies: Staffordshire
Jackson, Richard Richard Jackson
Ensign in William Bampfield’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 40.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Jackson, Robert Robert Jackson (died 1645)
Major of Henry Mainwaring’s regiment of foot in Sir William Brereton’s Cheshire Army. He was killed beating off a royalist raid upon Farndon, 23 Feb. 1645, and was buried at Nantwich two days later, presumably with full military honours (the funeral cost £11 3s 2d).
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 256-7; Civil war in Cheshire, 162-3, 259.
Armies: Cheshire
Jackson, Thomas Thomas Jackson
Lieutenant (Bringer-Up) in the Colonel’s company in the Green regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel John Warner) in summer 1642.
Probably the Thomas Jackson who served as captain in George Langham’s/Samuel Carleton’s regiment of foot attached to the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642-3.
Possibly the Thomas Jackson who was a lay trier for the Presbyterian church in his parish in 1646.
References: Thrale 1642; Lindley, Popular politics, 143-4.
Armies: London
Jacob, John John Jacob
Captain of a company of 55 men and 7 officers stationed at Dartmouth at some period before the siege in Sept. 1643. A later accounting note calls him major. Commissioned captain of foot in the Devon militia, 15 July 1650.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 4.404, 414, CSPD, 1650, 508.
Armies: Devon
James, - - James
Ensign. Noted as officer of garrison of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis, 21 Jan. 1647.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 161-2.
Armies: Dorset
James, John John James
Cornet in Captain Richard Grenville’s Buckinghamshire troop of Harquebusiers, initially raised as part of Arthur Goodwin’s regiment of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army. He was promoted lieutenant in the same troop, 22 July 1644, and on 28 Mar. 1645 succeeded Grenville as captain.
References: Bucks. contributions, 115-22; Peacock, Army lists, 54.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Buckinghamshire
James, Joseph Joseph James
In 1642 listed as cornet in both Richard Grenville’s and Thomas Tyrrill’s troops of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 51.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Janison [Danison, Janson], - - Janison [Danison, Janson]
Lieutenant, Dorset, payments 3 June, 23 June and 28 July 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West,5.524.
Armies: Dorset
Jaques, - - Jaques
A captain in Waller’s Southern Association Army, probably in Waller’s own regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 144.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Jarvis, Henry Henry Jarvis
Captain of a company in the force which took Corfe town but failed to take Corfe Castle in June 1643, possibly from a town garrison or raised in June 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.511.
Armies: Dorset
Jarvis, Thomas Thomas Jarvis
From the time it was raised in winter 1643-4 until it was largely disbanded in spring 1645, captain in the regiment of horse raised by Sir Richard Grenville and, after his defection to the king, commanded by Colonel Edward Cooke. Jarvis and his troop may have survived the breaking up the regiment in spring 1645, instead entering Massey’s brigade and serving under him in the West in 1645-6.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 59.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Massey Brigade
Jarvise, Peter Peter Jarvise
At its muster in Nov. 1643, captain in the earl of Warwick’s regiment of foot formed from the Essex militia, part of the Eastern Association Army that contributed to the siege of Reading in spring 1643, the siege of Greenland House in summer 1644 and probably to some other actions in which the army was involved.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.31.
Armies: Eastern Association
Jeffs, Christopher Christopher Jeffs
In Jan. 1645, lieutenant in Captain Smith’s company in Sir Samuel Luke’s Newport Pagnell-based regiment of foot. One letter from and one to him survive in Luke’s letter books.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 95; Luke Letter Books, nos. 678, 1268.
Armies: Bedfordshire
Jenkins, - - Jenkins
Ensign in Sir Richard Onslow’s regiment of foot (Surrey Auxiliaries) by 21 Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 107.
Armies: Surrey; Waller (Southern Association)
Jenkins, George George Jenkins
Lieutenant in (presumably his kinsman) John Jenkins’s company in John Pickering’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army. This may be the same George Jenkins who also shows up as an ensign in that company and who later, once it has transferred to the New Model Army, became lieutenant and by 1649 captain and who was killed at Drogheda in Sept. 1649. Alternatively, two separate men named George Jenkins may have served as officers in this company.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.86; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 104, 119, 137.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Jenkins, Henry Henry Jenkins
Captain in Cholmley’s probably short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642-3.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 36-7.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Jenkins, Hugh Hugh Jenkins
Ensign, later lieutenant, of the company commanded first by Pritchard in Edward Montagu’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army, and then by Giles Sanders when the company and regiment transferred to the New Model Army in spring 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.70; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 118.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Jenkins, John John Jenkins
By Aug. 1643, captain in Vermuyden’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army; he went as captain in that regiment when it transferred to the New Model Army in spring 1645 and remained with the regiment until the eve of the Restoration.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.102; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 52, 62, 73, 83, 94, 107.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Jenkins, John John Jenkins
By spring 1644 until his death at Faringdon in spring 1645, by which time the regiment had transferred to the New Model Army, captain in John Pickering’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.86; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 49, 60.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Jenkins, John John Jenkins
Fifth captain (for firelocks) in Charles Essex’s regiment of foot in Lord Wharton’s Army raised for Ireland in 1642. Later that summer he instead went with the regiment into the earl of Essex’s Army as captain in Charles Essex’s regiment of foot.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 70, 45.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Jenkins, William William Jenkins
In 1643-4, lieutenant in Major John Lilburne’s company in Edward King’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.47.
Armies: Eastern Association
Jenkinson, - - Jenkinson
Captain in the White regiment, London Auxiliaries (Colonel Bellamy) in Oct. 1646.
References: Thrale 1642; Lindley, Popular politics, 208, 246, 343-4; JHC, 2.894, 3.149; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 11.
Armies: London
Jennings, - - Jennings
Ensign in John Hampden’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in June 1643, very possibly in the company of William Barriffe.
References: TNA, SP28/8/115.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Jennings, Charles Charles Jennings
Lieutenant in the Yellow regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Sir John Wollaston) in summer 1642.
On 19 Dec. 1642 he was on a list presented to the House of Commons of Londoners to be secured for alleged involvement in a royalist plot to release all the prisoners in the City and seize the Tower; an assessment defaulter and peace petitioner, and in 1643 also implicated in the Waller plot. On 29 June he was one of those royalists whose goods had been seized by the Committee for Sequestrations. As he had not come to clear himself, they were to be sold by the candle.
References: Thrale 1642; JHC, 2.894; JHC, 3,149.
Armies: London
Jennins [Gimmins], Thomas Thomas Jennins [Gimmins]
By 1645 captain-lieutenant in the Colonel’s own company in the regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army, which had been commanded successively by Henry Bulstrode, Adam Cunningham and Richard Fortescue. He then became captain in Fortescue’s New Model Army regiment of foot, promoted to major in 1646, but he left the regiment the following year.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 45, 57, 148.
Armies: Earl of Essex; New Model Army
Jenny, George George Jenny
In spring 1644 ensign in Captain Tilly’s company in the Tower Hamlets Trained Bands foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 139.
Armies: Tower Hamlets
Jephson, John John Jephson
Third son of Sir John Jephson (died 1638) of Froyle, Hampshire, and Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir Thomas Norreys of Mallow Castle, County Cork; younger brother of William Jephson and Norris Jephson. Captain in the Portsmouth garrison regiment commanded by his brother William and (after Apr. 1645) by Richard Norton. Jephson was captured at the siege of Basing House on 6 Sept. 1644, but was exchanged by 12 Oct. He was still in the regiment on 25 Aug. 1645. By 1649 he was serving in Ireland under Lord Inchiquin for the king, and governor of Bandon Bridge.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 63; Godwin, Hants., 256, 261.
Armies: Hampshire
Jephson, Norris Norris Jephson
By late summer 1645 he had succeeded Poynes as lieutenant-colonel of the Portsmouth-based regiment of foot which had been commanded by his elder brother William Jephson in 1644-5.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 71.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Hampshire
Jephson, William William Jephson (1609/10-1658)
Eldest son of Sir John Jephson (died 1638) of Froyle, Hampshire, and Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir Thomas Norreys of Mallow Castle, County Cork; elder brother of John and Norris Jephson. He had from birth strong English and Irish connections, the former strengthened when he married into a prominent Buckinghamshire family in 1636. MP for Stockbridge, Hampshire, in the Short and Long Parliaments. He was in Munster at the time of the Irish Rebellion, returned to London and to parliament to plead help for the Protestants of Munster and spent much of 1642-3 negotiating and fighting in Ireland, including defending Mallow Castle.
He fought in England for roughly a year, from spring 1644 until spring 1645, when he lost his English command under the Self-Denying Ordinance and focused on Irish affairs, initially in parliament until his seclusion at Pride’s Purge, and thereafter back in Ireland as a soldier, politician and administrator there. He represented Irish seats in the first and second Protectorate Parliaments.
For most of his year actively campaigning in England, 1644-5, he was governor of Portsmouth. Much of the regiment of foot, which he strengthened and took command of in May 1644, probably incorporating most of the infantry and some of the officers who had formed the Portsmouth garrison from 1642-3, served under him at Portsmouth, though some of his companies fought elsewhere for a time, joining operations at Wareham and Basing House. The regiment continued after Jephson lost his command and later in summer 1645 Richard Norton was appointed its colonel.
References: Oxford DNB; Spring, Waller’s army, 70-1.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Hampshire
Jervoise [Jarvis], Henry Henry Jervoise [Jarvis]
Third but second surviving son of Sir Thomas Jervoise (1587-1654) of Britford, Wiltshire and Herriard, Hampshire, and his first wife Lucy, daughter and coheir of Sir Richard Powlett of Herriard; younger brother of Captain Thomas Jervoise.
He served parliament at sea, in the earl of Warwick’s fleet, as captain of the Fellowship. On land he was captain in the Portsmouth garrison regiment of foot commanded by Sir William Lewis and William Jephson, by 10 Jan. 1643 and was still there on 25 Aug. 1645.
On 8 July 1648 he was granted £500 out of the discovery of concealed delinquent estates that he uncovered for his arrears by land.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 62; F.H.T. Jervoise, ‘The Jervoises of Herriard and Britford’, The Ancestor, 3 (Oct. 1902), 5; JHL, 10.370.
Armies: Hampshire
Jervoise [Jarvis], Thomas Thomas Jervoise [Jarvis] (1616-1693)
Of Herriard, Hampshire. Second but eldest surviving son of Sir Thomas Jervoise (1587-1654) of Britford, Wiltshire and Herriard, Hampshire, and his first wife Lucy, daughter and coheir of Sir Richard Powlett of Herriard. He married in 1657 Mary, daughter of George Purefoy of Wadley, Berkshire.
Cornet in Captain William Cross’s troop in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of horse, 29 Aug. to Nov. 1643. Captain in Sir Richard Grenville’s/Edward Cooke’s regiment of horse, 29 Dec. 1643 to 30 Apr. 1645, commanding the Surrey troop. He was captured at the siege of Basing House in Sept. 1644, along with Captain John Jephson, but was exchanged the following month. In Apr. 1645 he joined Cooke’s regiment of horse in Massey’s brigade, in which time he was present at the siege of Corfe Castle, and in which regiment he served until its disbandment in Oct. 1646. Fairfax’s certificate on his disbanding recorded how in the Massey brigade Jervoise ‘hath demeaned himself with fidelity and courage in the Service wherein he hath bin employed, and with fair and civill carriage in the Disbanding of the said Brigade’ (Godwin, Hants, 314). (Spring, Waller’s army, 98, suggests that at some point he also commanded a troop – probably the Surrey troop – in John Middleton’s regiment of horse, but it is not clear how it fits into what else is known of his military career).
He held a number of offices in Hampshire before and after the Restoration: JP for Hampshire, 1652 to 1680 (when he was removed from the bench for his exclusionist politics) and from 1689 till his death; assessment commissioner, 1649-52 and 1660-80; militia commissioner in 1659 and Mar. 1660 and captain of militia horse in Apr. 1660; and sheriff 1666-7. He was elected MP for Hampshire in Nov. 1680 (in a by-election) and in the 1689 Convention Parliament; in both parliaments he seems to have been totally inactive.
References: Spring, Waller’s army,56, 98; Temple, ‘Massey Brigade’,438-9, 441, 444; Godwin, Hants., 256; 313-4; HoP: The Commons, 1660-1690, 2, 650-1; F.H.T. Jervoise, ‘ The Jervoises of Herriard and Britford’, The Ancestor, 3 (Oct. 1902), 5-7.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Massey Brigade
Jessop, John John Jessop
Captain in William Bampfield’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 40.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Jessup, Thomas Thomas Jessup
Surgeon to the Lancashire forces at the siege of Chester: referred to as such on 20 Dec. 1645 and 12 Jan. 1646.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 396, 510.
Armies: Lancashire
Jewkes [Jukes], Thomas Thomas Jewkes [Jukes]
In 1642 lieutenant in James Sheffield’s troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army and then lieutenant of the Colonel’s own troop in Sheffield’s regiment of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army probably from its formation in summer 1643 through to its disbandment in spring 1645; unlike several officers of the regiment, he did not transfer to the New Model Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 49; Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 150.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Jewty, James James Jewty
Ensign in Captain Skutt’s company at Poole, Dorset, 29 June 1643. Possibly the same man as Captain James Dewy, a reduced officer in Dorset in Apr. 1648.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.517.
Armies: Dorset
Jewty, William William Jewty
Cornet in Sir William Balfour’s troop of horse in the latter’s regiment of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 48.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Jobson, Michael Michael Jobson
Lieutenant in Cholmley’s probably short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642-3.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 36-7.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Johnson, Charles Charles Johnson
In spring 1644, lieutenant in Matthew Bridges’s company in Godfrey Bosvile’s Warwick-based regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 31.
Armies: Warwickshire; Waller
Johnson, Edward Edward Johnson
Lieutenant (or captain-lieutenant) in Sir Walter Erle’s troop of horse, references 25 Aug. 1642-29 July 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.526-9.
Armies: Dorset
Johnson, Humphrey Humphrey Johnson
A lieutenant in Cheshire. On 14 Jan. 1647 he was reimbursed for arrears due serving in Captain John Brooke’s company of volunteers before it was made the Trained Band of Bucklow Hundred. He may be the same Humphrey Johnson mentioned in a receipt of 21 Jan. 1648 annexed to pay orders, when Bucklow sequestrators were ordered to pay him £2 5s 4d which Ensign Pike had paid to Robert Massey of Warrington for a debt to him from Pike and Lieutenant Johnson on 2 June 1647 (from original order of 7 June 1645 for powder and match for guarding Frodsham Ditch Ford).
References: TNA, SP28/224, f. 218; TNA, SP28/225, f. 524.
Armies: Cheshire
Johnson, John John Johnson
By May 1644 Johnson was a captain in Colonel John Fox’s newly-raised regiment of horse and dragoons at Edgbaston, and at muster in July 1644 he was captain of a company of dragoons. In May 1644 he and Reignold Fox took a party of 60 horse to beat up the royalist quarters at Bromsgrove. In another foray, he clashed with a party of royalist horse at Atherton. With the shrinkage of the garrison the following year, by Apr. 1645 he was commanding a party of 26 foot at Edgbaston. In 1651, by when he was an excise collector in Staffordshire, he distrained the goods of the tenants of the Catholic owner of Edgbaston House for arrears of pay.
References: Hopper, ‘Fox’, 103, 106.
Armies: Earl of Denbigh; Warwickshire
Johnson, John John Johnson
Chosen captain in the Yellow regiment, London Auxiliaries, by the Presbyterian militia committee in 1647.
References: TNA, SP28/46, Part 1, f. 39r.
Armies: London
Johnson, John John Johnson
Ensign in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 26.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Johnson, Robert Robert Johnson
Captain initially in Lord Brooke’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s army, 1642-3, in summer 1643 he was briefly captain in John Fiennes’s regiment of foot and then from its formation in Aug. 1643 until it was absorbed into the New Model Army in spring 1645, captain in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army. He is probably the Robert Johnson who was to be a captain in Fairfax’s New Model Army regiment of foot, but who soon left the regiment and was gone by May 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.64; Holmes, Eastern Association, 146, 235, 238; TNA, SP28/42; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 95, 108.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Eastern Association; New Model Army
Johnson, Thomas Thomas Johnson
Ensign in the Green regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel John Warner) in summer 1642.
References: Thrale 1642.
Armies: London
Johnson, Thomas Thomas Johnson
Initially cornet in, but promoted to lieutenant of, Ralph Knight’s troop in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army. He is probably the Thomas Johnson who in 1647 became a captain in the New Model Army horse regiment by then commanded by Matthew Tomlinson.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.53.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Johnstone [Johnson], William William Johnstone [Johnson]
Captain of a company in Lawrence Crawford’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army, succeeding Robert Taylor as its captain by 15 July 1644 and continuing as such until the regiment’s disbandment on 17 Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.15; Davies, ‘Eastern Association’, 94.
Armies: Eastern Association
Jollie [Jolly], Robert Robert Jollie [Jolly]
Of Warbreck (in Layton with Warbreck township, now part of Blackpool), Bispham, Poulton-le-Fylde parish, Lancashire.
One of the captains commissioned by Alexander Rigby, senior to raise a company of foot in Bispham and Poulton-le-Fylde; later captain in the regiment of Alexander Rigby, junior (the same regiment, passed from father to son because of the father’s resignation under the Self-Denying Ordinance).
In Jan. 1648 Jollie was in Robert Duckenfeild’s Cheshire regiment of foot.
Jollie fought in the third civil war, and was captain of one of the companies of foot that came up to join Robert Lilburne on the eve of the battle of Wigan Lane on 25 Aug. 1651: ‘Captain Jollie with the other Captaines and their companies were active and serviceable in beating up the Earle’s foot whereof many were slaine…’ (Warr in Lancashire, 42, 75).
Jollie was owed arrears of £413 14s in Nov. 1651.
His sergeant (later lieutenant) Robert Creane was owed £632 13s 6d in May 1659.
References: Warr in Lancashire, 43, 75; TNA, E121/5/7 (Duckenfeild, 29/11/1651); E121/4/8 no. 18; Gratton, Lancs. war effort, 294.
Armies: Lancashire; Cheshire
Jolly, James James Jolly (1600-1666)
Clothier, of the Clock House, Droylsden, Manchester.
Appointed provost marshal general of the forces raised in Lancashire in 1643. He became provost marshal in Robert Duckenfeild’s Cheshire regiment of foot and in the Chester garrison after the city fell in 1646.
Jolly’s library, sold to Humphrey Chetham in 1641, showed his Puritan commitments; he later became an Independent. For his sons, John and Thomas, both nonconformist minsters, see Oxford DNB.
References: TNA, E121/5/7 (Duckenfeild, 29/11/1651); Raines and Newton, Chetham, I, 125-6; S.J. Guscott, Humphrey Chetham, 1580-1653: fortune, politics and mercantile culture in seventeenth-century England, Chetham Soc., ser. 3, 45 (2003), 34, 93-4, 98, 182, 198, 214, 235, 243.
Armies: Lancashire; Cheshire
Jones, - - Jones
Captain-Lieutenant. Captain of Strode’s company in the latter’s regiment of foot. He can be identified as such, 13 Apr. 1643. At the end of May he was sent for from Malmesbury, but on return from Malmesbury, having reportedly lost half the men and their arms, he resigned the service.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.556.
Armies: Somerset: Col. William Strode’s Regt. of Foot
Jones, - - Jones
In Mar. 1645 lieutenant in the company of Captain Martin Husband in a regiment of foot which served under Oliver Cromwell and later under Colonel Francis Russell in their capacity as governors of the Isle of Ely and later under Colonel Valentine Walton senior, which probably originated as an auxiliary regiment of the Cambridgeshire militia.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.28.
Armies: Eastern Association
Jones, Henry Henry Jones
Ensign in Lieutenant-Colonel Benjamin Norton’s company in Thomas Ayloffe’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army at the time of its disbandment in Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.8.
Armies: Eastern Association
Jones [Fownes], Humphrey Humphrey Jones [Fownes]
Captain in Sir William Constable’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 41; Davies, ‘Essex’s Army’, 47.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Jones, John John Jones (c. 1597-1660)
Son of Thomas ap John ab Ieuan ap Huw of Maesygarnedd, Llanbedr, Merionethshire, and his wife, Ellen, daughter of Robert Wynn of Taltreuddyn, Llanenddwyn, also of Merionethshire. His biography in the Oxford DNB brings out both the modest freeholder status of Jones’s family and his connections, through his married, to Sir Thomas Myddelton. Jones became free of the London Grocers’ Company in 1633. He was in Sir Thomas Myddelton’s personal service when he became a parliamentarian captain of foot, possibly in 1642. Jones held the rank of captain in Apr. to July 1644, when he is named on warrant after warrant (in TNA, SP28/346) as joint treasurer in London (with Andrew Myddelton) of Sir Thomas’s brigade. In autumn 1644, assisted by another of Myddelton's officers Captain Roger Sontley, Jones raised his own troop of horse, recruited, subsidised and quartered in London, Essex and Suffolk The troop marched north in late Oct. or early Nov., arriving at Coventry on 12 Nov. en route to join Myddelton’s brigade in the North Welsh borderlands. Jones remained a captain in Apr. 1645, but by 19 Dec. had been promoted colonel in the horse regiment of Thomas Mytton, prominent in the final stages of the campaign to conquer north-west Wales including Anglesey. He was again prominent in containing the minor royalist rising in north-west Wales in autumn 1648. A political and religious radical and a regicide, during the 1650s Jones was prominent in the administration of Wales and Ireland. Although initially wary, he was reconciled to and accepted office under the Protectorate, especially following his marriage to a widowed sister of Oliver Cromwell. He was arrested at the Restoration and executed as a regicide.
References: Oxford DNB; Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 194, 2. 392; TNA, SP28/139, Part 20, f. 15; SP28/346.
Armies: North Wales
Jones, John John Jones (c.1610-1692)
Born in Shrewsbury of obscure parentage.
A member of the Grocers’ Company and resident of Bartholomew Lane, St Bartholomew by the Exchange parish, London.
Jones does not appear in the lists of Trained Bands officers in 1642, Sept. 1643 or Oct. 1646. However, in Mar. 1644 he was evidently captain in the White regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Isaac Penington), serving in Major-General Richard Browne’s London brigade serving in Sir William Waller’s Army. He wrote a first-hand account of Waller’s victory at the battle of Cheriton (29 Mar. 1644), in which he boasted that, ‘Our LONDON regiments, but above any, our Major Generall BROWN hath bin a prime means for our present welfare’ (A letter from Captain Jones). Of the two Trained Bands regts. at Cheriton, residence and contacts make the White the more plausible (Nagel, ‘London militia’, 285, also places him in the White Trained Bands). The vestry records of his parish start calling him captain on 1 Aug. 1644.
Jones was a militant in 1641-2, signing radical petitions including one in support of parliament’s Militia Ordinance. On 13 Oct. 1643 Jones was a collector (alongside Captain Richard Venner and Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Harsnett), of St Bartholomew by the Exchange’s contribution towards £100,000 to be lent to ‘our brethren of Scotland towards payment of the Army raised for our defence’ (Freshfield, Exchange, 2.4), himself promising £10. His militancy may explain his prominence in the vestry of St Bartholomew by the Exchange in the 1640s, as he was evidently less rooted in its elite than men such as Richard Venner and Samuel Harsnett. He became a leading religious and political Presbyterian, identified as one of those activists who remained militant throughout the war, ‘who had fought the war for a reformed state church and city privileges, not for religious liberty and military domination’ (A. Hughes, Gangraena and the Struggle for the English Revolution (2004), 350).
Jones was elected common councilman for Broad Street ward for his parish in Dec. 1645 and 1646, a Presbyterian who defeated the Independent Samuel Harsnett in the former year. He was a significant religious and political Presbyterian in the period 1645-7, an ally of the Scots who in May 1646 was reported to have consulted with the earl of Essex as to timing the presentation of the City’s remonstrance in favour of peace and Presbyterianism. In the same year he published a defence of the remonstrance and attack on the Independents, Plain English: or the Sectaries Anatomized (which provided material against Hugh Peter for Thomas Edwards’s Gangraena). In May 1647 he was appointed to the Presbyterian City militia committee. In the wake of the failure of the Presbyterian counter-revolution, Jones was removed from the committee and on 25 Sept. 1647 the Commons voted that he be impeached of high crimes and misdemeanours and committed to the Sergeant-at-Arms’s custody.
Elected MP for London: 1656 (when excluded), 1659 and 1661 (when as a Presbyterian candidate it was estimated that he got 3,800 votes out of 4,000).
After the Cavalier Parliament, he retired to his estate at Hampton, Middlesex
He died 21 May 1692; his burial at St Bartholomew by the Exchange cost £600 and his net personal estate at death was £20,000.
References: A letter from Captain Jones, to a worthy friend of his dwelling in Bartholmew Lane. Being a more full and an exacter relation of the particular proceedings of Sir William Wallers armie, then any that hath yet been published (1644); V. Pearl, ‘London Puritans and Scotch Fifth Columnists’, Studies in London History ed. A. E. J. Hollaender, W. Kellaway (1969), 320-1, 323-4, 329; Lindley, Popular politics, 191, 207, 361, 365, 368-9, 375-7, 379, 385-6; Brenner, Merchants, 398-9, 482-4, 487, 489;Freshfield, Exchange, 2. 4, 5, 9, 15, 20; A. Hughes, Gangraena and the struggle for the English Revolution (2004), 63, 141-3, 145, 336, 350, 394, 400, 403; Kingdomes Weekly Intelligencer, 21-28 Sept. 1647, no. 228, 683; JHL, 5.316; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 258, 268, 298; HoP: The Commons, 1660-90, 2.659-61.
Armies: London; Waller (Southern Association)
Jones, Michael Michael Jones (1606x10-1649)
Second son of Lewis Jones (1560-1640), later bishop of Killaloe, and his wife Mabel (born c.1580), daughter of Arland Ussher and Margaret Stanihurst; elder brother of Sir Theophilus Jones and younger brother of Henry Jones, bishop of Clogher and later of Meath (for both, see Oxford DNB).
Jones had risen to the rank of major in the earl of Kildare’s regiment in Ormonde’s Army. He went to England after the Cessation to represent Protestant interests at Oxford, but in Jan. 1644 withdrew rather than fight in the king’s army in England.
Jones became lieutenant-colonel of Sir William Brereton’s regiment of horse in the latter’s army in Cheshire; his first recorded actions were against units of Rupert’s defeated army in Aug. 1644 at Tarvin and Malpas (where he was wounded). He commanded Brereton’s horse and during the siege of Chester in 1645 was responsible for the Welsh side of the River Dee. He succeeded Brereton as colonel of the regiment when the latter was recalled to parliament in June 1645, and evidently retained his colonelcy when Brereton returned to active military service later in the year. He was made governor of Chester when the city fell in Feb. 1646.
By early 1646 Jones and Brereton had fallen out. Chidley Coote, an officer who had left the Irish service after the Cessation and had joined Brereton’s Army, wrote to Jones reproving him for siding with the Cheshire gentry against Brereton in Mar., whilst the following month John Swinfen wrote to Sir William that ‘he seems to abate some thing of his former heat and if he takes entertainment under the Lord Lisle I could wish you did part fairly (Carr and Atherton, Brereton Staffs., 794).
Jones did not go to Ireland then, but immediately the commission of the Independent Lisle expired on 9 Apr. 1647, Jones was formally appointed governor of Dublin and commander of the parliamentarian forces in Leinster. Two days earlier the Cheshire county committee had authorized the county treasurer, ‘forasmuch as Colonel Michael Jones has done good service in this county, and is now for the present expedition into Ireland’, to present him with £100 in gold ‘as a token of our acknowledgement of his good service done in this county’ (TNA, SP28/224, f. 241).
Jones’s main political and military significance was in Ireland between 1647 and 1649. He defeated General Preston’s Confederate Army at Dungan’s Hill (8 Aug. 1647) and routed Ormonde at Rathmines (2 Aug. 1649). With Cromwell’s arrival in Dublin on 15 Aug., Jones became his lieutenant-general and second-in-command. He died of fever at Dungarvan on 10 Dec. 1649.
References: Oxford DNB; Dore, Brereton letter books, esp. 1. 48-9, 324; Carr and Atherton, Brereton Staffs.,esp. 73-4, 94.
Armies: Cheshire;
Ireland
Jones, Philip Philip Jones (1617/18-1674)
His background and upbringing remain obscure, but he was born into a solid family – his father thought himself a gentleman – in an upland parish in Glamorganshire, north of Swansea, and by the outbreak of civil war he had married into a Gower family.
Jones does not appear in the pay warrants for Sir Thomas Myddelton’s Army in Apr. 1644, when it was forming, and the earliest reference to him is 1 Apr. 1645, when Myddelton at Nantwich sent a warrant to Andrew Myddelton in London, directing him to furnish the bearer, Captain Philip Jones, with what monies he shall want during his abode in London (Jones signed the undated receipts for £10 and £5). In a further warrant of 8 June Myddelton directed a further payment of £10 to Captain Philip Jones. This indicates that Jones had some connection with Myddelton’s North Wales Army and, rather opaquely, fills a little of the gap in our knowledge of his career in the civil war before he appears at Cardiff in Oct. 1645.
Thereafter he rose swiftly as governor of Swansea and, claiming or holding the rank of colonel, as parliament’s main agent in much of South Wales. There followed a meteoric ascent to wealth, property and power, not only in South Wales but also nationally during the Protectorate, not as a military man but as a councillor, courtier and confidant of Oliver Cromwell.
References: Oxford DNB; TNA, SP28/346, nos. 21, unnumbered, 231.
Armies: North Wales
Jones [Jines], Richard Richard Jones [Jines]
Captain in Cholmley’s probably short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642-3.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 36-7.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Jones, Samuel Samuel Jones
Of London, a merchant there. Colonel of a Surrey troop of horse, based at Farnham Castle in 1643-4, which saw action in the area, including at the 1644 siege of Basing; it was also present at the final and successful siege of Basing in Oct. 1645, though by then John Fielder had succeeded Jones as commander of the troop.
In early 1643 Jones was also commissioned to raise and command a regiment of foot, largely raised in London and Surrey, which again was based at Farnham Castle, though companies were sent off to support operations elsewhere under other commanders, including the relief of Gloucester, the unsuccessful siege of Basing and the storming of Alton during the latter half of 1643. Part or most of the regiment fought at the battle of Cheriton in Mar. 1644, though it is not clear whether Jones was present or still at Farnham; again, part of the regiment, though perhaps not Jones himself, was present at the battle of Cropredy in June 1644 and the second battle of Newbury in the autumn.
Jones seems to have fallen out with a clique on the Surrey county committee – there were accusations and counter-accusations of false musters, arrears of pay and unfair treatment – and in Mar. 1645 he resigned and command of his now reduced foot regiment, still based at Farnham, was also given to John Fielder.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 73.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Surrey
Jones, William William Jones
Captain in Sir William Springate’s regiment of Kentish foot in summer 1643, but not there by the following year.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 120.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Kent
Jones, William William Jones
Ensign in Francis Blethin’s company in Edward Montagu’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army. Although various William Joneses later appeared as ensigns or lieutenants in New Model Army regiments, the name is far too common safely to make a link with the Eastern Association Jones.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.71.
Armies: Eastern Association
Jones, William William Jones
Quartermaster of the Colonel’s troop in Robert Burghill’s regiment of horse (later Jonas Vandruske’s) by 18 Aug. 1643. He was still an officer in Waller’s Army in Apr. 1645, serving as commissary of provisions, 4 Nov. 1643-30 Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 140.
Armies: Waller; Waller (Southern Association)
Jordan, - - Jordan
By spring 1644 he was serving as major in Henry Mildmay’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.68.
Armies: Eastern Association
Jordan, - - Jordan
Major.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 377.
Armies: Dorset
Jordan, - - Jordon
Captain in Sir Richard Onslow’s regiment of foot (the Surrey Auxiliaries), who brought his company to the siege of Basing House in 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 107.
Armies: Surrey; Waller (Southern Association)
Jordan, Edmund Edmund Jordan
Sheriff of Surrey in 1644 who in that year raised afresh or took command of an existing troop of horse and a regiment of mounted troops, possibly dragoons. However, his brief military career embroiled him in large debts which led to him losing his command by the end of 1644 and imprisonment; his troop of horse and regiment of dragoons were taken over by Robert Wood.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 76.
Armies: Surrey
Joy, Thomas Thomas Joy
Ensign in the regiment of foot of Oliver Lord St John (later of Thomas Essex), named in the 1642 list of the officers in the earl of Essex’s army.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.650; Peacock, Army Lists, 34.
Armies: Bristol
Joyce, George George Joyce (1618-?)
Lieutenant-Colonel, governor of Portland, 1651. Probably a London man, he was a trooper in Oliver Cromwell’s horse regiment and a cornet in the New Model Army under Sir Thomas Fairfax. He is famous for having intervened to place Charles I under the control of the New Model Army and its Independent supporters in June 1647, when faction-fighting in parliament raged between Independents and Presbyterians. Governor of Southsea Castle, 1648, and was very active on behalf of the army in the events before, during and after the trial and execution of the king. Stripped of rank and fortune for opposing the Cromwellian protectorate, he escaped abroad at the Restoration, and disappeared from view after 1670.
References: Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 337; Oxford DNB.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army; Dorset
Joyner, John John Joyner
Lieutenant in Major Jeremy Baines’s company in George Melve’s regiment of dragoons in the earl of Essex’s Army, as confirmed by a pay warrant of 22 June 1643. He went with Baines into Samuel Jones’s Surrey regiment of foot at Farnham Castle from 5 July 1643, as captain. He served in the regiment (later John Fielder’s) until its disbandment in spring 1646. His company served as part of the besieging force at Basing House in 1643, and by the end of that year was apparently garrisoning Reigate Castle.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 66; TNA, SP28/135/1, SP28/7/444.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Surrey; Waller (Southern Association)
Jubbs, John John Jubbs
His birth, family and early life are obscure and little is known, though he may have been from Norfolk and just possibly of or related to the Jubbs family of Wymondham. According to his own later account, he felt compelled to join the parliamentarian army to fight for liberty in spring 1643 (Jubbs, An apology unto the honorable and other the honored and worthy officers of his excellencies the lord generals army).
Initially captain in Sir Miles Hobart’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army, active in recruiting and raising funds; from spring 1644 major in John Pickering’s regiment of foot, continuing at that rank and in that regiment when it transferred to the New Model Army in spring 1645. In late 1645 he became the regiment’s lieutenant-colonel, in succession to John Hewson who had replaced the newly-deceased Pickering as commander of the regiment. He became active in Army politics in 1647 and his radicalism and growing distrust of the senior officers may have lain behind his resignation from the Army in spring 1648. In 1648-9 he wrote and published several pamphlets explaining his own position and setting out his thoughts for the future settlement of the country, but thereafter he disappears from view and nothing is known of his later life and the date of his death.
References: Oxford DNB; Spring, Eastern Association, 1.44, 2,84; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 49, 59, 71, 81, 91.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Judd, Thomas Thomas Judd
Captain in Sir Thomas Myddelton’s North Wales Army. Almost all we know of him is gleaned through surviving pay warrants of spring 1644: of 29 Mar., to pay him £165 15s as full pay to 12 Apr. and to pay his wife, Hanna Judd, £40 within one month as his full and complete arrears; of 1 Apr. to pay him £20 to enable him to pay his soldiers, who are to march this day; and of 5 Apr. 1644, to pay him £10 to enable him to pay his soldiers.
References: TNA, SP28/346, nos. 22, 55, 61, 187.
Armies: North Wales
Jukes [Juckes], - - Jukes [Juckes]
A captain in Staffordshire. Jukes was one of two captains who took prisoner Sir Mortimer Briggs, released in Apr. 1644 upon coming to an agreement with them. He was paid £2 out of county funds in May or June 1644.
References: Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, 90, 317.
Armies: Staffordshire
Jukes, W. W. Jukes
Captain of one of the Shrewsbury town companies in Humphrey Mackworth’s Shropshire regiment of foot.
References: TNA, SP28/134, SP28/ 115, f. 347; Shropshire Archives, 3365/1267.
Armies: Shropshire
Jules [Jubbs], Thomas Thomas Jules [Jubbs]
Lieutenant in Captain Spensley’s company in the regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army commanded first by Sir John Palgrave and later by Sir Thomas Hoogan.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.78.
Armies: Eastern Association
Julian, William William Julian
Ensign in the Orange regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel John Towse) in summer 1642.
References: Thrale 1642.
Armies: London
Justice, Hugh Hugh Justice
Ensign in Viscount Grandison’s regiment of foot in the earl of Northnmberland’s Army against the Scots in 1640.
Lieutenant in Captain Sir Anthony St John’s company in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army Sept.-Oct. 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 26; TNA, SP28/2a/278.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Juxon, John John Juxon (died 1643)
Eldest son of John Juxon (died 1626), sugar baker of London, and his mother Elizabeth Kirrell (died 1619); elder brother of Thomas Juxon. He married Susan Langham, daughter of George Langham senior Matthew Shepheard was John’s father's half-brother.
Ensign in the White regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Isaac Penington) in summer 1642. He became a captain in Colonel Edmund Harvey’s regiment of London horse and was mortally wounded at the first battle of Newbury. Although Symonds was hopelessly confused as to which Juxon (he thought it was a Thomas Juxon of Godalming), John was probably the Juxon he was referring to when he gave an account of his death: ‘His Horse was Shott by a Cannon bullet in the Forehead being Stunnd wth the blow, ran wth him violently right on, in to his Maties Army where the Horse Fell down dead, & He was mortally wounded & left dead, but the body of the Army leaving the place left him too, & by that time he recovered his Sences, & was carried to London, & dyed wthin few dayes’ (BL, Harl. 986, p. 33).
Juxon’s will urged his siblings to see that ‘they would Christianly, and carefully see to the godly and religious educating’ of his children and that the Presbyterian minister Lazarus Seaman preach at his funeral (Juxon, Journal, 6).
His troop seems to have survived, captainless, until at least Apr. 1644.
References: Thrale 1642; Juxon, Journal, 1, 2, 5, 6, 8; TNA, SP28/131, Part 6, 1r.-2r., Part 7, ff. 1r.-19r.
Armies: London
Juxon, Thomas Thomas Juxon (1614-1672)
Born in London in 1614, son of John Juxon of St Stephen Walbrook. Like his father, he became a prosperous sugar baker – ‘A Sugar baker living in St Thomas Apostle. most violent asst [?]’ (Symonds, BL, Harl. 986, p. 33: last word illegible and ‘most violent’ may refer to the death which Symonds initially ascribed to him at the first battle of Newbury). Business partner with Mathew Sheppard.
Colonel’s ensign in the Green regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel John Warner) in summer 1642; captain-lieutenant of the Colonel’s company of the same regiment by Sept. 1643; captain in the Green regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Owen Rowe) in Oct. 1646, promoted major of the same regiment by the Presbyterian militia committee (under Matthew Sheppard as colonel).
Wounded at the first battle of Newbury, but recovered and survived.
Invested heavily in land in Ireland during the 1640s and 1650s and, although briefly MP for Helston, Cornwall, in 1659, he spent most of his later life in Ireland; he died in Dublin in 1672.
Now remembered mostly as a diarist and for the journal which he kept while living in London 1644-7, reflecting his godly and anti-royalist principles and outlook.
References: Oxford DNB; Juxon, Journal; Thrale 1642; BL, Harl. 986, pp. 33, 36; Marshall, Essex funeral, 12; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317-8.
Armies: London