Institutions for Education: Chapel schools

Historical Account of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne Including the Borough of Gateshead. Originally published by Mackenzie and Dent, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1827.

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Citation:

Eneas Mackenzie, 'Institutions for Education: Chapel schools', Historical Account of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne Including the Borough of Gateshead, (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1827), pp. 451-452. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/newcastle-historical-account/pp451-452 [accessed 13 June 2024].

Eneas Mackenzie. "Institutions for Education: Chapel schools", in Historical Account of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne Including the Borough of Gateshead, (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1827) 451-452. British History Online, accessed June 13, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/newcastle-historical-account/pp451-452.

Mackenzie, Eneas. "Institutions for Education: Chapel schools", Historical Account of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne Including the Borough of Gateshead, (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1827). 451-452. British History Online. Web. 13 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/newcastle-historical-account/pp451-452.

HANOVER SQUARE CHAPEL CHARITY-SCHOOL.

This school, in which 15 boys are educated and clothed, commenced, as is supposed, early in the last century. Mrs. Airey, in 1767, bequeathed £100 towards its support. It is chiefly supported by annual subscriptions (usually of one guinea), and by an annual collection. When the boys are of an age to go to business, the managing committee endeavour to place them with proper masters; and, if they have behaved well in the school, one of the committee is always ready to become their bondsman. Each subscriber of one guinea is entitled to nominate in his turn in cases of vacancy; but, if there be no nomination, the committee generally fill up vacancies from the Sunday-school.