13th May 1624

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. "13th May 1624", Proceedings in Parliament 1624: The House of Commons, (, 2015-18). . British History Online. Web. 19 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/proceedings-1624-parl/may-13.

In this section

THURSDAY, 13 MAY 1624

I. JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS, PA, HC/CL/JO/1/14

[CJ 703; f. 38v]

Jovis, 130 Maii, 220 Jacobi

Saturday, 2 [o']clock in the Inner Temple Hall, for the bill between the Lady Wharton and the heirs of Sir [blank] Willoughby.

SIR EDWARD COKE reports from the conference about the bill of monopolies. For the exemption of the subpoena office, writing to the Great Seal and glasses: to leave these as before at c[ommon] law. Mr. Attorney General, ‘That they would have the hostmen of Newcastle, being incorporated, confirmed by act of Parliament.’ This resolved. To have the King's power for printing left as he had before this act. This resolved. So for saltpetre. The cursitors came now in, and Mr. Attorney General would have all offices heretofore granted confirmed by the King. But resolved to have none exempted but such as were particularly named. That the licence for wines resumed from the Earl of Nottingham to the crown and there shall continue. Mr. Attorney General pressed to have an exception for smalt. Foetidum gravamen. New offices, new courts, new corporations prejudicial. The Lords concluded they would appoint 4 committees of their House, with 8 of ours, to pen the alterations in this bill.

Resolved, to send again to the Lords for a conference about the bill of monopolies. This to be done tomorrow.

Sir Edward Coke Mr. [William] Noye
Sir John Walter Mr. [John] Glanville
Mr. [John] Selden Mr. [Humphrey] Were
Sir Robert Phelips Mr. Chancellor Duchy

are appointed for the committee aforesaid about monopolies.

SIR EDWARD COKE reports from the committee for grievances concerning briefs, being [illegible] statute of 39 Eliz. is a great grievance and so to be presented to the King.

  • [f. 39] 1. Resolved, upon question, that these briefs against law and a general grievance in the opinion of this House.
  • 2. Resolved, upon question, that this shall be included among the rest of the grievances, and the aggravations thereof, by particulars to be set down by the committee.

The matter of proclamation for keeping Lent, and exacting of money by it, to be examined by the committee of grievances and reported to the House.

[CJ 704] SIR W[ALTER] EARLE reports the bill against simony, recommitted, with amendments and a proviso; which twice read. Engrossetur.

MR. [WILLIAM] MALLORY moves a patent of the keeping of the gaol of York.

This referred to the committee for grievances and they desired to speed it.

MR. [JOHN] PYM reports from the committee for corruption in religion and learning, a petition and articles against a book of Mr. [sic] [Richard] Montagu.

Sir John Davies and Sir Edward Salter bring from the Lords a message. That the Lords purpose, before they rise, to send another special message to this House, and that therefore this House would sit as long as it can with conveniency until they hear again from them.

Answer, by the same messengers: that we will do so.

SIR ROBERT PHELIPS moves Sir Edward Coke and Sir Edwin Sandys may now give in the heads of the charge of the Lord Treasurer.

Resolved, Sir Robert Hatton and Sir D[udley] Digges, Sir P[eter] Heyman, Sir J[ames] Perrot and Mr. [John] Pym shall, as from the House, acquaint the Lord Archbishop of Canterbury with the petition against Mr. [sic] Montagu's book, and with the book itself.

[f. 39v] Resolved, Mr. Speaker, at his going up to the Lords, shall demand judgement upon the charges presented from this House against Lionel, Earl of Middlesex, Lord Treasurer of England, and Master of the Wards, viz. for bribery, extortion, oppression and other grievous offences.

The committee about our claim against impositions to meet tomorrow in the afternoon.

Mr. Speaker went out of his chair, and the House sat as a committee about the bill of subsidy.

The Lords' message came, and thereupon Mr. Speaker went into his chair.

Mr. Serjeant [Ranulphe] Crewe, Mr. Attorney General. That the Lords are now ready to give sentence against the Lord Treasurer if this House, by their Speaker, will come to demand it.

Answer, by the same messengers. That the House will presently come up with their Speaker.

Ordered, the subsidy shall go on at half hour past 3 [o']clock this afternoon, and other committees to proceed in the meantime.

Sir Christopher Hildyard has leave from the House, in respect of his sickness, to depart into the country.

Mr. Speaker, with the House, went up to the Lords to demand judgement, ut supra.

[House adjourned]

II. JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS, PA, HC/CL/JO/1/13

[CJ 788; f. 199v]

Jovis, 13 Maii 1624

Lady Wharton's bill, Saturday, 2 [o']clock, Inner Temple Hall.

SIR EDWARD COKE reports from the conference with the Lords about the bill of monopolies. The excepted monopolies to be in the same state they were before, and, for the trial of them at the common law, said they would take it into consideration. Mr. Attorney [General], he would have the hostmen of Newcastle confirmed, but they left as they were before. Then for printing, an exception of such authority as the King had before this act. Then saltpetre: no more for that than before. Then came the cursitors and divers others. Mr. Attorney [General] would have all offices exempted out of the bill. Agreed not to have all in general, but to have them particularly named. Then the licence for wines: only reserved to the crown, never to be granted to any subject. Then for the penalty of a praemunire: that they stuck at but yielded at last. Then Attorney [General] would [have] smalt excepted. Foetidum gravamen, depending before us. One said that this bill would touch corporations, but that sufficiently answered. They desired that 4 of their House and 8 of our House might be appointed for the penning of these things.

Resolved, upon question, that a committee of 8 of our House shall meet a committee of 4 of the Lords to agree upon this bill of monopolies.

SIR EDWARD COKE reports from [the committee for] grievances about briefs. Resolved, them against law, the statute of 39 Eliz., and to be a great grievance.

Resolved, upon question, that these briefs are a grievance to the commonwealth and shall be presented to the King among the grievances.

[f. 200] Sir Edward Coke Mr. [William] Noye
Sir John Walter Mr. [John] Glanville
Mr. [John] Selden Mr. [Humphrey] Were
Sir Robert Phelips Chancellor Duchy

are appointed for the committee about monopolies.

SIR EDWARD COKE. To desire a conference with the Lords about it.

SIR WALTER EARLE reports the bill to prevent simony in elections of colleges and halls. Amendments twice read.

Ordered. To be engrossed.

MR. [WILLIAM] MALLORY tenders a copy of a patent of the gaol of York. Referred to the committee of grievances.

MR. [JOHN] PYM. A petition brought into the committee for [Dr. Thomas] Anyan against a book printed and published by [Dr.] Richard Montagu, full fraught with dangerous opinions of Arminius quite contrary to the articles established in 5 several points.

The petition read. [Blank]

A message from the Lords by Serjeant [Sir John] Davies and Sir Edward Salter. The Lords signify to this House that they have a purpose, before they rise, to send another special message to this House, and there[fore] desire this House, so long as conveniently they may/

Answer. This House resolves to sit in expectation of the message from their Lordships.

SIR ROBERT PHELIPS. Made a motion the other day to have some gentlemen draw into form the charge of the Lord Treasurer. To have it now delivered into the House.

[f. 200v] Resolved, upon question, that my Lord of Canterbury should be acquainted with this petition and book of Doctor Montagu. Sir Dudley Digges, Sir Robert Hatton, Sir Peter Heyman, Sir James Perrot and Mr. [John] Pym shall do it, as from the House.

SIR EDWARD COKE. His part two-fold:

  • 1. Sordid bribery.
  • 2. The alteration of the instructions in the Court of Wards.

As [Lord] Treasurer, charged with taking £500 of the petty farms and £500 of the grand farms; as [CJ 789] Master of the Wards, for altering the good and profitable orders of the Court of Wards, and bringing in new and dangerous.

Resolved, that Mr. Speaker, when he goes up to the Lords to demand judgement, shall do it upon the charges presented from this House against Lionel, Earl of Middlesex, Lord Treasurer of England and Master of the Wards, for bribery, extortion, oppression of the people and other grievous offences.

Committee about impositions to meet tomorrow, 2 [o']clock.

A message from the Lords by Serjeant [Sir Ranulphe] Crewe and Mr. Attorney [General]. [Blank] [f. 201] The Lords are now ready to give sentence against the Lord Treasurer if this House, by their Speaker, will come to demand it.

Answer. This House intend presently to come with their Speaker and demand judgement.

The subsidy bill, this afternoon. Other committees to sit until half an hour after 3 [o']clock.

The Speaker and the House went up unto the Lords to demand judgement against the Lord Treasurer.

[House adjourned]

III. DIARY OF JOHN HAWARDE, WILTSHIRE AND SWINDON ARCHIVES, 9/34/2

[p. 287]

Jovis, 13 Maii 1624

SIR EDWARD COKE reporte le bill de monopolies conference de 4 ove les seignours et 8 de notre [Huise].

Et [SIR EDWARD COKE] reporte les breifes deste greevance. Resolve sur severall questions et deste present al Roy ove les greevances.

Move pur SIR WILLIAM BULSTRODE et SIR ROBERT PHELIPS pur proclamacion pur Lente come juste greevance, mes le temps improper.

SIR WALTER EARLE reporte le bill versus simonie.

Sur question, ingrosse.

MR. [JOHN] PYM reporte peticion versus seditious liver de [Dr. Richard] Montagu. Long debate.

Sur question, d'intimate al Lord de Canterbury le peticion et liver.

Message del seignours par Sergeante [Sir John] Davies et [Sir Edward] Salter. To sitte as long as with conveniency we can and we shall have anoather message of l'ymportance.

SIR ROBERT PHELIPS move de preparer les heads pur demander le judgmente versus le Lord Tresorer.

SIR EDWARD COKE recite les heads de son offence:

  • 1. Sordide briberie.
  • 2. Altering bon orders in le gards et profitable, et establishing male and dangerous pur le Roy et commonwealthes.
  • 3. Extortinge fees, et encrease et creating novell fees.
  • 4. Le vaste authoritie de son secretarye [p. 288] et trust ove seal et stampe.
  • [5.] Birberie, extorcion, oppression and other greevouse offences.

Sur question, resolve pur demand judgmente in ceux general parolls.

[Committee of the Whole House]

Mr. Sollicitor to the chaire. Longe debated but nothinge concluded.

Then came a message from the Lords by Sergeante [Sir Ranulphe] Crewe and the Attornie [General] that the Lords were readye to gyve judgemente aga[n]ste the Lord Tresorer yf we woulde come to demaunde it.

The SPEAKER retorned answeare by the same messengers and sente the mace for all the members of the Howse, and to cleere the roome, and then shifted his garmentes and put on his scarlette, and so wee wente all to the Upper Howse.

[Conference with the Lords]

The Lord Tresorer standinge at the barre, the Prince and all the Lords in there roabes, our Speaker said thus. “My Lords, the knightes citiznes and burgesses of the Howse of Commons by mee, there Speaker, doe demande judgemente against the Right Honorable Sir Lionel Cranfield, knight, [p. 289] Earl of Middlesex, Lord Tresorer, and Master of his Majestie's Courte of Wards and Liveryes, for his briberyes, extortions, oppressions and other greevouse offences heretofore transmitted to your Lordships by the Howse of Commons and taken into your grave consideracion and judgemente.”

Then the Lord Keeper sayde, “The Lords doe adjudge that you, Lionel Cranfield, Earle of Middlesexe, shall be remooved from all offices that you now holde, and [be] disabled for ever from all office in this state and governemente, and from beinge of the Howse of Parliamente, and from cominge within the verge of his Majestie's Courte, and shall pay 50 thousand poundes fine, and [be] commytted to the Tower during the Kinge's pleasure.”

The Lord Tresorer began to speake, [but] the Lord Keeper sayde, “My Lorde, you are not now to speake; you are to petition if you have cause.”

So wee departed and wente to dynner and not to the Howse. All were of opinion his sentence was milde in regarde of his offence.

IV. DIARY OF SIR THOMAS JERVOISE, HAMPSHIRE RECORD OFFICE, 44M69/F4/20/1

[p. 146]

[13 May 1624]

Upon Thursday before Whitsuntide, the Lord Treasurer was censured by both the Houses of Parliament as follows:

  • First, to leave both his offices, [Lord] Treasurer and Master of the Wards, and be disabled never to bear any office in the commonwealth.
  • 2. Fined at £50,000 to the King.
  • 3. Never to be admitted to sit in Parliament again.
  • 4. To be a close prisoner in the Tower during the King's pleasure.

He went to the Tower the day following…

V. ANONYMOUS DIARY, KENNETH SPENCER RESEARCH LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS, MS E237

[f. 112v]

[13 May 1624]

Upon the 12th [sic] of May 1624, the Lords sent a message to the House of Commons to let them know that if it stood with their conveniency, they were ready to go to the sentencing of my Lord Treasurer presently if we would come and demand judgement.

The Commons returned answer they would come presently, whereupon the Speaker with the whole House went to the Upper House, and used to the Lords these words: the knights, citizens and burgesses, for the bribes, extortions, oppressions and other grievous offences committed by Lionel, Earl of Middlesex, Lord High Treasurer of England and Master of the Court of Wards, do crave judgement. Whereupon the Lord Keeper pronounced this sentence: that they did adjudge him to be fined at £50,000, to be incapable for ever bearing office in the commonwealth again, or to sit in Parliament, never to come within the verge of the Court and to be imprisoned in the Tower during the King's pleasure.

VI. DIARY OF EDWARD NICHOLAS, TNA, SP 14/166

[f. 204]

Thursday, 130 Maii

A petition is preferred and subscribed by Mr. Nathaniel [sic] Ward and by Mr. [John] Yates, signifying that there is a book printed and published by one Mr. [sic] [Richard] Montagu maintaining many point of Arminianism.

This petition has much debate whether it should be here considered of or, by special messengers of this House, sent to the King or to the Lord of Canterbury or otherwise recommended by us to the Convocation House to be fully examined and adjudged.

Ordered, that some of the members of this House shall, as from themselves, go to acquaint the Lord of Canterbury with the petition and book now in question in this House.

Ordered, that the briefs read in churches shall be presented to the King as a grievance and a thing against law.

Ordered, that it shall be inserted in a petition to the King that according to his Majesty's own resolution in 120 Regis, the power of granting licences to sell wines (granted long since to the Earl of Nottingham) shall be taken away.

Resolved, and ordered, that Mr. Speaker shall, when we go up to the Lords to hear judgement given on the Lord Treasurer, make a repetition of the heads of all the particulars that we presented to their Lordships against the Lord Treasurer and demand judgement of all of them, as after is expressed. [f. 204v] The Speaker is to go in his scarlet robes. The words the Speaker is to use to the Lords: that the knights, citizens and burgesses of the House of Commons, having transmitted over to their Lordships divers complaints against Lionel, Earl of Middlesex, Lord High Treasurer of England and Master of his Majesty's Wards and Liveries, for bribery, extortion, oppression of the subject and other grievous offences, of all which we demand judgement of their Lordships.

[Conference with the Lords]

When our House with our Speaker had accordingly demanded judgement against the Lord Treasurer, the Lord Keeper said, the Lord Treasurer being present at the bar, “You, Earl of Middlesex, are adjudged to lose all your offices and to be henceforth incapable of bearing any other office in any of his Majesty's dominions; that you shall be imprisoned in the Tower of London during the King's pleasure; you shall pay £50,000 fine to the King; you shall never more sit in Parliament nor come within the verge of his Majesty's Court.

This being done, the Lord Treasurer offered to speak but the Lord Keeper told him he might not now speak anything, but if he had anything to say, it must be by petition.

And thereon the Lord Treasurer said, “I am well content.”

VII. DIARY OF SIR THOMAS HOLLAND, RAWL. D. 1,100, BODLEIAN LIBRARY

[f. 87]

13 Maii, Thursday

It is, by question, resolved that the briefs which came down to the churches are grievances and so shall be presented to the Lords.

It is directed by the House that the proclamation for binding butchers shall be dealt with at the committee of grievances.

[MR. JOHN] PYM. A petition was exhibited by [Mr. John] Yates against Mr. [sic] Richard Montagu for publishing a book wherein he broached Arminianism.

SEYMOUR. That the petition is not considerable here, but he wished that those of the committee who entertained it may deliver it up to the Convocation.

Message that the Lords desire that we will sit as long as conveniently we may because they will send a special message.

It is ordered that Sir Robert Hatton and [Sir Dudley] Digges, [Sir Peter] Heyman, [Mr. John] Pym and [Sir James] Perrot shall acquaint my Lord Archbishop from the House [f. 87v] with the book and petition and to leave it to the consideration of him.

[SIR ROBERT] PHELIPS moved that when we shall be called up to demand judgement against the Lord Treasurer, the charge against him presented by this House may be by those who delivered it up, may demand judgement against him upon those several charges.

[Conference with the Lords]

This upon the 13th of May by the Speaker: “May it please your Highness and your Lordships, the knights, citizens and burgesses of the House of Commons, having heretofore transmitted diverse complaints against the Right Honourable Lionel Cranfield, Earl of Middlesex, Lord High Treasurer of England, Master of the Wards, for bribery, extortion, oppression and other grievous offences, they now by me, their Speaker, demand judgement against him for them.”

[Lord] Keeper: “The high court of Parliament does adjudge that you, Lionel Cranfield, Earl of Middlesex, Lord High Treasurer of England, shall lose all your offices and be hereafter made incapable [f. 88] of any office within this state or kingdom. You shall be imprisoned in the Tower during the King's Majesty's pleasure, and pay to the King £50,000. You shall never sit in Parliament nor come within the verge of the King's Court. And this is the judgement.

VIII. DIARY OF RICHARD DYOTT, STAFFORDSHIRE RECORD OFFICE, MS D661/11/1/2

[f. 136v]

May 13

[f. 137] A petition was preferred to the House against a book written by [Dr. Richard] Montagu for maintaining points of popery Arminianism.

The House employed two members of the House to acquaint my Lord of Canterbury with and to do therein as to his wisdom shall seem convenient.

In which manner we shall demand judgement of the Lords against Lord Treasurer.

As Lord Treasurer charged with sordid bribery, £500 of the petty farmers, as much [?from] great.

Alteration of the good and profitable orders of the Court of Wards; bringing of new dangerous and inconvenient [blank]; extortion, increase of fees; erecting of an [illegible]; committing his seals and stamps of his hand to his secretary; having put so vast and large a trust in governing the [?heirs] of the kingdom to his servant.

Moved by CHANCELLOR OF THE DUCHY that we should demand judgement in general without [f. 137v] enumeration of the heads that were presented, for the Lords perhaps have many other offences proved, whereupon the proceed/

[SIR ROBERT] PHELIPS. 10 R. 2 Michael De la Pole was judged severally, being Chancellor of England.

[SIR ROBERT] PHELIPS. Where there be variety of precedents, we have election to proceed as we shall see cause. It is in vain for us to present offences to the Lords if they do not judge them. Would therefore have the heads presented to them that may know [illegible] they have judged them.

[SIR EDWIN] SANDYS would have judgement demanded for bribery, extortion and oppression of the people (thereby intimating his laying of an imposition) and no particular instances.

[MR. JOHN] GLANVILLE would have general offences only, because a question by some whether [f. 138] the Lords can judge of Commons without complaint.

[SIR EDWARD] COKE would have breach of trust added.

[SIR ROBERT] PHELIPS. And other grievous misdemeanours.

Resolved, that judgement shall be demanded for bribery, extortion, oppression and other grievous offences.

Mr. Solicitor in chair. [Committee] concerning bill of subsidy

[Mr. Christopher] Brooke would not have the punishment arbitrary, because then when the Parliament [illegible] it is gone, and we must do by act of Parliament. If you will have it [illegible], let it be employed to those [illegible] the money the misemployed should have gone to and not to the King. Would rather have it felony without corruption of blood, etc.

Solicitor. This is equal to all offences. He that offends near so much can have no more. He that offends less shall have no less. [f. 138v] If the Lords pass it, they must. By this bill the Lords must lose their privileges, or not pass our bill. Let us not embroil ourselves with them.

[Mr. John] Carvile. Felony is not determinable here, and the King may pardon it.

Resolved, upon question, that some punishment shall be expressed in the act.

Wentworth would have us moderate in the punishment because the office of [Lord] Treasurer is imposed upon them against their wills. Yet to carry provision to the enemy is treason.

[Sir Edward] Coke would not have a future punishment after that they have undergone one by being subject to the censure of Parliament. To have a net hang over. If we transmit the account by one of their members to the Lords, we make the account determinable by them, which we will not. Some course must be taken that the [f. 139] money shall be levied after the Parliament ended if the Parliament end before the money be levied.

Message from [?the] Lords by Serjeant [Sir Ranulphe] Crewe and Mr. Attorney [General]. The Lords are ready to give judgement of my Lord Treasurer if this House, by their Speaker, will come to demand it.

Answer: that we are ready.

[Conference with the Lords]

The Speaker said that the knights, citizens and burgesses of the Commons House of Parliament, having transmitted diverse great offences against the Right Honourable Lionel, Earl of Middlesex, Lord High Treasurer of England and Master of his Majesty's Wards and Liveries, do demand judgement of their Lordships of his bribery, extortion, oppression and other grievous offences.

The judgement by the Lord Keeper. The high court of Parliament does adjudge that you, Lionel, Earl of Middlesex, shall lose all [f. 139v] your offices and be incapable of any office, place or employment in the commonwealth hereafter. Shall be imprisoned in the Tower during the King's pleasure. Shall pay £50,000 fine to the King. Shall never sit in Parliament more. And shall never come within the verge [of the King's Court].

He being in person at the bar after judgement pronounced, offered to speak. But the Lord Keeper told him he was not speak to [sic] after judgement, but if he had anything to say he must move the Lords by petition. And bid the officer take away the prisoner.

IX. DIARY OF SIR WALTER EARLE, BL, ADD. MS 18,597

[f. 182]

Thursday, the 13th of May

MR. [JOHN] PYM'S report from the committee for examination of matters concerning corruption of religion and learning. A petition complaining of Doctor [Richard] Montagu's book broaching points of Arianism [sic].

MR. [CHRISTOPHER] SHERLAND. [John] Speccott's case vouched, the Lord Coke's Reports, the judges to confer with divines what is a schism, and what not, etc.

MR. [THOMAS] WENTWORTH alleged that one that had preached the like and was made to recant. Consider, first, what authority we have to meddle with it, what the consequence is like to be to this commonwealth. For law, vide the statute 1 E. 6, cap. 1. 1 Eliz. the Parliament to declare what is heresy. Statute 32 H. 8, cap. 25 [sic]. Nothing does more disturb the peace of the land than diversity of religion, etc.

Resolved to acquaint the Lord Archbishop of Canterbury, by some members of the House, with the petition and book.

A message from the Lords to signify their intent of sending another message during this sitting.

This being supposed to be touching the Lord Treasurer, reporters Sir Edward Coke and Sir Edwin Sandys were enjoined to recollect the heads of the charge.

[f. 182v] SIR EDWARD COKE. The charge:

  • 1. Bribery.
  • 2. Altering orders of the Court of Wards.
  • 3. Giving over his power to his secretary, a stamp of his name and his seal.

Ordered, that when the message should come from the Lords, the Speaker to go up with the House to demand judgement touching the Lord Treasurer's charge of bribery, extortion, oppression and other, etc.

The Speaker went from the chair.

The committee of the bill of subsidy

Question being concerning the punishment of such as should mis-account for or mis-employ the moneys, etc., some moving to have it treason, etc., some felony, and some 10 times the value, and further punishment to be inflicted by Parliament.

Secretary Conway. If the penalties be so great, who will undertake, etc. Many questions may arise. What if the King should allow Count Mansfeld £20,000 per month to take the assistance of France, Venice and the Grisons, and so maintain an army of 30,000 in Germany; or if the King should send £30,000 or [£]40[,000] or [£]50,000 to Bethlen Gabor to engage him; or should employ some to stir up the King of Denmark. The King does really intend to issue out the money to those ends that we [f. 183] desire, and has engaged himself already for more than one half of the sum.

A message came from the Lords to signify that they were ready to give judgement on the Lord Treasurer, if this House would by their Speaker demand it.

[Conference with the Lords]

The whole House went up with the Speaker in his scarlet robes, and there the Lord Treasurer on the right hand, and the Speaker on the left at the bar, the Speaker demanded judgement in the name of the House of Commons.

The Lord Keeper gave sentence:

  • 1. Fined £50,000.
  • 2. Imprisoned in the Tower during the King's pleasure.
  • 3. Loss of all his offices for the present.
  • 4. Made incapable of bearing office hereafter.
  • 5. Never hereafter to sit in Parliament.
  • 6. Not to come within the verge of the King's Court.

X. JOURNAL OF SIR SIMONDS D'EWES, BL, HARL. MS 159

[f. 115v]

May 130, Thursday

A petition preferred against Mr. [sic] Richard Montagu, prebend of Windsor, for a book lately written called the Gagg, wherein were supposed to be divers points of popery and Arminianism, etc. After much debate and dislike of the book being so offensive to the state, yet not willing to become judges in so deep points of religion, it was ordered to send the book and petition to my Lord's Grace of Canterbury, entreating him to take such course in it as he in his wisdom should think fit.

A message from the Lords desiring the House to sit as long as conveniently they might, because they would send some particular special message to them as soon as they were ready.

This being supposed an intimation of the censuring of the Lord Treasurer, the heads of his charge was recollected; but order given to the Speaker to demand judgement only upon the generality of the charge for bribery, extortion, oppression and other grievous offences.

The bill of subsidy committed again to the [f. 116] whole House until the Lords sent.

A message from the Lords that their Lordships were now ready for censure against the Lord Treasurer if the House thought fit by their Speaker to demand judgement, which was consented unto immediately, and the Speaker and Commons went up and at the bar the Speaker in their names demanded judgement against the Lord Treasurer for his bribery, extortion, oppression and other grievous offences.

Upon which the Lord Keeper rose up and spoke thus: “You, Lionel, Earl of Middlesex, and now Lord High Treasurer of England, are sentenced by this honourable House to lose all your offices and places that you now hold, to be incapable of bearing any office or charge in the commonwealth for the time to come, to pay £50,000 to his Majesty for a fine, to be committed a prisoner to the Tower during his Majesty's pleasure, never to sit more in the court of Parliament, nor never hereafter to come within the verge of the Court.

[Committee for grievances]

In the afternoon, the patent of the Winterton[nes]s lights was condemned as a grievance both in creation and execution. The charge of maintaining of lights comes but to £180, sometimes £230, sometimes to £233 per annum, allowing thereout also these 3 several sums for wages: £20 and £45 and £12; and Sir John Meldrum makes of it a matter of £1,400 or £1,500 per annum. Others offer to keep the lights for 6d. in a score, sc. of chaldrons of coals coming from Newcastle, and he by this patent takes 3s. 4d. a score.