BHO

Memorials: 1391

Pages 523-531

Memorials of London and London Life in the 13th, 14th and 15th Centuries. Originally published by Longmans, Green, London, 1868.

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Punishment of the Pillory, for fraud.

14 Richard II. A.D. 1391. Letter-Book H. fol. cclviii. (Latin.)

On Wednesday, the 25th day of January, in the 14th year etc., John Sewale, who for certain reasons had been before committed to the Prison of Neugate, was brought here, into the Guildhall of London, by the Keeper of that Gaol, to make answer as well unto our Lord the King, as to Adam Bamme, Mayor, and the Commonalty of the City of London, in a plea of deceit and falsehood: as to which, Robert Peke said that the aforesaid John, on the Tuesday next before the Feast of St. Katherine the Virgin [25 November], in the 14th year aforesaid, together with other persons to him unknown, came to the house of Bartholomew, (fn. 1) in the Parish of St. Bartholomew the Little, in the Ward of Bradestrete (fn. 2) in London, falsely and deceitfully imagining how to deceive the said Bartholomew; and saying there that he, the same John, was the servant of a certain nobleman, and wanted to buy for his master some cloths of gold, velvet, baudekyn, (fn. 3) and satyn. Whereupon, Bartholomew showed him, then and there, such cloths as he desired; and he then made choice of divers cloths of gold, velvet, baudekyn, and satyn, 55 pounds in value. And when the said John had agreed with Bartholomew as to the price aforesaid, imagining falsehood and deceit therein, he put his hand to his purse, and, after holding it there for a long time, said that Bartholomew must send one of his servants with him to the hostel of his master aforesaid; and there, when the cloths had been seen by such master of his, he should be paid for them.

Whereupon, the said Bartholomew, putting full confidence in his words, sent one John Duffeld, his servant, and the said cloths, with the same John Sewale; who then took this John Duffeld, with the cloths, to a certain hostel, called "Le Flouredelys" (fn. 4) and "Le "Kay sur le Hoope," in Smythfeld, in the Parish of St. Sepulchre without Neugate, in the suburb of London; where the said John Sewale told him that his master had gone to Westminster, and that he must wait until he should return home. And then afterwards, this same John Sewale there told him, that he must now go with him, and take the cloths to a hostel known as "Le Walssheman " (fn. 5) sur le Hoope," in Fletestret, in the Parish of St. Martin without Ludgate, in the suburb of London, where he should be paid for the same. Upon which, John Duffeld took the cloths, and accompanied him to the hostel, called "Le Walssheman, "aforesaid: and there this John Sewale took John Duffeld, together with the cloths, falsely and deceitfully, into a certain room in the hostel, and then ordered him to lay out the cloths upon a bed there; after which, he made him and the other persons leave the room, and then shut the door with a key and bolted it, the cloths being left within; which being done, he said to John Duffeld that his master would be there presently to look at the cloths; and then, by false and deceitful words he detained the same John in the hall of the hostel for five hours in the day, and more: while in the meantime, he, the same John Sewale, made off with the cloths, and conveyed them away from the room, no moneys having been paid either to John Duffeld, or to Bartholomew aforesaid, for the same.

And the same John Sewale, being interrogated as to the matter aforesaid, said that he was in no way guilty thereof, and put him self upon the country as to the same etc. Upon Thursday, the 26th day of January etc., the jury appeared by William Chambre and eleven others; who declared upon their oath, the same John Sewale to be guilty of the deceit and falsehood aforesaid. And it was therefore adjudged by the Mayor and Aldermen that he should be put upon the pillory, there to remain for one hour of the day. And precept was given to the Sheriffs, to have proclamation made of the reason for the same. (fn. 6)

Punishment of the Thewe, for false accusation.

14 Richard II. A.D. 1391. Letter-Book H. fol. cclviii. (Latin.)

Isabel Lynchelade was attached to make answer, as well to the Mayor and Commonalty etc., as to William Squier, Chaplain, and Thomas Vaghan, in a plea of falsehood. And they said that William aforesaid having bought a Bible of the executors of Master William Blankpayn, he afterwards pledged it to one Master William of Milkstrete, for 5 marks, to be repaid on a certain day. Upon which day he repaid the five marks, and had back his said Bible; whereupon, the same Isabel afterwards came to the said William Squyer, in Bredestret in London, and asked him if he had had back his Bible; to which enquiry he made answer that he had. Upon which, she said that the book had been stolen, and unless he would give her two shillings, she would do him some damage and injury. And as he would not agree to give her two shillings, of her malice aforethought, she gave information to the Sheriffs of London that the said William Squyer and Thomas Vaghan had stolen the book aforesaid. By reason of which false information, the said William and Thomas were taken and imprisoned for five days, to their grievous damage and scandal.

And the same Isabel, on the first day of March, in the 14th year etc., being questioned as to the matters aforesaid, declared that she was in no way guilty thereof, and put herself upon the country as to the same. And upon Thursday, the 2nd day of March then next ensuing, the Jury of that venue, by John Carbonelle and eleven others, declared upon their oath the same Isabel to be guilty of the falsehood aforesaid. Therefore, as an example to others, it was adjudged that on the same day she should be put upon the thewe, for women ordained, there to remain for one hour of the day.

Proclamation that no person shall speak, or give his opinion, as to either Nicholas Brembre or John Norhamptone.

14 Richard II. A.D. 1391. Letter-Book H. fol. cclix. (Norman French.)

"Whereas many dissensions, (fn. 7) quarrels, and false reports have prevailed in the City of London, as between trade and trade, person and person, because of divers controversies lately moved between Nicholas Brembre, Knight, and John Norhamptone, of late Mayors of the same city, who were men of great power and estate, and had many friendships and friends within the same; to the great peril of the same city, and, maybe, of all the realm; to the displeasure also of God, and of every good man: and by reason thereof, if some remedy, with the Almighty aid, be not applied thereunto, destruction and annihilation to the said city may readily ensue, and peril and damage to all the realm,—the which may God avert;—therefore, by assent of Adam Bamme, the Mayor, and the Aldermen of the said city, considering the mischief and great damage that from this cause has ensued, and desiring to maintain the peace of our Lord the King, and the tranquillity and prosperity of the said city, mainly to the honour of God, of our said Lord the King, and of all the realm; for the common profit, they have ordained and established, that no man, great or small, of whatsoever estate or condition he be, shall speak from henceforth, or agitate upon any of the opinions, as to either of them, the said Nicholas and John, or shall by sign, or in any other manner, shew that such person is of the one opinion or the other. But let the folks of the same city be of one accord in good love, without speaking, any person to another, on the said matter, in manner of reproof or of hatred; on pain, if any one shall speak or do against any of the points aforesaid, of imprisonment in Neugate for a year and a day, without redemption; and of being subject to other penalty and ordinance, in the Guildhall for the like cause made and ordained."

Punishment of the Pillory inflicted upon a Scrivener and another, for forging title-deeds.

14 Richard II. A.D. 1391. Letter-Book H. fol. cclix. (Latin.)

On the 22nd day of April, in the 14th year etc., William Bowyer, citizen and pelterer of London, and Thomas Panter, were severally attached to make answer, as well unto our Lord the King, as to the Mayor and Commonalty of the City of London, in a plea of falsehood and deceit. As to the which, Robert Peck, Common Countor of the City of London, said that one John de Bathe, citizen and webbe (fn. 8) of London, and Cristina, his wife, formerly by their deed enrolled gave and granted unto John de Thorntone and John de Wendelyngeburghe, citizens of the same city, a tenement, with a shop in the fore part thereof, which they before had had of the gift and feoffment of John Elys, citizen and pouchemaker of London, and Eva, his wife, in the Parish of St. Botolph without Aldrichesgate, in the suburb of London; and that the same John Thorntone and John de Wendelyngburghe afterwards, by another deed, enrolled in the Husting of London of Pleas of Land, holden on the Monday next after the Feast of St. Luke the Evangelist, [18th October], in the 48th year of King Edward, grandsire of our Lord the King, re-enfeoffed the same John de Bathe and Cristina thereof, to have and to hold the same to them and the heirs (fn. 9) of the same John de Bathe etc.

And the said John de Bathe afterwards died; whereupon, the aforesaid William Bowyer took her, the said Cristina, to wife: and when he found and saw the deed aforesaid, by which the said John and John had re-enfeoffed the same John de Bathe and Cristina, and the heirs of John de Bathe, of the tenement and shop aforesaid; he, of his own false imagining and malice aforethought, to oust the heirs or assigns of the same John de Bathe from their right therein, and with the intention of making the said Cristina have an estate in fee simple in the tenement and shop aforesaid, went to the said Thomas Panter, scrivener, and, with his assistance, coun terfeited and forged a certain other false deed; substituting therein that the aforesaid John Thornton and John Wendelyngburghe had re-enfeoffed the same John de Bathe and Cristina, their heirs, and assigns; and then had the same writing endorsed as having been enrolled at the said Husting holden on the Monday next after the Feast of St. Luke aforesaid; whereas, in truth, the said false deed was written and endorsed on Monday, the 10th day of April, in the 14th year of King Richard the Second, now reigning.

And when this false deed had been so written and endorsed, the said William and Thomas set it off with pendants, (fn. 10) and deceitfully took off the wax which had been impressed with the seals of the same John Thorntone and John Wendelyngburghe, upon the pendants of their own deed aforesaid, and placed the same upon the pendants of the false deed, so forged: all which falsehoods, deceits, and imaginings, the said William perpetrated by assent of the same Thomas; that so, he and his said wife might enfeoff other persons in fee, who might re-enfeoff them and the heirs of the same William: and in virtue of which false deed, they, the said William and Cristina, did enfeoff in fee simple Roger Elys, Robert Polehulle, John Silvertone, and Richard Horwode, citizens of London.

And all the same falsehoods, deceits, and imaginings, the same William and Thomas openly and publicly acknowledged, and admitted that they had committed the same. And because that the said falsehoods and deceits were first and principally imagined and committed by the same William, as well to the dishonour of our Lord the King, and of his law, as in contradiction of the records of his city aforesaid; and further, to the retarding of the execution of the will of the same William de Bathe, and also to the disgrace and scandal of all the Commonalty, etc.; it was adjudged that the said William, on the Monday then next ensuing, between the hours of 10 and 11 before Noon, with bare head and bare feet, should be put upon the pillory, there to remain for one hour of the day, the said false deed being hung about his neck; and that he should from thence be taken back to prison; and so, on the Wednesday and Friday after, at the same hour, be again put upon the pillory, for one hour each day; and that each time the cause thereof should be proclaimed. And further, that the said William should never after be received or admitted to hold any office in the same city, or be of the livery of any trade or craft therein, or arrayed in the suit thereof; nor yet should be placed upon any inquisition, or received or admitted to testify as to the truth in any matter, or be believed as to the truth; but should be held and reputed for the future as one defamed, false, and infamous.

And because that the aforesaid Thomas Panter wrote the said deed, and endorsed it, and, along with the said William, took the seals of the same John and John, which were appended to their real deed, and annexed them to the said false deed, and so was aiding in, and consenting to, the falsity and deceit before-mentioned; therefore it was adjudged that on the Monday aforesaid, at the same hour, he should be put upon the pillory, there to remain for one hour of the day. And afterwards, he was to be precluded from ever following his calling of scriveyn, (fn. 11) within the same city, unless he should meet with increased favour as to the same.

False caps ordered to be burnt in Chepe.

15 Richard II. A.D. 1391. Letter-Book H. fol. cclx. (Latin.)

Forasmuch as by Robert Bristowe, John Longe, Thomas Walsyngham, and John Bat, Masters and overseers of the trade of the Hurers, (fn. 12) Robert Pek, Common Countor of the City of London, was given to understand that one John Godefray, pynnere, (fn. 13) made caps to sell, which were false and deceitfully made, and sold them both in the market and in his own house, in deceit of the commonalty, and to the scandal of the whole trade aforesaid; therefore, the said Robert demanded that the said John Godefray should be warned to be here, in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before the Mayor and Aldermen, on a certain day by them to be named, to make answer as to the same etc. Whereupon, precept was given to Robert Glaunville, serjeant of the Chamber, to warn the same John Godefray to be here on Wednesday, the 28th day of June, in the 15th year etc., to make answer as to the matters aforesaid etc.; and to have here some of the caps so alleged to have been deceitfully made.

Which John Godefray appeared, and, being questioned as to the matters aforesaid, he said that the same cappes, brought here by the serjeant, were good and sufficient, and not false and deceitfully made etc. And Robert aforesaid alleged that they were false and deceitfully made, to the danger and prejudice of the whole commonalty etc.; and he asked that inquisition should be made as to the same. And hereupon, because that in the Ordinance of the trade aforesaid, enrolled in the Husting of London of Pleas of Land holden on the Monday next before the Feast of St. Margaret the Virgin [20 July] in the 36th year of King Edward, grandsire of our Lord the King now reigning, it is expressly set forth, that if any false work shall happen to be found in the same trade, and this shall be proved, as well by reputable men of the said trade, as by other reputable dealers of the City aforesaid, having knowledge of the same trade, then such false work shall be burnt, and he who shall have had it made shall pay 20s. to the use of the commonalty; a day was therefore given, the 5th day of July then next ensuing, for the said John Godefray again to appear here in Court.

And on that day the said John did not appear, but made default; and the Jury came, one half whereof were of the trade of Cappers, and the other half of the Hatters who are wont to sell such cappes, by William Harlowe, William Longelee, Henry Offyngtone, John Godechepe, Stephen Roo, and John Herlowe, cappemakers, John Wenlok, Walter Caustone, John Donne, John Godeburghe, John Rokel, and John Reynold, haberdasshers. (fn. 14)

Who said upon their oath, that the cappes aforesaid wanted fulling, and were oiled with grease that was rank and putrid, by reason whereof they stank; and that they had been fulled under the feet, and were false and deceitfully made; the more especially as cappes cannot, and ought not to, be fulled under the feet, or in any other way than by the hands of men; and that cappes so fulled under the feet, or in any other way than by hand, are false, and made in deceit of the commonalty. Therefore, it was ordered that the said cappes should be burnt in Chepe; and that the same John Godefray should pay 20s. to the Chamberlain aforesaid, according to such Ordinance.

Punishment of the Pillory, for stealing a leg of mutton.

15 Richard II. A.D. 1391. Letter-Book H. fol. cclx. (Latin.)

On the 24th day of July, in the 15th year etc., Richard Whyte, of Ireland, was brought here before Adam Bamme, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, for that on the Sunday then last past he stole a leg of mutton at the Shambles of St. Nicholas, 1½d. in value, from Walter Beawe, butcher.

On being questioned as to the same, he acknowledged that he had stolen it. Therefore, it was adjudged by the said Mayor and Aldermen, that the said Richard Whyte should be put upon the pillory, with the leg of mutton hung from his neck, there to remain for half an hour; and that the reason for such sentence should be proclaimed.

Footnotes

  • 1. No surname is given.
  • 2. Broad Street.
  • 3. Cloth made of silk, interwoven with threads of gold.
  • 4. "The Fleur-de-lis," and "The Gridiron(?) on the Hoop."
  • 5. "The Welchman on the Hoop."
  • 6. This is followed (fol. cclviii. b) by the trial of Sewale's two accomplices, John Heyesterre and John Norwich, with a jury half English and half Lombards. They were found guilty and a similar sentence was pronounced.
  • 7. As to these dissensions, see pages 460, 468, 473, 494, ante.
  • 8. Weaver.
  • 9. Giving only a limited interest to Cristina therein.
  • 10. pendiculis; slips of vellum for the pendent seals.
  • 11. Scrivener.
  • 12. Makers of bures, or shaggy caps.
  • 13. Pinner, or pin-maker.
  • 14. Who dealt, among other things, in hats and caps; see page 422 ante.